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Village Beat

It’s back to the drawing boards for
Firehouse Station # 3 as new board puts
off MPC hearing, p. 12
SBIFF 2013
High-Powered Producers Panel features
Django Unchained, Silver Linings
Playbook and Life of Pi makers, p. 26
Sunrises and Sunsets
French landscape painter Jean-Baptiste-
Camille Corot’s work on display at Ridley-
Tree Museum of Art, p. 22
The Voice of the Village SSINCE 1995 S
The best things in life are
FREE
31 Jan – 7 Feb 2013
Vol 19 Issue 5

THIS WEEK IN MONTECITO, P. 11 • MONTECITO EATERIES, P. 38 • CALENDAR OF EVENTS, P. 42
The smiling Feinbergs – Margo
and Robert – featured in Dr.
Weiser’s new ad campaign;
Hayley Bridges’ new shop
opens on State Street, p. 6
Mineards’
Miscellany
– Matt Middlebrook,
Caruso Affiliated
(full story on page 6)
A new generation of
talented and ambitious
young men and women
(such as J.J. Kandel, seen
here on the set of Hurt
Locker) is about to reshape
the entertainment industry;
those profled here have one
thing in common: They all
went to school in Montecito
(story begins on page 30)
MONTECITO’S
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31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 2 • The Voice of the Village •
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 3
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5 Editorial
To remove or not to remove; are left-lane freeway ramps best for Montecito?
6 Montecito Miscellany
John Cleese’s ways to keep fnancially afoat; Walter Bortz’s advice for living a long, healthy
life; Robert and Margo Feinberg’s modeling career; Industry Home opening; Spencer Pratt
and Heidi Montag’s possible new TV show; Eric Schmidt’s daughter talks about North
Korea trip; SB Dance Teater launches season; Daniel Day-Lewis speaks at SBIFF; Jim
Piekarski releases frst book; SB Chamber Orchestra’s frst concert of year; Hubbard Street
Dance Chicago returns; continued Kardashian clashing
8 Letters to the Editor
Hillary Hauser appreciative of donations to Sarah House; John Pate responds to Ernie
Solomon; Ty Saxby star-struck; Edith Tipple worried about possible roundabout trafc
infux; Maxi Decker wants to know that spoiling Los Patos is not in the cards; Ardene
Fredricksen remembers Harry Carey, Jr.
11 This Week in Montecito
Santa Barbara Republican Women, Federated dinner and movie; largest circuit
class world record attempt; Claudia Hoag McGarry signs book; SB Tea Party
Critical Issue Series; Casa de Maria hosts retreat; Tea Dance at Cabrillo Rec
Center; MA Land Use Committee meets; Montecito Library hosts teens; Father-
Daughter Dance at MUS; Midnight Mynx rocks Wildcat; Friendship Center’s
Festival of Hearts; art exhibit opening; Channel City Club lecture and luncheon;
Rotary Club anniversary
Tide Guide
Handy guide to assist readers in determining when to take that walk or run on the beach
12 Village Beat
Montecito Fire District Board of Directors votes to withdraw Fire Station 3 application;
Rick Caruso holds meeting to mark end of Miramar demolition; Friendship Center’s
14th annual Festival of Hearts; Holiday Haulers honored by Foodbank and SB County;
Trudy Ludwig speaks at schools
14 Seen Around Town
Trekkies fock to Arlington for “Shatner’s World: We Just Live in it”; SBMA Women’s
Board new members’ luncheon
22 Your Westmont
Exhibition shows works of quintessential French landscape painter Jean-Baptiste-
Camille Corot
25 Seniority
Diana Basehart Foundation helps care for pets
26 SBIFF 2013
Conversations with three producers in town for panel taking place at Lobero this
weekend
27 Sheriff’s Blotter
Man on probation stopped in Vons parking lot
29 Book Talk
A look at the mischievous and humorous life of Barnaby Conrad
Ernie’s World
Te curious case of Ernie’s missing spleen
30 Montecito at the Movies
Montecito has spit out a slew of talented individuals, many of which are taking part in
this year’s flm festival
34 On Entertainment
Hank, Jr.’s daughter Holly Williams makes local debut at SOhO; Johnny Lee plays
Chumash
38 Guide to Montecito Eateries
Te most complete, up-to-date, comprehensive listing of all individually owned
Montecito restaurants, cofee houses, bakeries, gelaterias, and hangouts; others in Santa
Barbara, Summerland, and Carpinteria too
40 Legal Advertisements
41 Movie Showtimes
Latest flms, times, theaters, and addresses: they’re all here, as they are every week
42 Calendar of Events
Vagina Monologues ends this week; Father John Misty plays SOhO; SB Dance
Alliance performances; Cambridge Drive Concert Series; Food Confessions returns;
10 years of Carnaval; Kathie Deviny reads from book at Curious Cup; Timothy
Noah lectures; Lisa Ling makes SB debut; Qantara at UCSB; Tales from the Tavern
releases CD
44 Real Estate
Mark Hunt’s picks for homes in the mid-$3m range
45 93108 Open House Directory
Homes and condos currently for sale and open for inspection in and near Montecito
46 Classifed Advertising
Our very own “Craigslist” of classifed ads, in which sellers ofer everything from summer
rentals to estate sales
47 Local Business Directory
Smart business owners place business cards here so readers know where to look when
they need what those businesses ofer
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 5 If you smile when no one else is around, you really mean it – Andy Rooney
“Mardi Gras Magic”
Lana Marmé
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The Debate Over Left Lane
Ramps on a Widened 101

T
he widening of the 101 in the Montecito corridor is the biggest change
facing Montecito in over sixty years,” says Jack Overall, a member of the
Montecito Planning Commission (MPC) and a spokesperson for the 101
Community Coalition Plan. For the last six months, the Montecito Association
(MA) and the Community Coalition have labored relentlessly to come up with a
101 widening alternate that is less expensive, offers a shorter construction time
and would be far less disruptive to residents and businesses in Montecito.
The Community Coalition Plan for the 101

The MA/Community Coalition has asked Caltrans and elected government
leaders to allow the continuation of left-lane ramps after widening. Meetings
have been conducted with personnel from Gov. Jerry Brown’s office; Caltrans
District Director, Malcolm Dougherty; Rachel Falsetti, former Caltrans Acting
District 5 Director; Tim Gubbins, Caltrans Director District 5; and Bud Shuster,
former Pennsylvania 9th District Congressman, who resigned in 2001 as a mem-
ber of the U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
Caltrans has evaluated the MA request for a design exception, and repeatedly
rejected it, claiming left-lane ramps, though acceptable in highway construction
30 years ago, are not deemed safe under current highway construction standards.
The Caltrans Position

Caltrans has insisted that the 101, the second or third most important north-
south highway in California, will not be widened in Montecito with left-lane on
or off ramps. Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty, the highest level official in
the state for Caltrans and an appointee of Governor Jerry Brown, sent a letter
on October 16, 2012 to the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments
(SBCAG), which was quite specific on this issue:
“Members of the Montecito community are proposing a Community Coalition
Alternative for the interchanges at Hot Springs/Cabrillo and Sheffield Drive.
This proposal was also submitted during public comment to the project’s
draft environmental document, and we will respond formally within the final
document. The stated goal of the proposal is to further reduce the cost and con-
struction impacts beyond what has been proposed with the five configurations
under consideration. However, the Community Coalition is not viable because
it retains existing features that contradict engineering principles for highway
safety over the long term.
“It is widely documented that left-side ramps for general use have a poor
safety record and cause operational problems. With higher speed traffic flowing
in the left lane and slower moving traffic in the right lanes, drivers have learned
to expect freeway exits and entrances on the right side. Exiting or entering from
the left side creates conflicts when slower moving traffic has to merge with
higher speed traffic. This conflict is exacerbated for trucks. With an increase in
the number of freeway lanes and traffic volumes, the problems with left-side
ramps become worse. Therefore, left-side ramps are not acceptable in current
highway design practice and are systematically being removed throughout
California and the United States.
“There are no viable redesign alternatives that would allow the left-side
ramps to remain. The project’s environmental document studied more than 20
different interchange configurations, and eight of them were rejected because
they would perpetuate the use of left-hand ramps.”
On October 18, 2012, SBCAG voted 12 to 1 to request Caltrans to evaluate the
MA/Community Coalition proposal in its response to the Draft EIR. Caltrans
was already obligated to address the MA/Community Coalition Plan based on
MA comments submitted prior to the Draft EIR public comment cutoff date of
July 9, 2012.
Legal Liability Concerns

Caltrans fears that if they approve an exception for left-lane ramps, the state
agency would be sued and lose every lawsuit involving a truck driver who
overturned his rig on a left-lane ramp, or every motorist struck by a truck, van
or car which crossed three lanes of traffic to exit on the left. The indefensible
position for Caltrans would be: “We knew it was more dangerous when we built
it, but we did it anyway, but please don’t find us guilty of gross negligence.”
Editorial by Bob Hazard
Mr. Hazard is an Associate Editor of this paper and a former president of
Birnam Wood Golf Club
EDITORIAL Page 104
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 6 • The Voice of the Village •
Coast 2 Coast Collection
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Cleese’s Cash Conundrum
Monte ito
Miscellany
by Richard Mineards
Richard covered the Royal Family for Britain’s Daily Mirror and Daily Mail before moving to New York
to write for Rupert Murdoch’s newly launched Star magazine in 1978; Richard later wrote for New York
magazine’s “Intelligencer”. He continues to make regular appearances on CBS, ABC, and CNN, and
moved to Montecito five years ago.
T
he crippling cost of divorce
has already forced former
Montecito funnyman John
Cleese into crisis measures, includ-
ing launching his standup comedy
“Alimony Tour” and even moving to
another country.
But it would seem he is still looking
for ways to keep his finances afloat.
The former Monty Python and
Fawlty Towers star has embarked on a
massive sale of film props and signed
photos he accumulated during his
lengthy career.
Items on the Original Memorabilia
Company website include a helmet
used in Monty Python and the Holy
Grail and a treasure trove of pictures
from various sketches from his TV
series.
It’s the same website the 73-year-
old actor recently used to sell his 1987
Bentley, which was bought for more
than $25,000, as I reported in this
illustrious organ.
As part of the deal he agreed to
have lunch with the Australian buyer
and give a handwritten story of some
of the car’s most famous passen-
gers, including Jamie Lee Curtis and
Kevin Kline, his co-stars from the
film A Fish Called Wanda.
John, who last year married his
fourth wife, jewelry designer
Jennifer Wade, 31 years his junior,
divorced psychotherapist Alyce Faye
Eichelberger in 2008 after 16 years of
marriage.
But the breakup did not come
cheap.
He was ordered to pay nearly $20
million in finance and assets, includ-
ing $1 million annually until 2016,
and hand over an apartment in New
York and a $3 million mews house in
London’s ritzy Holland Park.
Faced with such a hefty bill, John
was also forced to sell his $10 million
beach house in our rarefied enclave
and has now set up base in Monte
Carlo to avoid a huge tax bill on the
divorce payments.
It also prompted him to embark on
his standup tour, in which he told
audiences: “I am here because, frank-
ly, I have fallen on hard times having
been through a costly and acrimoni-
ous divorce. I call it the Alimony Tour
or Feeding the Beast.”
John has remained friends with
his first wife, Connie Booth, who
co-wrote and starred in Fawlty Towers
with him, and his second wife,
American actress Barbara Trentham...
Bolting Bortz
Stanford professor emeritus, Walter
Bortz, is a man on the run!
Walter, 82-year-old father of
Montecito socialite Gretchen Lieff,
has participated in more than 50 mar-
athons, including three times in New
York and 15 times in Boston.
He will be running again in
Massachusetts on April 15.
“Hopefully it won’t be too taxing!”
he joked when he gave a talk at the
Coral Casino on aging.
Walter, former president of the
American Geriatric Society, has writ-
ten eight books, including We Live
Too Short and Die Too Long and The
Roadmap to 100: The Breakthrough
Science of Living a Long and Healthy Life.
“I have a sense of mission,” he
says. “You can’t escape it, but aging
is negotiable. Are you a resource or a
liability?
“We don’t die accidentally, we die of
choice. It is about maintaining your-
self. Use it or lose it. Fitness is an age
offset. There is no expiration date to
getting better.”
Walter, who was with his wife, Ruth,
82, another marathon runner, says he
lifts weights and runs ten to 15 miles
three times a week.
Now PBS has approached him about
doing a series for the network.
Among those listening to his sage
advice were Carter and Victoria
Hines, Marilyn McMahon, Beverley
John Cleese auctions off more memorabilia to
boost his bank balance
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MISCELLAnY Page 184
Jackson, Anne Towbes, Gerald
Incandela, George Schoellkopf and
Robert Lieff...
Nothing But Smiles
Call them the newsome toothsome!
Philanthropic Montecito couple
Robert Feinberg and his wife, Margo,
are being featured in print and TV
ads for their friend and longtime den-
tist, Mark Weiser.
“He said he’d always wanted to get
some pictures of his work and asked
us if we’d mind,” explains Robert,
an inveterate traveler and keen rack-
eteer.
“We just said to go ahead and we
did them last month.”
After being featured locally in print
ads, the dynamic duo are now in
commercials on KEYT-TV, the ABC
affiliate, and certainly have a lot to
smile about.
“We seem to be getting a lot of
recognition,” says Robert. “Even the
FedEx man recognized us!”
Celebrities, indeed...
Robert and Margo Feinberg, flashers of note
Marjorie and
Joseph Shipp,
Ruth Ann
Bortz, hus-
band, Walter,
and daugh-
ter Gretchen
Lieff (photo
by Priscilla)
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 8 • The Voice of the Village •
Elizabeth Teare
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If you have something you think Montecito should know about, or wish to respond to something
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Steven Libowitz • Books Shelly Lowenkopf • Business Flora Kontilis • Columns Ward Connerly, Erin Graffy,
Scott Craig • Food/Wine Judy Willis, Lilly Tam Cronin • Gossip Thedim Fiste, Richard Mineards • History
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The best little paper in America
(Covering the best little community anywhere!)
T
hank you for your beautiful
piece, “The Friends of Sammy”
(MJ # 19/2), that focused on
the tremendous loving kindness of
Sarah House, which took care of our
friend Judith “Sammy” Case in her
final illness. Sammy passed away on
Saturday, January 19, but not before
knowing of the phenomenal outpour-
ing of community support and love
that came her way via your words
in Montecito Journal. Our goal was to
raise $10,000 for Sarah House, and
we are now at $27,000 and climbing!
We thank Lucky’s (where Sammy
worked for years) for the incredibly
generous $5,000 sent, and we thank
the benefactress who sent $15,000
with a note, “Please don’t send a
thank you note!” Montecito Journal
has done something wonderful for
Sarah House, which is a jewel in the
Santa Barbara community that not
only took care of Sammy, but all of
us, too. Thank you from all of us!
Hillary Hauser
Santa Barbara
(Editor’s note: Sammy’s Last Swim, a
photo story of the flotilla of boats, surfers,
and paddlers that helped scatter Sammy’s
ashes in the sea off Leadbetter Beach
appears in the current issue of the Santa
Barbara Sentinel)
Re-Writing History
Regarding the letter from Ernie
Solomon (“He Fears The ‘Nut Cases’
MJ # 19/4); The Republican party
was founded in 1854 to combat the
Kansas Nebraska act which threat-
ened to extend slavery into the ter-
ritories. The Ku Klux Klan was an
outgrowth of the Democratic Party,
sometimes with overlapping member-
ships. Robert Byrd (Democrat, West
Virginia) was one of the most pow-
erful U.S. Senators ever. He was the
longest serving Senator (1959-2010)
and was Senate Majority leader from
1977 to 1981, and 1987 to 1989. He was
also a member of the Ku Klux Klan.
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 9 All men are not created equal, but should be treated as though they were under the law – Andy Rooney
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LETTERS Page 204
George Wallace (Democrat, Alabama)
ran for president as a segregationist.
Every major piece of civil rights leg-
islation was passed by Republicans
and fought by Democrats. According
to Dr. Alveda King, her grandfather
– Dr. Martin Luther King – was a
Republican, as was her uncle, Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. She says, “It
should be no surprise that Dr. King
was a Republican. Why? It was the
Democrats who Dr. King was fight-
ing and he would not have joined the
Democratic Party.”
Mr. Solomon’s views, sadly, are
prevalent in society today. Is this lack
of knowledge of our own history a
reflection on our subpar schools or a
commentary on how biased and dis-
torted the media is?
John Pate
Santa Barbara
(Editor’s note: Good question, John.
The Democrat party that ruled the “Solid
South” for nearly a hundred years after
the Civil War installed official racism in
its region to replace what had been legal
slavery. The Southern Democrats aligned
themselves with northern Democrat liber-
als; their unholy alliance solidified FDR’s
government-centered “recovery” efforts
during the Great Depression, while allow-
ing Jim Crow laws to fester and flourish
in the South. After the Civil Rights Act
was passed in 1964 with the help of nearly
80% of Republicans voting for it and most
Southern Democrats voting against it,
and as black southerners gained increased
participation in the political life of the
South, Democrats – who already felt quite
comfortable with racist policies – intro-
duced racism in reverse – Affirmative
Action – thereby garnering the vote of the
very people the party had held down for
so long. It was an impressive achievement
and as history books are now written,
one would be hard-pressed to learn that
George Wallace, Orville Faubus, fire hose-
wielding Commissioner of Public Safety
Eugene “Bull” Connor, Robert Byrd, Al
Gore Sr., and the rest of the Southern rac-
ists were all Democrats. Just as one would
be hard-pressed to learn that Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. was a Republican. Bias?
Perhaps. Negligent? To say the least.
Duplicitous? You bet. – J.B.)
Thank God
For Jim Alexander
As I was entering the Arlington
Theatre to attend SBIFF’s tribute to
Daniel Day-Lewis, I thought I spot-
ted Jim Alexander out of the corner of
my eye. The theater was packed, so as
soon I put my jacket down to save my
seat I ventured outside to see if I could
meet Jim and tell him how much I
enjoy his column.
I remember when I moved to Santa
Barbara twelve years ago. I was wait-
ing in line for something and picked
up a copy of Montecito Journal. I came
across the column n.o.t.e.s. from down-
town. I have been picking up copies of
the MJ ever since, with the hope that it
is the week of Mr. Alexander’s column.
I was fighting off sleep as I listened
to Daniel Day-Lewis drone on and on
and I reflected that it had indeed been
a great night in spite of my present
state of boredom. I got to meet the best
humor columnist in America. I only
regret that I haven’t written to you
sooner to thank you for publishing his
column. Thank you MJ and thank you
Mr. Alexander for all the laughter.
Sincerely,
Ty Saxby
Santa Barbara
(Editor’s note: Well, we are pleased to
learn you were spared from the tedium
of Mr. Day-Lewis’s interview, as I was
not spared from the boredom of Lincoln,
the movie he starred in. When people ask
what I thought of it, I have told them
I would have enjoyed the movie much
more if my wife hadn’t kept waking me
up by poking me in the ribs with her
elbow every time I started to snore. I do
believe that Mr. Day-Lewis deserves and
shall surely win this year’s Academy
Award as Best Actor. However, Lincoln
wasn’t so much a “movie” as it was a
“glacial.” I have since renamed it Dead
Man Walking. As for Mr. Alexander, we
are also pleased to learn that you enjoy his
column. However, is that the only reason
you pick up Montecito Journal? We hope
not! – J.B.)
Roundabout Concerns
Thorn and Linda Robertson spoke
well to the concerns of the Las Aves
business owners and the Bird Refuge
preservationists on Los Patos, but
I have seen no discussion of the
Montecito Association’s Community
Coalition Alterna tive Plan (CCAP) to
run all incoming traffic from the south
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 10 • The Voice of the Village •
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It would be unlikely that Helene Schneider would ask the taxpayers of Santa
Barbara to share the legal liability with Caltrans for accidents related to left-
lane ramps at Cabrillo Blvd. It is also unlikely that Salud Carbajal and Santa
Barbara County taxpayers would be willing to share liability for left-lane ramp
accidents at Sheffield Drive in a widened 101. Will Governor Brown override
his engineers’ professional opinion on a matter of public safety and support
the MA/Community Coalition proposal to retain left lane ramps? The MA/
Community Coalition is hopeful of Governor Brown’s support.
Forecasting Future Accident Rates
Caltrans and the MA/Community Coalition have competing views on the
public safety of left-lane ramps in a widened highway. Jack Overall suggests
that the highway public safety danger may be greater in Fresno or Bakersfield,
but it is lessened in Montecito because our ramps are used primarily by local
residents. Caltrans notes that the guests in hotels along the beach, or visitors
to the Fiesta Parade or Summer Solstice, or beach goers, or the drivers of hotel
and restaurant delivery trucks are not all local residents using the Cabrillo/Hot
Springs interchange.
Overall also notes that the accident statistics for the existing left-lane ramps in
Montecito are as good or better than right-lane ramps. Caltrans responds that,
with the addition of a new high-speed third lane in each direction, the potential
accident rate for left-lane ramps increases dramatically because slow-speed on-
ramp vehicles are merging into high-speed freeway traffic, and slow-speed right
lane vehicles have to cross two lanes of higher-speed traffic to exit on the left.
High Risk Poker

At the end of the day, what happens if Caltrans continues to say “no” to left-
lane ramps? The challenge facing Montecito is that because the Cabrillo inter-
change lies wholly within the boundaries of Santa Barbara, Caltrans will ask
the City of Santa Barbara and SBCAG to accept its recommended interchange
alternative at Cabrillo/Hot Springs. The City of Santa Barbara Planning still has
to certify the final EIR before issuing permits. Similarly County Planning has to
issue Coastal Commission permits for the County’s section of the 101, giving
the planning commissions some influence over the final outcome.
The MA/Community Coalition could persist in its opposition and challenge
the Caltrans final EIR in court. Faced with added delay and an uncertain out-
come, Caltrans could well shift state and federal highway funding away from
the Montecito corridor to other badly needed highway projects in the state that
would welcome its transportation dollars. An editorial by Dan Walters in the
Santa Barbara News-Press on January 23, 2013 stated that “California has $538
billion in unfunded transportation needs.”
For Montecito residents, this could mean that the 101 widening funding for
our community would continue in its present unfunded time warp, and we
would have to live permanently with a two-lane gridlocked freeway. In the
early ‘90s we foolishly turned down Caltrans’ offer to fund the widening of
the 101 through Montecito, a result we have regretted ever since. It will be
interesting to see how negotiations between Caltrans and the MA/Community
Coalition play out over the next ten months. The ultimate question is, “What is
best for our community?” •MJ
EDITORIAL (Continued from page 5)
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 11 Vegetarian is an old Indian word that means “lousy hunter” – Andy Rooney
The Santa Barbara Ballroom Tea Dance
is held on the frst Sunday of every month
at the Carrillo Rec Center. No partner
necessary, but if you can fnd one bring him
or her along!
When: 2 pm to 5 pm
Where: 100 East Carrillo Street
Info: 897-2519
Cost: free
TUESDAY FEBRUARY 5
Montecito Association Land Use
Committee Meeting
The Montecito Association is committed
to preserving, protecting, and enhancing
the semi-rural residential character of
Montecito; today the Land Use Committee
meets to discuss new and ongoing
projects
When: 4 pm
Where: Montecito Hall,
1469 East Valley Road
THURSDAY FEBRUARY 7
Teen Program at Montecito Library
Arts & crafts meet up for all ages; must have
manual dexterity for crochet and knitting
When: 3:30 pm to 5 pm, every Thursday in
February
Where: 1469 East Valley Road
Info: 969-5063
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 8
Father-Daughter Dance
Montecito Union School hosts annual dance;
daughters can bring their fathers or other
special adult
When: 6 pm to 8 pm
Where: 385 San Ysidro Road
Info: 969-3249
Midnight Mynx at The Wildcat
Midnight Mynx is a local, all-women rock
band performing an eclectic mix of high-
energy rock covers from the ‘60s to now plus
originals
When: 8 pm to 10 pm
Where: 15 West Ortega
Info: 689-6683
WEDNESDAY JANUARY 30
Dinner & Movie
Santa Barbara Republican Women,
Federated, will show the movie, Jihad in
America: The Grand Deception, at their
dinner meeting at Marmalade Café. The
70-minute flm is directed by Steve
Emerson, author of American Jihad,
and investigates the covert structure and
growing infuence of the Muslim Brotherhood
and Islamist groups in the United States,
specifcally how they infltrate politics,
entertainment, news media, law enforcement,
publishing and museums.
When: 5:30 pm
Where: 3825 State Street
Reservations: 699-6756
Cost: $35-$40
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 1
Book Signing at Curious Cup
Author Claudia Hoag McGarry will sign
all three of her novels: My Scorpio Soul, My
Aries Secret, and Beignet and Grandpa Au
Lait
When: 5 pm
Where: Curious Cup in Carpinteria,
929 Linden Avenue
SATURDAY FEBRUARY 2
Tea Party Event
The Santa Barbara Tea Party Critical Issue
Series presents: “Muslim Brotherhood: The
Threat to Western Civilization.” The event,
sponsored by the Tea Party & Culpepper
Society and Act! For America, welcomes
speaker Donald Dix, who will speak on the
Muslim Brotherhood.
When: 5:30 pm
Where: Fess Parker’s Doubletree Resort,
633 East Cabrillo Blvd
Cost: $8 per person in advance, two tickets
for $15, or $10 at the door
Info and Tickets: 967-7520
or email info@santabarbarateaparty.com
Retreat at Casa de Maria
By attending the upcoming retreat titled,
“The Butterfy Passage: Taking Flight from
Transition,” readers can better understand
the opportunities presented by change. The
facilitators, Cynder Sinclair and Mary
Jean Vignone, will focus on the positives
offered in life transitions.
When: 8:30 am to 4 pm
Where: La Casa de Maria,
800 El Bosque Road
Cost: $70 per person, continental breakfast
and lunch will be provided
Info and Tickets: 689-2137
or cynsyn@cox.net
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 3
Tea Dance
The City of Santa Barbara donates use of the
ballroom and volunteers provide music and
refreshments for this ongoing, free dance
event.
Ballroom dance music including the
Waltz, Tango, Viennese Waltz, Slow
Fox Trot, Quick Step, and rhythm dances
such as the Cha Cha, Rumba, Swing,
Mambo, and Bolero are played, among
other dance music. Participants can hone
their dancing skills or learn new dance
techniques.
(If you have a Montecito event, or an event that concerns Montecito,
please e-mail kelly@montecitojournal.net or call (805) 565-1860)
SATURDAY FEBRUARY 2
Book Signing at Tecolote
John Aaron, author and artist, will be reading
from his illustrated memoir, Romancing the
Smoke. Personalized signed copies will
be available. The memoir is about Aaron’s
successful battle to stop smoking after 40 years.
When: 3:30 pm
Where: Tecolote Book Shop, 1470 East Valley
Road
Info: 969-4977
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 1
World Record Attempt
Fitness enthusiast Jenny Schatzle attempts
to hold the largest circuit class in the world
to raise awareness and support the American
Heart Association. Open and free to all,
please wear red.
When: 6 am to 7 am
Where: SBCC track, 721 Cliff Drive
This Week
Montecito
in and around
Montecito Tide Chart
Day Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt
Thurs, Jan 31
5:54 AM 1.5 11:41 AM 4.1 05:58 PM 0.6
Fri, Feb 1
12:39 AM 4.6 7:00 AM 1.5 12:39 PM 3.5 06:34 PM 1.1
Sat, Feb 2
1:28 AM 4.7 8:25 AM 1.4 02:04 PM 2.9 07:20 PM 1.7
Sun, Feb 3
2:31 AM 4.8 10:04 AM 0.9 04:09 PM 2.6 08:30 PM 2.1
Mon, Feb 4
3:44 AM 5.1 11:25 AM 0.3 05:57 PM 2.9 010:04 PM 2.3
Tues, Feb 5
4:55 AM 5.4 12:26 PM -0.3 07:00 PM 3.3 011:27 PM 2.2
Wed, Feb 6
5:57 AM 5.8 01:15 PM -0.9 07:45 PM 3.7
Thurs, Feb 7
12:32 AM 1.9 6:52 AM 6.2 01:58 PM -1.2 08:23 PM 4.1
Fri, Feb 8
1:27 AM 1.5 7:41 AM 6.4 02:37 PM -1.5 09:00 PM 4.4

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 9
Friendship Center’s 14th Annual
Festival of Hearts
This year’s theme: “Midday in Paris!” …a
festive luncheon with wine, live music, Heart-
Art, and live auction, all to beneft Friendship
Center.
All proceeds from the event support
Friendship Center’s H.E.A.R.T. (Help Elders At
Risk Today) Program, subsidizing the cost of
adult day services for low-income aging and
dependent adults and their families.
When: Saturday, February 9, 11:30 am
to 2:30 pm
Where: Fess Parker’s Doubletree Resort,
Reagan Room, 633 East Cabrillo Blvd.
Tickets: $100 per person, available online:
www.friendshipcentersb.org
Art Opening
Richard Schloss, California Landscape
artist presents “California Light & Color”
When: now through April 22
Where: Easton Gallery,
557 Hot Springs Road
Info: www.rschloss.com
MONDAY FEBRUARY 11
Lecture & Luncheon
Channel City Club presents U.S. Ambassador
Vicki Huddleston, who will speak on “The
Growing Al-Qaeda Threat in Africa: From
Mali to Djibouti.”
Amb. Huddleston was U.S. Deputy Assistant
Secretary of Defense for African Affairs
in the Offce of the Secretary of Defense
(2009-2011). She is a former U.S. Deputy
Assistant Secretary of State for Africa;
U.S. Ambassador to Madagascar and to
Mali; Principal Offcer of the U.S. Interests
Section in Havana and Charge d’affairs ad
interim in Ethiopia. She was Deputy Chief
of Mission in Haiti & Director and Deputy
Director of Cuban Affairs at the U.S. Dept.
of State.
Formerly, Amb. Huddleston was a Visiting
Scholar at Brookings Institution.
When: 11:30 am
Where: Fess Parker’s Doubletree Resort,
Reagan Room, 633 East Cabrillo Blvd
Cost: $35 for members,
$40 for non-members
Info: www.channelcityclub.org
TUESDAY FEBRUARY 12
Rotary Club Anniversary
The Rotary Club of Montecito will
celebrate the 60
th
anniversary of its
chartering on February 12. Along
with dinner, this momentous occasion
includes entertainment by well-known
jazz musician Peter Clark, “and
friends.”
When: 6 pm
Where: Montecito Country Club
Info and RSVP: Murray Ray (805) 689-
3692; RSVP deadline is January 31 •MJ
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 12 • The Voice of the Village •
Read’n Post Valentine’s stoRe
Cards, Wrapping Paper, Gifts, Candies and Much
Montecito country Mart
(courtyard WalkWay across froM Vons)
NOW OPEN
M-F 10-6; SAT 10-5 ~ 969-1148
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410 OLIVE ST. 805-962-2166
OPEN MON-SAT 10-6
Fire Station 3 Delayed
Village Beat
by Kelly Mahan


A
t their board meeting on
Monday, January 28, the
Montecito Fire District Board
of Directors voted 3-1 to withdraw
their application for Fire Station 3 from
the Montecito Planning Commission
hearing scheduled for February 27.
The move, which was supported by
new directors Abe Powell and Susan
Keller, as well as board president
John Venable, will allow the district
to re-evaluate several factors related
to the new fire station.
Directors Keller and Powell (new
director Gene Sinser is recused from
discussing Fire Station 3 due to his
proximity to the proposed location)
have been vocal about wanting to
thoroughly evaluate the finances,
response times and alternative options
related to building another fire station
in Montecito. Also on Monday, the
board established three new commit-
tees for Finance, Strategic Planning,
and Public Relations. In the past, com-
mittees were not an option due to hav-
ing only three members on the board.
The decision to withdraw the appli-
cation is supported by Montecito
Agricultural Foundation (MAF), a
group of nearby homeowners who
have questioned the need for the sta-
tion and feel the project is out of scale
with the community. MAF has called
the District’s Environmental Impact
Review (EIR) of the project into ques-
tion, claiming it did not include all the
facts.
According to Joe Cole, MAF’s attor-
ney, the move to withdraw the appli-
cation will give the new and existing
board members – in light of signifi-
cant changes over the past 10 years in
demographics, finances, emergency
risk patterns, development and other
material circumstances – to have the
good faith opportunity to fully evalu-
ate the MFPD’s provision of existing
services across the community. “It will
also allow the opportunity to assem-
ble, understand and share transpar-
ently with the community complete
information crucial for the new board
to fully evaluate the MFPD’s proposal
for a new fire station,” he explained in
a letter to the board. He says the direc-
tors, as well as Chief Hickman, who
has been Chief for less than a year,
need to evaluate the new station’s
size, features, and costs, both to con-
struct and to operate, and to consider
whether there may be other poten-
tially more appropriate and affordable
alternatives.
The project, to be located on the
Palmer Jackson property on the 2500
block of East Valley Road, includes
plans for parking, living quarters,
administrative offices, apparatus bays,
a 35-foot hose-drying tower, and two
driveways. The station, which MFPD
says is needed to lessen response
The proposed Fire Station 3, seen here in an architectural rendering, has been put on hold (courtesy
Thompson Naylor Architects)
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VILLAGE BEAT Page 234
times on the east end of Montecito,
will also have a training component
on the property.
On March 5, Santa Barbara Superior
Court Judge Thomas Anderle
is expected to decide whether the
California Environmental Quality
Act (CEQA) document associated
with the project is adequate as part
of the litigation between MAF and
MFPD. The Judge will rule whether
or not the EIR needs more information
added, and whether it will need to be
re-circulated. According to MFPD’s
Geri Ventura, the District plans on
resubmitting the application with
the Montecito Planning Commission
upon learning Judge Anderle’s deci-
sion. In the meantime, the newly
formed committees will take a closer
look at the ins and outs of the project
and any possible alternatives to it.
Miramar
Site Demolished
Last week, developer Rick Caruso
held a press conference on the
grounds of the 16-acre site where he
hopes to eventually rebuild his ver-
sion of the Miramar Resort. Caruso,
along with his team, Santa Barbara
County First District Supervisor
Salud Carbajal, and representatives
from the Montecito Association, held
the meeting to mark the end of demo-
lition of the former buildings on the
property, which had been vacant and
rotting for nearly 12 years.
“We are still one hundred percent
committed to this and one hundred
percent excited,” Caruso said. The
approved plans for the resort call for
over 180 guest rooms, a full spa, three
restaurants, and full banquet facilities
on the property, which boasts 600 feet
of oceanfront real estate. “It doesn’t
get much better than this,” Caruso
said.
While Caruso’s team works on the
design details, the building of the
resort has stalled due to an impasse at
the county level.
In July 2012, the Santa Barbara
County Board of Supervisors
approved a countywide Hotel
Incentive Program (HIP), in which
the county could pay back hoteliers
the Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT)
earned at their hotel for the first sev-
eral years of operation. The Miramar
project was rejected from the program
in October 2012 when Caruso’s team
was unable to come to an agreement
with the county and County Executive
Officer Chandra Wallar.
At issue is the fact that the county
will not agree to a 15-year commit-
ment to pay the rebate. It says that not
stipulating an annual review of the
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 14 • The Voice of the Village •
14 W. Gutierrez | Santa Barbara | 963-6677
Free pick-up & delivery
Ablitts.com
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Ms Millner is the author
of “The Magic Make
Over, Tricks for Looking,
Thinner, Younger,
and More Confident –
Instantly!” If you have an
event that belongs in this
column, you are invited to
call Lynda at 969-6164.
Seen Around Town
by Lynda Millner
Shatner’s World
SEEn Page 164

S
hatner’s World: We Just Live
in it” had a lot of folks who
wanted to peek inside as the
Arlington filled up with fans. You
didn’t have to be a Trekkie to enjoy the
full two hours of this one-man show
presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures.
At the preshow there were a couple
of Vulcan High Priestesses as well as a
Romulan and a Borg strolling around
the outdoor lobby. They had entered
the costume contest trying to win
two one-day passes to the Star Trek
Convention in Los Angeles. Judges
were D. J. Palladino from the Santa
Barbara Independent, Carla Hoffman
from Metro Comics and Ted Coe from
KCSB 91.9 FM.
Before entering Shatner’s World,
Miller McCune executive director
Celesta M. Billeci welcomed spon-
sors, donors at all levels, audience
members, subscribers and students.
The curtain rose to a star-studded sky
and a scene of space projected on a
screen. William Shatner kept us riv-
eted acting out vignettes of his 50-year
career as an award-winning actor,
director, producer, writer, recording
artist and horseman.
In spite of his varied career, he is
still most beloved for originating the
role of Captain James T. Kirk in the
television series Star Trek and that’s
okay with him. He is a prolific writer
as well, having authored about 30
bestsellers, both fiction and non-fic-
tion. His last book, Shatner Rules, was
published in 2011.
Shatner breeds American Quarter
horses and has ridden world cham-
pions winning many equine events.
Because of his passion for philan-
thropy he started the Hollywood
Charity Horse Show, which benefits
The Arlington
invaded by
Star Trek cos-
tumed fans
Savina Saib,
Pilar Montes,
T’Maire and
Val Maxey
Lynda with the man of the hour at “Shatner’s
World: We Just Live in it”
Miller McCune
executive direc-
tor Celesta
Billeci, Star
Trek costume
judges D. J.
Palladino, Carla
Hoffman and
Ted Coe at
the “Shatner’s
World: We Just
Live in it” event
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 15
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 16 • The Voice of the Village •
SEEn Page 244
SEEn (Continued from page 14)
Los Angeles based children’s charities.
There was a reception after the
show in the Arlington courtyard. Fans
lined up for a chance to have their
photo taken with Shatner and receive
a signed poster. Instead of getting
“beamed up” we “climbed into our
spaceships” and went home.
new Members’
Luncheon
The Santa Barbara Museum of Art
(SBMA) Women’s Board held their
annual new members’ luncheon at
the Santa Barbara Club. The garden
room was full and the 15 new recruits
were the biggest group in years.
They are Jen Barton, Berta Binns,
Melanie Brewer, Gayle Cummings,
Jane Dailey, Catey Dunkley, Jeanne
Fulkerson, Lorry Hubbard, Diane
McQuarie, Fran Morrow, Holly
Murphy, Roz Rosin, Helene Segal,
Cindy Steffen and Carolyn Williams.
As vice president Cecia Hess said,
“This new membership mix of busi-
ness owners, art enthusiasts, corpo-
rate executives and community lead-
ers will be a great catalyst for produc-
ing the Women’s Board’s next major
fundraising event – the wildly popu-
lar ‘Mystery in Masterpieces,’ to be
held on June 1, 2013.”
President Mary Maxwell wel-
comed former presidents, members
and guests saying, “If you can’t hear
me in the back, raise your hand.”
“This is the only time of year I get to
thank the whole group,” the Robert
and Mercedes Eichholz Director of
SBMA Larry J. Feinberg told the audi-
ence. The museum works with sev-
eral groups but according to Larry the
Women’s Board does the most. “You
have moxie and you do fun events
which the museum gets credit for,”
added Feinberg.
The Women’s Board was founded in
1951, just ten years after the Museum
of Art opened. They contribute funds,
which go to programs and education-
al activities, but they also underwrite
exhibitions and purchase works of art
for the permanent collection.
The luncheon committee was co-
chairs Karen Chin and Catherine
Clark along with Kathy Weber. They
want you to save the date on June 1 for
the Who? What? Where? event at the
museum – Mystery in Masterpieces.
There’ll be clue sheets and prizes
along with lavish hors d’oeuvres and
cocktails, and you get to be a sleuth
for a night.
St. Cecilia Fund
Though it’s always been a secular
organization, the St. Cecilia Society
does meet in a church and have a saint
for a name. This was because the ladies
who organized the group in 1891 were
all musicians and St. Cecilia is the
patron saint of music. They formed a
small orchestra and gave benefit con-
certs to raise funds to assist patients
at the new Cottage Hospital. Today,
we have a new Cottage Hospital once
again.
The St. Cecilia Society is the old-
est charitable organization in Santa
Barbara. The board this year changed
the name to the St. Cecilia Fund to
further secularize it. This is a group
where you can pay your dues and
not do anything except come to the
annual tea.
In over 100 years there has never
been any paid staff. Instead, a board
works throughout the year. They are
president Tish Gainey, Ann Conway,
Sallie Coughlin, Mary Garton, Susan
Johnson, Ladeen Miller, Nikki
Rickard, Heidi Rose and Sigrid Toye.
Nikki is the case investigator for low-
income people asking for funds. She
reviewed 118 cases in 2012 and 105
were approved.
Last year the Women’s Fund gave a
grant specifying that it only be used for
dental care. No other group in Santa
SBMA Women’s
Board president
Mary Maxwell,
Robert and Mercedes
Eichholz Director and
CEO Larry J. Fienberg,
and vice president of
membership Cecia
Hess at the new
members’ luncheon
New members for the SBMA Women’s Board: Cindy Steffen, Roz Rosin, Catey Dunkley, Gayle Cummings,
Helene Segal, Diane McQuarie, Berta Binns
More new SBMA members: Carolyn Williams, Jane Dailey, Melanie Brewer, Fran Morrow, Jeanne
Fulkerson, Lorry Hubbard, and Jen Barton
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 17
M a r s h a K o t l y a r
Exquisite Properties of Montecito & Santa Barbara
805. 565. 4014 | Marsha@prusb. com
www. Monteci toFi neEstates. com
Chairmans Circle Gold, Top 2% Of Prudential agents Nationwide
Li cense #: 01426886
Prudential
California Realty
For more information about the properties above please call, 805 . 565 . 4014
or visit www.MontecitoFineEstates.com
Marsha Kotlyar Presents
116 Palm Tree Lane
290 Sheffield Drive
1568 Ramona Lane
NEw LiSTiNg
NEw LiSTiNg
NEw LiSTiNg
Tis charming board and batten cottage is situated on half acre at the end of a
cul-de-sac and features 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, ofce, den, bright kitchen, dining room,
hardwood foors, freplace in living room, 2-car garage, fountains, and sprawling lawns.
Walled and gated for privacy, in a superb location convenient to the beach, Coast
Village shops, farmer’s market, and Montecito Country Club. Additionally, there are
MBAR approved plans for expansion to create a “San Ysidro Ranch’’ style residence.
www.116PalmTree.com
Tis spectacular European Country home is privately sited down a long drive on 1.3 creekside acres. Built in 2000 with superior quality, the elegant home ofers 5 bedrooms, 5.5
baths, grand living room with stone freplace, formal dining room, gourmet chefs kitchen, family room, 1000+ bottle wine cellar, wood and tile foors, steel windows, French doors,
high ceilings, stone exterior, impressive motor courts, 3-car garages, and loggia with freplace ideal for outdoor entertaining. Sited down and away from the road, the home is sur-
rounded by lush landscaping, stone patios, fruit trees, roses, lawns, putting green, and majestic sycamores and oaks. www.290Shefeld.com
Tis Montecito cottage is the epitome of classic 1920’s California charm.
Quietly nestled in coveted Hedgerow location, convenient to Miramar Beach & lower
village. Enchanting home currently includes 3 bedroom, inviting living room with
freplace, eat-in kitchen, formal dining, tall ceilings, wood foors, & magical gardens.
On .3 acre, this is an incredible opportunity to create your ideal Montecito haven!
www.1568Ramona.com
Offered at $1,495,000
Offered at $3,995,000
Offered at $1,695,000
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 18 • The Voice of the Village •
mi ssi on
AUDI O / VI DEO
TECHNOLOGY + PERFORMANCE + SERVI CE
TECHNOLOGY + PERFORMANCE + SERVICE
Showroom open Tuesday thru Saturday missionaudiovideo.com 1910 De La Vina at Pedregosa, Santa Barbara 805.682.7575
Don’t let your audio video system fall to the bottom of your priority list. Not many things in life can bring
more enjoyment than a well thought out home theater or hi-f audio system. We have the knowledge
and experience to help you choose the system that’s right for you, and to make sure it gets
planned and integrated seamlessly. So, no matter whether it’s the drama of the home theater
experience or the thrill of a stereo system reproducing music fawlessly, we have the expertise to
make it happen. Stop by our showroom, sit back and enjoy the show.
HOW YOU SPEND YOUR MONEY IS YOUR BUSINESS.
MAKING SURE YOU ENJOY YOURSELF IS OURS.
MISCELLAnY Page 364
MISCELLAnY (Continued from page 7)
Family Affair
As Argo director and Golden Globe
winner, Ben Affleck, was receiving
the Santa Barbara International Film
Festival’s Modern Master Award from
his friend and co-star, Matt Damon,
at the Arlington, Oscar winner Jeff
Bridges was just a tiara’s toss or two
down the road celebrating his daugh-
ter Hayley’s new store, Industry
Home.
Hayley, the youngest of Jeff and
wife Susan’s daughters, has part-
nered with her boyfriend, Andrew
Hernandez, his brother, Peter, and
Thomas Masker to open the charm-
ing emporium, just across from De La
Guerra Plaza, which features reconsti-
tuted furniture and housewares.
Peter, a Westmont graduate, and
Andrew, a UCLA student, started the
business as Brothers of Industry a
couple of years ago, working in the
garage of their Montecito parents,
David, a physician at Westmont, and
Kate, a former Summerland antiques
dealer.
“We started out making things for
her and it blossomed from there,” says
Peter. “We were using old wood from
a guy we knew in L.A. and were pro-
ducing a table and a light each week.
We’ve now partnered with him and
have an 8,000 square foot workshop
in Carpinteria with ten employees
producing eighty-two tables weekly.
“As to the shop, we’ll see how it
goes. It’s a great location and Hayley
is doing a lot of the design.”
Industry Home furniture retails
from $600 to $10,000 for custom
designed pieces...
Across the Pond with Speidi
It seems that Santa Barbara two-
some, Spencer Pratt and Heidi
Montag’s attention grabbing behavior
on the British TV reality show Celebrity
Big Brother is paying dividends.
The publicity seeking duo, who rose
to fame on MTV’s The Hills, have
reportedly landed their own U.K.-
based reality show after narrowly los-
ing the Big Brother winners’ trophy
last week.
A major TV company is said to have
lined up the drama loving pair for a
new series, which would see the cou-
ple traveling around Britain poking
fun at local manners and traditions.
“Speidi have been TV gold on Big
Brother and are clearly no fans of the
British,” says a source.
“It makes perfect sense for them to
bag their own explosive series in the
U.K.”
Previously the pair have been
bemoaning their economic lot, with
Pratt admitting on Big Brother: “I had
to step up and pay my bills!”
Stay tuned...
Bizarre Trip
The details of Google chairman
Eric Schmidt’s secret “humanitar-
ian mission” to North Korea earlier
this month have remained largely
unknown.
But his daughter, Sophie, has just
revealed aspects of their cloak and
dagger trip where they served as
delegates to the largely inaccessible
nation.
In a lengthy post, she revealed their
visit was “a mixture of highly staged
encounters, tightly-orchestrated view-
ings and what seemed like genuine
moments,” saying the nation, run by
leader Kim Jong Un, was at once wel-
Andrew, Peter
and Kate
Hernandez
with Jeff,
Hayley,
and Susan
Bridges, along
with Thomas
Masker at
the Industry
Home open-
ing (photo by
Priscilla)
Eric
Schmidt
and
daughter,
Sophie,
back
from trip
to North
Korea
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 19
Keith C. Berry, Realtor®
Visit: WWW.KEITHBERRYREALESTATE.COM
Experience:
49 years in the Real Estate Industry. Born and raised in Santa Barbara.

Marketing Plan:
Each property has a specifc, written marketing plan designed especially to
sell your property.

Results:
In the past 17 years, of the hundreds of properties Keith put on the market
only 12 have not sold.
In the Top 1,000 Agents worldwide for Coldwell Banker each year.

Repeat Past Clients:
1 client used my services 10 times 5 clients used my services 4 times
1 client used my services 7 times 8 clients used my services 3 times
1 client used my services 6 times 20 clients used my services 2 times
2 clients used my services 5 times Remainder used my services 1 time
Support Staff:
Highly trained, broker-licensed, available seven days a week.
*Never represents both sides of a transaction *Up to the minute market knowledge
*Long-time community charities supporter *Experienced negotiating skills
*Complete client confdentiality practiced

Call: (805) 689-4240
keith@keithberryrealestate.com
CA DRE Lic. #363833
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 20 • The Voice of the Village •
Always a Special Lunch & Brunch!
686 LINDEN AVENUE – DOWNTOWN CARPINTERIA
Just blocks from the World’s safest beach!
SEAFOOD
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items, Eggs Benedict
& so much more!
LUNCH
WEEKDAYS
11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Louis & Salads
Mussels & Fries
Linguini with Pesto
Burger & “those” Onion
Rings
HAPPY HOUR
4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Today’s Classic
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by the Glass $6
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Reservations
805.684.6666
SlysOnline.com
Next class is February 6th - See you there!
For more info call 692-2005
FREE Monthly
iPad / iPhone class
Learn & explore tips & tricks
with your favorite Apple devices.
Beginners & advanced users welcome!
Where:
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Montecito Library
1469 East Valley Rd.
When: 1st Wednesday
of each month at
1pm
LETTERS Page 284
LETTERS (Continued from page 9)
into the roundabout. According to
CCAP spokespersons at the meeting
on January 22, Caltrans’ planned traf-
fic light (F- Modified Plan) at the inter-
section of the off-ramp with Cabrillo
would cause a blockage. (At the pres-
ent time there is a stop light to beach-
directed traffic and no traffic back-
up.) Therefore CCAP recommends
bringing all traffic, both beach and
Montecito directed, directly into the
roundabout, in which case the round-
about would have to be enlarged.
I would like to suggest that, if
there were two lanes at the proposed
Cabrillo stoplight – the right one for
Montecito roundabout traffic and
the left for beach traffic (such as the
Carrillo and Mission off-ramps in
town) – there would be no need for
a costly expansion of the roundabout,
and normal Montecito traffic could
continue as is without the addition
of the many vehicles en route to the
beach.
Sincerely,
Edith Tipple
Montecito
(Editor’s note: CCAP’s plan is inter-
esting as far as its attempt to leave in
place the two left-hand southbound exits
at Cabrillo-Hot Springs and Sheffield is
concerned. The proposal to convert Los
Patos to a southbound ingress onto 101,
however, is seriously flawed. – J.B.)
Poor Little Los Patos
After months of time and seri-
ous negotiation with Caltrans, the
Montecito Association seems to have
offered a viable plan for making the
new freeway through Montecito less
expensive, less time consuming and
less intrusive. The only “hang-up” that
many people are concerned with is the
intrusion on Los Patos by the bird
refuge. This early proposed south-
bound entrance is not only awkward
but would cause many dire results for
the small community of shops, restau-
rants and birds. I hope everyone in the
planning stages realizes the negative
aspect of this alternative, and perhaps
enters the southbound freeway south,
in front of the cemetery, where there
are no buildings or businesses.
At least, inform concerned citizens
that spoiling Los Patos is not the
intent.
Sincerely,
Maxi Decker
Montecito
Let’s Work Together
I attended the January 22, 2012
Montecito Association Community
Forum after receiving the email from
Victoria Greene, executive director
of the Montecito Association, asking
citizens to attend the forum where MA
would “accept input, answer ques-
tions and identify how you (neigh-
bors) can help with efforts to move the
right project forward.”
The presentation both verbally and
visually failed to describe what their
plan was in detail. It only said “Our
101 Community Coalition Alternative
Plan (CCAP) will take less than two
years to construct, will keep all on-
ramps and off-ramps open during
construction, and will save $50 mil-
lion dollars.” They went on to ask for
money to hire consultants (read law-
yers) and PR people.
But, what is the plan and who are the
experts that have drawn it up? The visu-
als shown do not suffice. I was told
the details are on the website. Well,
they aren’t.
Since the HOV widening project was
presented by Caltrans in 2010, many
citizens have been seeking a solution
that would work best for Montecito
and still achieve an improved flow of
traffic on the 101. We had hoped the
south-bound left exit could be retained
but it became abundantly clear that
wasn’t an option. We asked for further
options. Caltrans heard our voices and
presented Modified F and Modified M.
Perhaps at that time it would
have been wise for the Montecito
Association to have hired an objective
expert to study the options and recom-
mend something workable. Instead
they formed the transportation sub-
committee, with well meaning, but by
no means experts or objective think-
ers, who continued to pursue what
was becoming an obviously unwork-
able solution. There was no dialogue
of ideas, nor an outreach to all citizens
who were directly affected by final
decisions. Members of this committee
treated the public input with derision
and excluded interested parties from
their meetings.
Certainly there are valid concerns
expressed by the supporters of CCAP
that we can all agree on. Design mod-
ifications can be worked out with
Caltrans. If we can just stop hedging
the truth, insulting and yelling at each
other, we would realize we have simi-
lar concerns. Let’s work on realistic
solutions together.
I am deeply saddened by Montecito
citizens’ lack of desire to try to be
more informed. Fellow neighbors: ask
the hard questions, get the details and
do the research. What is the history
here? Money donated to MA could be
well spent to work with Caltrans, hire
an outside expert & mediator to work
through design modifications unique
to our area’s special needs and keep-
ing within the standards of Caltrans.
It will delay the project but should get
a good result for a beautiful project
that will not only serve Montecito, but
enhance it for the next 50 years!
Sybil Rosen
Montecito
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 21
The best dry cleaning is accomplished by One Hour Martinizing Dry Cleaning. They use the best
and most modern processes. When you pick-up your clothing, each item is clean, odorless, and shirts
are well pressed.
One Hour Martininzing specializes in dry cleaning for the entire family.
One Hour Martininzing offers one-hour dry cleaning & same day shirt service. From drapery
cleaning to wedding dresses, you'll like their friendly, courteous personnel. The business is owned and
operated by Diane Honaker. She is experienced and genuinely cares that you are completely satisfied
with their services. There are 3 One Hour Martininzing locations in this area: 1024-B Coast Village
Road, in Montecito, and 2 locations in Santa Barbara, at 155 S. Turnpike, and 3351 State Street.
The editors of this Consumer Business Review wish to direct the attention of our readers to
One Hour Martininzing, who is one of the reliable business institutions in this community. We
recommend them for the 14th time!
Madam Lu Chinese Restaurant, at 3524 State Street, in Santa Barbara, is one of the most original
places on the central coast. When Madam Lu opened, it was with the idea that a Chinese Restaurant
should not only serve the most authentic food but also provide customers with great service. The
popularity of this fine dining place has proved the value of this theory.
At Madam Lu, the service is cordial and quick, and the decor is completely relaxed but pleasant in
every detail. Madam Lu offers great menu selections; from the spicy Kung Pao Chicken to the sweet
and tangy Walnut Shrimp, everything tastes great and the generous portions make sure you will never
leave hungry. Try Madam Lu's personal favorite dish, Shrimp with Snow Pea Tips; it is cooked to
perfection. Madam Lu also offers a lunch buffet from 11:00-4:30 daily. Be sure to bring your appetite!
The editors of this Consumer Business Review pause not a moment on giving our complete
endorsement to Madam Lu Chinese Restaurant!
www.MadamLu.com
With all of the insurance agents and different companies in this area, business professionals and
consumers alike lose touch with what they really need and want in this area of planning for their future.
The editors of this Business Review would like to help. We recommend you call HUB International.
They are located at 40 E. Alamar Avenue, in Santa Barbara. They are interested in helping you plan
for your future security!
They offer all types of insurance services, including commercial, home and auto, life, health,
Workers' Compensation, as well as helpful, friendly advice. They can structure your coverage to
exactly match your needs and budgetary limitations. Whether you need insurance for your business or
yourself, talk to HUB International. You can enjoy the peace of mind that comes only with quality
insurance protection.
The editors of this Consumer Business Review recommend to anyone new in the area, or anyone
not satisfied with the attention they're presently receiving to call HUB International for a personal
appointment or telephone quote. They appreciate your business and their care and dedication shows
it! www.HUBInternational.com
Vital changes have been made in the tax laws! You may have to pay more taxes this year, unless
you take full advantage of all your deductions. With 14 years of experience, Scott H. Walther, E.A., will
seek out every deductible item!
Mr. Walther is employed with the Law Offices of Dana F. Longo, at 509 Brinkerhoff Avenue, in Santa
Barbara, and offers a professional and accurate tax reporting service. Mr. Walther is trained in tax laws.
Training in this field enables him to prepare your tax returns in less time, and often with substantial tax
savings for you. Mr. Walther is an enrolled agent who has successfully represented many clients before
the IRS.
Phone 805-963-6551 today and let Mr. Walther explain his many methods of saving you time and
money on your tax preparation. Don't let the tax laws confuse you!
In this Consumer Business Review, the editors recommend Scott H. Walther, E.A., to our readers.
Contact him for all your tax reporting needs. We endorse his fair and ethical practices, and commend
him for the fine service that he provides.
www.LongoLawOffices.com
Many partial-hearing losses can be aided or compensated by the simple fitting of a
hearing aid. If you're having trouble hearing, schedule a visit at Hearing Services of Santa
Barbara, at 5333 Hollister Avenue, Suite 207, in Santa Barbara. Here you can be expertly
fitted with a hearing aid that will work to correct your hearing loss for optimal hearing health.
Hearing Services of Santa Barbara features most brands and you will find that their
prices are very competitive.
At Hearing Services of Santa Barbara, you will find something else that many
people just talk about...service. Awarded the customer Service Award for 2012 by the BBB
of Santa Barbara, they go out of their way to insure that a licensed dispensing audiologist
with 25 years of experience has fit you properly!
The editors of this Consumer Business Review recommend that you consult
Hearing Services of Santa Barbara for your hearing loss. They can help! Your first step to
better hearing health!
University Movers, one of Santa Barbara's most respected moving companies, has established its
reputation for the highest quality customer service in the industry by developing a powerful, highly trained base
of professional movers while keeping its administration small and available. Started in 2001 by a UCSB
student, and now graduate, this company has served thousands of Santa Barbara residents and businesses.
"Providing the highest professional standards!" is more than mere lip service. Even though you can expect
premium quality service, University Movers is refreshingly affordable. Why? In a word…efficiency.
University Movers provides a complete line of services that are personally tailored to every client's
individual needs. Whether you are moving across the street or across state lines, University Movers is
rapidly expanding its facilities to serve Santa Barbara County with new equipment, modern training,
specialized technology, and the ever increasing commitment to community service.
This company does more than just move. University Movers vigorously supports the Santa Barbara County
community by sponsoring local charities.
The editors of this Consumer Business Review recommend University Movers to our readers, for the 10th
consecutive year! www.University-Movers.com
Now enrolling: "Here We Grow Again". Come see our additional rooms and expanded playgrounds!
One of the area's finest facilities for the quality education of children is the Rainbow School, at 5689 Hollister
Avenue, in Goleta. They've won the support and approval of parents from all over the local area.
Rainbow School is state licensed and insured, and they employ certified instructors. The teacher to
student ratio is smaller than the public school system. This enables the child to blossom to his or her
individual capacity, before entering that environment, or before going to another private school.
Rainbow School is the best place for children to get a quality head start on the road to a well rounded
education.
Rainbow School features a mentally stimulating environment allowing the children to grow to their full
potential, while acquiring a life long enthusiasm for learning. The whole program at Rainbow School focuses
on math, reading, language, and the arts. And parents, you'll be surprised at the affordability of this quality
education!
The editors of this Consumer Business Review are indeed proud to be able to recommend Rainbow School
to our readers. We know you will be pleased with their fine programs!
www.RainbowSchoolSB.com
Where do you go to get your Rolls Royce, Mercedes or BMW tuned and repaired? If you said Muller &
Goss, then you're in excellent hands because they are one of the leading European and German car experts
in the entire South Coast area!
Located at 424 N. Quarantina Street, in Santa Barbara, Muller & Goss specializes in repair and service on
most British or German autos. They're qualified to perform repairs and service that other shops can't or won't
do. Muller & Goss features state of the art diagnostic equipment to efficiently repair your valuable automobile
accurately and economically.
With a record of hundreds of satisfied customers, Muller & Goss can definitely make your automobile
perform the way you want it to.
Take your automotive problems to Muller & Goss whenever you need any type of work done. They're
famous for doing high quality, guaranteed work at a reasonable cost. Just ask any one of their many satisfied
customers.
The editors of this Consumer Business Review, for the 22nd consecutive year, can say you'll be more than
pleased with the results you get when you do business with Muller & Goss.
Martin, Dale and the entire crew at Muller & Goss wish everyone a happy winter. Please put safety first on
the road!
Nationally Ranked Locally Operated Since 1886
Your Independent Agent
Business Insurance * Workers' Comp * Home & Auto
Group & Life * Retirement Plans
Call: (805) 682-2571
Hearing Services of Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara's Hearing Health Center
805-967-4200
Scott H. Walther, E.A.
Personal * Business * Fiduciary 1041
IRS Problems * Trust Tax Returns
805-963-6551 * scott@LongoLawOffices.com
The Best Chinese Restaurant In Town
Phone (805) 898-9289
"Quality Child Care Since 1978"
Prepare Your Child For Learning In Our Award Winning
Programs
Infant * Toddlers * Pre-School * Pre-Kindergarten
After School Programs * Summer Day Camps
Call: (805) 964-4511
University Movers
Mover of The Year 2004 Through 2013
Complete & Professional Moving Services
Local * Long Distance
Locally Owned & Operated * Residential * Office * Industrial
Call (805) 705-5854
Muller & Goss
Expert Quality Repairs On Rolls Royce, Mercedes & BMW
Factory Parts & They'll Maintain Your New Car Warranty
All Work Guaranteed * State Of The Art Equipment
Call (805) 962-1613 For An Appointment
Celebrating Over 40 Years Serving The Community!
* ENVIRONMENTALLY SAFE - Odorless, Gentle Dry Cleaning *
Shirt Service * Alterations * Wedding Dresses * Casual Wear Care
Coast Village Shopping Center 969-3880 * Turnpike Center 967-1555
San Roque Plaza 687-7800
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 22 • The Voice of the Village •
Ful l Ser vi ce Beaut y
Hai r •Nai l s •Ski n Car e
Complimentary
Kerastase
treatment with any
haircut & or color
(a $35.00 value)
expires
March 1st, 2013
1272 Coas t Vi l l age Road 969- 6963
www.redstudionet.com
Lymphatic Therapy
Reduce swelling, boost your immune system
and increase your body's ability to flter
out toxins with Lymphatic Terapy
Jennifer Schwarz, LMT, MLD
(805) 452-2678
Licensed and certifed through Norton School of
Lymphatic Terapy and Center for Lymphatic Health
Scott Craig is manager of media relations at
Westmont College
Your Westmont
Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot on Display
by Scott Craig
T
he works of Jean-Baptiste-
Camille Corot, the most influen-
tial French landscape painter in
the late 19th century, will be displayed
in the Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum
of Art from January 31-March 23. A
free, public reception for the exhi-
bition, “Jean-Baptiste-Camille
Corot: The Lady Leslie Ridley-Tree
Collection in the Context,” will feature
live French music Thursday, January
31, from 4-6 pm at the museum.
Leslie Ridley-Tree has donated 10
paintings, 12 lithographs and a draw-
ing by Corot to the exhibition. The
museum will also feature works on
loan from Michael Armand Hammer,
Robert and Chris Emmons, Howard
and Roberta Ahmanson, the Santa
Barbara Museum of Art and other
prestigious collections that place
Ridley-Tree’s works into the context
of nineteenth century art.
Judy L. Larson, director of the
museum and curator of the exhibition,
has worked with a team of scholars
to produce a 150-page catalog that
includes essays by Larson, along with
Amy Kurlander, a Corot scholar from
Houston; Charlene Garfinkle, secre-
tary of the Association of Historians
of American Art; and entries by Laura
diZerega, a UC Santa Barbara gradu-
ate student, and Brandon Waybright,
Westmont museum outreach and edu-
cation coordinator.
Three experts will speak at
a symposium, “Jean-Baptiste-
Camille Corot: Conversations about
Connoisseurship,” Saturday, February
9 from 10 am to noon in Winter Hall’s
Darling Foundation Lecture Hall
(Room 210) at Westmont. The talk
includes Kurlander, Scott Allan, asso-
ciate curator at the Getty Museum,
and Jill Newhouse, a New York gal-
lery owner and editor of a definitive
catalog on Corot’s drawings.
“Corot’s work celebrates the ethe-
real beauty of nature,” Larson says.
“Corot was an influential leader
among the Barbizon artists. He loved
to paint the sunrise and sunset and
is among the first landscape painters
to capture the specifics of weather
and atmosphere by going directly to
nature and painting ‘en plein air.’”
The Dutch post-Impressionist painter
Vincent van Gogh owned a Corot paint-
ing and praised Corot’s figure paintings.
“Picasso saw a selection of Corot’s figur-
al works at the 1909 Salon D’Automne,
which likely served as the inspiration of
his own classical female figures holding
mandolins or violins – a direct bor-
rowing from Corot,” Waybright says.
“Monet himself praised Corot, calling
him ‘the only master. We are nothing to
him, nothing …’
“We hope to communicate Corot’s
love and appreciation of nature by
sharing these paintings with our stu-
dents and community on the beauti-
ful Westmont campus. We also hope
that his work will open eyes to the
natural world that surrounds us. For
art students, there can be few better
ways to learn about how to capture
a landscape in movement than by
encountering the work of Corot.”
The museum is open Monday
through Friday from 10 am to 4 pm
and 11 am to 5 pm on Saturdays. It
is closed Sundays and college holi-
days. For more information, please
visit www.westmontmuseum.org or
contact the museum at (805) 565-
6162. •MJ
“Voisinlieu,
In Mr.
Wallet’s
Park”
“Watering Hole
near Saint Omer,
evening”
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 23
live with their caregivers, usually a
spouse or child. Programming at the
center allows the caregiver to work or
complete chores during the day, while
his or her loved one is being cared for
in a safe environment.
Education and support is also
available for caregivers through the
center. Transportation, meals, nurs-
ing, socialization and various activ-
ities are offered for members, and
the “Adventuresome Aging” pro-
gram provides bi-weekly outings
to local destinations specifically for
older adults in the early stages of
Alzheimer’s Disease.
This year tickets cost $100. The event
is from 11:30 am to 2:30 pm. For more
information call 969-0859. To learn
more about the Friendship Center
visit www.friendshipcentersb.org
Holiday Haulers
Honored
The Holiday Haulers, a group
of business owners and volunteers
founded by Lisa Cullen of Montecito
Landscape, were honored last week
by the Foodbank and Santa Barbara
County. For the last few years, the
group has picked up and delivered
agreement goes against state laws that
prohibit taking on long-term indebt-
edness, while Caruso maintains that
not committing to the 15 years essen-
tially defeats the purpose of the rebate
plan. “The Hotel Incentive Program
is critical to getting the financing we
need,” Caruso said, adding that the
stalemate with the county will cause
the building timeline “to slip.”
Caruso said he hoped to break
ground on the project in 2014, with
doors open by 2016, but that financ-
ing remains an unresolved issue.
“We would love to see this project
built sooner rather than later,” said
Supervisor Carbajal, who noted that
talks between the county with the
Caruso team regarding the HIP are
still in the works. In the meantime,
Supervisor Carbajal thanked Caruso
for demolishing the buildings, a move
many Montecito residents had been
asking for. “You’ve taken away the
eyesore, and we thank you,” he said.
Friendship Center
Festival of Hearts
On Saturday, February 9, Friendship
Center will hold its 14th annual
Festival of Hearts event to benefit
the H.E.A.R.T. (Help Elders At Risk
Today) program. Taking on a Parisian
theme, the event, to be held at Fess
Parker’s Doubletree Resort, will fea-
ture French music by the Montecito
Jazz Project, a Valentine luncheon
with local wines, Valentine’s themed
shopping, a live auction and more.
At the center of the Hearts event
are whimsical papier-mâché hearts
donated by local artists and stu-
dents from area high schools. Guests
receive a hand-decorated heart as a
party favor; other decorated hearts
are available by silent bid. Noted
“heart artists” this year include Ellen
Orlando, Janice Gilbar Treadwell,
Claudia Bott, Margaret Hurley, Heidi
Artman, Chia Lee Yeh, Steven Gilbar,
and others. The hearts that will be
on sale are now hanging on display
at Renaissance Fine Consignment in
La Arcada Plaza on State Street until
Thursday, February 7.
Local merchants and residents have
donated goods and services for the
event, others have donated gift cer-
tificates for the auctions. The live auc-
tion features a weekend getaways to
San Francisco and the French Quarter
in New Orleans, a desert getaway
to Palm Springs, wine tasting tours,
lunches with local elected officials,
and a lobster dinner prepared by
Alex Broumand of the Montecito
Firefighters Charitable Foundation
and his diving partner Bill Whitaker,
and “staycation” packages featur-
ing Santa Barbara Zoo passes, hotel
vouchers, restaurant certificates and
more.
Friendship Center, located on the
grounds of All Saints-by-the-Sea
Episcopal Church, has been provid-
ing adult day care and respite for
caregivers since 1976. In 2011 the
Friendship Center also opened a new
Goleta facility, located at 820 North
Fairview Avenue. The goal of the non-
profit organization is to defer nursing
home care for as long as possible.
Friendship Center members typically
It’s paradoxical that the idea of living a long life appeals to everyone but the idea of getting old doesn’t appeal to anyone – Andy Rooney
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Miramar
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First District
Supervisor
Salud Carbajal
on the
Miramar site
Holiday Haulers honored by First District Supervisor Salud Carbajal and Foodbank representative Jane
Lindsey (photo courtesy Lisa Cullen)
Festival of
Hearts orga-
nizers Sharon
Morrow, Justine
Sutton, and
Friendship
Center Executive
Director Heidi
Holly display
a few of the
“hearts” to
be sold at the
annual event
VILLAGE BEAT Page 274
VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 13)
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 24 • The Voice of the Village •
5:30 PM
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SEEn (Continued from page 16)
Barbara addresses dental. Referrals
come from various sources like the
County Health Department, schools,
police and assisted living homes. St.
Cecilia can frequently get a discount-
ed price on the services. One recipient,
after receiving $6,000 for dental, said,
“No one has ever done anything that
nice for me.” Before receiving the pro-
cedure, she always covered her mouth
she was so ashamed. Amounts vary
from as little as $15 for a co-pay to sev-
eral thousand, excluding catastrophic
expenses.
Dr. Peter Hassler from the County
of Santa Barbara Public Health
Department spoke to the group at
All Saints-by-the-Sea Church, which
lends the church for the tea. He told
us, “Santa Barbara County has one of
the highest amounts of poor kids in
the state because of North County.”
The County Department sees 30,000
patients with 120,000 visits a year.
Instead of horses and carriages, the
ladies now have cell phones and com-
puters. Instead of long dresses and
hats, there are short dresses and no
gloves, but the need is still there for
helping lives. Membership is open to
all and they welcome your help. Check
it out on www.stceciliasociety.org. •MJ
Case manager Nikki Rickard, president Tish Gainey, Dr. Peter Hasler, and Charlene Nagel at the St.
Cecilia Fund tea
St. Cecilia board members Susan Johnson, Gail Arnold, Mary Garton, Heidi Rose and Sigrid Toye at All
Saints-by-the-Sea
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 25 Don’t rule out working with your hands; it does not preclude using your head – Andy Rooney
WHAT’S NEXT?
SANTA BARBARA SYMPHONY PRESENTS
CAMA PRESENTS
OPERA SANTA BARBARA PRESENTS
THE GRANADA THEATRE CONCERT SERIES PRESENTS
UCSB ARTS & LECTURES PRESENTS
CAMA PRESENTS
Nir Kabaretti, Conductor
Michelle Temple, Harp
SENIORITY
by Patti Teel
Patti Teel is the com-
munity representative for
Senior Helpers, providers
of care and comfort at a
moment’s notice. She is
also host of the Senior
Helpers online video
show. www.santabar
baraseniors.com. E-mail:
patti@pattiteel.com.
new Foundation
Helps People and
Their Pets
L
ong-time Montecito resident
Diana Basehart loves animals,
and her heart breaks for people
who lack the funds to adequately care
for their pets.
In response to the needs of pet own-
ers, Diana Basehart recently started a
foundation which exists to help elders
and others on limited incomes care
for and keep their beloved animals
by providing support for veterinary
and nutritional needs, while also mini-
mizing the number of animals being
turned over to shelters. While there is
great wealth within our community,
there are also many people who are
struggling financially due to the down-
turn in the economy and the high cost
of housing. Even people with jobs can
often find it impossible to put aside
savings. With no money to spare, a
medical emergency can quickly turn
into a catastrophe. Thankfully, if you or
a family member needs urgent medical
care you will not be turned away from
a hospital, regardless of your ability to
pay – unless your family member is
of the four legged variety. Your family
pet is likely to be refused emergency
treatment unless you can pay the bill
upfront and in full. Diana Basehart
regularly hears from people who can-
not afford to pay the bill upfront, forc-
ing them to make an unbearable choice
– either let their beloved pet suffer or
die due to lack of treatment, or have
them euthanized.
The foundation gets calls from peo-
ple asking for help each and every day.
While it would love to be in a position
to help all those who need it, for now
Diana compares it to a triage approach
where they have to decide who is in
the most urgent need of assistance and
what they can afford to take on.
Diana understands that it is the
right time to take on this challenge
because so many people have fallen
onto hard times. While the founda-
tion often helps those who are elderly
or disabled, she stresses that we all
interact on a daily basis with everyday
people whose plight goes unnoticed.
These people are our neighbors, our
co-workers and our friends. The Diana
Basehart Foundation recently helped a
woman whose dog desperately needed
orthopedic surgery. The woman is not
homeless or unemployed. She works
for the county and lives in a modest
apartment, but lacked the funds nec-
essary to pay for her dog’s expensive
surgery. Her beloved companion was
suffering and losing his ability to walk.
The woman agonized over her dog’s
plight. Thankfully, The Diana Basehart
Foundation came to her rescue.
Diana has a long history as an ani-
mal advocate. Back in 1970, she start-
ed Actors and Others for Animals in
Hollywood. At that time, there were no
celebrities involved in animal rights.
Diana knew that her husband, actor
Richard Basehart, had the fame and
notoriety to reach celebrities who could
make an impact on the public and raise
awareness of animal rights. It has been
41 years since she started Animals and
Others for Animals and it is still going
strong. They help other animal orga-
nizations that are struggling, have a
massive neuter and spay program and
put on grand fundraising events every
year. Diana recalls that their first fun-
draising event was held at her daugh-
ter’s school.
In December, the Diana Basehart
Foundation held a successful fundrais-
er at a Montecito estate. It was a rainy
day but that didn’t deter animal lov-
ers from both Los Angeles and Santa
Barbara from attending. Although it
was a great success, the need for addi-
tional funding is great and ongoing.
If you are a person who understands
the deep love shared by animals and
their owners, please consider mak-
ing a donation to the Diana Basehart
Foundation. Any amount, large or
small, would be greatly appreciated.
Diana is also hoping that local veterinar-
ians will be interested in working coop-
eratively with her foundation. For more
information, visit www.basehart.org.
You can listen to my radio interview
with Diana at www.youngatheartra
dio.com. •MJ
Diana Basehart in her home with her beloved pets
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 26 • The Voice of the Village •
What was the most challenging part of
the shoot?
Having only thirty-three days for
a 155-page script. Just being able to
shoot it the way we wanted to in such
a short time. But it was also exciting
for the movie. There was no down
time. Every second demanded full
focus and energy and excitement from
everyone on the cast and crew. And
every day had a least one phenom-
enal scene if not more. When you’re
on a big movie you can go a long
time doing nothing of substance, no
memorable moments. But this was big
stuff every day. That got everyone all
jazzed.
David O. Russell likes to rewrite on the
set. Did that pose any difficulties?
No, the opposite. Even Robert De
Niro said he thought the lines that
as they were originally written were
amazing, and then he gets the new
pages in real time and found them
even more incredible. All the actors
have talked about how every change
he made helped them to feel even
more in their characters. That started
on day one. So as a producer it
makes my job even easier, because
he’s making stuff that’s already
great even better. And he’s extreme-
ly collaborative, so as a producer
I’m busy; he wants my opinion on
everything.
Any idea of what you’ll talk about on
the panel this week?
We’ll see where things go. But it’s
a great group of producers this year.
Kathy Kennedy was my mentor on
my first movie (The Color Purple). She
taught me everything I know about
producing. And the way it’s turned
out, all three times I’ve been nominat-
ed for an Academy Award, she has
too. It’s also great to meet the people
I didn’t know before, and make new
friends in the business.
David Womark
(Life of Pi)
Q. I know the movie had a long devel-
opment. Where did you come in on the
process?
A. I’ve been on this journey for three
years. Once the first draft was writ-
ten and the studio was excited, I was
brought on board because it’s so com-
plicated. Ang Lee had already cap-
tured the essence of everything. And
there was a creative template. Then
we spent ten months with a small
group of people figuring out how to
make the movie in a practical sense.
Shooting in 3-D, on water, with a CGI
tiger, young actors… That all seems
fairly complex. What were the most chal-
lenging aspects to making the movie and
how were they overcome? Was there ever
a point where things were not coming
together?
When you work with someone like
Ang, who’s a very strong force, it’s
the daunting task of all of those ele-
ments, but creatively you’ve also got
to deliver a movie that maintains the
artistic essence of the book, but is still
commercial enough to sell because of
the big investment. I do think that was
in Ang’s head too all the time, and
that drove all the decisions. So with
the ocean scenes, we did an animated
movie of all the parts on the water.
He wanted each scene to have its own
signature that would give you the
passage of time. But there has been
a tradition in filmmaking in water
– Waterworld, Master and Commander
– of major production headaches and
budget issues. And since this wasn’t a
potential sci-fi franchise or with a big
movie star, we had to control every-
thing by shooting it in a tank. But
then there are the long scenes in open
space where you need to have swells

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Bradley Cooper stars in Silver Linings Playbook; producer Bruce Cohen will take part in the SBIFF
Producers Panel on Saturday, February 2
Week Two Preview:
Producers Panel
SBIFF 2013
by Steven Libowitz
T
he actors and actresses draw the
huge crowds at SBIFF, of course,
followed by the directors and
writers, whose seminars on the first
Saturday attracted big audiences to
the Lobero last week for spirited dis-
cussions on the process of creating the
scripts and the vision to capture them
on film. Somewhere down at the other
end of the spectrum are the produc-
ers, who operate even further behind
the scenes and with whom audiences
can’t really put a finger on what they
do.
But aside from the fact that the
producers are the last folks standing
at the podium on Oscar night when
the final Academy Award for Best
Picture is handed out, the jobs can
be very hands-on positions, ranging
from raising the money to serving as a
buffer between the set and the studio
to handling day to day issues from
scheduling to planning to anchoring
the creative team in making critical
decisions on everything from camera
placement to script changes.
SBIFF’s producers panel this year is
about as high-powered – and varied –
as they come, what with seven of the
nine current best picture Oscar nomi-
nees duking it out on the stage of the
Lobero at 11am Saturday. (Three more
producers of Academy Award nomi-
nated films – Django Unchained’s Pilar
Savone, Brave’s Katherine Sarafian
and Frankenweenie’s Allison Abbate
– join Beasts of the Southern Wild co-
screenwriter Lucy Alibar and others
on the Women in the Biz panel at 2pm
at the Lobero.)
We talked with three of the produc-
ers over the phone to preview the
panel: Bruce Cohen – who worked
with Sam Mendes (American Beauty),
Gus Van Sant (Milk), and Tim Burton
(Big Fish) prior to teaming up with
David O. Russell (“The Fighter”) for
Silver Linings Playbook; David Womark,
whose only other credit as a full pro-
ducer was One More Chance back in
1983 before he signed on to Life of Pi;
and Django Unchained’s Stacey Shur,
whose extensive credits include Erin
Brockovich, Get Shorty and Out of Sight.
Bruce Cohen
(Silver Linings Playbook)
Q. How did you come to the movie?
A. I try to pick and develop things
that I deeply love and believe might
really move people. That’s the orga-
nizing principle, even if directors
and studios and genres change. What
excited me about this movie is that I
remember all these people telling me
that they’d loved American Beauty so
much they saw it more than once in
the theater. It hadn’t happened since,
but I thought this might be like that.
And it has been, which is wonderful.
David O. Russell and I have known
each other for years, and had wanted
to work together, but hadn’t yet. He’d
sent me an earlier draft before The
Fighter and I’d fallen deeply in love
with it and wanted to be a part of it.
So the day I heard from (the other pro-
ducer) that they wanted me, it was an
instant yes. You could hear me shout-
ing across the neighborhood!
The lead actors were taking on new, pos-
sibly career-defining roles, even growing
as the movie was being developed. What
was that like?
David gave them both a chance to
do something they hadn’t before. He
talked about the opening shot of the
film starting on Bradley [Cooper’s]
back then coming around to his face as
a metaphor: it was the character, Pat Jr.
reintroducing himself to the world to
prove that he’s not who they thought
he was, and also introducing Bradley
as not the actor you thought either.
And for Jennifer [Lawrence, who will
be honored with SBIFF’s Outstanding
Performance of the Year award on
Saturday night], those kind of roles
just don’t come around very often, one
with such depth and many layers and
levels. It was an extraordinary chance
for her to announcer herself as a major
new talent.
SBIFF Page 394
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 27 We’re all proud of making little mistakes; it gives us the feeling we don’t make any big ones – Andy Rooney
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WINTER SALE
compiled by Kelly Mahan from information supplied by Santa Barbara County
Sheriff’s Department
SHERIFF’S
BLOTTER
Erratic Driving on Hot Springs Road
Friday, 25 January, 10:04 pm – Deputy Johnson was patrolling Montecito in a
marked patrol car. While traveling on Hot Springs Road, the deputy observed
a truck two cars ahead, driving considerably slower than the speed limit. The
deputy initiated a traffic stop while the vehicle was pulling into the Vons park-
ing lot. When the driver pulled his truck into the parking stall, he went too
fast and hit the curb. When the deputy approached, there was an odor of alco-
hol coming from the driver. A records check showed the driver’s license was
expired and he was on probation for DUI. When the man went to put his license
and insurance information back in his wallet, he reached down and produced a
bottle of mouthwash, which he took a drink of.
Fifteen minutes later, after several field sobriety tests, the deputy asked the
man for a breath sample, which was .052 BAC. Because of the low BAC, the man
was allowed to leave via taxi. Later, the deputy researched further, and found
a section in the Vehicle Code which prohibits persons on probation for driving
under the influence to be operating a vehicle with blood-alcohol percentages of
.01 or greater.
The District Attorney is expected to follow up with charges. •MJ
VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 23)
food that is donated to the Foodbank
during holiday food drives.
“We can’t quantify the value
of all that you do, it’s that big!”
said Foodbank Development and
Resource Officer, Jane Lindsey. First
District Supervisor Salud Carbajal
was on hand to present certificates
of recognition to the individuals and
businesses. The group of volunteers
picked up and delivered over 60,000
pounds of food this holiday season.
To become a part of this volunteer
organization, contact Lisa at 969-3984.
For more information about the Santa
Barbara Foodbank, call 967-5741.
Bullying Discussed
at Cold Spring School
On February 4 and 5, children’s
author and advocate Trudy Ludwig
will be visiting two Santa Barbara
elementary schools to give her presen-
tations on relational aggression (using
relationships to manipulate and hurt
others) to students, staff, and parents.
Cold Spring School and Roosevelt
Elementary have joined forces to co-
sponsor Ludwig’s two-day author
visit. On Monday, February 4, Ludwig
will present to Cold Spring School
students during the day and, in the
afternoon, to staff in an in-service
workshop (“Addressing Aggression:
Providing a Safer Social & Learning
Environment at School”). On Tuesday,
February 5, Ludwig will then pres-
ent to students and staff at Roosevelt
Elementary.
On the evening of February 4,
Cold Spring School and Roosevelt
Elementary are co-sponsoring
Ludwig’s special parent presenta-
tion: “Understanding Our Kids’ Social
World: Friendships, Cliques & Power
Plays.” The parent presentation will
take place from 6:30 pm to 8 pm at
Cold Spring School.
“We’re excited to have Trudy
Ludwig share her books and exper-
tise with our schools about this very
important issue,” said Dr. Tricia
Price, Cold Spring School superin-
tendent.
An award-winning author and
speaker, Ludwig has been featured on
ABC’s Good Morning America, PBS’s
Keeping Kids Healthy, the National
Crime Prevention Council’s Circle of
Respect Program, and most recent-
ly as an expert panel member on
Sesame Street Workshop’s video series
addressing bullying.
Her books, My Secret Bully, Just
Kidding, Sorry, Trouble Talk, Too Perfect,
Confessions of a Former Bully, and her
newest release, Better Than You, focus
on helping children thrive in their
social world.
For more information about Ludwig
and her work, visit www.trudylud
wig.com. •MJ
Author and
activist Trudy
Ludwig will
speak to
kids, parents
and teachers
about bul-
lying
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 28 • The Voice of the Village •
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LETTERS (Continued from page 20)
Barnaby Conrad
Update
Last Saturday, Laird Koenig and I
visited Barnaby Conrad, founder and
former director of the Santa Barbara
Writers Conference begun in 1973. He
is doing surprisingly well given he’s 90
years old and his heart can no longer
support activities like bounding up
onto the stage at the Miramar. Those
were the days when he’d welcome
the 400 or so students each June to the
Santa Barbara Writers’ Conference for
a week of intense workshops, friend-
ships and change-of-life directions.
In spite of body frailties, he was chip-
per and carried on a conversation in
typical Barney style with stories and
humor. Even the Hospice worker was
chortling.
If you have memories of the
Conference and would like to send
a card or note, please send them
to: Barnaby Conrad, c/o Montecito
Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle,
Montecito, CA 93108.
Perhaps you feel awkward? Take
advice from former student and cur-
rent workshop leader, Ernie Witham.
“I sent an artistic card with a blank
inside and wrote him a note. Like
most of us, I feel I owe so much to the
SBWC and to Barney and Mary for
giving me a chance to be a workshop
leader.”
Susan Gulbransen
Montecito
Another Empty Saddle
Shortly after returning from the
funeral service for Harry Carey, Jr.
on Saturday January 12, I picked up a
copy of Montecito Journal and was sad-
dened to read that in Lynn P. Kirst’s
Trail Talk article (“Empty Saddles,”
MJ # 19/2), regarding deaths in 2012
there was no mention of Mr. Carey’s
passing. She did state that the list was
incomplete and perhaps the fact that
he passed on December 27, so close to
the end of 2012, may be a factor in the
omission.
I became acquainted with him and
his wife, Marilyn, through a facil-
ity where I worked in Santa Barbara.
There was no celebrity ego; they were
both friendly down-to-earth people.
Harry Carey, Jr. appeared in many
movies with John Wayne, including
the movie, The Searchers, which is
a Western favorite of many, includ-
ing myself. At his service, his son,
Tom Carey, and Marty Gish sang the
theme song from The Searchers. At the
reception following the service, Harry
Carey, Jr.’s saddle was displayed. A
fitting tribute to a cowboy legend. He
will be missed.
I hope if Lynn P. Kirst does another
Trail Talk article for Montecito Journal,
she will include his passing.
Ardene Fredricksen
Santa Barbara
(Editor’s note: Ms Kirst’s “Trail Talk”
column appears monthly; she has been
apprised of Mr. Carey’s death and will
likely address it in next year’s “Empty
Saddles” roundup – J.B.)
Gun Control In Israel
In the current debate over gun con-
trol, a letter writer (“As Goes Israel…”
MJ # 9/3) writes that “taking our guns
away isn’t the answer.” Incredibly she
holds up Israel as the exemplar for
her position. She states that in Israel,
“every person who graduates from
high school goes into the military,”
and they all keep their rifles after their
service. Over there, she says, “they
don’t have these weird problems with
people shooting each other or going
into schools and doing these atroci-
ties.”
This is inexplicably way off the
mark. In my various visits to Israel
– and to the Palestinian colonies it
occupies – I have seen an abundance
of weapons. As she suggests, many
of these weapons are in the hands
of civilians, often maniacal settlers.
One has only to remember Baruch
Goldstein in 1994. He walked into the
Ibrahim Mosque in Hebron, killing 29
Muslims and wounding 129 others,
all of them in prayer. The residents of
Kiryat Arba (an illegal settlement in
Palestine, not in Israel) turned their
killer into a folk hero, calling him “a
martyr with clean hands and a pure
heart,” and they built a monument to
honor him. A national poll in Israel
reported that 4% of the population
was in support of this mass murder.
Then-Prime Minister Yitzakh Rabin
described Goldstein as a “degenerate
murderer,” but Rabin himself would
be shot to death in 1995 in Tel Aviv,
by Yigal Amir, who faulted Rabin
for supporting peace talks with the
Palestinians.
It is not only the settlers who are
out of control. The Israeli military
routinely shoots Palestinian civilians
with impunity. Thanks to the coura-
geous reporting of an Israeli news-
paper such as Haaretz, some of these
crimes come to our attention. Most do
not. Israeli soldiers have been seen to
sign their mission with graffiti on the
walls of destroyed buildings, some in
Hebrew, others in naïve English, such
as “Arabs need 2 die,” and “Make war
not peace.” According to a Norwegian
physician who endured the assault
on al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza during
“Operation Cast Lead,” Israeli snipers
from the Givati Brigate could pur-
chase T-shirts depicting a young, obvi-
ously pregnant woman in traditional
Palestinian dress, her belly centered
in the cross-hairs of a sniper’s scope,
with the words underneath: “1 Shot
2 Kills.”
The letter is datelined London,
England. If she’s at all interested in
facts about arms and Israel, I would
recommend she take a brief journey
southwest to Exeter, to meet with
Professor Ilan Pappe, a renowned
Israeli historian. If she finds this
impractical, she could at least get her-
self a copy of Pappe’s book, The Ethnic
Cleansing of Palestine (2008).
Francis Sarguis
Santa Barbara
(Editor’s note: The letter you reference
was mistakenly attributed to a woman
who lives in London. We have not been
able to ascertain who wrote it – at this
point – so we’ll forego any comments,
other than if we are ever forced to choose
between Israelis and “Palestinians,” we’re
going with the Israelis. – J.B.)
From Butter Knives
To Heroin
Everyone is entitled to know who
owns, or conceals, dangerous weap-
ons. It doesn’t matter whether those
objects are tucked under the front
car seat, hidden in a purse, strapped
around an ankle, stored in a beer
cooler or forgotten in a kitchen draw-
er.
According to U.S. Senator Dianne
Feinstein, there is no such thing as
a safe weapon. If she includes steak
knives, broken glass bottles, jagged
metal, keychain-size gun replicas or
ice picks, I’ll agree.
The proposal to “ban” knives
may sound ridiculous, but a Google
search (“UK Doctors Ban Knives”)
will show how this brilliant idea is
coming to fruition. Another Google
search (“Ice Picks vs. Bullets”)
reveals that even a bulletproof vest
provides little protection against a
combat knife, ice pick or hunting
arrow. Perhaps the availability of
these cheap, unregistered, easily
available “assault knives” needs to
be regulated.
Some experts believe that, once
innocent kids have been desensitized
to butter knives, violent birthday par-
ties will likely follow, or once kids
learn to be “comfortable” around
archery equipment, it’s only a matter
of time before they start using heroin,
killing their neighbors or become
dictators. (Google: “Armed-Piñata
Syndrome”)
When a kindergartener is arrest-
ed for pointing her finger, or a boy
suspended because one of his Lego
figures carried a dime-sized plastic
machine gun, we are not far from
an extremely slippery slope. These,
and 50 additional, “zero-tolerance”
examples can be found.
If firearms are going to be regis-
tered, or concealed-carry permit hold-
ers exposed in a newspaper or web-
site, isn’t it appropriate that everyone
be included? In the interest of “fair-
ness” and “equality,” shouldn’t every
gun-toting or ammo-hoarding politi-
cian (state, local, national), celebrity,
sports star and newspaper journalist
be clearly identified?
How about “zero-tolerance” for
lawmakers who think their lives are
more important than the electorates’?
With such fantastic free publicity
and political “transparency,” what
could possibly go wrong?
Dale Lowdermilk
Founder NOTSAFE(dot)ORG •MJ
Harry Carey, Jr. (May 16, 1921 – December 27,
2012) then… and more recently, with his wife,
Marilyn
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 29 If you’re going to be crazy, you have to get paid for it or else you’re going to be locked up – Hunter S. Thompson
BOOK TALK
by Shelly Lowenkopf
Barnaby Conrad
Shelly Lowenkopf blogs
@ www.lowenkopf.
com. Lowenkopf’s lat-
est book is The Fiction
Writer’s Handbook. His
short fiction, which has
appeared widely in the
literary and commercial
press, is featured in Love
Will Make You Drink and
Gamble, Stay Out Late at
Night, due in 2013.
near Death Experience
Ernie’s World
by Ernie Witham
Please note: I have tried to add humor to a painful incident, but though I poked
a bit of fun at them, the staff at the hospital emergency room that treated me
were incredibly caring and efficient.
B
arnaby Conrad has said he
paints pictures, draws portraits,
and carves wooden versions of
such objects as egg beaters, and liv-
ing things like crocodiles and brown
trout, in order to avoid writing books.
When you pause to consider the
number of books – novels and nonfic-
tion – he has written, this confession
seems an elaborate gesture, in effect
a trompe l’oeil come to pass. Conrad
has painted, drawn, and carved doz-
ens, likely hundreds, of these tricks of
the eye from which the genre takes its
name in French.
One of his favorite commissions
was to paint a swimming pool on a
San Francisco rooftop, about which
the client then deployed deck chairs,
and served drinks to guests.
His books run an eclectic spec-
trum, starting with his first novel,
The Innocent Villa, of which he and the
critics are dismissive, followed by his
breakthrough bestseller, Matador, a
roman a clef featuring a moody Spanish
bullfighter. Some years later, an his-
torical thriller featured a character
based on his younger self, attempt-
ing to foil the escape of a Nazi war
criminal from Spain at the close of
World War II. His most recent fiction
is a fanciful account of the life of John
Wilkes Booth, after his assassination
of Abraham Lincoln, wherein Booth
is portraying Abraham Lincoln in a
festival, and is shot by a man portray-
ing John Wilkes Booth.
Nonfiction Conrad titles ease from
instructions on bullfighting to mem-
oirs of his time as owner of a noted
San Francisco bistro, to his stay at
the Bette Ford Rehabilitation Center.
In the heyday of more literate maga-
zines, he wrote travel and nostalgia
pieces, including portraits of some of
his many friends.
At a birthday celebration for him not
long ago, the hostess placed two party
favors at the setting of each guest. The
first was a small wind-up toy with the
built-in ability to recognize and stop
short of running over the edge of a
table. Within moments of being seated,
the guests had their toys sashaying
over the table at a happy buzz, sound-
ing like the aggregate giggle of amused
youngsters at a playground.
The other party favor removed any
doubt that decorum and dignity were
to be shown the nearest exit. A clear
plastic envelope held one form or
another of an exaggerated, paste-on
mustache, ranging from the tooth-
brush shrub of Oliver Hardy to the
shaggy droop reminiscent of Mark
Twain and the Old West. The guests
sprouted their facial furnishings,
resulting in the mischievous ambi-
ance of a Marx Brothers movie. For
the rest of the dinner, Barnaby and
Mary Conrad maintained the natural
ease and good fellowship of persons
who’d been born and raised, wearing
exaggerated mustaches.
The Conrad home in the Rincon
Beach enclave is in its way an exten-
sion of the wind-up toys and mus-
taches, although to be fair, there are
many features, including Conrad’s
own paintings, charcoal portraits,
sculpting, and intricate carvings best
described without apology as art.
Even so, the atmosphere of mischief
and irrepressible humor are as much
a presence as the iodine tang from the
nearby beach and slough. The light
switch in the guest bathroom is a case
in point. When you’re aware of turn-
ing the lights on or off, you’re drawn
to the switch, a rascally conflation of a
photo of the Michelangelo David and
the up-down on-off lever, placed just
a tad below David’s waist.
Today, you find yourself in the
library, a room that seemingly has
more books, photos, paintings, and
drawings than it can accommodate.
In the center of the room, facing the
western bank of windows, you see
a large hospital bed, one that eas-
ily could be a part of an elaborate
Conradian trompe l’oeil.
The bed suggests the care Conrad
takes when he renders details. This
one has lettering attributing the bed to
Hospice. In the corner, two tall tanks
of oxygen. What fun Conrad might
have had, carving and shaping those.
There, in the midst of the bed, a form
Conrad might have done as a whim-
sical self-portrait, down to the faux
Rolex watch purchased from a dis-
play outside the Tijuana bullring. The
figure’s sidewalls, fluffy and cottony,
protrude, as Conrad’s do. A nurse,
wearing a Hospice jumper, nudges
the figure with gentle concern, wak-
ing him from a doze. “You’ve got a
visitor,” she says. The figure in the
bed comes to focus then leans for-
ward. “Another fine mess you’ve got
us into,” he says, then motions you to
the chair at his side. •MJ
T
hey couldn’t locate my spleen.
I’m not even sure what my
spleen looks like or what it does
or why it should go into hiding like
a common criminal, but it did. My
spleen had some ‘splainin’ to do.
Maybe the sound of my ribs fractur-
ing sent it scurrying. Maybe all my
organs were now standing around
going: “Did you feel that?” “You
kidding? I practically secreted. an
enzyme” “Did we hit an iceberg or
something?”
No, my squishy innards, we’ve been
in a car accident.
“Oh.” “Right.” “Yeah, guess that
makes more sense, was the brain
working?”
Good question.
They had offered me a ride to
Emergency in the ambulance, but I
declined. Partially because the full
extent of the pain hadn’t kicked in
at that point, and partially because
my friend and fellow columnist Jim
Alexander told us it cost more to ride
in an ambulance than to ride on the
space shuttle, but mostly because my
wife was there, talking to the police,
the tow truck driver, the paparazzi
(well I’m sure they would have been
there given time) and I knew she
would give me a lift. Though, she did
refuse to make siren noises on the
way.
They took x-rays then wheeled me
into a curtained stall to wait for the
results.
This gave us a chance to eavesdrop
on some of the neighbors. There was
the flu guy, who only stopped moan-
ing long enough to cough and gasp
for air. Our air.
There was the guy who dislocated
his finger. They kept trying to pull
it back into place but it wouldn’t go.
Stalwarts that they were they kept try-
ing and we all held our breath waiting
for the pop that never came.
And there was the young guy who
tried “Robo-tripping,” taking so much
cold medicine he couldn’t turn his
head and cough if they offered him
money.
My x-rays were inconclusive but I
had these bruises on my back that my
wife kept referring to as “Holy crap!”
So they took some CT scans and that’s
when they discovered small fractures
to two ribs and my hip. But my spleen
didn’t show up on the CT scans. So
now they were trying an ultrasound.
“This might be a little cold,” the
emergency room doctor said, as she
put goop all over my stomach.
Colder than the room itself?
Colder than my wheelchair trip from
Emergency across the parking lot to
the x-ray department? Colder than the
air blowing up my little cute hospital
gown?
“There it is,” she said.
My wife and I looked at the screen.
I’m not sure what she saw, but to me
my spleen looked like a raccoon’s face.
Was it wearing a mask? Was it hiding
because it tipped over one of the other
organ’s trash cans?
Some of these thoughts may have
been courtesy of the painkillers they
had given me. Turns out the more you
grimace, the more they take care of
you. Nice folks these emergency room
folks.
“We need to make sure it’s not
bleeding or you could die.”
See what I mean? Some doctors may
hem and haw, and explain things in
such a way as to leave you wondering
about your odds, but not in the emer-
gency room.
I looked for signs of blood, but the
ultrasound was only in black and
white – probably a budget constraint.
The doctor cleaned up the goop,
packed up the scanner and left. The
rest of the staff went to get my take-
home package – drugs, crutches and
this weird little device I had to use
to make sure I kept my lungs fully
inflated.
“Or you could get pneumonia, your
lung could collapse, and you could
die.”
My wife helped me get dressed.
“Let’s get out of here.”
That’s when the doctor came back
and said they needed to do another
CT scan of my spleen using contrast,
just in case.
I couldn’t remember the last time
my wife undressed me twice in one
night, but she hasn’t lost her touch.
“Why can’t I go home and finish my
trip?” Robo guy asked, as they gur-
neyed me through the ER yet again.
“Because we need to pump your
stomach or you could die.”
I was beginning to wonder if any-
one made it out alive. •MJ
I’m not sure what she saw,
but to me my spleen looked
like a raccoon’s face
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 30 • The Voice of the Village •
Montecito’s Emerging Movie Makers
W
hat follows is a short – very
short – examination into
what some young men and
women are now doing after spend-
ing a usually productive childhood
in Santa Barbara and/or Montecito.
Among this list of talented, success-
ful, ambitious, and inventive current
and future filmmakers, screenwriters,
producers, actors, and directors are a
number that attended one or another
of Montecito’s public and private ele-
mentary schools, and some that began
their budding careers at – of all places
– the Montecito Journal.
Matt Ornstein
For example, Matt Ornstein attend-
ed MUS from the second grade to the
sixth; from there, he went on to Santa
Barbara Middle School, Santa Barbara
High School and then to Bard College,
a liberal arts school in the Hudson
Valley, about an hour and a half north
of New York City. Matt’s writing was
featured in the very first issue of
Montecito Journal. Matt was a middle
school ninth grader and had done an
interview with Dick Tuck, a longtime
antagonist of Richard Nixon and good
friend of outlaw journalist Hunter
Thompson.
Matt chose to attend Bard, “because
the other option was USC, which
probably would have been better,” he
suggests during a short telephone call
from his home in Los Angeles. “But I
figured since I was from Los Angeles
originally, I wanted something differ-
ent,” he adds.
At the time, he was eager to begin
making films and was frustrated that
Bard didn’t have much in the way
of filmmaking equipment. Instead,
students watched movies, took them
apart verbally and put them back
together again. “I did get to edit,”
Matt recalls, “and was probably one
of the last [students] to edit a film
using a flatbed editing machine, razor
blades and tape.”
He finally did get to make a few
short films, “and from there,” he says,
“I went to music videos and commer-
cials.” In 2003, he was out of college
and was offered a job making music
videos back in Los Angeles for MTV’s
Total Request Live. Those videos had
million-dollar budgets and included
big names such as *NSYNC, Britney
Spears, Janet Jackson, Mariah Carey,
and others. “I wandered into that
world when it was a hurricane of
money. But,” he laments, “it ended
when the bubble burst in terms of how
much they spent and I, like everybody
else, went into commercials.”
Matt’s first film, “Atlantis,” a docu-
drama about a couple that meets just
before the launch of the last space
shuttle from Cape Canaveral, was in
last year’s Santa Barbara Film Festival.
“We kind of learn about the end of
the Shuttle program and watch the
final launch through their eyes,” he
explains.
After “Atlantis’” premiere in Santa
Barbara, Matt brought his film to
“eighteen or nineteen other festivals,”
he says. “It was well received and,
in fact, we showed it at Montecito
Union during that time. It was age
appropriate except for one kiss that
the principal had to fast forward,” he
recalls, laughing.
Today, Matt has his own production
company – Sound & Vision (sound-
vision.tv) – and is currently co-pro-
ducing Out There for cable TV. “It’s an
exploration of some fringe scientific
ideas, directed by Gaspar Noé (Enter
the Void, Irreversible). I’m not directing
it, but I am hands-on. It’s a six-episode
mini-series and we’re just doing the
pilot.”
A Princeton Grad
Mattie Brickman attended MUS
from kindergarten right through sixth
grade, graduating in 1995, before going
to Santa Barbara Middle School, and
then Cate for high school. She went off
to Princeton in 2001, where she was
accepted into the Woodrow Wilson
School for Public and International
Affairs. After graduation, she spent
one year between college and grad
school studying playwriting at UCSB
before settling into the Yale School
of Drama where she earned her MFA
in playwriting in 2009. She spent the
next two years in New York City –
Manhattan for a year and Brooklyn for
a year and a half, but has now settled
back on the West Coast.
With a full degree from Princeton,
one would have thought Mattie would
now be a star in the political arena, but
she exposed her hand when she asked
for permission to write a play at the
Woodrow Wilson School in place of a
dissertation. They said no.
While in New York, Mattie col-
laborated with a group called Art.
Party.Theater.Company that attempts
to incorporate the audience into its
work. “They had a theater piece in the
middle of Bryant Park in the summer
of 2010,” she tells us, “called Star Box,
where we built this weird box in the
middle of the park and created a huge
media campaign to get the word out
that there would be a ‘star,’ a celebrity,
in the box.”
For this effort, Mattie wrote a
90-page script that included thirty
actors, “which was essentially a
staged media circus around this box.
So, people would show up, but they
Matt Ornstein
dresses the
part for the
screening of
Atlantis at the
Cannes Film
Festival
Matt Ornstein holds up the film’s Best Picture and
Best Producing award at the Holly Shorts Film
Festival in Los Angeles
Coming & Going
by James Buckley
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 31 For every moment of triumph, for every instance of beauty, many souls must be trampled – Hunter S. Thompson
Where friends meet
STEAK • SEAFOOD • COCKTAI LS
Lunch from 11:30am • Dinner from 5:00pm
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COMInG & GOInG Page 324
weren’t sure if there were actors or
real journalists [outside]; there was a
mix of both.”
Mattie’s first writing assignment
was for… Montecito Journal. She wrote
a cover story about her attendance at
the Academy Awards (her dad, Paul
Brickman, is a film director – Risky
Business was his hit and Tom Cruise
was his discovery). As a sophomore at
Cate, she wrote a column for MJ, called
“Upward & Outward,” concentrating
on, curiously enough, Montecito kids
who were or had gone on to bigger
things.
After graduating from Yale, Mattie
received a commission from Vassar
to write a play about Hallie Flanagan,
the woman who founded the the-
ater program at the college and the
first woman to receive a Guggenheim
Fellowship. Shortly after finishing
that, producer Jon Avnet (Black Swan)
and TV producer-director Rodrigo
Garcia asked her to participate in the
creation of a web series about women
they were working on for YouTube’s
Original Channel Initiative, backed by
Google.
“Jon and Rodrigo had each written
a piece about speed-dating events and
they asked me to write one. I could re-
use some of their characters, use some
of my own, use their sets, etcetera,”
Mattie explains. “I started fresh with
the characters, got that to them by the
end of January 2012 and we started
production in March.”
Mattie’s series features a main char-
acter named Ro, and it follows her
through one evening of speed dating,
during the course of which Ro comes
into contact with her parole officer.
Although Mattie hadn’t done any
speed dating herself (she’d been dat-
ing someone), she says that “at Yale,
they were always offering that. They
were always trying to mix the school
of drama with the school of divinity,
with the school of forestry, with medi-
cal students. Go to a bar, have a drink,
and meet ten people,” so she was
familiar with the process.
Currently Mattie is working on her
own TV pilot. She says she loves “the
idea of a writers’ room and the col-
laboration of it,” and would prefer
that kind of work. Her pilot “follows
three estranged friends as they recon-
nect in New York and scrape together
strange and unique ways to pay their
bills. The cast consists of two guys
and a girl who used to be in a band
together.”
You can catch Mattie’s complete
web series on: www.YouTube.com/
user/wigs, and then click on “Ro.” or:
watchwigs.com.
Discovering Mavericks
Sean Maurer was also an MUS boy,
and he, along with director Josh Pomer
and others, produced this year’s Santa
Barbara International Film Festival
documentary: Discovering Mavericks.
Sean is a Montecito kid, but Josh is
a northern California guy, although
he has lived in Summerland recently.
“I grew up in Santa Cruz and have
been making surf documentaries for
twenty years, since I was eighteen,”
Josh says. “The Hollywood version
of the film – Chasing Mavericks – con-
centrated on Jay Moriarity, but all I
needed to do were the interviews, as
I had all the footage already, cause I’d
been filming [Mavericks] for so long,”
Josh explains.
Josh’s earlier film, The Westsiders,
about the rise and fall of a surf gang,
has been shown and has won acco-
lades internationally.
The world premiere of Discovering
Mavericks is scheduled for Friday,
February 1, beginning at 7 pm at
the Lobero. The film is narrated by
Dean Winters, the actor that has
become a YouTube, cable, and net-
work TV star portraying the popular
character “Mayhem” in the Allstate
Insurance commercials.
Sean Maurer’s Santa Barbara-based
production company is called State &
Cabrillo; his father, Michael Maurer,
was production manager on the origi-
nal Hair in New York City, and his
mom, Jane Maurer, not only appeared
in that production, but also went on
the road for a year with Hello Dolly
starring Carol Channing. Michael,
who has since passed away, wrote,
produced and directed the short-lived
but ambitious Broadway produc-
tion of The Shroud. Josh has recently
stretched out into a feature film that
Sean is helping to finance and pro-
duce. It’s a horror film that takes place
all around the Big Yellow House in
Summerland. “We have a rough cut
already,” says Josh, who both wrote
and directed the film.
Zero Dark Thirty
J.J. Kandel is another MUS boy
(what was in that water?). He arrived
in Santa Barbara in the mid 1980s and
attended Crane Country Day School
before moving into the Montecito
Producer Jon Avnet and Mattie Brickman during
the shooting of Ro
Screenwriter
Mattie
Brickman
on the set
of her web
series, Ro
Heidi Rushing, Sean Maurer, Jane Maurer, and Josh Pomer get ready to screen Discovering Maverick
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 32 • The Voice of the Village •
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COMInG & GOInG (Continued from page 31)
Union School District. After gradu-
ating from MUS, he went to Santa
Barbara Middle School (there’s some-
thing in the water there too), and then
Santa Barbara High School (okay,
okay). Unlike most of his classmates,
however, J.J. didn’t go to college;
he knew what he wanted to do and
didn’t believe a college degree would
be all that useful. He had been study-
ing acting in Santa Barbara, but after
spending six months in Los Angeles,
headed for the place where real actors
go: New York City. He wanted to do
live theater, on stage, in front of audi-
ences; and New York was the only
place for that.
In New York, J.J. is both president
and producing director at Throughline
Artists, a non-profit that produces
a theatrical festival at a small the-
ater on East 59
th
Street between Park
and Madison Avenues that has been
going for seven years. His first screen
role was as a sentry in the six-time
Oscar winner, Hurt Locker, directed by
Kathryn Bigelow.
“I worked with a friend who was
involved in [Hurt Locker] at a the-
ater retreat in upstate New York,” J.J.
says during a telephone conversation
from his home, speculating on how
he got the role in the first place. The
“friend” is a screenwriter who also
happens to be Mark Boal’s brother.
Mark Boal was the writer-producer
of Hurt Locker. “His brother, Chris,
has seen my work at this retreat,”
recounts J.J. “They had some passing
emergency with some cast members
and sent out a mass e-mail looking to
fill some of the roles and I responded.”
J.J. spent a week in Jordan film-
ing his brief role in Hurt Locker,
and worked directly with Kathryn
Bigelow during the filming. “She must
have liked me,” J.J. says, “because she
hired me for her next film (Zero Dark
Thirty). I’m assuming that she asked
for me, because I got a phone call ask-
ing if I’d be interested in doing a line
in this movie. The casting director,
who I knew, said if I wanted the part
I’d have to get a visa. I had to sign a
bunch of things, got a visa, got on a
plane again and went to India.
“It’s a very nice scene,” he contin-
ues. “It’s at the beginning of the movie
and I’m one of the CIA case officers
that works at the embassy there in
Islamabad. The character is credited
as J.J., so there’s J.J. playing J.J.”
When asked whether he could sing
or would consider a role that required
singing, such as that required by
Russell Crowe in Les Miserables, he
responded that he doesn’t really sing
and that “the idea of doing musical
theater terrifies me. But,” he adds,
“if it scares me, there’s a good chance
I’m going to find a way to do it, just
for that reason. But the idea certainly
does terrify me a bit.”
J.J.’s mom, Joyce, is a writer; his
dad, Bob Kiken, is a Santa Barbara
oral surgeon. As a side note, while
attending MUS, J.J. wrote and directed
and performed in an onstage skit with
some of his classmates, including MJ
publisher Tim Buckley. “I remem-
ber; in those days, in my early days
of producing,” J.J. says with a laugh,
“I would put on little shows for the
dinner guests. Little did I know what
I was doing; it’s just what I did and
Tim was enrolled in one of them.” For
the record, Tim doesn’t sing, and he
whistles out of tune.
If you’d like to learn more about
J.J., you are invited to go to: summer
shortsfestival.com or throughlineart
ists.org.
Beasts
Of The Southern Wild
Ariana Rubcic is a tenth-generation
Californian who was born in Santa
Maria and grew up in Summerland.
She attended El Montecito Early
School, Mt. Carmel, Crane and then
Laguna Blanca for high school.
Ariana says she doesn’t know how
to think about Beasts of the Southern
Wild, the making of the film, or her
small part in it all.
“It’s all so strange,” she says,
“that this little movie I worked on in
Louisiana has gotten to be such a big
thing. It’s all so strange,” she repeats.
It was the middle of 2010; Ariana
was dating someone who had been
working with the people involved in
making the film and she was hired on
to help with the production. (Ariana
is listed as an “artist” on her film
credit.) “I was in what was called
the ‘aurochs’ unit (aurochs are the
mythical “beasts” that look a lot like
Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs with extra
hair and horns).”
Ariana served as an assistant to
the production coordinator, “who was
responsible for laying out what tools
we needed and ways to do things to
complete certain shots. We had to cre-
ate clouds, for example, with certain
chemicals so that a camera could still
film through it.” Ariana spent nearly
three months – March through May –
helping with the movie. “We were sta-
tioned in New Orleans proper in an old
firehouse that had been converted into
kind of an artist’s workshop where we
made puppets and costumes, using
horns and hair,” she recounts. Ariana
says she didn’t have a lot of contact
with the star (Quvenzhané Wallis)
but she could see there was some-
thing “remarkably self-assured” about
her. Ariana accompanied the cast and
crew to the Sundance Film Festival
and then to Brooklyn. “I watched the
young girl grow up before my eyes,”
she marvels.
Ariana is working on her own short
film right now, but didn’t feel free to
describe the plot. She has a website
This is the 2007 headshot that won J.J. Kandel
the role as a sentry in Kathryn Bigelow’s Academy
Award-winning film, Hurt Locker
Ariana Rubcic worked as an artist on Beasts of
the Southern Wild, spending three months in New
Orleans for the shoot
This is Oliver,
the piglet one
sees in the
close-up shots
of the aurochs
near the end
of Beasts of the
Southern Wild
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 33 I have a theory that the truth is never told during the nine-to-five hours – Hunter S. Thompson






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COMInG & GOInG Page 374
that she controls via her iPhone: ari
anarubcic.com, and says that anyone
that would like to follow her progress
is welcome to sign in. She lives and
works in the Carroll Gardens section
of Brooklyn.
Film Skillet
Jeremy Norris was born in Los
Angeles, grew up in Santa Barbara,
attended Crane School and has lived
“on and off” in the Santa Barbara-
Montecito area for the past twenty-
five years. His mother lives in Santa
Barbara and his father lives in Santa
Monica, and works in the film industry.
Taylor Frees was born in Provo,
Utah, but only lived there for a month
before moving to California and has
been in Santa Barbara since 1986, hav-
ing moved here as a sophomore and
attended Santa Barbara High School.
These two have created a unique
website called Film Skillet, an enter-
tainment and social networking site
whose sole purpose is to discover and
promote talented filmmakers around
the world.
“More and more people every year
stream their entertainment online,”
Jeremy says during an interview
outside Pierre Lafond in Montecito.
“With the onset of mobile devices,
you’re seeing these people watching
these things on their phones and tab-
lets. They are commuting to and from
work and they’re entertaining them-
selves,” he adds.
Film Skillet offers cash rewards and
backing for winners for drama in their
film contests. The creator of this sum-
mer’s winner, Anamnesis, for exam-
ple, got to meet with Jeremy’s father,
Emmy Award-winning TV Director
Patrick Norris (Parenthood, Gossip Girl,
The O.C., and many others). “They
got to go on the set of Parenthood and
get their work out in the industry.
They’ve been offered walk-on roles on
TV and developing alongside other
creative people down in Hollywood,”
Jeremy points out.
Anamnesis is a look into life at the
last stages of one’s life, where a group
of people are dreaming and meet in
the dream world; the line between
waking and the dream world starts
to blur. “With Finite Films, creators of
Anamnesis,” Taylor says, “we decided
to develop a web series based around
their short film. We thought it was
very good. And, in doing so, we’ve
committed ourselves to twenty thou-
sand dollars worth of investment, as
well as them pitching in financially to
make it happen.”
At the end of the process, Film
Skillet and Finite Films will have an
original series with original content
that they then will take through their
connections into Hollywood, “and put
it in front of networks as an original
idea for television. So, it might start
off as a short film,” Jeremy continues,
“be developed into a web series and
made into a television series. That is
where the potential is.”
Taylor says there really isn’t any
second-place prize for their contest
entrants, “but we have taken the best
films that come in and are in the pro-
cess of creating a series of compila-
tions. It’s pretty hard for filmmakers
to market an individual short film,”
he says. “There aren’t a lot of ven-
ues for that, but by compiling them
into DVDs, it provides filmmakers an
opportunity to showcase their work
alongside other talented filmmakers,
thereby increasing their international
exposure.”
Taylor focuses on another entry
that they believe has potential to be
made into a series: Suckablood is a
five-minute short by Ben Franklin (a
Brit) about a young girl that sucks her
thumb and lives with her stepmother.
Her stepmother puts a curse on her so
that should she suck her thumb again,
the monster Suckablood would come
and eat her in her sleep. And, sure
enough, he shows up that night when
the girl sucks her thumb but he ends
up going after the stepmother instead.
The Third Letter is a six- or seven-
minute long film set in the future: the
world is very polluted and everyone
suffers from health problems. There is
a man that needs a new battery for his
pacemaker but his insurance doesn’t
cover it. He is recently separated from
his wife and needs a letter from her
insurance company with her activa-
tion code to activate her battery. In
desperation, he rips the pacemaker
out of his body and enters her code.
All the films are done on extremely
limited budgets. “People are pulling
off these really great short films for
between two and five thousand dol-
lars by virtue of favors from friends
and relatives,” notes Taylor. “All the
films we’ve selected for the site,”
Jeremy adds, “have incredible pro-
duction values. If you were actually
to re-film these in Hollywood, you
would be looking at fifty, sixty thou-
sand dollars.”
Is there money in a web series, we
wondered?
“Any time you can develop traf-
fic, there’s money in it. So, if you can
develop a web series that builds an
audience, there’s money in it. Anytime
you have an audience in the hundreds
of thousands, you have a viable prod-
uct; anytime you are in the millions,
you have a very successful one.
“While everyone can submit their
film to Film Skillet, only the top films
are selected to be featured on the site,”
suggests Jeremy. “This means less time
searching and more time watching.
When you select an independent film
from our library, you can be assured
the film has been viewed by our staff
and selected for its quality.”
Jeremy and Taylor are currently
looking for financial partners to help
grow Film Skillet into a major pro-
vider of entertainment.
If you’d like to learn more or how to
enter Film Skillet’s contests, you can
contact Jeremy at: jeremy@filmskillet.
com, or Taylor: taylor.frees@filmskil
let.com.
Inventing Shadows
Susan Venable (no relation to
Montecito’s John Venable, she says)
is a Santa Barbara artist whose lat-
est art project has been made into a
film by Ali Lassoued. “The docu-
One of the “costumes” created by the artists for
the aurochs, including Oliver, who turned out to
be one of the smartest of the piglets
The converted
firehouse used
as a workspace
for the “special
effects and cos-
tume” crew that
included Ariana
Rubcic, is in the
Marigny district
of New Orleans
Film Skillet
co-founders
Jeremy Norris
(left) and Taylor
Frees
Director Ali
Lassoued with
Santa Barbara
artist Susan
Venable;
Inventing
Shadows will
be shown
at 1 North
Calle Cesar
Chavez, Suite
102 at 6:30
pm, Friday,
February 8
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 34 • The Voice of the Village •
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Williams Family Album:
Holly’s Holy Emergence
On Entertainment
by Steven Libowitz
Steven Libowitz has
reported on the arts and
entertainment for more
than 30 years; he has
contributed to Montecito
Journal for over ten
years.
C
onsidering her heritage, it’s
hard to believe that Holly
Williams didn’t pick up a
guitar until she was almost 18. Her
grandfather was the legendary Hank
Williams, the acknowledged father of
contemporary country music, and her
dad is the country outlaw/honky-
tonk superstar Hank, Jr.
But protected by her dad – who
wanted her to avoid the trappings
he’d suffered when his mom had him
performing Hank Sr.’s songs at the
Grand Ole Opry while he was still in
single digits – Holly was raised on a
steady diet of teen pop and current
R&B before getting into writing and
playing at the tail end of high school.
“I didn’t grow up the way people
think because my dad didn’t want
us on the road with him at all,” she
recalled from her home in Nashville,
where she was trying to rally from
being sick with the flu in time to make
it onto The Tonight Show two days
later. “It was school and field trips,
not concert. He always said, ‘I’m not
Bocephus [Hank Jr.’s nickname], I’m
daddy.’ So we were very sheltered
from all those rowdy things.”
In fact, so much so that she didn’t
even really hear her grandfather’s
music until it was referenced through
artists Hank Sr. had influenced.
“My dad was so famous then that it
shadowed Hank Sr.’s music. I didn’t
understand the legacy that he’d left.
But then at seventeen I heard Sarah
McLachlan cover Tom Waits’ ‘Old
55,’ and bought every record of his.
After that I got into Leonard Cohen
and Bruce Springsteen and of course
Bob Dylan, who used to say Hank
Williams was ‘his radio.’ To know that
the people who influenced me were
themselves influenced by my grand-
father is such an ironic thing. It really
has come full circle.”
Despite Hank Jr.’s successes, he too
didn’t offer much help to Holly when
she was starting out, and she would
have eschewed it anyway, she said.
“He didn’t have any idea what to
tell his fingerpicking, piano-playing
folksinging daughter about what to
do. And I wasn’t looking to put on a
cowboy hat and sign a country red-
neck deal. I was in such a different
genre. All he could have done is make
some phone calls to Music Row, but
I didn’t want to sing other people’s
songs. I wanted a fan base for my own
stories and songs.”
Now, at 31 – two years longer than
Hank, Sr. lived and around the same
age her dad was when he released his
career-altering record Hank Williams, Jr.
and Friends – Holly is about to unleash
her third CD, The Highway, which
comes out on Tuesday, the same day
she makes her Santa Barbara debut at
SOhO. The album was produced by
Charlie Peacock of the Civil Wars
and features guest shots from Jackson
Browne, Jakob Dylan, Dierks Bentley
and Gwyneth Paltrow in an organic
gathering much like her dad’s Friends
album. It also marks something of
another fresh start for Williams, who
is putting out the record on her own
after stints on two different major
labels.
It’s an even more acoustic affair
than the others, too, full of more roots
than twang and deepening the sto-
rytelling angle to her songs. But it
was a long time coming, and not just
because she’d spent a couple years
at home helping her sister to heal
from a near-fatal car accident that also
injured Holly.
“I wanted to explore characters,
people I knew or things I had gone
through myself,” she said. “And I
thought the album was finished
because after nine songs the well had
run dry, and I wanted to get it done.
We even mastered it and did all the
artwork. But I kept thinking there
was something I still had to say but
I couldn’t put my finger on it. Then
at the gas station one night, I just
started singing the chorus [to what
became the title track]. It came out of
nowhere. But I knew immediately it
was the whole point of this record…
I have so much wanderlust. I missed
being out on the road. And as a singer-
songwriter you better freaking love it
because if you want a career, you have
to build it fan by fan, city by city, tour-
ing by van across the country. That’s
great, because seeing the way you
touch someone, how they’re moved
by your songs, you can’t get that any-
where else.”
The rest of the record is pretty darn
personal, too, including a couple of
songs dedicated to her husband, most
endearingly “Good Man.”
“The accident happened so quick,
so shocking and fast [that] it left me
with fear of people around me dying.
But I feel like I needed to get it out
of me so I’d find a better way to live.
It’s hard for me to write a happy love
song, so I wanted the world to know
if something happened, I’d been with
a good man.”
Her own family actually does show
up on the album, but only the mater-
nal side. Both of her mom’s parents
died in the last couple of years, and
the emotions came bubbling up in the
songs “Gone Away From Me” and
“Waiting on June.”
“Every single word of that song is
true, from the cotton fields, to the war,
the kids, and the separate rooms in
the nursing room,” she said. “It’s the
hardest song for me to get through
when I sing it now, because I miss
them so much, and it’s bittersweet.
It’s the most personal song I’ve ever
written, the kind I couldn’t have done
until now. It’s been a slow build.”
Undoubtedly, Hank, Sr. would be
proud.
Holly Williams headlines a schizophren-
ic triple-bill at SOhO on February 5 that
also features five-time Gibson Female Jazz
Guitarist of the Year Leni Stern and her
trio [which sadly no longer features Bill
Frisell], and Santa Barbara’s own sing-
er-songwriter-guitarist-rock bandleader
Kirstin Candy. The music starts at 7.
Tickets cost $10. Call 962-7776 or visit
www.sohosb.com.
‘Lookin’ for Love’
in Santa Ynez
Texas country singer Johnny Lee
exploded onto the national scene
through his role in the 1980 film
Urban Cowboy, which came about via
his long association with then-coun-
try legend Mickey Gilley, whose self-
named nightclub was the main set-
ting for the film. “Lookin’ For Love,”
featured in the movie, became a
massive crossover hit, scoring on
country, pop and adult contempo-
rary charts and heard on myriad
radio stations and dance floors all
over the country.
Lee didn’t have to look too far to
score more hits in the succeeding
decade, either, as “One in a Million,”
“Pickin’ Up Strangers,” “Sounds
Like Love” all reached the charts,
while his cover of the R&B standard
“Hey Bartender” hit No. 1. But it’s
been slimmer pickins since; Lee has
only released a handful of albums
of new music after the early 1990s.
Which makes him perfect for the
casino-revival circuit, including the
last day of January at the Chumash
Resort. [Tickets: $25-$35; Info: (800)
CHUMASH or www.chumashcasino.
com] •MJ
Holly Williams makes her Santa Barbara debut on February 5 at SOhO (photo credit: Kristine Barlowe)
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 35 Absolute truth is a very rare and dangerous commodity in the context of professional journalism – Hunter S. Thompson
Tickets available at
sbcaf.org | (805) 966-5373
16th Annual Valentine’s Day Beneft
8 pm to Late
Sponsors as of January 11, 2013:
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Artistic Director David Maldonado creates a glimmering
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31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 36 • The Voice of the Village •
MISCELLAnY (Continued from page 18)
coming, but austere.
Sophie says citizens “live in a near
total information bubble, without any
true frame of reference.”
“My understanding is that North
Koreans are taught to believe they
are lucky to be there, so why would
they want to leave? They’re hostages
in their own country without any real
consciousness of it.”
The four-day trip was led by for-
mer New Mexico governor and U.N.
ambassador, Bill Richardson.
Her father’s goal, among other
things, was to promote a freer internet
in the country.
Sophie adds that she and the other
eight delegates were always accompa-
nied by two “minders” and they never
spoke with a citizen who hadn’t been
pre-approved by the state government
in Pyongyang.
It must be nice to be back in
Montecito...
Dance Theater Dazzles
Santa Barbara Dance Theater, under
new artistic director Christopher
Pilafian, has made a most impressive
start.
Launching its season with a thor-
oughly entertaining performance with
“Leap of Faith” at the Hatlen Theater,
it featured a variety of solos, duets,
trios and quartets, encompassing orig-
inal music by William Pasley and
other composers.
The four accomplished dancers –
Kyle Castillo, Monica Ford, Tracy
Ray Kofford and Christina Sanchez
– wearing costumes by Anaya Cullen,
were seamless with the 80-minute
show which, in 34 segments, explored
the relationships of space, time and
how humans connect.
“Each segment of the dance seemed
to have its own external form and
internal logic,” says Christopher,
a member of the dance faculty at
UCSB since 1990. “The process always
involved the dancers’ interpretation
of my ideas or improvisation upon
a theme... The process has felt to me
like a dialogue, informed by mutual
respect between choreographer and
dancers.”
A wonderful portent of things to
come...
Delighted by Daniel
Oscar nominated for Steven
Spielberg’s Lincoln, Daniel Day-
Lewis showed a decidedly mischie-
vous side when he accepted the
SBIFF’s Montecito Award from his co-
star Sally Field, at a packed Arlington
Theatre.
Already a two-time Academy Award
recipient for My Left Foot and There
Will Be Blood, he recounted when, at
the age of 12, he was at Sevenoaks
School, outside London, and a mem-
ber of the cast of South African author
Alan Paton’s Cry, The Beloved Country.
“I played a black boy and, need-
less to say, just wearing shorts and
t-shirt, had to have a lot of makeup
applied. Even showering, for what
seemed hours, I couldn’t get it all off
and would get it all over the sheets on
my bed.
“The matron had always disliked
me, but couldn’t say anything, given
this was the school play.”
Revenge is sweet...
Mastering Your Emotions
Carpinteria author Jim Piekarski’s
first book, Mastering Your Emotions
With Your Spouse and Others, comes
from more than 30 years of experience
as a marriage and family therapist.
Jim, 63, is the clinical director of
Phoenix of Santa Barbara, a 41-year-
old non-profit that treats adults with
mental disorders. He has worked with
couples, individuals and families dur-
ing his career.
“It took me five years on and off to
do this book,” Jim told me at a bijou
launch bash at Tecolote, the lively lit-
erary lair in the Upper Village.
“It is learning how people trigger
each other’s emotions such as guilt,
anger, hurt and fear.”
He is now working on his second
tome, about dependent adult children,
tentatively titled The Way Out, which
he hopes to publish next year...
Magalif’s Magnificent Premiere
Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra’s
first performance of the New Year
at the Lobero featured the U.S. pre-
miere of composer Eugene Magalif’s
work “Hummingbird” with Angela
Wiegand on flute.
Magalif, 56, who hails from Belarus,
gained notoriety in his homeland and
other countries that comprised the old
U.S.S.R., as a composer of pop songs,
many of which hit the top ten in the
Russian record charts.
Having moved to America 22 years
ago, where he now teaches music at
a high school in New Jersey, Magalif
turned his attention to the classics
with, if “Hummingbird” is anything
to go by, considerable success.
The performance, under the capable
baton of Heiichiro Ohyama, kicked off
with Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante
in E-flat major, with soloists Judith
Farmer, bassoon, Michael Grego,
clarinet, Jennifer Johnson, oboe,
Jenny Kim, horn, and Wiegand.
Benjamin Britten’s Variations on a
theme of Frank Bridge, featuring the
British composer’s ten-part tribute to
his composition teacher and suitably
combining Bridge’s lyrical style with
his own more modern sound, filled
the second half of the entertaining
performance, ending appropriately
with Bridge’s An Irish Melody...
Hubbard Street Returns
It was the first time a dance com-
pany had been booked in consecu-
tive years to perform as part of
UCSB’s popular Arts & Lectures
series, but watching Hubbard Street
Dance Chicago’s sold-out perfor-
mance at the Granada, it was easy
to see why.
Exhibiting world class choreogra-
phy, the program featured resident
choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo’s
works “Blanco” and “Pacopepepluto,”
the latter a series of three frenetic
male solos set to the music of the late
Dean Martin with minimal clothing in
appropriately darkened light.
The show ended with Swede
Mats Ek’s “Casi-Casa,” a 40-min-
ute work first created four years ago
for Danza Contemporanea de Cuba,
set to electronic arrangements from
Fleshquartet, using a number of
domestic objects, including a chair,
vacuum cleaners and a television.
An accomplished company full of
surprises, without a doubt...
Klashing Kontinues
Kim Kardashian claimed she felt
“handcuffed” to basketball star Kris
Humphries after he refused to divorce
after their short-lived Montecito mar-
riage.
But it seems her cuffs are set to stay
on a little longer, as Humphries has
reportedly turned down a $10 million
offer to settle their case.
The athlete is asking for an annul-
ment on the basis of fraud, something
the reality TV star vigorously denies.
“Kris wants to be able to marry in a
church again, with a clear conscience,
when he finds someone special,” a
source tells RadarOnline.com.
Because of Humphries’ basket-
ball commitments, the earliest their
divorce trial can commence is the
middle of June.
And this is where their bitter feud
takes on a soap opera-like quality, for
technically Kardashian, 32, will still be
married to Humphries, 27, when she
is due to give birth in July to current
boyfriend Kanye West’s baby.
Watch this space...
Sightings: Reese Witherspoon
checking out the wares at Rooms
& Gardens on State Street... Oscar
nominee Virginia Madsen noshing at
Olio Pizzeria... Former pro footballer
and CBS analyst Marcus Allen din-
ing with jewelry designer Corinna
Gordon at Sakana Sushi
Pip! Pip! for now
Readers with tips, sightings and
amusing items for Richard’s column
should e-mail him at richardmin
eards@verizon.net or send invita-
tions or other correspondence to the
Journal •MJ
Kyle Castillo,
Monica Ford,
Christina
Sanchez and
Christopher
Pilafian at the
SBDT Leap of
Faith event
(photo credit:
Mo McFadden)
Oscar nominee Daniel Day-Lewis recounts his
school days
Composer Eugene Magalif, flutist Angela
Wiegand and conductor Heiichiro Ohyama at the
SBCO performance
Family
thera-
pist Jim
Piekarski
launches
first book
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 37 Going to trial with a lawyer who considers your whole lifestyle a Crime in Progress is not a happy prospect – Hunter S. Thompson
Santa Barbara Debut /
Acclaimed Journalist, TV Host and Author
Lisa Ling
TUE, FEB 5 / 8 PM / UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
Books will be available for purchase and signing
Community Partner:
Featuring Masterworks of the Middle East
Simon Shaheen Quintet
Arab Traditional and
Contemporary Music
WED, FEB 6 / 8 PM / UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
(805) 893-3535
www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia
A Brown Bear, a Moon, and
a Caterpillar: Treasured
Stories by Eric Carle
SUN, FEB 10 / 3 PM / UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
$15 / $10 children
David B. Agus, M.D.
The End of Illness
MON, FEB 11 / 8 PM
UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
$15 / $10 UCSB students
Event Sponsor: Carla Hahn
Author of The Handmaid’s Tale and The Blind Assassin
Margaret Atwood
TUE, FEB 12 / 8 PM / UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
$20 / $10 UCSB students
Distinguished Visiting Fellow
in the College of Creative Studies
Event Sponsors: Marcia & John Mike Cohen
Santa Barbara Solo Recital Debut / All-Beethoven Program
Leonidas Kavakos, violin
Enrico Pace, piano
FRI, FEB 15 / 7 PM / HAHN HALL
Event Sponsor:
Patricia Gregory for the Baker Foundation
Diana Paradise
PO Box 30040, Santa Barbara, CA 93130
Email: DianaParadise_@hotmail.com
Portfolio Pages: www.DianaParadise.com
Prices start at $3200 for a 24”x36” oil portrait of one person.
COMInG & GOInG Page 454
COMInG & GOInG (Continued from page 33)
mentary follows the evolution of
my work as an artist over thirty
years and it follows my latest piece
from concept to completion,” she
tells us. “I’ve invented a particular
style of working, my own unique
invention,” she says, “that came out
of my MFA at UCLA. It’s twisted
copper wires on a metal grid juxta-
posed with encaustic (molten) wax.
It’s quite unusual.”
The film is called Inventing Shadows
and it is a twenty-five minute docu-
mentary that will have a free screening
as its public premiere. The screening
begins at 6:30 pm, Friday, February 8.
It will be hosted by Synergy Business &
Technology Center and JM Holliday &
Associates, Architecture, and will take
place at 1 North Calle Cesar Chavez,
Suite 102. Both the artist, Susan
Venable, and the film’s 31-year-old
director, Ali Lassoued, will be in atten-
dance. There will be wine and hors
d’oeuvres served, beginning at 6 pm.
The Condor’s Shadow
Jeff McLoughlin has produced a
film on the recovery of the California
Condor entitled The Condor’s Shadow.
It screens on Saturday, February 2 at
10 am at the Santa Barbara Museum
of Art.
Jeff has lived in Montecito since
1969 and attended Santa Barbara High
School. He studied filmmaking at San
Francisco State in the late 1970s. When
he left the corporate video world in
2010 he decided to pursue documen-
tary filmmaking and “grasped around
for a project that appealed to me,” he
says during a short telephone conver-
sation.
“I particularly wanted to do an
environmental film that had a posi-
tive hopeful story line. You read a
lot about environmental issues these
days and many of those are quite
bleak; I felt there were success stories
to be told.”
So, he went out looking for one
and coincidentally read a piece in
the Santa Barbara Independent, written
by Matt Kettmann, called the Great
California Condor Comeback. “That
story was the inspiration for the film,”
he reveals.
One of the more interesting aspects
of the recovery of the California
Jeff
McLoughlin,
director of
The Condor’s
Shadow,
scheduled
to unspool
at the Santa
Barbara
Museum
of Art on
Saturday,
February 2 at
10 am
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 38 • The Voice of the Village •
Bella Vista $$$
1260 Channel Drive (565-8237)
Cafe Del Sol $$
30 Los Patos Way (969-0448)
CAVA $$
1212 Coast Village Road (969-8500)
Regional Mexican and Spanish cooking
combine to create Latin cuisine from tapas and
margaritas, mojitos, seafood paella and sangria
to lobster tamales, Churrasco ribeye steak and
seared Ahi tuna. Sunfower-colored interior
is accented by live Spanish guitarist playing
next to cozy beehive freplace nightly. Lively
year-round outdoor people-wat ching front
patio. Open Monday-Friday 11 am to 10 pm.
Saturday and Sunday 10 am to 10 pm.
China Palace $$
1070 Coast Village Road (565-9380)
Giovanni’s $
1187 Coast Village Road (969-1277)
Los Arroyos $
1280 Coast Village Road (969-9059)
Little Alex’s $
1024 A-Coast Village Road (969-2297)
Lucky’s (brunch) $$ (dinner) $$$
1279 Coast Village Road (565-7540)
Comfortable, old-fashioned urban steak-
house in the heart of America’s biggest little
village. Steaks, chops, seafood, cocktails,
and an enormous wine list are featured, with
white tablecloths, fne crystal and vintage
photos from the 20th century. The bar
(separate from dining room) features large
fat-screen TV and opens at 4 pm during the
week. Open nightly from 5 pm to 10 pm;
Saturday & Sunday brunch from 9 am to
3 pm. Valet Parking.
Montecito Café $$
1295 Coast Village Road (969-3392)
Montecito Coffee Shop $
1498 East Valley Road (969-6250)
Montecito Wine Bistro $$$
516 San Ysidro Road 969-7520
Head to Montecito’s upper village to indulge in
some California bistro cuisine. Chef Nathan Heil
creates seasonal menus that include fsh and
vegetarian dishes, and fresh fatbreads straight
out of the wood-burning oven. The Bistro of-
fers local wines, classic and specialty cocktails,
single malt scotches and aged cognacs.
Pane é Vino $$$
1482 East Valley Road (969-9274)
Plow & Angel $$$
San Ysidro Ranch
900 San Ysidro Lane (565-1700)
Enjoy a comfortable atmosphere as you dine
on traditional dishes such as mac ‘n cheese
and ribs. The ambiance is enhanced with
original artwork, including stained glass
windows and an homage to its namesake,
Saint Isadore, hanging above the fre-
place. Dinner is served from 5 to 10 pm
daily with bar service extending until 11 pm
weekdays and until midnight on Friday and
Saturday.
$ (average per person under $15)
$$ (average per person $15 to $30)
$$$ (average per person $30 to $45)
$$$$ (average per person $45-plus)
MONTECI TO EATERI ES . . . A Gu i d e
Sakana Japanese Restaurant $$
1046 Coast Village Road (565-2014)
Stella Mare’s $$/$$$
50 Los Patos Way (969-6705)
Stonehouse $$$$
San Ysidro Ranch
900 San Ysidro Lane (565-1700)
Located in what is a 19th-century citrus
packinghouse, Stonehouse restaurant features
a lounge with full bar service and separate
dining room with crackling freplace and
creekside views. Chef Matthew Johnson’s
regional cuisine is prepared with a palate of
herbs and vegetables harvested from the on-site
chef’s garden. Recently voted 1 of the best 50
restaurants in America by OpenTable Diner’s
Choice. 2010 Diners’ Choice Awards: 1 of 50
Most Romantic Restaurants in America, 1 of
50 Restaurants With Best Service in America.
Open for dinner from 6 to 10 pm daily.
Sunday Brunch 10 am to 2 pm.
Trattoria Mollie $$$
1250 Coast Village Road (565-9381)
Tre Lune $$/$$$
1151 Coast Village Road (969-2646)
A real Italian boite, complete with small but
fully licensed bar, big list of Italian wines, large
comfortable tables and chairs, lots of mahogany
and large b&w vintage photos of mostly fa-
mous Italians. Menu features both comfort food
like mama used to make and more adventurous
Italian fare. Now open continuously from lunch
to dinner. Also open from 7:30 am to 11:30 am
daily for breakfast.
Via Vai Trattoria Pizzeria $$
1483 East Valley Road (565-9393)
Delis, bakeries, juice bars
Blenders in the Grass
1046 Coast Village Road (969-0611)
Here’s The Scoop
1187 Coast Village Road (lower level)
(969-7020)
Gelato and Sorbet are made on the premises.
Open Monday through Thursday 1 pm to 9 pm,
12 pm to 10 pm Friday and Saturday, and
12 pm to 9 pm on Sundays.
Jeannine’s
1253 Coast Village Road (969-7878)
Montecito Deli
1150 Coast Village Road (969-3717)
Open six days MNJ31S0 MNJ31S018P a week
from 7 am to 3 pm. (Closed Sunday) This
eatery serves homemade soups, fresh salads,
sandwiches, and its specialty, The Piadina, a
homemade fat bread made daily.
Panino
1014 #C Coast Village Road (565-0137)
Pierre Lafond
516 San Ysidro Road (565-1502)
This market and deli is a center of activity
in Montecito’s Upper Village, serving fresh
baked pastries, regular and espresso cofee
drinks, smoothies, burritos, homemade
soups, deli salads, made-to-order sandwiches
and wraps available, and boasting a fully
stocked salad bar. Its sunny patio draws
crowds of regulars daily. The shop also
carries specialty drinks, gift items, grocery
staples, and produce. Open everyday 5:30 am
to 8 pm.
Village Cheese & Wine
1485 East Valley Road (969-3815)

In Summerland / Carpinteria
Cantwell’s Summerland Market $
2580 Lillie Avenue (969-5893)
Garden Market $
3811 Santa Claus Lane (745-5505)
Jack’s Bistro $
5050 Carpinteria Avenue (566-1558)
Serving light California Cuisine, Jack’s ofers
freshly baked bagels with whipped cream
cheeses, omelettes, scrambles, breakfast bur-
ritos, specialty sandwiches, wraps, burgers, sal-
ads, pastas and more. Jacks ofers an extensive
espresso and cofee bar menu, along with wine
and beer. They also ofer full service catering,
and can accommodate wedding receptions to
corporate events. Open Monday through Fri-
day 6:30 am to 3 pm, Saturday and Sunday
7 am to 3 pm.
Nugget $$
2318 Lillie Avenue (969-6135)
Padaro Beach Grill $
3765 Santa Claus Lane (566-9800)
A beach house feel gives this seaside eatery its
charm and makes it a perfect place to bring the
whole family. Its new owners added a pond,
waterfall, an elevated patio with freplace and
couches to boot. Enjoy grill options, along with
salads and seafood plates. The Grill is open
Monday through Sunday 11 am to 9 pm
Sly’s $$$
686 Linden Avenue (684-6666)
Sly’s features fresh fsh, farmers’ market veg-
gies, traditional pastas, prime steaks, Blue Plate
Specials and vintage desserts. You’ll fnd a full
bar, serving special martinis and an extensive
wine list featuring California and French wines.
Cocktails from 4 pm to close, dinner from 5 to 9
pm Sunday-Thursday and 5 to 10 pm Friday and
Saturday. Lunch is M-F 11:30 to 2:30, and brunch
is served on the weekends from 9 am to 3 pm.
Stacky’s Seaside $
2315 Lillie Avenue (969-9908)
Summerland Beach Café $
2294 Lillie Avenue (969-1019)
Tinkers $
2275 C Ortega Hill Road (969-1970)
Santa Barbara / Restaurant Row
Bistro Eleven Eleven $$
1111 East Cabrillo Boulevard (730-1111)
Located adjacent to Hotel Mar Monte, the
bistro serves breakfast and lunch featuring
all-American favorites. Dinner is a mix of tradi-
tional favorites and coastal cuisine. The lounge
advancement to the restaurant features a big
screen TV for daily sporting events and happy
hour. Open Monday-Friday 6:30 am to 9 pm,
Saturday and Sunday 6:30 am to 10 pm.
Cielito $$$
1114 State Street (225-4488)
Cielito Restaurant features true favors of Mexi-
co created by Chef Ramon Velazquez. Try an an-
tojito (or “small craving”) like the Anticucho de
Filete (Serrano-chimichurri marinated Kobe beef
skewer, rocoto-tomato jam and herb mashed po-
tatoes), the Raw Bar’s piquant ceviches and fresh
shellfsh, or taste the savory treats in handmade
tortillas at the Taqueria. It is located in the heart
of downtown, in the historic La Arcada.
Chuck’s Waterfront Grill $$
113 Harbor Way (564-1200)
Located next to the Maritime Museum, enjoy
some of the best views of both the mountains
and the Santa Barbara pier sitting on the newly
renovated, award-winning patio, while enjoy-
ing fresh seafood straight of the boat. Dinner is
served nightly from 5 pm, and brunch is ofered
on Sunday from 10 am until 1 pm. Reservations
are recommended.
Enterprise Fish Co. $$
225 State Street (962-3313)
Every Monday and Tuesday the Enterprise Fish
Company ofers two-pound Maine Lobsters
served with clam chowder or salad, and rice or
potatoes for only $29.95. Happy hour is every
weekday from 4 pm to 7 pm. Open Sunday
thru Thursday 11:30 am to 10 pm and Friday
thru Saturday 11:30 am to 11 pm.
Los Agaves $
600 N. Milpas Street (564-2626)
Los Agaves ofers eclectic Mexican cuisine, using
only the freshest ingredients, in a casual and
friendly atmosphere. Serving lunch and dinner,
with breakfast on the weekends, Los Agaves fea-
tures traditional dishes from central and south-
ern Mexico such as shrimp & fsh enchiladas,
shrimp chile rellenos, and famous homemade
mole poblano. Open Monday- Friday 11 am to
9 pm, Saturday & Sunday 9 am to 9 pm.
Miró $$$$
8301 Hollister Avenue at Bacara Resort & Spa
(968-0100)
Miró is a refned refuge with stunning views,
featuring two genuine Miro sculptures, a
top-rated chef ofering a sophisticated menu
that accents fresh, organic, and native-grown
ingredients, and a world-class wine cellar. Open
Tuesday through Saturday from 6 pm to 10 pm.
Olio e Limone Ristorante $$$
Olio Pizzeria $
17 West Victoria Street (899-2699)
Elaine and Alberto Morello oversee this
friendly, casually elegant, linen-tabletop eatery
featuring Italian food of the highest order. Of-
ferings include eggplant soufé, pappardelle
with quail, sausage and mushroom ragù, and
fresh-imported Dover sole. Wine Spectator
Award of Excellence-winning wine list. Private
dining (up to 40 guests) and catering are also
available. It is open for lunch Monday thru
Saturday (11:30 am to 2 pm) and dinner seven
nights a week (from 5 pm).
Next door at Olio Pizzeria, the Morellos
have added a simple pizza-salumi-wine-bar
inspired by neighborhood “pizzerie” and
“enoteche” in Italy. Private dining for up to
32 guests. The Pizzeria is open daily from
11:30 am to close.
Pierre Lafond Wine Bistro $
516 State Street (962-1455)
The Wine Bistro menu is seasonal California
cuisine specializing in local products. Pair your
meal with wine from the Santa Barbara Winery,
Lafond Winery or one from the list of wines
from around the world. Happy Hour Monday
- Friday 4:30 to 6:30 pm. The 1st Wednesday of
each month is Passport to the World of Wine.
Grilled cheese night every Thursday. Open for
breakfast, lunch and dinner; catering available.
www.pierrelafond.com
Rodney’s Steakhouse $$$
633 East Cabrillo Boulevard (884-8554)
Deep in the heart of well, deep in the heart of
Fess Parker’s Doubletree Inn on East Beach in
Santa Barbara. This handsome eatery sells and
serves only Prime Grade beef, lamb, veal, hali-
but, salmon, lobster and other high-end victuals.
Full bar, plenty of California wines, elegant
surroundings, across from the ocean. Open for
dinner Tuesday through Saturday at 5:30 pm.
Reservations suggested on weekends. •MJ
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 39 Nothing is more responsible for the good old days than a bad memory – Franklin P. Adams
so it looks real. We hired an aquatic
design group who build waterparks
all over the world to reverse engineer
a swell tank.
As far as the tiger, what made it so
photo realistic was that we worked
for a couple of weeks with live ani-
mals in order to learn – which only
were less than ten percent of the final
footage – to have a lot of reference
footage of all their movements and
habits that we could use with the ani-
mators. So we didn’t have to guess
what all the details should look like.
And we integrated our tiger trainer
as a visual effects consultant and
quality control guy. In an early test,
we thought it looked amazing and
he said, but wait, his testicles aren’t
swinging back and forth. That was
the level of detail.
Ang Lee is a very strong director. Was
there a lot of input from the producers in
how the film took shape?
It’s an auteur collaboration. All the
crew can give him ideas. He usu-
ally comes in with a blueprint but
then works with each team to get
the details right and make it hap-
pen. And of course the studio also
gave him notes because adapting a
book like this you have the invisible
line between artistic integrity and
commercial appeal. The challenge for
everyone was to define where that
was, how to keep it accessible with-
out losing the intellectual notions so
that everyone watching it can take
something away. And being a PG
movie, we had to please both eleven
year olds and grownups.
After this experience, what’s next for
you?
I’m not sure. I’m still catching my
breath, and still running around with
Ang doing all these crazy things.
Stacy Sher
(Django Unchained)
Q. You worked with Quentin Tarantino
on Pulp Fiction, his early breakthrough,
and not again until now. What’s up?
A. We met before Reservoir Dogs
in 1991. The company I had with
my partners (Jersey Films) made a
blind deal to for the second movie,
which was “Pulp.” Then we both
did a bunch of other things. I did
three films with Stephen Soderbergh,
worked with Milos Forman. But we
were very good friends, and he would
always show me his first drafts and
first cuts.
How have things changed after eighteen
years?
You know, we talked about it a lot.
We’d just look at each other and know
we have the same passionate enthusi-
astic love of film we’d had when we
were just kids starting out. And the
same independent spirit, even though
you can’t really call us outsiders any-
more. But our skill set had surely
grown with our experience, and
that was really great for both of us.
Quentin was always a singular voice
of film. Even talking to him about cin-
ema, there’s no one like him and never
will be again. But with him becoming
a more sophisticated filmmaker, more
confident, more of a problem-solver,
even bolder with more power, I just
continue to be knocked out by him
every day
When you’re on a Tarantino film, you
know it’s going to be violent, and usually
controversial. What’s the producer’s role
in that arena?
When you have a creative relation-
ship, you bounce things off of each
other. Quentin likes to surround him-
self with smart people and engage in
discussions all the time, so the job has
many facets. He wants to be inspired,
not just have them take dictation.
But make no mistake, he’s an auteur
and you serve his vision. This was a
complicated film, difficult to shoot,
starting with an extraordinary group
of actors who wanted to all be in the
film, any of whom would be the sin-
gular star in any other film. But then
we had practical problems, too. It
didn’t snow in Mammoth in January
for the first time in 100 years. And it
was crucial for the film, so we had
to move the set – where we’d done
everything including removing tree
stumps to make room for the horses
– and take it to Wyoming, and film
in the elk preserve where no one had
done that before.
Does anyone really get to rein Quentin
in, or just stand back and watch him
work?
The best filmmakers are very con-
scious of limitations. In somebody
else’s hands, this movie – which was
considerably under the one hundred
million dollar budget that was report-
ed – might have been two hundred
million. He’s constantly looking for
ways to do things economically, but
not stint on what’s absolutely needed.
It had to be emotionally epic. The
genius is in the choosing where that
line is. It’s not an indulgent process at
all. He doesn’t go back and reshoot.
He makes it as he goes along.
Besides moving from Mammoth, what
else posed a big challenge?
For the first time ever, we trained
thirty-five horses to fall in that
explosion. None of that was CG.
We had one of the greatest wrangler
and stunt coordinators and stunt-
men, who worked for months figur-
ing out what we could do completely
safely. We spent a lot of time seeing
where the actors were at with quick
draw, riding, etcetera. It was an old
fashioned movie with a postmodern
tone, classical in the demands. And
we built and blew up that planta-
tion. Nobody gasps anymore when
they see it because we’re so used to
seeing it with CG. But I was terrified
because Quentin (and others) were
in a tiny little box and if the blow-
back went their way… I don’t want
to think about it. •MJ
Life of Pi producer David Womark will be in town
this weekend to talk about the film
Director Quentin Tarantino on the set of Django Unchained; producer Stacy Sher will talk about making
the movie this Saturday at the Lobero (photo credit: Andrew Cooper, SMPSP/The Weinstein Company)
SBIFF (Continued from page 26)
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 40 • The Voice of the Village •
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Isabel’s Private
Tutoring, 309 Mohawk Road,
Santa Barbara, CA 93109.
Isabel Esparza, 309 Mohawk
Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93109.
This statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on December 31, 2012.
This statement expires fve years
from the date it was fled in the
Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement on
fle in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa
Mercer. Original FBN No. 2012-
0003684. Published January
30, February 6, 13, 20, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Local Artisans
Market; Santa Barbara
Local Artisans Market, 7711
Calle Real, Goleta, CA 93117.
Catherine Moss, 7711 Calle
Real, Goleta, CA 93117. This
statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 25, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce of
the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on fle in my
offce. Joseph E. Holland, County
Clerk (SEAL) by Catherine
Daly. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000300. Published January
30, February 6, 13, 20, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Palmera, 1317 De
La Guerra Road, Santa Barbara,
CA 93103. Lisa Gandy, 1317
De La Guerra Road, Santa
Barbara, CA 93103. Lisa
McGill, 400 West Figueroa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA
93101. This statement was fled
with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on January 18,
2013. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was
fled in the Offce of the County
Clerk. I hereby certify that this
is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong.
Original FBN No. 2013-
0000234. Published January
30, February 6, 13, 20, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Ocean View
Plumbing, 394 Freear Drive,
Buellton, CA 93427. Stanton
L. Savino, 394 Freear Drive,
Buellton, CA 93427. This
statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 22, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce
of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle
in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel
Cabello. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000236. Published January
23, 30, February 6, 13, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are
doing business as: Artbark
International, 2911 La
Combadura, Santa Barbara, CA
93105. The Future Traditions
Foundation, 2911 La
Combadura, Santa Barbara, CA
93105. This statement was fled
with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on January 9,
2013. This statement expires fve
years from the date it was fled in
the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement on
fle in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy
Miller. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000092. Published January
23, 30, February 6, 13, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Hyatt Creative
Group, 72 Vista Del Mar Drive,
Santa Barbara, CA 93109.
Benjamin Hyatt, 72 Vista
Del Mar Drive, Santa Barbara,
CA 93109. Edith Houghton
Hyatt, 72 Vista Del Mar Drive,
Santa Barbara, CA 93109. This
statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 18, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce
of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle
in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Joshua
Madison. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000235. Published January
23, 30, February 6, 13, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Santa Barbara
Real Estate, 4589 Vieja Drive,
Santa Barbara, CA 93110.
Robert Brown, 4589 Vieja
Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93110.
This statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 18, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce
of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle
in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel
Cabello. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000219. Published January
23, 30, February 6, 13, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Solvang Gift &
Souvenir, 1653 Copenhagen
Drive, Solvang, CA 93463.
Jamie Martinez, 371 Sycamore,
Buellton, CA 93427. This
statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 16, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce
of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle
in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Jaunita
Spitzer. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000177. Published January
23, 30, February 6, 13, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are
doing business as: Ascentia
Bodywork, 22 North Milpas,
Suite D, Santa Barbara, CA
93103. Lisa Bryant, 14 Camino
Verde, Santa Barbara, CA 93103.
This statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 18, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce
of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle
in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Gabriel
Cabello. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000233. Published January
23, 30, February 6, 13, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Cielo Foundation
for The Performing Arts,
West Coast Symphony, West
Coast Chamber Orchestra,
West Coast Pops Orchestra,
1812 La Coronilla Drive,
Santa Barbara, CA 93109.
Cielo Foundation for The
Performing Arts, Inc. 1812 La
Coronilla Drive, Santa Barbara,
CA 93109. This statement was
fled with the County Clerk of
Santa Barbara County on January
11, 2013. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was
fled in the Offce of the County
Clerk. I hereby certify that this
is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong.
Original FBN No. 2013-
0000125. Published January
23, 30, February 6, 13, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: A Dog’s Life, 380
Miramonte Ave, Montecito, CA
93108. Ellen Benner, 380
Miramonte Ave, Montecito, CA
93108. This statement was
fled with the County Clerk
of Santa Barbara County on
January 4, 2013. This statement
expires fve years from the date
it was fled in the Offce of the
County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of
the original statement on fle in
my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy
Miller. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000038. Published January
16, 23, 30, February 6, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Always Collectors
Corner, 989 College Canyon
Rd, Solvang, CA 93463. Suzi
Harry, 989 College Canyon Rd,
Solvang, CA 93463. Sandra
Silvius, 989 College Canyon
Rd, Solvang, CA 93463. This
statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 14, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce
PUBLIC NOTICES

CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5207

DUE DATE & TIME: February 14, 2013 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

FENCE PROJECT AT EL ESTERO TREATMENT PLANT

A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on February 5,
2013 at 11:00 a.m., in the El Estero Conference Room,
located at 520 E. Yanonali Street, Santa Barbara, CA, to
discuss the specifications and field conditions. Bid
Documents are available at the Purchasing Office and at
the pre-bid meeting.

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California General A or C-13 Fencing
Contractors License. The company bidding on this must
possess one of the above mentioned licenses and be otherwise
deemed qualified to perform the work specified herein. Bids
submitted using the license name and number of a
subcontractor or other person who is not a principle partner or
owner of the company making this bid, will be rejected as being
non-responsive.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.


____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: January 30, 2013
General Services Manager Montecito Journal


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5208

DUE DATE & TIME: FEBRUARY 20, 2013 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

HVAC Systems Maintenance and Repair at City Airport


A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on February 6,
2013 at 8:00 a.m., at the Airport Maintenance Conference
Room, located at 1699 Firestone Road, Santa Barbara, CA,
to discuss the specifications and field conditions. Please
allow 3 – 4 hours for pre-bid meeting. Plans and
specifications are available at the Purchasing Office and at
the pre-bid meeting.

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California C-20 contractorʼs license. The
company bidding on this must possess one of the above
mentioned licenses and be otherwise deemed qualified to
perform the work specified herein. Bids submitted using the
license name and number of a subcontractor or other person
who is not a principle partner or owner of the company making
this bid, will be rejected as being non-responsive.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Performance Bond in the
amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the
successful bidder for bids. The bond must be provided with ten
(10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to the
performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.


____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: January 30, 2013
General Services Manager Montecito Journal

31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 41 Middle age occurs when you are too young to take up golf and too old to rush up to the net – Franklin P. Adams
EASING RECOVERY
FROM SURGERY
Recovering from surgery can be a long and arduous
journey.  Painful incisions and infammation are
frequently present even after the most successful surgeries.
Using a feather light touch the body is speeded along
the road to recovery.  Recently, scientists at the Pacif ic
Advanced Technology Laboratory were able to provide
proof positive that I emit and transfer energy.  Using
sophisticated infrared research equipment scientists
were able to identify that the energy from my hands
was successfully transferred to my subjects,  If you go to
my website you can view this... just click medicine and
science.
 
Tis healing energy may reduce infammation, heal
hematomas and reduce scar tissue.  Please allow me to
assist you along the road to recovery
Gloria Kaye, Ph.D.
314 East Carrillo Street, Suite 10
Santa Barbara, California 93101
805-701-0363
www.drgloriakaye.com
drgloriakaye@aol.com
PUBLIC NOTICES
of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle
in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Miriam
Leon. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000134. Published January
16, 23, 30, February 6, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: The G Spa, 33 W.
Mission, Ste. 204, Santa Barbara,
CA 93101. Kathleen Griffn,
M.D. Inc., 33 W. Mission, Ste.
204, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
This statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 10, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce
of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle
in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy
Miller. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000109. Published January
16, 23, 30, February 6, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Resolution Quest
Consulting, P.O. Box 1613,
Summerland, CA 93067. Gary
Robinson, 2559 Whitney
Avenue, Summerland, CA 93067.
This statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 11, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce
of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy
of the original statement on fle
in my offce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa
Mercer. Original FBN No. 2013-
0000113. Published January
16, 23, 30, February 6, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Just One Soup,
231 S. Magnolia Ave, Santa
Barbara, CA 93117. Carole
Bennett, 605 Romero Canyon
Road, Santa Barbara, CA
93108. This statement was fled
with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on January 3,
2013. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was
fled in the Offce of the County
Clerk. I hereby certify that this
is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong.
Original FBN No. 2013-
0000023. Published January
16, 23, 30, February 6, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are
doing business as: Montecito
Weddings, 1482 East Valley
Road #312, Santa Barbara,
CA 93108. Sarah Farmer,
1944 East Valley Road, Santa
Barbara, CA 93108. This
statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on December 28,
2012. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was
fled in the Offce of the County
Clerk. I hereby certify that this
is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong.
Original FBN No. 2012-
0003675. Published January
16, 23, 30, February 6, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Montecito Asphalt,
2781 Ben Lomond Drive, Santa
Barbara, CA 93105. Roger
Jennell, 2781 Ben Lomond Drive,
Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This
statement was fled with the County
Clerk of Santa Barbara County
on December 21, 2012. This
statement expires fve years from the
date it was fled in the Offce of the
County Clerk. I hereby certify that
this is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce. Joseph
E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Melissa Mercer. Original FBN
No. 2012-0003647. Published
January 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Santa Barbara
Specialty Pharmacy, 174 Aero
Camino, Goleta, CA 93117.
Marcel Sassola, 7771 Heron
Court, Goleta, CA 93117. This
statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on January 7, 2013. This
statement expires fve years from
the date it was fled in the Offce
of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Kathy Miller. Original FBN
No. 2013-0000057. Published
January 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: M&M Metals,
4980 Rhoads Ave, Santa
Barbara, CA 93111. L. William
Mitarotonda, 4980 Rhoads
Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93111.
This statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on December 31, 2012.
This statement expires fve years
from the date it was fled in the
Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Kathy Miller. Original FBN
No. 2012-0003678. Published
January 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Taub Designs,
5142 Hollister Ave #238,
Santa Barbara, CA 93111.
Ken Taub, 1064 Via Regina,
Santa Barbara, CA 93111. This
statement was fled with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on December 11, 2012.
This statement expires fve years
from the date it was fled in the
Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Miriam Leon. Original FBN
No. 2012-0003547. Published
January 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013.
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME:
CASE No. 1415037. To all
interested parties: Petitioner
Katherine Ellen Atkinson fled
a petition with Superior Court
of California, County of Santa
Barbara, for a decree changing
name to Karie Ellen Atkinson.
The Court orders that all persons
interested in this matter appear
before this court at the hearing
indicated below to show cause,
if any, why the petition for change
of name should not be granted.
Any person objecting to the name
changes described about must fle
a written objection that included
the reasons for the objection at
least two court days before the
matter is scheduled to be heard
and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition
should not be granted. If no written
objection is timely fled, the court
may grant the petition without a
hearing. Filed January 10, 2013,
by Terri Chavez, Deputy Clerk.
Hearing date: March 7, 2013 at
9:30 am in Dept. 6, 1100 Anacapa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Published 1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE
No. 1414722. To all interested
parties: Petitioner Carlos Alfredo
Carachure fled a petition with
Superior Court of California,
County of Santa Barbara, for a
decree changing name to Carlos
Alfredo Yescas. The Court orders
that all persons interested in this
matter appear before this court
at the hearing indicated below to
show cause, if any, why the petition
for change of name should not
be granted. Any person objecting
to the name changes described
about must fle a written objection
that included the reasons for the
objection at least two court days
before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the
hearing to show cause why the
petition should not be granted. If no
written objection is timely fled, the
court may grant the petition without
a hearing. Filed January 10, 2013,
by Terri Chavez, Deputy Clerk.
Hearing date: February 21, 2013 at
9:30 am in Dept. 6, 1100 Anacapa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Published 1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME:
CASE No. 1413978. To all
interested parties: Petitioner
Dustin Lee Green fled a
petition with Superior Court
of California, County of Santa
Barbara, for a decree changing
name to Dustin Lee Hallam.
The Court orders that all persons
interested in this matter appear
before this court at the hearing
indicated below to show cause, if
any, why the petition for change
of name should not be granted.
Any person objecting to the
name changes described about
must fle a written objection that
included the reasons for the
objection at least two court days
before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the
hearing to show cause why the
petition should not be granted.
If no written objection is timely
fled, the court may grant the
petition without a hearing. Filed
December 17, 2012 by Terri
Chavez, Deputy Clerk. Hearing
date: February 21, 2013 at 9:30
am in Dept. 6, 1100 Anacapa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Published 1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6
ARLINGTON
1317 State Street - 963-4408
RIVIERA
2044 Alameda Padre Serra - S.B.
PASEO NUEVO
8 W. De La Guerra Pl. - S.B.
PLAZA DE ORO
371 Hi t chcock Way - S. B.
Information Listed for Friday thru Thursday - February 1 - 7
FIESTA 5
Features Stadium Seating
916 Stat e St reet - S. B.
CAMINO REAL
Features Stadium Seating
CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE
Hollister & Storke - GOLETA
METRO 4
Features Stadium Seating
618 Stat e St reet - S. B.
FAIRVIEW
Features Stadium Seating
225 N. Fai rvi ew - Gol eta
DJANGO UNCHAINED (R)
1:00 4:25 7:50
LIFE OF PI (PG)
in 2D: 1:10 7:20 in 3D: 4:10
GANGSTER SQUAD (R) 8:10
LES MISERABLES (PG-13)
1:20 4:45
Al Pacino....Christopher Walken
 STAND UP GUYS (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 5:15 7:45
Sat/Sun - 2:15 5:15 7:45
7 Academy Award Nominations
ARGO (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 7:30
Sat/Sun - 2:00 7:30
Bill Murray.....Laura Linney
HYDE PARK ON HUDSON
Daily - 5:00 (R)
 BULLET TO THE HEAD (R)
Fri-Sun - 2:15 4:50 7:20 9:45
Mon-Thu - 3:00 5:30 8:00
 WARM BODIES (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 2:00 4:40 7:10 9:35
Mon-Thu - 2:40 5:10 7:40
MOVIE 43 (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:30 4:10 6:40 9:00
Mon-Thu - 2:30 5:00 7:30
MAMA (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:40 4:20 7:00 9:20
Mon-Thu - 2:50 5:20 7:50
HANSEL & GRETEL:
WITCH HUNTERS (R)
in 3D: Fri-Sun - 6:50
Mon-Thu - 8:00
in 2D:
Fri-Sun - 1:50 4:30 9:10
Mon-Thu - 3:10 5:40
 WARM BODIES (PG-13)
1:20 4:10 6:40 9:10
 BULLET TO THE HEAD
1:30 4:20 7:00 9:20 (R)
ZERO DARK THIRTY (R)
1:00 4:30 8:00
PARKER (R)
1:10 4:00 6:50 9:40
MAMA (PG-13)
1:45 4:50 7:20 9:45
HANSEL & GRETEL:
WITCH HUNTERS (R)
in 3D: 9:30
in 2D: 2:00 4:40 7:10
A Dustin Hoffman Film
QUARTET (PG-13)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 5:00 7:30
Sat/Sun - 2:15 5:00 7:30
Metropolitan Theatres
Welcomes
THE 28th SANTA BARBARA
INT’L FILM FESTIVAL
thru Sunday, February 3
Monday, February 4 at 7:30
LIVE IN HD:
 JOSH GROBAN:
ALL THAT ECHOES
Starts Tuesday, February 5:
THE OSCAR NOMINATED
SHORT FILMS 2013
Animated:
Tue-Thu - 1:00 5:30
Live Action:
Tue-Thu - 3:00 7:30
12 Academy Award Nominations
including Best Picture!
LINCOLN (PG-13)
12:40 4:00 7:15
8 Academy Award Nominations
SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK
1:20 4:35 7:30 (R)
5 Academy Award Nominations
including Best Picture!
ZERO DARK THIRTY (R)
12:50 4:15 8:00
Academy Award Nominee!
Best Actress - Naomi Watts
THE IMPOSSIBLE (PG-13)
1:45 5:00 7:45
Metropolitan Theatres
Welcomes
THE 28th SANTA BARBARA
INT’L FILM FESTIVAL
thru Sunday, February 3
Starts Monday, February 4:
8 Academy Award Nominations
LES MISERABLES (PG-13)
Mon-Thu - 1:00 4:20 7:40
5 Academy Award Nominations
DJANGO UNCHAINED (R)
Mon-Thu - 1:10 4:35 8:00
11 Academy Award Nominations
LIFE OF PI (PG)
Mon-Thu - in 2D: 4:45
Mon-Thu - in 3D: 1:30 7:30
GANGSTER SQUAD (R)
Mon-Thu - 2:15 5:00 7:50
 Denotes ‘SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT’ Restrictions
877-789-MOVIE www.metrotheatres.com
 THE MET Opera 2012-2013 
Saturday - February 16 - 9:55 am
Verdi’s RIGOLETTO
ARLINGTON THEATRE
FACEBOOK - ‘Like Us’
(Metropolitan Theatres) for access to
Discount Admission and Popcorn Coupons
    EMAIL NEWSLETTER    
Weekly Discounts - Showtimes - Film Information
Sign Up.....www.metrotheatres.com (No Solicitation)
Monday, February 4 - 7:30 pm
LIVE IN HD:
 JOSH GROBAN
ARLINGTON THEATRE
Tickets On Sale!
ARLINGTON
1317 State Street - 963-4408
RIVIERA
2044 Alameda Padre Serra - S.B.
PASEO NUEVO
8 W. De La Guerra Pl. - S.B.
PLAZA DE ORO
371 Hi t chcock Way - S. B.
Information Listed for Friday thru Thursday - February 1 - 7
FIESTA 5
Features Stadium Seating
916 Stat e St reet - S. B.
CAMINO REAL
Features Stadium Seating
CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE
Hollister & Storke - GOLETA
METRO 4
Features Stadium Seating
618 Stat e St reet - S. B.
FAIRVIEW
Features Stadium Seating
225 N. Fai rvi ew - Gol eta
DJANGO UNCHAINED (R)
1:00 4:25 7:50
LIFE OF PI (PG)
in 2D: 1:10 7:20 in 3D: 4:10
GANGSTER SQUAD (R) 8:10
LES MISERABLES (PG-13)
1:20 4:45
Al Pacino....Christopher Walken
 STAND UP GUYS (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 5:15 7:45
Sat/Sun - 2:15 5:15 7:45
7 Academy Award Nominations
ARGO (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 7:30
Sat/Sun - 2:00 7:30
Bill Murray.....Laura Linney
HYDE PARK ON HUDSON
Daily - 5:00 (R)
 BULLET TO THE HEAD (R)
Fri-Sun - 2:15 4:50 7:20 9:45
Mon-Thu - 3:00 5:30 8:00
 WARM BODIES (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 2:00 4:40 7:10 9:35
Mon-Thu - 2:40 5:10 7:40
MOVIE 43 (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:30 4:10 6:40 9:00
Mon-Thu - 2:30 5:00 7:30
MAMA (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:40 4:20 7:00 9:20
Mon-Thu - 2:50 5:20 7:50
HANSEL & GRETEL:
WITCH HUNTERS (R)
in 3D: Fri-Sun - 6:50
Mon-Thu - 8:00
in 2D:
Fri-Sun - 1:50 4:30 9:10
Mon-Thu - 3:10 5:40
 WARM BODIES (PG-13)
1:20 4:10 6:40 9:10
 BULLET TO THE HEAD
1:30 4:20 7:00 9:20 (R)
ZERO DARK THIRTY (R)
1:00 4:30 8:00
PARKER (R)
1:10 4:00 6:50 9:40
MAMA (PG-13)
1:45 4:50 7:20 9:45
HANSEL & GRETEL:
WITCH HUNTERS (R)
in 3D: 9:30
in 2D: 2:00 4:40 7:10
A Dustin Hoffman Film
QUARTET (PG-13)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 5:00 7:30
Sat/Sun - 2:15 5:00 7:30
Metropolitan Theatres
Welcomes
THE 28th SANTA BARBARA
INT’L FILM FESTIVAL
thru Sunday, February 3
Monday, February 4 at 7:30
LIVE IN HD:
 JOSH GROBAN:
ALL THAT ECHOES
Starts Tuesday, February 5:
THE OSCAR NOMINATED
SHORT FILMS 2013
Animated:
Tue-Thu - 1:00 5:30
Live Action:
Tue-Thu - 3:00 7:30
12 Academy Award Nominations
including Best Picture!
LINCOLN (PG-13)
12:40 4:00 7:15
8 Academy Award Nominations
SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK
1:20 4:35 7:30 (R)
5 Academy Award Nominations
including Best Picture!
ZERO DARK THIRTY (R)
12:50 4:15 8:00
Academy Award Nominee!
Best Actress - Naomi Watts
THE IMPOSSIBLE (PG-13)
1:45 5:00 7:45
Metropolitan Theatres
Welcomes
THE 28th SANTA BARBARA
INT’L FILM FESTIVAL
thru Sunday, February 3
Starts Monday, February 4:
8 Academy Award Nominations
LES MISERABLES (PG-13)
Mon-Thu - 1:00 4:20 7:40
5 Academy Award Nominations
DJANGO UNCHAINED (R)
Mon-Thu - 1:10 4:35 8:00
11 Academy Award Nominations
LIFE OF PI (PG)
Mon-Thu - in 2D: 4:45
Mon-Thu - in 3D: 1:30 7:30
GANGSTER SQUAD (R)
Mon-Thu - 2:15 5:00 7:50
 Denotes ‘SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT’ Restrictions
877-789-MOVIE www.metrotheatres.com
 THE MET Opera 2012-2013 
Saturday - February 16 - 9:55 am
Verdi’s RIGOLETTO
ARLINGTON THEATRE
FACEBOOK - ‘Like Us’
(Metropolitan Theatres) for access to
Discount Admission and Popcorn Coupons
    EMAIL NEWSLETTER    
Weekly Discounts - Showtimes - Film Information
Sign Up.....www.metrotheatres.com (No Solicitation)
Monday, February 4 - 7:30 pm
LIVE IN HD:
 JOSH GROBAN
ARLINGTON THEATRE
Tickets On Sale!
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 42 • The Voice of the Village •
ENDINg THIS WEEk
‘Vagina Monologues’ at UCSB –
The UCSB Women’s Ensemble Theatre
Troupe’s annual staging of Eve Ensler’s
iconic compilation of poignant, comedic
and tragic monologues about women and
their bodies comes to a close this weekend.
Based on testimonials Ensler created, The
Vagina Monologues have been translated
into nearly 50 languages and performed
in more than 140 countries, nowhere more
than the U.S., where various groups stage
the work annually. UCSB’s production
will be donating most of the proceeds to
the Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center,
with a portion earmarked for One Billion
Rising, the campaign to raise awareness
about violence against women. WHEN:
8pm Feb. 1-2 & 3pm on Feb. 3 WHERE:
UCSB’s Campbell Hall COST: $12
available at the door
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Play Misty for me – They grow very
versatile musicians up there in the Pacifc
Northwest, with frequent rain producing
territory fertile for both verdant green
landscapes and uber-talented players. Years
ago the scene spawned drummer-turned-front
man Dave Grohl (out of Nirvana), and
now Fleet Foxes stick man Joshua Tillman
has left the group to further pursue his solo
career as a singer-songwriter-guitarist.
Truth is Tillman had already garnered lots
of attention for his beautiful if sad acoustic
vignettes that earned comparisons to Nick
Drake and Ryan Adams even as he played
drums in earlier bands, and he released the
solo effort Year in the Kingdom in 2009.
Now, indie-folk crooner Tillman has adopted
the pseudonym Father John Misty and put
out a 12-track collection called Fear Fun last
April that broadens the range, recalling – as
critics have noted – Harry Nilsson, Laura
Nyro and even the more modern (and also
fake-named) Edward Sharpe. WHEN: 9pm
WHERE: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club,
1221 State Street, upstairs in Victoria Court
COST: $15 INFO: 962-7776/www.sohosb.
com or www.clubmercy.com
Dueling duos – The Cambridge
Drive Concert Series is not sponsored
by Doublemint gum, despite tonight’s
double billing of duos. Burns & Kristy are
the headliners, beftting since the latter
member is Terry Burns, the youngest
of the acclaimed folk-oriented Burns
Sisters, who made albums with venerable
label Columbia Records. Burns later
moved to Nashville where she became
a successful staff writer for EMI Music,
MCA/Universal and others. Ron Kristy
is a longstanding flm and TV composer
whose music has been heard on 20/20,
The Dog Whisperer, HBO’s Inside the NFL,
Access Hollywood, and Dancing With
the Stars. After meeting and marrying in
Nashville eight years ago, the pair moved
to upstate New York, where they fnally
released their debut joint CD, Caravan,
last July. Opening are singer-songwriters
Kirk Mann and Shelby Figueroa,
local residents who fnd spirituality and
myth fltering through their songs about
relationship, family and longing. WHEN:
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Note to readers: This entertainment calendar is a subjective sampling of arts and other events taking place in the Santa
Barbara area for the next week. It is by no means comprehensive. Be sure to read feature stories in each issue that complement
the calendar. In order to be considered for inclusion in this calendar, information must be submitted no later than noon on the
Wednesday eight days prior to publication date. Please send all news releases and digital artwork to slibowitz@yahoo.com)
by Steven Libowitz

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1
KIN SIS 2013 – Santa Barbara’s
dance community is clearly
close-knit whether that comes
off as in-bred or just casually
and cleverly connected. This
weekend’s annual performances
of new contemporary pieces
presented by Santa Barbara
Dance Alliance surely shows off
some of those relationships. Two
of the choreographers – SBCC’s
Tracy Kofford and UCSB’s
Christopher Pilafan – just
fnished a year-long collaboration as 40 percent of Santa Barbara Dance Theater’s
restructured debut with “A Leap of Faith.” Pilafan’s Kinesis contribution, Solo and
Trio, in fact is excerpted from “Faith,” while Kofford’s Grace is a choreographic
study based on one solo, performed by four different people using unique dynamics,
energy, spacing and partnering. Power/less, from Melissa Lynn Block, who
has previously performed in works by Misa & Stephen Kelly, is a dance about
female empowerment touching on strength, softness, and ability to both yield and
draw boundaries where needed. The Kellys, by the way, have their own work in the
program, along with fellow area choreographers Meredith Cabaniss, Melanie
Johnson, Lyn Wiltshire and Yvette Johnson, whose piece carries the intriguing
title “Poor Roots Grow Rich.” All in all, the sophisticated originals cover such genres as
ballet, lyrical, jazz, and American modern dance, all falling under the contemporary
umbrella. WHEN: 8pm Friday, 2 & 8pm tomorrow WHERE: Center Stage Theater,
751 Paseo Nuevo, upstairs in Paseo Nuevo mall COST: $22 general, $18 students/
seniors/SBDA members ($50 patrons include priority reserved seating) INFO: 963-
0408/www.centerstagetheater.org or 966-6950/www.sbdancealliance.org

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2
Still tastes great! – Food
Confessions, Santa Barbara
actress Nancy Nufer’s new
‘saucy’ comedy that that represents
her playwriting debut, interweaves
stories about our own appetite
and the appetites of the people
we love. The piece made its
debut last fall with three ambitious
performances at the Lobero Theatre
here in town. Now the show that
combines a large helping of food,
a dash of family, and a whole lot
of crazy travels down the 101 to
Ventura for its frst full-length run at
the Rubicon Theater. Nufer created
the play out of some of her own
experiences along with those of
friends and family as well as other anecdotes. “Confessions” covers such subjects as
personal peeves to bad dates, family dinners, cooking fascoes, bringing to the table
a lighthearted but purposeful look at life, love, why we’re hungry, and what we’re
really hungry for. RTC veteran Jenny Sullivan directs a cast of local residents and
RTC faves including Nufer herself in four roles, Sara Bashor, Dan Gunther,
Robert Lesser and Devin Scott, plus Los Angeles-based actress Kara Revel,
while Rod Lathim, who helped steer the work, is associate producer. Our advice:
don’t show up too hungry... or too full. WHEN: Opens 7pm tonight (following
previews Jan. 31-Feb. 1). Plays Wednesdays-Sundays through February 24
WHERE: 1006 E. Main Street, Ventura COST: $35-$49 INFO: 667-2900 or www.
rubicontheatre.org
7:30pm WHERE: Cambridge Drive
Community Church, 550 Cambridge
Drive, Goleta COST: $10 with advance
reservation, $12 at the door INFO: 964-
0436 or www.cambridgedrivechurch.org
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2
Carnaval culture – The annual Santa
Barbara Brazilian celebration marks 10
years of Carnaval with three different
events that begin tonight with singer Ney
Rios. The former singer for Olodum –
who played with Michael Jackson, Jimmy
Cliff and Paul Simon – fronts Los Angeles-
based BatucAxe for a samba-reggae
party blending percussion, intoxicating
rhythms and mesmerizing vocals. The
singer-composer from Salvador, state
of Bahia (which is often described as
the most African city in the Americas),
appears tonight with her brother, Fabio
Assis, a former member of traditional
Bahia carnaval group Ilê Aiyê. The
kickoff also features “Carnaval Queen
Contest” where the 2012 Santa Barbara
Brazilian Carnaval Queen Kaf Bella
will announce the new carnaval queen
to be chosen by a team of jurors that will
include former Brazilian national soccer
player “Palhinha,” frst Miss Brazil-USA
Ana Ligia and local radio personality
Paul Berenson. The celebration
continues next Saturday with “Cinema &
Lectures” at the Santa Barbara Central
Public Library for a “Tour Around Brazil”
screening four videos from different
regions of the country. The anniversary
party closes the next afternoon back
at SOhO, an all-ages dance featuring
Rio-style samba school plus a Brazilian
culinary experience with Brazilian food,
dessert and drinks. WHEN: 9:30pm
tonight, 1:30pm on Feb. 10 WHERE:
SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221
State Street, upstairs in Victoria Court
COST: $15 tonight; $8 (free under 12) on
Feb. 10 INFO: 962-7776/www.sohosb.
com or 245-5615
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3
Church mystery – Kathie Deviny, a
recent transplant from the Northwest, drew
on her experience as both a clergy spouse
and a retired government employee
in the criminal justice system to create
her debut novel, Death in the Memorial
Garden, a tale of a downtown church on
its last legs. Deviny, now a member of the
Carpinteria Writers’ group, will read from
and autograph copies of the “cozy-style”
mystery Sunday afternoon at Curious Cup
Bookstore in cozy downtown Carpinteria.
Tea and cookies will be served. WHEN:
3-5pm WHERE: 929 Linden Ave. COST:
free INFO: 220-6608 or www.curiouscup.
com
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4
Noah fair – Timothy Noah, senior
editor of The New Republic, takes a look
at the most recent presidential contest
and the full election cycle in a timely
lecture titled “Inequality and the 2012
Election.” Author of The Great Divergence:
America’s Growing Inequality Crisis
And What We Can Do About It, Noah’s
journalism career includes stints as senior
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 43 The true Republic: men, their rights and nothing more; women, their rights and nothing less – Franklin P. Adams
Pollock Theater
Sunday, February 10
3:00 to 6:00 pm
Pollock Theater, UCSB
Live accompaniment by
pianist Michael Mortilla
Q&A w/ Christel Schmidt
Reception and
Book Signing
$20 General | $10 Students | Group Discounts
Tickets: www.carseywolf.ucsb.edu/Pollock
Special Screening of Pickford’s
1926 classic silent flm
SparrowS
america’s First Sweetheart
So Much More than a pretty Face
CW-Pickford-MJ-4.85x6.19.indd 1 1/24/13 4:52 PM

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5
Media hero makes SB debut – Here’s your
chance to be in the same room with The View’s
former co-host Lisa Ling, when the executive
producer and host of Our America with Lisa
Ling (which airs on the Oprah Winfrey Network)
makes her Santa Barbara debut at UCSB’s
Campbell Hall. Ling, who is also an author and
a former correspondent for CNN and Nightline,
will share stories from her career, exploring how
journalism – even as the profession undergoes
radical change – plays an important role in the
world and can still serve to propel the world
forward in new and positive ways. She has
reported from dozens of countries, covering
stories about gang rape in the Congo, bride
burning in India, the Lord’s Resistance Army
in Uganda and the Mara Salvatrucha gang in
Central America, among others. Now Ling’s
OWN show challenges and entertains viewers with true stories from their own
backyards, focusing on positive social change, shedding light on harsh realities
and championing true heroes. And it’s likely we’ll get something of a sneak preview
of The Job, the new CBS reality competition series hosted by Ling that one-ups The
Apprentice and begins airing this Friday. WHEN: 8pm WHERE: UCSB’s Campbell
Hall COST: $38 INFO: 893-3535 or www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6
Oud and plenty – It should
come as little surprise that
Simon Shaheen called
his New York-based music
ensemble “Qantara” – the
Arabic word for “arch” or
“doorway between two
worlds.” A Palestinian who
grew up in northern Israel with
a family of musicians, Simon
Shaheen’s early life was spent
studying traditional music on the
oud and violin. But in the early
1980s he moved to New York City to complete his graduate studies at the Manhattan
School of Music and Columbia University, where he formed the Grammy-nominated
band that exhibits an unbridled fusion of Arab, jazz, Western classical and Latin
American music. Considered one of the most signifcant Arab musicians, performers
and composers of his generation, Shaheen – who received the prestigious National
Heritage Award in 1994 at the White House, served on the President’s Advisory
Committee at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts during the Clinton
administration – maintains a legacy of Middle Eastern music while busting boundaries
to traverse and explore other frontiers. With his current quintet of master musicians,
Shaheen will perform a program of classical Arabic repertoire, including a few of
his original compositions, in tonight’s concert sponsored by UCSB Arts & Lectures.
WHEN: 8pm WHERE: UCSB’s Campbell Hall COST: $38 INFO: 893-3535 or www.
ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
writer and “Chattterbox” columnist
at Slate, reporter for the Wall Street
Journal, assistant managing editor for U.S.
News & World Report, congressional
correspondent for Newsweek, and editor
of the Washington Monthly. The free event
is sponsored by the Walter H. Capps
Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion,
and Public Life. WHEN: 8pm WHERE:
Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St.
COST: free INFO: 963-0761 or www.
lobero.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6
Ridge, over the ridge – Tales from
the Tavern has released another CD
culled from its singer-songwriter series at
the Maverick Saloon, and the purveyor
of that record is a favorite Santa Ynez
local. Wil Ridge Live at The Maverick
Saloon - Mercy! compiles songs from his
two Tales’ performances back in 2008
and 2011, capturing his gravelly growl
over rough-edged songs about inner
and outer turmoil including heartache
and misplaced passion. Ridge’s record-
release concert tonight at the Maverick
(where else?) also serves as a lead into
Tales’ spring concert series, part of its
10th anniversary season, which gets
underway Feb. 13 with John Gorka
and Dan Siegal. (Gorka also plays the
Ojai Concert Series on Valentine’s Day).
WHEN: 7pm WHERE: 3687 Sagunto
Street, Santa Ynez COST: $10 INFO:
688-0383 or www.talesfromthetavern.
com •MJ
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 44 • The Voice of the Village •
Looking At The Mid $3’s
Real Estate by Mark Hunt
Mark and his wife, Sheela Hunt, are real estate agents. They live in Montecito with their daughter Sareena,
a sophomore at SBHS. His family goes back nearly one hundred years in the Santa Barbara area. Mark’s
grandparents – Bill and Elsie Hunt – were Santa Barbara real estate brokers for 25 years.
T
his has been a busy time in the
Montecito real estate world, as
a number of homes went into
escrow in the past week alone, includ-
ing four from my “Best Buys” list in
the mid-$2- to low-$3-million range,
which is basically Montecito’s “aver-
age” home price. This price range
seems to be picking up increased inter-
est, while other price points are not
moving so quickly. This can change
week to week and month to month,
but for those (like me) who watch the
market closely and study inventory
in every price category, it becomes
interesting to note the ups and downs
of different price ranges, areas, etc…
For instance, the $10-million-plus
market has been slow (compared to
this time last year when that mar-
ket was moving fast)… the under-
a-million range is moving, but still
has many listings available that are
seemingly good deals. The $5-million
range is slower too. However, the hot
market currently is the mid-$2-million
to mid-$3-million range. There are, as
of this writing, 10 homes pending in
this narrow price range, out of a total
of 26 pending.
When I decided to focus on the mid-
$3-million market, and looked to see
what properties made sense to profile,
four listings jumped out at me as good
representations of what is available in
different areas and different types of
homes in this price range.
They are:
875 Rockbridge Road
– $3,450,000
This gated contemporary estate
is in the Riven Rock area near East
Mountain Road, and has a resort-like
feel. The home sits comfortably on
1.07 fenced acres and offers privacy
and mountain views. The front yard
has a gazebo and Koi pond, and the
spacious backyard includes a pool,
BBQ terrace, & sprawling lawn. Inside
are three bedrooms, three and a half
baths, plus an office-den-nursery. The
master bedroom features a walk-in
closet with a security “safe room.”
Additionally, the home has high ceil-
ings, marble and wood floors and is in
the Cold Spring School District.
1010 Cima Linda Lane
– $3,450,000
This mid-century modern home was
recently reduced by $500,000 and is on
.7 acres. The property features ocean
views from a close-in location. Walls
of glass create light-filled rooms and
the large living room offers plenty of
room for entertaining. The home also
features a very private pool area sur-
rounded by lush landscaping, areas
for lounging and entertaining and a
patio for tables and outdoor dining.
The master bedroom has a marble fire-
place, two baths and head-on ocean
views. There are three bedrooms in the
west wing of the home, with bedroom
number five off the kitchen, which
would serve as a nanny or maid’s
room. At the front of the home there is
a half-circle driveway for formal entry.
There is a second, more private access
to the home via a small lane, that leads
to the three-car garage with additional
off-street parking. This home really
feels like a compound and is virtually
private to other homes or the street,
as it sits up on a small knoll over-
looking the city. Cima Linda is in the
Cleveland School District.
1512 Miramar Beach Drive
– $3,450,000
This beachfront home is right on
the sand at Miramar Beach and offers
panoramic ocean, island & coastline
views, not to mention direct beach
access from the back steps. Superb
craftsmanship, blending exotic
woods, copper, brass and stone into
smooth organic forms, is enjoyed
throughout this two-story beach cot-
tage. While the home is not large
(there is only one formal bedroom), it
does provide areas for relaxing, and
the patios on both levels allow for
indoor-outdoor living. This home has
been noted among local beachgoers
for its unique design. Miramar is in
the Montecito Union School District.
1775 Glen Oaks Drive
– $3,495,000
This re-designed mid-century mod-
ern compound is on a creek-side acre in
Montecito’s Glen Oaks area. The prop-
erty and the two homes on it offers
indoor-outdoor living and custom fin-
ishes done by one of the area’s top
builders. Sprawling lawns and moun-
tain views are enjoyed in this most
quiet and peaceful setting. There is a
two-bedroom, two-bath main house, a
three-bedroom, two-bath guest house
and a detached studio. Glen Oaks is in
the Montecito Union School District.
•••
For more information on these
properties, contact your Real Estate
agent or if you are not working with
anyone, please feel free to contact
me, Mark Hunt, through my website,
www.MontecitoBestBuys.com or call/
text me at 805-698-2174 for immediate
assistance. •MJ
The three-
bedrooms,
three-and-a-half
bath home at
875 Rockbridge
Road features
both privacy
and mountain
views
Walls of glass
expose and
highlight the
expansive views
that come
with this mid-
20
th
-century
modern home
at 1010 Cima
Linda Lane
Two separate
houses and a
detached studio
turn this Glen
Oaks Drive
home into a
family com-
pound
This seafarer’s
promontory
awaits a buyer
for this beach-
front home
on the sand at
1512 Miramar
Beach Drive
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 45 We would all like to vote for the best man, but he is never a candidate – Kin Hubbard
If you have a 93108 open house scheduled, please send us your free directory listing to realestate@montecitojournal.net
93108 OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY

SATURDAY february 2
ADDRESS TIME $ #BD / #BA AGENT NAME TELEPHONE # COMPANY
1685 Fernald Point Lane By Appt. $28,000,000 6bd/6ba Maureen McDermut 689-6800 Sotheby’s International Realty
1154 Channel Drive 12-3pm $9,500,000 3bd/3ba Ronald Brand 455-5045 Sotheby’s International Realty
620 Oak Grove Drive By Appt. $2,350,000 3bd/3.5ba Deanna Solakian 453-9642 Coldwell Banker
27 Seaview Drive By Appt. $2,095,000 3bd/2.5ba Bob Lamborn 689-6800 Sotheby’s International Realty
667 Cold Spring Road 1-4pm $1,795,000 3bd/3ba Brian King 452-0471 Village Properties
100 Arroqui Street 10-1pm $975,000 3bd/2ba Carlos Torres 570-2222 Village Properties
544-B San Ysidro Road 1-4pm $799,000 1bd/1ba John Holland 705-1681 Sotheby’s International Realty
197 Canon View Road By Appt. $699,996 2bd/2ba Jason Streatfeild 280-9797 Prudential California Realty



SUNDAY february 3
ADDRESS TIME $ #BD / #BA AGENT NAME TELEPHONE # COMPANY
1685 Fernald Point Lane By Appt. $28,000,000 6bd/6ba Maureen McDermut & Bob Lamborn 570-5545 Sotheby’s International Realty
1154 Channel Drive 12-3pm $9,500,000 3bd/3ba Omid Khaki 698-1616 Sotheby’s International Realty
356 Woodley Road 1-3pm $9,250,000 5bd/6ba Susan Burns 886-8822 Coldwell Banker
1163 Summit Road 12-3pm $5,975,000 5bd/6ba Dudley Kirkpatrick 403-7201 Village Properties
900 Park Lane West 12-2pm $4,995,000 4bd/5ba Christopher W. Hunt 453-3407 Village Properties
1821 Fernald Point Lane 10-2pm $4,950,000 3bd/3ba Ron Dickman & Cathy O’Neill 886-7760 Sotheby’s International Realty
670 El Bosque Road 1-3pm $3,985,000 4bd/5.5ba Mary Whitney 689-0915 Prudential California Realty
302 Woodley Road 1-3pm $3,895,000 4bd/6ba Beverly Palmer 452-7985 Village Properties
545 Valley Club Road 1-4pm $3,850,000 5bd/5ba David Goldstein 448-0468 Prudential California Realty
482 Woodley Road 1-3pm $3,500,000 4bd/4ba Patricia Grifn 565-4547 Village Properties
875 Rockbridge Road 1-3pm $3,450,000 3bd/3.5ba Renie Kelly 886-3303 Prudential California Realty
2140 Veloz Drive 1-3pm $2,895,000 4bd/4ba Sandy Stahl 689-1602 Sotheby’s International Realty
620 Oak Grove Drive By Appt. $2,350,000 3bd/3.5ba Deanna Solakian 453-9642 Coldwell Banker
1330 East Pepper Lane 1-3pm $2,350,000 3bd/3.5ba Reyne Stapelmann 705-4353 Prudential California Realty
1042 Arbolado Road 1-3pm $2,150,000 3bd/2.5ba Brittany Lough 455-5736 Village Properties
27 Seaview Drive By Appt. $2,095,000 3bd/2.5ba Bob Lamborn 689-6800 Sotheby’s International Realty
667 Cold Spring Road 1-4pm $1,795,000 3bd/3ba Brian King 452-0471 Village Properties
1032 Fairway Road 2-4pm $1,200,000 2bd/2ba Grant Danely 543-3954 Coldwell Banker
544-B San Ysidro Road 1-3pm $799,000 1bd/1ba Stefani Taliaferro 448-1867 Sotheby’s International Realty
197 Canon View Road By Appt. $699,996 2bd/2ba Jason Streatfeild 280-9797 Prudential California Realty
C&G (Continued from page 37
Condor, Jeff says, “is the broad
range of volunteers and peripheral
organizations involved in the con-
dor’s recovery. Los Padres Forest
Watch, for example, does these
micro-trash pick-ups, where they
go into the forest and pick up small
bits of trash that condors are prone
to pick up and bring back to the
nest. The chicks then ingest these
pieces of trash, which might be
bottle caps, shell casings, pieces
of glass. It’s a big problem and it
was having a big effect on the con-
dors early on in the program when
the chicks were becoming impacted
with this trash.”
Jan Hamber of the Museum of
Natural History and Anthony
Prieto, a coach at Crane School,
were intimately involved in helping
save the California Condor. “Jan is
eighty-two years old and continues
to track the birds,” Jeff notes admi-
rably.
“The Condor’s Shadow really is
uplifting,” Jeff says. “The passion
that goes into this program that
makes this bird a success is really
moving. The mission of the film,”
he concludes, “is that, ‘Hey, we can
fix this problem if we step up.’ It’s
not a matter of laws; it’s a matter
of people recognizing their place in
the ecosystem. It’s a good story.”
Jeff doesn’t have a fully evolved
next project in mind, but says he’s
most interested in the unanticipated
consequences that human activity
has on the environment for other
creatures. For more, go to: www.
theCondorsShadow.com. •MJ
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 46 • The Voice of the Village •
MONTECITO
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Santa Barbara Market! Professional,
Personalized Services for Moving,
Downsizing, and Estate Sales .
Complimentary Consultation
(805) 708 6113 email:
theclearinghouseSB@cox.net
website: theclearinghouseSB.com
MUNYON & SONS LIQUIDATORS
SINCE 1977
Top dollar results on entire estates.
-fne furnishings,
furniture & artworks
(805) 402-0350
(805) 444-6411
munyonandsons@
yahoo.com
www.
munyonandsons.com
REAL ESTATE SERVICES
SANTA BARBARA REAL ESTATE
sbre.com , listofhomes.com, sbhomesearch.
info Kevin Young, Berni Bernstein, DRE
#00870443
Coastal Properties, 805-564-3400
SPECIAL REQUEST
Classic car wanted. Looking for an old VW.
RR, hot rod, Porsche, MB, motorcycle or
convertible, you get the idea! R. A. Fox
805-845-2113.
Rare Record Sales
Convert rare LP’s into cash.
Consign or sell. Cell 818-631-8361.
Inquire: venusofvinyl@gmail.com
ART FOR SALE
Paintings & Drawings by listed artists
COLIN CAMPBELL COOPER. Antique
engravings at Kathryne Designs, 1225
Coast Village Road. Open daily 10-5.
565-4700
HEALTH SERVICES
Stressed? Anxious? Feel relaxed & calm
Biofeedback training is
fast & effective
Tina Lerner, MA
Licensed HeartMath &
Biofeedback Therapist
The Biofeedback Institute
of Santa Barbara
(805) 450-1115
HEAL TRAUMA GENTLY
A safe, effective way to
heal PTSD, trauma from
war, accidents, abuse
and loss.
DANI ANTMAN
Certifed in Somatic
Experiencing
www.daniantman.com
805 770 2294
PHYSICAL THERAPY in the comfort &
convenience of your
home.
Josette Fast, PT-32
years helping patients
achieve strength,
fexibility,
balance, coordination
& stamina to optimize
mobility.
805-722-8035
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING (805) 565-1860
(You can place a classifed ad by flling in the coupon at the bottom of this section and mailing it to us: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108. You can also FAX your ad to us at: (805) 969-6654.
We will fgure out how much you owe and either call or FAX you back with the amount. You can also e-mail your ad: christine@montecitojournal.net and we will do the same as your FAX).
It’s Simple. Charge is $2 per line, and any portion of a line. Multiply the number of lines used (example 4 lines x 2 =$8) Add 10 cents per
Bold and/or Upper case character and send your check to: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108.
Deadline for inclusion in the next issue is Thursday prior to publication date. $8 minimum. Email: christine@montecitojournal.net
Yes, run my ad __________ times. Enclosed is my check for $__________
$8 minimum TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD $8 minimum
Nancy Hussey
Realtor ®
Thinking of selling
your home?
Call me
805-452-3052
Coldwell Banker
/ Montecito
DRE#01383773
www.NancyHussey.com
COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR LEASE
1205 COAST VILLAGE ROAD
Now Available For Sublease
Stunning 2,665sf service retail or offce with
high visibility. Reserved prkg. 2009 remodel.
Call Michael Martz 805-898-4363
Hayes Commercial Group
SHORT/LONG TERM RENTAL
CARMEL BY THE SEA vacation getaway.
Charming, private studio. Beautiful garden
patio. Walk to beach and town. $110/night.
831-624-6714
Montecito ocean view Italian Villa! 8000sqf,
4br/6 baths, pool/sauna, maid quarter &
plenty of amenities to satisfy anyone with
exquisite taste.$12,000/mo 886-7750
Broker
Large 3 Bed/3 Full Bath Furnished Condo
located next to Cottage Hospital. Avail.
3/1, No Smoker/Pets. Garage & off Street
Parking. $3,600 –Short/Long Term Lease.
805.705.3201 or Condo805@cox.net
CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
Teddy Herzog
Old House
Renovation
805-448-7722
Top to bottom
remodels, additions
and repairs.
see: www.TeddyHerzogConstruction.com
local Montecito references
WOODWORK/RESTORATION
SERVICES
Ken Frye Artisan in Wood
The Finest Quality Hand Made
Custom Furniture, Cabinetry
31 January – 7 February 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 47 Fun is like life insurance: the older you get, the more it costs – Kin Hubbard
& Architectural Woodwork
Expert Finishes & Restoration
Impeccable Attention to Detail
Montecito References. lic#651689
805-473-2343 ken@kenfrye.com
PAVING SERVICES
MONTECITO ASPHALT & SEAL COAT,
•Slurry Seal• Crack Repair• Patching• Water
Problems• Striping• Resurfacing• Speed
Bumps• Pot Holes • Burms & Curbs •
Trenches.
Call Roger at (805) 708-3485
GARDENING/LANDSCAPING/TREE
SERVICES
Estate British Gardener Horticulturist
Comprehensive knowledge of Californian,
Mediterranean, & traditional English plants.
All gardening duties personally undertaken
including water gardens & koi keeping.
Nicholas 805-963-7896
Garden healer/landscape maintenance.
My secrets will surprise you with unexpected
beauty! Steve Brambach, 722-7429
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center
employs the power of the horse to enhance
the capabilities of children and adults with
special needs in Santa Barbara. Join our
volunteer team and make a difference in
someone’s life. To lean more, visit www.
heartsriding.org 964-1519.
Do you love Reagan history? The
Reagan Ranch Center is seeking volunteers
who would be interested in serving as
docents for the Exhibit Galleries. Docents
will have the opportunity share the history of
President Reagan and his “Western White
House.” For more information or to apply,
please contact Danielle Fowler at 805-957-
1980 or daniellef@reaganranch.org.
“The 1st Memorial Honors Detail is
seeking veterans to get back in uniform
to participate in an on-call Honor Guard
team to provide military honors at funeral
or memorial services throughout Ventura
and Santa Barbara Counties. For more
information visit www.usmilitaryhonors.org,
email carlvwade@gmail.com, or call 805-
667-7909.”
Help Save Threatened Shorebirds!
Coal Oil Point Reserve is looking for
volunteers to help protect Western Snowy
Plovers on Sands Beach. We are looking for
volunteer docents to spend 2 hours a week
on Sands Beach, teaching the public about
the importance of protecting the snowy
LOCAL BUSINESS DIRECTORY (805) 565-1860
Live Animal Trapping
“Best Termite & Pest Control”
www.hydrexnow.com
Free Phone Quotes
(805) 687-6644
Kevin O’Connor, President
$50 off initial service
Voted
#1
Termite Inspection 24hr turn around upon request.
Got Gophers?
Free
Estimates
GET $20,000 CASH BACK
When you buy or sell a million
dollar house with me
Based on a typical 6% broker fee
refund at close of escrow.
PATRICK JOHN MAIANI
805•886•0799
patrikpiano@gmail.com
www.OnePercentRealEsateAgent.com
New Century Real Estate
DRE #01440541
BILL VAUGHAN 805.455.1609

Principal & Broker DRE LIC # 00660866
www.MontecitoVillage.com
®
Broker Specialist In Birnam Wood
Active Resident Member Since 1985
w w w . M o n t e c i t o V i l l a g e . c o m
PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY
Flood Control/Site Drainage Systems
French Drains/Erosion control
Visit: www.williamjdalziel.com
Free Consultation ~ Residential/Commercial
WILLIAM J. DALZIEL & ASSOC., INC
Contact Bill @ 698-4318 • billdalziel@yahoo.com
General Building Contractors • Lic#B414749 • Bonded & Insured
698-4318~billdalziel@yahoo.com
General Building Contractors
Put your fitness in focus
with
Pilates
Private Pilates Training - focused4fitness@gmail.com

*Mention this ad for 20% off your first three sessions*
1101 State St
Santa Barbara
CA 93101
State and Figueroa
805.963.2721
a fne coffee and tea establishment
sant abar bar a
st i cker s. com
GIMME FIVE
plover habitat. You can make a difference!
Interested parties should call (805)893-
3703 or email copr.conservation@lifesci.
ucsb.edu.
“ B o n V i v a n t ”
L U C K Y ’ S
s t e a k s / c h o p s / s e a f o o d / c o c k t a i l s
D i n n e r & C o c k t a i l s N i g h t l y , 5 t o 1 0 p m . B r u n c h S a t u r d a y & S u n d a y , 9 a m t o 3 p m .
M o n t e c i t o ’ s n e i g h b o r h o o d b a r a n d r e s t a u r a n t . 1 2 7 9 C o a s t V i l l a g e R o a d M o n t e c i t o C A 9 3 1 0 8 ( 8 0 5 ) 5 6 5 - 7 5 4 0
w w w . l u c k y s - s t e a k h o u s e . c o m
P h o t o g r a p h y b y D a v i d P a l e r m o

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