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Thursday, February 7, 2013
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Possible Ohio voter fraud
investigation heats up, p3

Three locals sign college football
LOIs, p6
Upfront
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Farm 7
Classifieds 8
TV 9
World News 10
Index
www.delphosherald.com
YOUR WEEKEND WEATHER OUTLOOK
Mostly
cloudy
with a
chance of
flurries in
the morn-
ing, then
partly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 30s. Lows around 15.
Mostly
cloudy
with a 30
percent
chance
of rain.
Highs in the lower 40s.
A 70 percent chance of
rain Sunday night. Lows in
the upper 30s.
Mostly
sunny.
Highs
in the
lower 30s.
Lows in
the lower 20s.

Partly cloudy. Breezy. Highs in the mid 40s. Lows in the
upper 20s.
FRIDAY
EXTENDED
FORECAST
SATURDAY SUNDAY
Ohio seeks to overhaul Medicaid eligibility system
By ANN SANNER
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — Ohio is closer
to replacing an outdated computer
system that’s known for rejecting
eligible people from the Medicaid
program and accepting others who
don’t meet the criteria. Officials said
Wednesday the state will contract
with Accenture LLC for a new sys-
tem that will help determine who’s
eligible for programs across Ohio’s
health and human services agencies.
The move comes as the governor
says he plans to expand the Medicaid
program to cover more low-income
people under President Barack
Obama’s health care law. Gov. John
Kasich unveiled his decision on
Medicaid expansion in his two-year
state budget proposal on Monday.
The Kasich administration
anticipates that almost 366,000
Ohioans will be eligible for cover-
age beginning in 2014 by expand-
ing Medicaid, the health program
for the poor that already provides
care for one of every five residents
in the state.
The state also is bracing for
230,000 eligible Ohioans to sign up
for Medicaid once the federal law
requires most people to have health
insurance. Kasich’s proposed bud-
get includes $230 million for the
eligibility system upgrade, though
the federal government would reim-
burse the state for most of the
cost. The state’s share of the bill is
expected to be $26 million over the
two-year budget.
The state’s current eligibil-
ity system, known as CRIS-E, was
launched in 1978. The administra-
tion says it’s “so fragile and techni-
cally obsolete that it is no longer
practical or cost effective to invest
in enhancing the system.”
The state estimates that 60 per-
cent of CRIS-E’s eligibility deter-
minations for Medicaid are inac-
curate and must be manually over-
ridden to prevent applicants from
being denied coverage or remove
those who weren’t eligible.
Officials say the move will make
applicants’ lives easier.
“This new system will allow
more Ohioans to apply for ser-
vices online, instead of waiting in
line,” said Greg Moody, director
of the governor’s Office of Health
Transformation.
Ohio Medicaid Director John
McCarthy said most who fill out
the online applications would find
out quickly whether they’re eligible
for the Medicaid program, without
having to leave their home and go
to a county office.
The state also wants to use the
system to determine whether appli-
cants are eligible for food or cash
assistance programs.
“We’re all working together to
make it as seamless for a person
as possible,” McCarthy said. The
system will begin enrolling people
in Medicaid by Jan. 1.
K of C hall hosts blood drive
The American Red Cross held a blood drive at the Delphos Knights of Columbus
Hall on Wednesday. Dave Menke takes it easy as his pint of blood is collected by
Brenda Scott, left, of the Red Cross Bloodmobile. (Delphos Herald/Stacy Taff)
City schools feverishly
‘Race to the Top’
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
sgroves@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — As one of
480 school districts in Ohio
participating in the federally-
funded Race to the Top ini-
tiative, Delphos City Schools
adminstrators and educators
are using the third year of the
program to meet state-mandat-
ed assessments.
Jefferson High School’s
Principal John Edinger said
Phase III of Race to the Top
primarily deals with Ohio
Teacher/Principal Evaluation
Systems (OTES), which are
common core standards mea-
suring education effective-
ness, including student growth
and educator observations.
“Ohio teachers have been
working hard. With all the
new things thrown at them,
we are doing our best to lay
out the program, tweak the
rubric and document instruc-
tor feedback,” Edinger said.
“The biggest pitfall may be
trying to keep that pace.”
The $4.35 billion Race to
the Top Fund is an unprec-
edented federal investment in
reform and includes $4 billion
for statewide reform grants
and $350 million to support
states working together to
improve the quality of their
assessments and lead the way
in comprehensive, coherent,
statewide education reform.
Ohio began development
of its OTES prior to receipt
of its Race to the Top grant
in 2010. The OTES includes
a self-assessment against
the Ohio Standards for the
Teaching Profession, analysis
of student data, multiple for-
mal observations, formative
assessments, collection of evi-
dence/artifacts and perception
data, student growth data, a
written cumulative evaluation
and an improvement plan.
Principal evaluations are
measured by student per-
formance data derived from
attendance records, gradu-
ation rates, the number of
suspensions and expulsions,
the percentage of students in
Advanced Placement (AP)
classes and personal perfor-
mance rubrics based on state
standards.
“Every building is respon-
sible for their own data —
teacher evaluations and com-
mon core standards — which
takes a lot of professional
time,” Edinger added. “The
new mapping of standards to
our curriculum — horizon-
tal and vertical alignment of
a student’s education — will
ensure the best comprehensive
instruction possible.”
To ensure teachers the
best possible resources inside
and outside the classroom,
Delphos City Schools have
adopted Thinkgate as their IIS
(Instructional Improvement
System). Thinkgate is a web-
based tool designed with cus-
tomizable components called
Elements, which integrates data
and resources composed of five
areas, including Assessment,
Instructional, Learning and
Strategic Management Systems
and Student Informational
Systems. The system will
expedite staff collaboration,
allowing improvement of each
teacher’s skill-set. In addition,
each student will have equal
access to high-quality learning
materials inside and outside of
class, be challenged to dem-
onstrate learning before tran-
sitioning to new material and
know where he or she stands in
White House allies produce
preschool-for-all plan
By PHILIP ELLIOTT
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Days before President
Barack Obama outlines his agenda for the
coming year, a think tank with close ties to the
White House is outlining a plan that would
provide preschool for all children within five
years.
The Center for American Progress pro-
posal, released today, provides a road map for
how the Obama administration could move
forward with pre-kindergarten programs for
all 3- and 4-year-olds. For families with
younger children, federal subsidies for child
care would increase to an average $7,200
per child and the number of students in Early
Head Start programs would double.
“We’re trying to ensure all children are
ready to learn when they get to school,” said
Neera Tanden, the president and CEO of the
think tank and a former top policy official in
the Obama administration. “Investing in early
learning and pre-K is the best investment that
we can make. The return on investment is
significant.” Education Department officials,
including Secretary Arne Duncan, have sig-
naled that pre-kindergarten programs would
be a priority during Obama’s second term.
The Center for American Progress has been
an influential partner for the White House in
fleshing out its policies. Think tank officials
say they don’t know what precisely will be
in Obama’s State of the Union speech on
Tuesday, but seldom does the organization
move too far or too quickly ahead of White
House priorities.
Under the center’s plan, Washington would
match states’ spending on these preschool
programs for 3- or 4-year-olds at an average
rate of $10,000 per child — enough to cover
full-day programs. The program would be
phased in over five years, starting first with
low-income students who, studies show, ben-
efit the most from pre-kindergarten programs.
Children ages 3 and 4 would be eligible to
attend preschool for free if they come from
a family of four earning $46,100 or less. For
families making more than that, the rates
would be adjusted based on income.
The price tag for the plan is not small:
Over a 10-year period, it would cost $98.4 bil-
lion for preschool, $84.2 billion for child care
subsidies and $11.5 billion for Early Head
Start — a total of almost $200 billion. Once
the program was up and running, it would
cost nearly $25 billion a year — $12.3 billion
for preschool, $10.5 billion for child care sub-
sidies and $1.4 billion for Early Head Start.
But given the fierce debate on spending
and debt — especially among Republicans
— that kind of spending would probably
meet resistance in Congress even if Obama
embraced it as a blueprint.
“This is an area where you have a chal-
lenge in the political timeline. Early learning
is an investment when you get the returns in
10 or 20 years,” Tanden said. “What we do
have in the arena of early learning is the hard
data that shows the actual return on invest-
ment.”
For instance, a child who does not have
early childhood education is 25 percent more
likely to drop out of school, 40 percent more
“The commu-
nity needs to learn
more about the
system. It is im-
portant they un-
derstand the rigor
of the new curric-
ulum; it will build
stronger, college-
ready students.”
— John Edinger,
Jefferson High
School principal
See RttT, page 2
See PLAN, page 2
Local voters to
see light Primary
Delphos voters have few
choices to make during the
May 7 Primary Election.
Council seats in the
first and third wards
will be up for grabs.
Republicans Andrew
Daley and Andrew Knueve
will vie for a spot in
the November election
for the first-ward seat.
Republicans Greg Etgen
and Del Kemper will battle
for the third-ward seat.
Treasurer Bob Mosier
and Councilman Fourth
Ward Mark Clement
are unopposed.
Delphos residents will also
decide on a .6-mill Renewal
Levy for current expenses for
the Delphos Public Library.
Elida voters will
decide on two issues for
its school district, includ-
ing a 1-mill Permanent
Improvement renewal and
an additional 5.95-mill
5-year Emergency Levy.
Herald seeking
volunteers
The Delphos Herald is
looking for family’s liv-
ing in multi-generational
housing to contribute
their accounts of liv-
ing under one roof with
three or four generations
of family members.
The information will
be included in a series of
articles focused on family
dynamics including car-
ing for elderly parents in
the home and the roles of
the middle-aged caregiver,
adult children and grand-
children in the home.
We would prefer to use
the names of the fami-
lies that we interview.
For more infor-
mation, please call
Stephanie Groves at
419.695.0015 Ext. 132.
2 – The Herald Thursday, February 7, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERALS
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
VAN WERT COUNTY COURT NEWS
WEATHER
POLICE REPORT The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 170
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
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and Holidays.
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Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
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Roger Lawrence
Kimmet
Roger Lawrence Kimmet,
66, of Van Wert, went to be
with his Lord and Savior
Tuesday at St. Rita’s Medical
Center.
He was born in Lima
to Lawrence and Bertha
(Beining) Kimmet, who pre-
ceded him in death.
On May 1, 1971, he was
united in marriage with Jan
(McCaslin) Kimmet, who sur-
vives him in Van Wert.
Survivors also include four
children, Bryan Kimmet of
Kettering, Nichole (Trevor)
Miller of Van Wert, Kristy
(Jason) Rager of Crown Point,
Ind., and Nathan (Becky)
Kimmet of Van Wert; nine
grandchildren, Cassie Hale of
Middle Point, Dustin Hale of
Van Wert, Elizabeth Rager,
Carlton Rager, Davison Rager,
Claire Rager and Ashton
Rager all of Crown Point, Ind.,
and Brenna and Elise Kimmet
of Van Wert; and three sib-
lings, Patricia Williams of
Lima, Gary (Pamela) Kimmet
of Rochester, N.Y., and Dan
(Cindy) Kimmet of Sylvania.
Mr. Kimmet worked at
Aeroquip in customer ser-
vice for 17 years. He also
worked in IRA Accounts at
First Financial for five years.
He was a member of the Van
Wert Lions Club and a for-
mer member of Van Wert City
Pool Board and Knights of
Columbus 6034.
Funeral services will begin
at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at
Calvary Evangelical Church,
Pastor Clark Williman offi-
ciating. Burial will follow at
Woodland Cemetery.
Friends may all from 3-8
p.m. Friday and one hour prior
to the service Saturday at the
church.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Ohio State
Ross Heart Hospital, Caring
Voice Coalition or Calvary
Evangelical Church.
Condolences may be left at
bricknerfuneralhome.com or
sent to bricknerfuneralhome@
bright.net.
Jan. 15, 1930 - Feb. 4, 2013
Martha F. Dickrede, 83,
of Delphos, passed away at
9:15 p.m. Monday at Van Wert
Inpatient Hospice Center.
She was born on Jan. 15,
1930, in Lima to Clarence and
Mary (Rode) Hemker, who
preceded her in death.
On Aug. 11, 1948, she was
united in marriage to Urban
Dickrede, who passed away
on April 26, 1992.
Survivors include six sons,
Gene Dickrede of Delphos,
Mike (Vickie) Dickrede of
Elida, Tom Dickrede of Lima,
Ron Dickrede of Delphos,
Dan Dickrede of Ava, Mo.,
and Bob (Susan) Dickrede of
Lima; two brothers, George
Hemker of Dayton and Dick
(Marilyn) Hemker of Findlay;
one sister, Rosie Swick of
Defiance; six grandchil-
dren, Stacy Dickrede, Clint
(Kaelyn) Dickrede, Kyle
(Brittany) Dickrede, Kayla
Dickrede, Aaron Dickrede and
Ryan Dickrede; nine great-
grandchildren; and two step-
grandchildren, Chuck (Tressa)
Mulholland and Brent (Angie)
Mulholland.
Mrs. Dickrede was pre-
ceded in death by a brother,
Clarence Hemker; and a son,
David Dickrede.
Mrs. Dickrede was a home-
maker and worked as a baker
for Clyde Evans. Later in her
career, she worked for St.
John’s Rectory. She was an
active member of Delphos St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church and the church’s
Woman’s Prayer Group. She
was extremely devoted to her
faith and her church commu-
nity. Her hobbies included car-
ing for her fruit trees, canning
and baking. She especially
loved baking angel food cakes.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated at 11 a.m.
on Friday at St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church,
with Father Chris Bohnsack
officiating. Burial will follow
in Resurrection Cemetery.
Family and friends may
call from 2-8 p.m. today at
Harter and Schier Funeral
Home, where a Parish Wake
will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Memorial contributions
may be made to St. John’s
Church or Van Wert Inpatient
Hospice Center.
The following individuals
appeared Wednesday before
Judge Charles Steele in Van
Wert County Muncipal Court:
Arraignments
Samuel Geckle, 44,
Convoy, pled not guilty to
weapons under disability, a
felony of the third degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and his case is set for
pretrial Feb 13.
Lawrence Blakely, 63,
Van Wert, pled not guilty to
nine counts of deception to
obtain dangerous drugs, each
a felony of the fifth degree;
and to one count of Workers
Compensation fraud, a misde-
meanor of the first degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and his case is set for
pretrial Feb 13.
Todd Vincent, 46,
Willshire entered a not guilty
plea to corrupting another
with drugs, a felony of the
second degree; possession of
docaine, a felony of the fifth
degree; and permitting drug
abuse, a felony of the fifth
degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond with a condition that
he have no contact with the
alleged victim and his case set
for pretrial Feb 13.
Tracie Vincent, 49,
Willshire entered a not guilty
plea to corrupting another
with drugs, a felony of the
second degree; possession of
docaine, a felony of the fifth
degree; and permitting drug
abuse, a felony of the fifth
degree.
She was released on a sure-
ty bond with a condition that
she have no contact with the
alleged victim and her case set
for pretrial Feb 13.
James Sidle, 49, Convoy,
pled not guilty to operating a
vehicle while intoxicated, a
felony of the fourth degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and his case set for
pretrial Feb 13.
Robert Thompson, 29,
Van Wert, entered pleas of not
guilty to three counts: aggra-
vated trafficking in drugs, a
felony of the second degree;
aggravated trafficking in
drugs, a felony of the third
degree; and aggravated traf-
ficking in drugs, a felony of
the fourth degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and his case set for
pretrial Feb 13.
Dominique Brown, 27,
Defiance, entered not guilty
pleas to aggravated burglary,
a felony of the first degree and
Felonious Assault, a felony of
the second degree.
She was released on a
surety bond with a condition
that she have no contact with
the alleged victim and not be
in Van Wert County except
to meet with her probation
officer.
Her case set for pretrial
Feb 13.
Change of plea
Bradley Beining, 35, Van
Wert, entered a plea of guilty
to a charge of possession of
drugs, a felony of the fifth
degree. He then requested and
was granted Treatment in Lieu
of Conviction and his case
was stayed pending comple-
tion of his treatment program.
Sentencings
Allen McMillen, 29, Van
Wert, was sentenced on a
charge of obstructing official
business, a misdemeanor of
the second degree.
He was sentenced to 60
days jail with credit for 6
days, and ordered to pay court
costs and partial appointed
attorney fees.
Dennis Vickery, 62, Van
Wert, was sentenced for two
counts of trafficking marijua-
na, each a felony of the fifth
degree.
He was sentenced, on each
count, to 3 years community
control, 60 days jail now, an
additional 30 days jail later,
100 hours community ser-
vice, substance abuse assess-
ment and treatment, 3 years
intensive probation, Driver’s
License suspended 6 months,
ordered to pay court costs
and partial appointed attorney
fees.
A nine-month prison term
was deferred pending comple-
tion of community control.
The sentences in the two
counts are to run concurrently.
At 6:46 p.m. on Sunday,
Delphos Police and Fire
department’s were called to
the 400 block of East Second
Street in reference to a fire
at an apartment complex in
that area.
Upon officers’ arrival,
they spoke to the residence
of the complex and found a
credible suspect in the fire.
Detectives from the Delphos
Police Department were
contacted and took over the
case.
Upon speaking with the
suspect, it was found that the
12-year-old had set the fire in
the basement of the residence.
The juvenile was transport-
ed to the Juvenile Detention
Center in Lima on charges of
aggravated arson, a second
degree felony.
At 3:28 p.m. on Saturday,
Delphos Police were called
to the 100 block of East
Sixth Street in reference to
a subject gaining entry into
vehicles in that area.
Upon officers’ arrival,
they spoke with the wit-
ness who advised officers
the direction the subject had
fled in after gaining entry
into a vehicle parked in that
area.
After a search of the
area, officers were unable
to locate the subject but
did find an item believed
to have been taken from a
vehicle in the area. The item
was collected and entered
into evidence for further
processing by detectives.
At 9:41 p.m. on Friday,
Delphos Police were called to
the 400 block of East Second
Street in reference to a domes-
tic violence complaint at a
residence in that area.
Upon officers’ arrival,
the victim stated that a fam-
ily or household member had
caused physical harm to them
and had left the area prior to
officers arrival.
Officers will present the
case to the prosecutor for
review and approval of charg-
es.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
0 9 - 1 4 - 1 8 - 3 1 - 3 2 - 4 9 ,
Kicker: 1-7-9-9-4-0
Estimated jackpot: $27.5 M
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $12 M
Pick 3 Evening
9-2-8
Pick 3 Midday
5-3-9
Pick 4 Evening
7-7-9-1
Pick 4 Midday
9-1-7-7
Pick 5 Evening
2-7-6-8-1
Pick 5 Midday
4-8-6-7-0
Powerball
0 5 - 2 7 - 3 6 - 3 8 - 4 1 ,
Powerball: 12
Estimated jackpot: $208
million
Rolling Cash 5
01-04-11-27-35
Estimated jackpot:
$100,000
At 6:31 p.m. on Wednesday,
Delphos Police were contact-
ed by a resident of the 500
block of East Third Street in
reference to a theft complaint.
Upon speaking with the
victim, it was found someone
had gained entry into the vic-
tim’s vehicle and had taken a
wallet from inside.
Juvenile charged in apartment fire
Witness reports
someone gaining
entry into
vehicles
Police respond
to domestic
violence claim
WALLEN, Gerald “Jerry”
E., 74, of Delphos, funer-
al services will begin at 11
a.m. on Saturday at Harter
and Schier Funeral home,
the Reverend David Howell
officiating. Burial will fol-
low in St. Joseph Catholic
Cemetery. Friends and fam-
ily may call from 2-4 p.m.
and 6-8 p.m. on Friday and
one hour prior to the service
Saturday at Harter and Schier
Funeral Home. Memorial
contributions may be made to
the family.
POTHAST, Sr. Emma, 94,
of the Sisters of St. Francis
of Tiffin, funeral Mass will
begin at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at
St. Francis Convent Chapel.
Burial will follow in St.
Francis Convent Cemetery.
Visitation for family and
friends will be from 2:30-7
p.m. Friday at the St Francis
Home Chapel and 9 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Saturday at the
St. Francis Convent Chapel.
Memorial contributions may
be made to St. Francis Home
or St. Francis Convent, in
care of the Traunero Funeral
Home and Crematory, 214
S. Monroe St., Tiffin, OH
44883. To send condolences
go to traunerofuneralhome.
com.
Corn $7.38
Wheat $7.37
Soybeans $14.96
Delphos weather
High temperature
Wednesday in Delphos was
31 degrees, low was 20. High
a year ago today was 37, low
was 30. Record high for today
is 62, set in 1925. Record low
is -8, set in 1969.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Chance of
rain through midnight then
rain possibly mixed with
snow. No snow accumulation.
Lows in the upper 20s. South
winds 5 to 10 mph shifting to
the northwest after midnight.
Chance of rain 90 percent.
FRIDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a chance of flurries in the
morning, then partly cloudy
in the afternoon. Highs in the
lower 30s. Northwest winds
10 to 20 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly
clear. Colder. Lows around
15. Northeast winds around
10 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
SATURDAY: Mostly
sunny. Highs in the lower 30s.
East winds around 10 mph.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 20s.
SUNDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a 30 percent chance of
rain. Highs in the lower 40s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Rain
likely. Lows in the upper 30s.
Chance of rain 70 percent.
MONDAY AND
MONDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy. Breezy. Highs in the
mid 40s. Lows in the upper 20s.
Delphos Fire Assoc.
300 Club winner
Jan. 6 — Darlene Weyer
Wallet stolen
from vehicle
Martha F. Dickrede
CLUB WINNER
(Continued from page 1)
likely to become a teenage
parent and 70 percent more
likely to be arrested for a
violent crime.
Closer to the kitchen
table, the proposals have an
economic resonance. The
average family with two par-
ents working and with chil-
dren younger than 5 spends
roughly a one-tenth of the
income on child care. For
families making less, that
percentage climbs quickly.
In the think tank’s out-
line, states could partner
with public school districts,
charter schools, Head Start
programs or child care agen-
cies — a concession that
could win over Republicans
who want more options for
parents.
The plan would double the
number of families making
$46,100 or less who receive
child care subsidies, from 22
percent to 44 percent.
Currently, the average
subsidy is about $5,600
annually — far short the
actual cost of caring for these
infants and toddlers. The
proposal would have federal
tax dollars cover 75 percent
of the subsidy program and
take the annual amount to
about $7,200. States would
be left to pick up the rest.
That part of the proposal
would cost the federal gov-
ernment an estimated $84.2
billion over its first decade.
The proposal also would
increase the number of stu-
dents in Early Head Start
programs from 120,000 to
240,000. That piece of the
plan would cost $11.5 billion
over its first 10 years.
Plan
(Continued from page 1)
a given subject based on
performance data.
“The community needs
to learn more about the sys-
tem,” Edinger stressed. “It
is important they understand
the rigor of the new curricu-
lum; it will build stronger,
college-ready students.”
Edinger and his staff
are currently working on
completing a succession
of three webinars to learn
about Thinkgate. The first
session was an introduc-
tion and overview of the
program, the second was a
“live” hour-long training
on multi-functional users
and the third will focus on
curriculum, instruction and
resources.
“Our priority is pro-
fessional development,”
Edinger emphasized. “Even
when faced with daily chal-
lenges and uncontrollable
variables, we are always
focused on improving the
classroom environment and
reaching each student.”
For more information,
visit thinkgate.net/think-
gate-advantage/elements-
framework/.
RttT
A girl, Erica Eileen, was
born Feb. 6 at Lima Memorial
Hospital to Chad and Laura
Knippen of Ottoville.
Grandparents are Don and
Eileen Hoying of Greenville,
Bill and Lynn Knippen of
Bellefontaine and Joyce
Knippen of Cridersville.
In the Middle Ages, young
men and women drew names
from a bowl to see who their
valentines would be. They
would wear these names on
their sleeves for one week. To
wear your heart on your sleeve
now means that it is easy for
other people to know how you
are feeling.
2
are Ringing
Andy Wrasman & Nicole Neill
Pitsenbarger
Supply Co.
will be closing
at noon
on Saturday,
Feb. 9
for the
wedding of
PITSENBARGER
AUTO SUPPLY, INC.
234 N. Canal St., Delphos Ph. 419-692-1010
Wedding Showcase
March 3, 2013 • 1pm-4pm
Ft. Jennings
American Legion
Are you a business wanting to
reach brides & grooms?
You’ll want to showcase your
product or services at our
“Bridal Showcase.”
Taking reservations through
February 23, 2013.
Call Mary Jean at 419-286-2192
Income Tax and
Business Tax
Preparation
and Accounting
Services,
Payroll
Preparation
Edelbrock-
Reitz LLC
419-695-1099
edelbrockreitz.com
945 E. Fifth
(by bowling alley)
Delphos
2 – The Herald Thursday, February 7, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERALS
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
VAN WERT COUNTY COURT NEWS
WEATHER
POLICE REPORT The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 170
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will
be accepted in towns or villag-
es where The Delphos Herald
paper carriers or motor routes
provide daily home delivery for
$1.48 per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Roger Lawrence
Kimmet
Roger Lawrence Kimmet,
66, of Van Wert, went to be
with his Lord and Savior
Tuesday at St. Rita’s Medical
Center.
He was born in Lima
to Lawrence and Bertha
(Beining) Kimmet, who pre-
ceded him in death.
On May 1, 1971, he was
united in marriage with Jan
(McCaslin) Kimmet, who sur-
vives him in Van Wert.
Survivors also include four
children, Bryan Kimmet of
Kettering, Nichole (Trevor)
Miller of Van Wert, Kristy
(Jason) Rager of Crown Point,
Ind., and Nathan (Becky)
Kimmet of Van Wert; nine
grandchildren, Cassie Hale of
Middle Point, Dustin Hale of
Van Wert, Elizabeth Rager,
Carlton Rager, Davison Rager,
Claire Rager and Ashton
Rager all of Crown Point, Ind.,
and Brenna and Elise Kimmet
of Van Wert; and three sib-
lings, Patricia Williams of
Lima, Gary (Pamela) Kimmet
of Rochester, N.Y., and Dan
(Cindy) Kimmet of Sylvania.
Mr. Kimmet worked at
Aeroquip in customer ser-
vice for 17 years. He also
worked in IRA Accounts at
First Financial for five years.
He was a member of the Van
Wert Lions Club and a for-
mer member of Van Wert City
Pool Board and Knights of
Columbus 6034.
Funeral services will begin
at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at
Calvary Evangelical Church,
Pastor Clark Williman offi-
ciating. Burial will follow at
Woodland Cemetery.
Friends may all from 3-8
p.m. Friday and one hour prior
to the service Saturday at the
church.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Ohio State
Ross Heart Hospital, Caring
Voice Coalition or Calvary
Evangelical Church.
Condolences may be left at
bricknerfuneralhome.com or
sent to bricknerfuneralhome@
bright.net.
Jan. 15, 1930 - Feb. 4, 2013
Martha F. Dickrede, 83,
of Delphos, passed away at
9:15 p.m. Monday at Van Wert
Inpatient Hospice Center.
She was born on Jan. 15,
1930, in Lima to Clarence and
Mary (Rode) Hemker, who
preceded her in death.
On Aug. 11, 1948, she was
united in marriage to Urban
Dickrede, who passed away
on April 26, 1992.
Survivors include six sons,
Gene Dickrede of Delphos,
Mike (Vickie) Dickrede of
Elida, Tom Dickrede of Lima,
Ron Dickrede of Delphos,
Dan Dickrede of Ava, Mo.,
and Bob (Susan) Dickrede of
Lima; two brothers, George
Hemker of Dayton and Dick
(Marilyn) Hemker of Findlay;
one sister, Rosie Swick of
Defiance; six grandchil-
dren, Stacy Dickrede, Clint
(Kaelyn) Dickrede, Kyle
(Brittany) Dickrede, Kayla
Dickrede, Aaron Dickrede and
Ryan Dickrede; nine great-
grandchildren; and two step-
grandchildren, Chuck (Tressa)
Mulholland and Brent (Angie)
Mulholland.
Mrs. Dickrede was pre-
ceded in death by a brother,
Clarence Hemker; and a son,
David Dickrede.
Mrs. Dickrede was a home-
maker and worked as a baker
for Clyde Evans. Later in her
career, she worked for St.
John’s Rectory. She was an
active member of Delphos St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church and the church’s
Woman’s Prayer Group. She
was extremely devoted to her
faith and her church commu-
nity. Her hobbies included car-
ing for her fruit trees, canning
and baking. She especially
loved baking angel food cakes.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated at 11 a.m.
on Friday at St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church,
with Father Chris Bohnsack
officiating. Burial will follow
in Resurrection Cemetery.
Family and friends may
call from 2-8 p.m. today at
Harter and Schier Funeral
Home, where a Parish Wake
will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Memorial contributions
may be made to St. John’s
Church or Van Wert Inpatient
Hospice Center.
The following individuals
appeared Wednesday before
Judge Charles Steele in Van
Wert County Muncipal Court:
Arraignments
Samuel Geckle, 44,
Convoy, pled not guilty to
weapons under disability, a
felony of the third degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and his case is set for
pretrial Feb 13.
Lawrence Blakely, 63,
Van Wert, pled not guilty to
nine counts of deception to
obtain dangerous drugs, each
a felony of the fifth degree;
and to one count of Workers
Compensation fraud, a misde-
meanor of the first degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and his case is set for
pretrial Feb 13.
Todd Vincent, 46,
Willshire entered a not guilty
plea to corrupting another
with drugs, a felony of the
second degree; possession of
docaine, a felony of the fifth
degree; and permitting drug
abuse, a felony of the fifth
degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond with a condition that
he have no contact with the
alleged victim and his case set
for pretrial Feb 13.
Tracie Vincent, 49,
Willshire entered a not guilty
plea to corrupting another
with drugs, a felony of the
second degree; possession of
docaine, a felony of the fifth
degree; and permitting drug
abuse, a felony of the fifth
degree.
She was released on a sure-
ty bond with a condition that
she have no contact with the
alleged victim and her case set
for pretrial Feb 13.
James Sidle, 49, Convoy,
pled not guilty to operating a
vehicle while intoxicated, a
felony of the fourth degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and his case set for
pretrial Feb 13.
Robert Thompson, 29,
Van Wert, entered pleas of not
guilty to three counts: aggra-
vated trafficking in drugs, a
felony of the second degree;
aggravated trafficking in
drugs, a felony of the third
degree; and aggravated traf-
ficking in drugs, a felony of
the fourth degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and his case set for
pretrial Feb 13.
Dominique Brown, 27,
Defiance, entered not guilty
pleas to aggravated burglary,
a felony of the first degree and
Felonious Assault, a felony of
the second degree.
She was released on a
surety bond with a condition
that she have no contact with
the alleged victim and not be
in Van Wert County except
to meet with her probation
officer.
Her case set for pretrial
Feb 13.
Change of plea
Bradley Beining, 35, Van
Wert, entered a plea of guilty
to a charge of possession of
drugs, a felony of the fifth
degree. He then requested and
was granted Treatment in Lieu
of Conviction and his case
was stayed pending comple-
tion of his treatment program.
Sentencings
Allen McMillen, 29, Van
Wert, was sentenced on a
charge of obstructing official
business, a misdemeanor of
the second degree.
He was sentenced to 60
days jail with credit for 6
days, and ordered to pay court
costs and partial appointed
attorney fees.
Dennis Vickery, 62, Van
Wert, was sentenced for two
counts of trafficking marijua-
na, each a felony of the fifth
degree.
He was sentenced, on each
count, to 3 years community
control, 60 days jail now, an
additional 30 days jail later,
100 hours community ser-
vice, substance abuse assess-
ment and treatment, 3 years
intensive probation, Driver’s
License suspended 6 months,
ordered to pay court costs
and partial appointed attorney
fees.
A nine-month prison term
was deferred pending comple-
tion of community control.
The sentences in the two
counts are to run concurrently.
At 6:46 p.m. on Sunday,
Delphos Police and Fire
department’s were called to
the 400 block of East Second
Street in reference to a fire
at an apartment complex in
that area.
Upon officers’ arrival,
they spoke to the residence
of the complex and found a
credible suspect in the fire.
Detectives from the Delphos
Police Department were
contacted and took over the
case.
Upon speaking with the
suspect, it was found that the
12-year-old had set the fire in
the basement of the residence.
The juvenile was transport-
ed to the Juvenile Detention
Center in Lima on charges of
aggravated arson, a second
degree felony.
At 3:28 p.m. on Saturday,
Delphos Police were called
to the 100 block of East
Sixth Street in reference to
a subject gaining entry into
vehicles in that area.
Upon officers’ arrival,
they spoke with the wit-
ness who advised officers
the direction the subject had
fled in after gaining entry
into a vehicle parked in that
area.
After a search of the
area, officers were unable
to locate the subject but
did find an item believed
to have been taken from a
vehicle in the area. The item
was collected and entered
into evidence for further
processing by detectives.
At 9:41 p.m. on Friday,
Delphos Police were called to
the 400 block of East Second
Street in reference to a domes-
tic violence complaint at a
residence in that area.
Upon officers’ arrival,
the victim stated that a fam-
ily or household member had
caused physical harm to them
and had left the area prior to
officers arrival.
Officers will present the
case to the prosecutor for
review and approval of charg-
es.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
0 9 - 1 4 - 1 8 - 3 1 - 3 2 - 4 9 ,
Kicker: 1-7-9-9-4-0
Estimated jackpot: $27.5 M
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $12 M
Pick 3 Evening
9-2-8
Pick 3 Midday
5-3-9
Pick 4 Evening
7-7-9-1
Pick 4 Midday
9-1-7-7
Pick 5 Evening
2-7-6-8-1
Pick 5 Midday
4-8-6-7-0
Powerball
0 5 - 2 7 - 3 6 - 3 8 - 4 1 ,
Powerball: 12
Estimated jackpot: $208
million
Rolling Cash 5
01-04-11-27-35
Estimated jackpot:
$100,000
At 6:31 p.m. on Wednesday,
Delphos Police were contact-
ed by a resident of the 500
block of East Third Street in
reference to a theft complaint.
Upon speaking with the
victim, it was found someone
had gained entry into the vic-
tim’s vehicle and had taken a
wallet from inside.
Juvenile charged in apartment fire
Witness reports
someone gaining
entry into
vehicles
Police respond
to domestic
violence claim
WALLEN, Gerald “Jerry”
E., 74, of Delphos, funer-
al services will begin at 11
a.m. on Saturday at Harter
and Schier Funeral home,
the Reverend David Howell
officiating. Burial will fol-
low in St. Joseph Catholic
Cemetery. Friends and fam-
ily may call from 2-4 p.m.
and 6-8 p.m. on Friday and
one hour prior to the service
Saturday at Harter and Schier
Funeral Home. Memorial
contributions may be made to
the family.
POTHAST, Sr. Emma, 94,
of the Sisters of St. Francis
of Tiffin, funeral Mass will
begin at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at
St. Francis Convent Chapel.
Burial will follow in St.
Francis Convent Cemetery.
Visitation for family and
friends will be from 2:30-7
p.m. Friday at the St Francis
Home Chapel and 9 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Saturday at the
St. Francis Convent Chapel.
Memorial contributions may
be made to St. Francis Home
or St. Francis Convent, in
care of the Traunero Funeral
Home and Crematory, 214
S. Monroe St., Tiffin, OH
44883. To send condolences
go to traunerofuneralhome.
com.
Corn $7.38
Wheat $7.37
Soybeans $14.96
Delphos weather
High temperature
Wednesday in Delphos was
31 degrees, low was 20. High
a year ago today was 37, low
was 30. Record high for today
is 62, set in 1925. Record low
is -8, set in 1969.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Chance of
rain through midnight then
rain possibly mixed with
snow. No snow accumulation.
Lows in the upper 20s. South
winds 5 to 10 mph shifting to
the northwest after midnight.
Chance of rain 90 percent.
FRIDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a chance of flurries in the
morning, then partly cloudy
in the afternoon. Highs in the
lower 30s. Northwest winds
10 to 20 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly
clear. Colder. Lows around
15. Northeast winds around
10 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
SATURDAY: Mostly
sunny. Highs in the lower 30s.
East winds around 10 mph.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 20s.
SUNDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a 30 percent chance of
rain. Highs in the lower 40s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Rain
likely. Lows in the upper 30s.
Chance of rain 70 percent.
MONDAY AND
MONDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy. Breezy. Highs in the
mid 40s. Lows in the upper 20s.
Delphos Fire Assoc.
300 Club winner
Jan. 6 — Darlene Weyer
Wallet stolen
from vehicle
Martha F. Dickrede
CLUB WINNER
(Continued from page 1)
likely to become a teenage
parent and 70 percent more
likely to be arrested for a
violent crime.
Closer to the kitchen
table, the proposals have an
economic resonance. The
average family with two par-
ents working and with chil-
dren younger than 5 spends
roughly a one-tenth of the
income on child care. For
families making less, that
percentage climbs quickly.
In the think tank’s out-
line, states could partner
with public school districts,
charter schools, Head Start
programs or child care agen-
cies — a concession that
could win over Republicans
who want more options for
parents.
The plan would double the
number of families making
$46,100 or less who receive
child care subsidies, from 22
percent to 44 percent.
Currently, the average
subsidy is about $5,600
annually — far short the
actual cost of caring for these
infants and toddlers. The
proposal would have federal
tax dollars cover 75 percent
of the subsidy program and
take the annual amount to
about $7,200. States would
be left to pick up the rest.
That part of the proposal
would cost the federal gov-
ernment an estimated $84.2
billion over its first decade.
The proposal also would
increase the number of stu-
dents in Early Head Start
programs from 120,000 to
240,000. That piece of the
plan would cost $11.5 billion
over its first 10 years.
Plan
(Continued from page 1)
a given subject based on
performance data.
“The community needs
to learn more about the sys-
tem,” Edinger stressed. “It
is important they understand
the rigor of the new curricu-
lum; it will build stronger,
college-ready students.”
Edinger and his staff
are currently working on
completing a succession
of three webinars to learn
about Thinkgate. The first
session was an introduc-
tion and overview of the
program, the second was a
“live” hour-long training
on multi-functional users
and the third will focus on
curriculum, instruction and
resources.
“Our priority is pro-
fessional development,”
Edinger emphasized. “Even
when faced with daily chal-
lenges and uncontrollable
variables, we are always
focused on improving the
classroom environment and
reaching each student.”
For more information,
visit thinkgate.net/think-
gate-advantage/elements-
framework/.
RttT
A girl, Erica Eileen, was
born Feb. 6 at Lima Memorial
Hospital to Chad and Laura
Knippen of Ottoville.
Grandparents are Don and
Eileen Hoying of Greenville,
Bill and Lynn Knippen of
Bellefontaine and Joyce
Knippen of Cridersville.
In the Middle Ages, young
men and women drew names
from a bowl to see who their
valentines would be. They
would wear these names on
their sleeves for one week. To
wear your heart on your sleeve
now means that it is easy for
other people to know how you
are feeling.
2
are Ringing
Andy Wrasman & Nicole Neill
Pitsenbarger
Supply Co.
will be closing
at noon
on Saturday,
Feb. 9
for the
wedding of
PITSENBARGER
AUTO SUPPLY, INC.
234 N. Canal St., Delphos Ph. 419-692-1010
Wedding Showcase
March 3, 2013 • 1pm-4pm
Ft. Jennings
American Legion
Are you a business wanting to
reach brides & grooms?
You’ll want to showcase your
product or services at our
“Bridal Showcase.”
Taking reservations through
February 23, 2013.
Call Mary Jean at 419-286-2192
Income Tax and
Business Tax
Preparation
and Accounting
Services,
Payroll
Preparation
Edelbrock-
Reitz LLC
419-695-1099
edelbrockreitz.com
945 E. Fifth
(by bowling alley)
Delphos
Thursday, February 7, 2013 The Herald – 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
E - The Environmental
Magazine
Dear EarthTalk: I
understand that there are
many kinds of automatic
features that can be incor-
porated into a home—even
some that can be operated
remotely—that can save
energy and provide other
environmental benefits.
Can you enlighten?
— Robert Goodman,
Taos, NM
Home automation may
indeed be the next big trend
in what consumers can do
today to stand up for the
environment. By setting up a
wired (or even wireless) sys-
tem, homeowners can opti-
mize lighting level efficien-
cy, cut heating and cooling
energy costs and deactivate
energy-consuming devices
and appliances even when no
one is home.
“An automated home
brings together security, fire,
lighting, temperature control,
audio, video, pool, spa, drap-
ery control, sprinklers, and
anything else that you want so
that these systems can talk to
each other and work togeth-
er,” reports Jay McLellan
of Home Automation Inc., a
leading manufacturer of inte-
grated automation and secu-
rity systems for residential
and commercial use. “In an
automated home these devic-
es work together to make the
home more energy efficient,
comfortable, more conve-
nient and safer.”
One easy way to dip a toe
in the water of home automa-
tion is to swap out regular
light switches for occupancy
sensors, which can tell if a
room is occupied and will
turn lights on and off accord-
ingly.
Upgrading to a program-
mable thermostat that will
regulate heating and cooling
according to a set sched-
ule is another way to reduce
energy consumption and
save money. Some newer
models, such as Nest from
California-based Nest Labs,
can program themselves
based on occupants’ routines
and also offer the option to
adjust heating and cooling
settings remotely via the
Internet. A built-in occupan-
cy sensor signals to the Nest
whether and when people
are around, and the unit then
adjusts heating or cooling
accordingly. The newest ver-
sion, Nest 2, can tell within
a half hour when occupants
have vacated and will set the
indoor temperature to more
energy efficient level on its
own.
Shelling out $249 for
Nest’s so-called “learning
thermostat” may seem a lit-
tle extreme, but the feature
may save enough money and
electricity to pay for itself
in as little as a year. Nest
Labs helps consumers track
their energy usage and sav-
ings with monthly “energy
reports” that detail why home
heating and cooling costs
have gone up or down (based
on usage and time away, as
well as other factors, such as
weather). These reports also
contain tips on how to opti-
mize Nest as well as other
tips to increase energy sav-
ings accordingly. Nest ther-
mostats can replace most
existing thermostats and do
not require upgrading to a
newer furnace or air con-
ditioning system—although
newer heating and cooling
systems, especially those that
meet the U.S. government’s
EnergyStar criteria for effi-
ciency, do tend to save much
more energy than older ones.
Some 56 percent of the ener-
gy used in a typical American
home goes to heating and
cooling, so automation can
make a big difference for the
environment and the pock-
etbook.
Beyond lighting and
thermostats, whole-house
automation systems connect
home electronics (includ-
ing appliances and secu-
rity systems) into an inte-
grated wireless network that
allows occupants to control
from off-site, including via
the Internet or a mobile
phone app. A Sylvania
Z-Wave Starter Kit from
SmartHomeUSA.com is one
affordable way to get started
with whole-house automa-
tion; you can start small and
gradually add electronics to
the system.
EarthTalk® is written and
edited by Roddy Scheer and
Doug Moss and is a regis-
tered trademark of E - The
Environmental Magazine
(www.emagazine.com). Send
questions to: earthtalk@
emagazine.com. Subscribe:
www.emagazine.com/sub-
scribe. Free Trial Issue:
www.emagazine.com/trial.
Putnam County Common
Pleas Court Judge Randall
Basinger is accepting appli-
cations for appointment to
the Putnam County District
Library Board. The appoint-
ment will be to fill an unex-
pired term through December
31, 2019, and would be con-
sidered for reappointment.
The board consists of seven
members, three of whom are
appointed by the Common
Pleas Court. The court will
consider an appointee outside
the Ottawa-Glandorf School
District to geographically bal-
ance the make-up of the board.
Interested individuals may
submit a cover letter or resume
to Judge Randall Basinger,
245 East Main Street, Suite
302, Ottawa OH 45875 by
Feb. 15.
Judge accepting
library board
applications
Possible Ohio
voter fraud
probe heats up
CINCINNATI (AP) —
Elections officials in south-
western Ohio’s Hamilton
County will issue more
than two dozen subpoe-
nas as an investigation into
possible voter fraud during
November’s election heats
up.
By a unanimous vote,
The Cincinnati Enquirer
reports that the four-member
Hamilton County Board of
Elections on Tuesday decided
to issue 28 subpoenas and set
two hearings later this month.
The hearings will be a final
opportunity for voters to pro-
vide explanations before the
cases are turned over to pros-
ecutors for possible criminal
charges.
The cases include a
woman whose absentee bal-
lot was sent to her several
days after she died, a Florida
resident who tried to use her
old Cincinnati-area address
to vote in Hamilton County
and a woman who ran into a
problem voting on Election
Day because someone had
apparently already cast a bal-
lot in her name.
In what officials say is
the most troubling case, a
longtime poll worker from
Madisonville apparently
voted twice and may have
had a hand in falsifying other
votes.
Investigators found that
the woman cast an absen-
tee ballot, voted at the polls
under her own name, and
cast an absentee ballot under
her granddaughter’s name.
Investigators also found that
three other absentee requests
in the names of men also
came from the woman’s
address, meaning she could
have cast a total of six ballots.
All three of those requests
were received by the elec-
tions board on Oct. 25, the
same date as the woman’s
absentee request. All three
ballots were returned to the
board on Nov. 1, the same
date that the woman’s absen-
tee vote was returned. And
the investigative report also
concludes that, “Handwriting
on all documents is similar.”
The poll’s presiding judge
later told officials that the
poll worker in question “was
disruptive and hid things
from the workers on Election
Day,” according to an elec-
tions board report.
The poll worker was fired
and could face charges.
Another case concerns an
absentee vote purportedly
cast by a 75-year-old woman
who died several days before
the ballot was even mailed to
her home in Loveland.
The woman died Oct. 1,
but the elections board on
Oct. 11 received a signed
absentee ballot in her name
dated Sept. 29.
What makes that timetable
impossible — and legally
problematic — is that her bal-
lot was among roughly 60,000
absentee ballots countywide
that were not mailed to voters
until Oct. 5.
“There’s no way this per-
son voted that ballot,” said
elections board member Alex
Triantafilou. “On its face, it
looks like the husband voted
for the deceased wife.”
The husband also cast an
absentee ballot, in an enve-
lope also signed and dated
Sept. 29.
That was one of two cases
in which a voter’s pre-elec-
tion death raised questions. In
the other, however, the vote
counted, because the 67-year-
old Springfield Township
man died on Oct. 5, only
hours after casting his absen-
tee ballot in person at the
elections board downtown.
Ohioan gets life sentence
in septic tank body case
CHILLICOTHE (AP)
— An Ohio man convicted
of aggravated murder in the
slaying of his daughter-in-
law, who was strangled and
dumped in a septic tank, was
sentenced Wednesday to life
in prison without parole. The
judge accepted the jury’s rec-
ommendation of a life sen-
tence for William Inman, 48.
Jurors could have opted for
the death penalty for the 2011
slaying of Summer Inman, 25,
and defense attorney Robert
Toy said after court that the
defense was “relieved” the
jury did not recommend death.
Still, he said, he expects an
appeal. The jury found Inman
guilty Monday of aggravated
murder, murder, kidnapping,
tampering with evidence and
gross abuse of a corpse. The
trial was moved to Chillicothe
in Ross County after attempts
to seat a jury in Hocking
County were unsuccessful.
William Inman denied kill-
ing his daughter-in-law. His
attorneys said he and his
wife helped kidnap Summer
Inman in Logan, about 45
miles southeast of Columbus,
to talk about their fears that
their grandchildren were
being abused. The defense
maintained that Inman’s son,
William Inman II, killed
Summer Inman.
The younger Inman was
convicted last year of aggra-
vated murder, kidnapping and
other charges and was sen-
tenced to life in prison without
parole. The 28-year-old man
denied killing his estranged
wife. The elder Inman’s wife,
48-year-old Sandra Inman,
pleaded guilty last year to
charges including murder
and kidnapping, and was sen-
tenced to 15 years to life in
prison. Summer Inman filed
for divorce in June 2010 and
was seeking custody of the
couple’s three small children,
when she was abducted in
Logan in Hocking County on
March 22, 2011. Authorities
say she was strangled with a
zip tie and dumped in an under-
ground septic tank behind a
church near Nelsonville in
Athens County.
Her estranged husband
and his parents were arrested,
and Sandra Inman provided
authorities with information
that led them to the body about
a week after the killing. A
prosecutor told jurors in clos-
ing arguments Monday that it
didn’t matter who put the zip
tie around Summer Inman’s
neck. What mattered was
William and Sandra Inman
and their son worked togeth-
er in a plot to kill Summer
Inman, the prosecutor said.
OSU develops
clean coal process
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Researchers at Ohio State
University say they have
developed a way to cre-
ate energy from coal while
eliminating most of the
harmful carbon dioxide that
comes from burning it.
The scientists say that
it’s because they don’t burn
the fossil fuel — they use a
chemical reaction to draw
its energy.
The Columbus Dispatch
reports that the research-
ers are touting it as a huge
step toward the promise of
“clean coal.”
Researchers at OSU
say they have been able to
chemically burn coal lon-
ger than in any other test
worldwide.
The work is funded in
part by the U.S. Department
of Energy. The project is
now moving to a larger-scale
study at the agency’s U.S.
National Carbon Capture
Center in Wilsonville, Ala.
Ohio company
accused of dump-
ing wastewater
YOUNGSTOWN (AP)
— Documents obtained by a
newspaper show employees
of a northeast Ohio company
were directed to dump up to
20,000 gallons of gas drill-
ing wastewater down a storm
drain.
The (Youngstown)
Vindicator reports that two
state regulatory agencies are
conducting an investigation
into how and why the waste-
water from hydraulic fractur-
ing, or fracking, was dumped
in the Youngstown storm
drain last week.
U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, who
represents the region, said
he was “furious” about the
development.
The alleged dumping
occurred at the headquar-
ters of D&L Energy Group.
Documents said it happened
when a large storage tank,
capable of holding up to
20,000 gallons of waste —
including oil and brine — was
being cleaned by an employee
of the company.
Company officials haven’t
addressed the alleged viola-
tion.
Casino inks
agreements with
downtown hotels
CINCINNATI (AP) —
High-rollers and VIPs at
the new casino in down-
town Cincinnati will get free
rooms or discounts at seven
local hotels.
Casino officials said
Wednesday it’s just the begin-
ning of more expected pro-
motions and ties with local
businesses. The $400 million
Horseshoe Casino Cincinnati
opens March 4, the last of
the four voter-approved gam-
bling halls around Ohio to
debut.
The Cincinnati Enquirer
reports that casino is part-
nering with upscale hotels
that include the 21c Museum
Hotel Cincinnati, The
Cincinnatian Hotel and The
Westin Cincinnati.
Officials said the deals are
critical for the casino, which
doesn’t have its own hotel
like competing casinos in
southeastern Indiana.
Repeat drunk
driver convicted
in fatal crash
DELAWARE (AP) — A
central Ohio man with six pre-
vious drunken-driving convic-
tions has been found guilty of
a seventh. This time, authori-
ties say he caused a crash that
killed a woman.
The Columbus Dispatch
reports that 45-year-old
Marc Kraft was found guilty
Wednesday of eight counts
related to the fatal November
crash. He could face as much
as 28 years in prison when
he’s sentenced Friday.
Police said Kraft’s blood
alcohol level was nearly three
times the legal limit when he
slammed his pickup truck into
the back of a Subaru stopped
an at intersection in Delaware,
near Columbus.
Thirty-six-year-old Heidi
Hecker was killed, and her
10-month-old daughter and
boyfriend were injured.
Kraft had not had a valid
license since 1992, and has
six previous drunken-driving
convictions in Pennsylvania.
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2
“A cruel story runs on wheels, and every hand oils the wheels as they run.”
— Ouida (Marie Louise de la Ramee), English writer (1839-1908)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Thursday, February 7, 2013
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Landeck Elementary School has chosen the students who
will compete in the God, Flag and Country oratory contest
hosted by the Delphos Eagles Ladies Auxiliary Feb. 19 at the
lodge. Michelle Rode, Jacqueline Kaskel and Lauren Grothaus
will present their speeches.
25 Years Ago — 1988
• Edward Bielawski has been named an officer of Sigma
Nu Fraternity at the University of Toledo. The Interfraternity
Council at UT recently approved the formation of the social
fraternity. Bielawski, a junior majoring in public relations,
has been named social chairman. He is associate editor of The
Collegian, the UT newspaper.
• Landeck Altar Rosary Society met recently with a mass
celebrated by the Rev. John Hanacsek. Election of officers will
be held at the next meeting on April 5. The committee will
include chairwomen Lois Luersman and Pat Rode assisted by
Laura Reynolds, Janet Pohlman, Gertie Ernst, Elaine Rode,
Janet Bonifas and Dot Geise.
• What started as a decent ballgame turned out to be a rout.
St. John’s fast breaking style melted any hopes for Parkway to
pull off an upset on a bitterly cold Friday night, as the Blue
Jays rolled to a 110-55 Midwest Athletic Conference victory.
50 Years Ago — 1963
• Something new will be added to the Main Street scene
soon, with the addition of a lighted Time and Temperature
sign on the corner of The Peoples National Bank. The erection
of the sign will be one of the many events that will headline
this year of 1963, the bank’s observance of their 100
th
year of
banking.
• Today’s Home Demonstration Club met recently at the
Delphos Public Library with Myra Philpott, Allen County
home demonstration agent, in charge of the program. In a con-
test held, Mrs. Minor Truesdale was most successful. The club
will meet again at 8 p.m. next Monday in the home of Mrs.
Joseph Liebrecht, northwest of Delphos, with Mrs. Truesdale
as co-hostess.
• The Pilgrim Boosters Class of the Pilgrim Holiness
Sunday School held its February meeting Tuesday night in
the home of Marilet McClung, South Jefferson Street. Vice
president Florence Kohorst, presided over the meeting. Mary
Purdy led in prayer and Eugenia Teman read the 23
rd
Psalm.
Poems about Abraham Lincoln were read by Lula Rigdon and
Mrs. McClung.
75 Years Ago — 1938
• Mrs. Gust Beckman was elected as president of the Altar
Society of St. John’s Church, Landeck, at a meeting held at the
school auditorium in Landeck Sunday afternoon. The follow-
ing were also elected: Mrs. Michael Kimmet, secretary; and
Mrs. Adam Miller, treasurer. In bunco, Margaret Karst was
high and Mrs. Thomas Gengler, consoled.
• A group of Jefferson basketball players spent a most
enjoyable day Saturday at Wittenberg College at Springfield.
The boys attended a physical education demonstration at
the college gymnasium. Those who made the trip were
David Morgan, Richard Newton, Ronald Ridenour, Omar
Erickson, Eugene Osting, James Deffenbaugh, Don Foster,
Dale Van Meter, H. Dunlap, Mericle, R. Dunlap, Nile Strayer,
Supt. E. W. Bell and daughter, Eloise, Principal and Mrs.
Lawrence Schmidt and daughter, and Mrs. Frank Kurth and
son.
• The Northwestern Ohio chapter of the American
Institute of Banking will sponsor a Washington’s Birthday
dance on Feb. 21 at the Aragon ballroom in Lima. Robert
Rozelle, of the Delphos Commercial Bank, is a member of
the board of governors of the chapter. According to present
plans, a Lima orchestra will be furnishing the music for the
dance.
By JIM KUHNHENN
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
President Barack Obama is
promoting his second-term
agenda to House Democrats,
eager to keep them unified as a
bulwark against a Republican
majority on issues as diverse
as the economy, immigration
and guns.
Obama was meeting
with Democratic lawmakers
today during their retreat in
Lansdowne, Va., a day after
he held a closed-door session
with Senate Democrats at
their off-campus conference
in Annapolis, Md.
The meetings with legisla-
tors from his own party come
just days before Obama’s
State of the Union address
next Tuesday to a joint ses-
sion of Congress. This
week’s meetings have served
as something of a preamble
for that nationally televised
speech. Obama was to deliver
public remarks to the House
members and then take ques-
tions in a private session,
officials said.
White House officials say
that Obama’s top priority is
job creation and that he will
make a case for fiscal poli-
cies that encourage economic
growth. Setting up a contrast
with Republicans who are
insisting on spending cuts,
not tax increases, to stanch
federal red ink, Obama told
reporters Tuesday, “We can’t
just cut our way to prosper-
ity.”
Obama met privately
for more than two hours
Wednesday with Senate
Democrats. The White House
said the president spoke
briefly, took questions from
10 of the senators assembled,
then spent an hour chatting
with them in smaller groups.
Obama’s spokesman, Jay
Carney, said the session was
focused on coordinating
what Democratic senators are
doing with the administra-
tion’s own efforts to promote
Obama’s priorities.
The meeting with
House Democrats follows
Wednesday’s vote in the
Republican-controlled House
that would require the presi-
dent to submit a budget that
balances the federal ledger.
The bill was symbolic, meant
as a taunt to the president.
It has little chance in the
Senate but, still, 26 House
Democrats voted for it.
In the Senate, Democrats
hold the majority and can be
far more effective at driving
Obama’s legislative agenda.
But a unified Democratic
caucus in the House is
critical on issues that might
divide Republicans, such as
an overhaul of immigration
laws or even some fiscal poli-
cies.
Carney has said Obama
and lawmakers have made
“significant progress”
toward a bipartisan deal on
immigration. The Senate
has taken the lead assem-
bling comprehensive legis-
lation, including a path to
citizenship for the nation’s
estimated 11 million illegal
immigrants.
Gun control has been
a thornier issue. Many
Democrats are reluctant to
embrace Obama’s call for
banning certain weapons. But
Obama has argued that other
proposals, such as universal
background checks, have
broad public support.
Vice President Joe Biden,
addressing lawmakers at the
retreat Wednesday, told them
they can support the measures
he and Obama are proposing
without fear they’ll be booted
from office. He urged them
not to learn the wrong les-
son from the 1994 election,
when Democrats lost control
of Congress after supporting
a ban on assault weapons that
has since expired.
“I’m here to tell you the
world has changed,” Biden
said. “Public attitudes have
changed since 1994. Social
media has changed. The abil-
ity to misrepresent our posi-
tions has changed.”
By ALAN FRAM
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — House
Democrats will unveil 15 pro-
posals for curbing gun vio-
lence that resemble President
Barack Obama’s plan and
will include a call for ban-
ning assault weapons, people
familiar with the package
said Wednesday.
The Democrats’ recom-
mendations will also include
barring high-capacity maga-
zines carrying more than
10 rounds of ammunition,
requiring background checks
for all gun sales and prohib-
iting gun trafficking, all of
which Obama proposed last
month.
The proposals, to be
released Thursday by top
House Democrats, were
described by people who
requested anonymity because
they were not authorized to
discuss the plan publicly.
They represent the initial
House Democratic response
to the horrific Dec. 14 shoot-
ing of 20 first-graders and
six adults at the Sandy
Hook Elementary School in
Newtown, Conn.
Even so, the Democrats’
proposals are unlikely to
go anywhere quickly in
the Republican-controlled
House. A spokesman for
House Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, has said the House
will wait to see what the
Democratic-led Senate does.
Obama’s gun con-
trol proposals have been
opposed by the National
Rifle Association, which is
a potent lobbying force on
Capitol Hill. In addition,
some Democrats — includ-
ing many from rural or con-
servative areas — have been
reluctant to endorse the presi-
dent’s plan.
That hesitation was under-
scored Wednesday at a pri-
vate retreat Senate Democrats
staged in Annapolis, Md.
At that session, Democrats
largely embraced expanded
background checks on gun
sales, but some senators
expressed a desire to avoid
voting on an assault weapons
ban, according to two people
who described the closed-
door session only on condi-
tion of anonymity.
The House Democrats’ rec-
ommendations were proposed
by the 12-member House
Democratic Gun Violence
Prevention Task Force, led
by Rep. Mike Thompson,
D-Calif. Two-thirds of its
members had to approve an
item for it to be included in
their plan, meaning there like-
ly will be Democratic dissent-
ers to some of the ideas.
Among the task force
members was Rep. John
Dingell, D-Mich., the House’s
longest serving member.
Dingell has been a strong
ally of the National Rifle
Association, though he has
clashed with them on some
issues in the past.
There has been strong
public support for expanding
background checks beyond
the current system, in which
the checks only cover sales by
federally licensed gun deal-
ers. The checks are aimed
at weeding out gun sales to
criminals, people with men-
tal health problems and some
others.
That proposal has gotten
the most initial backing from
members of Congress and
is widely expected to be the
centerpiece of legislation the
Senate Judiciary Committee
plans to write as soon as this
month. Anti-trafficking provi-
sions — making it a crime
to sell guns to people who
are prohibited from having
them — also is expected to be
included.
The proposed ban on mil-
itary-style assault weapons,
while backed by about half
the public in polls, has gotten
tepid support so far on Capitol
Hill and is given scant chance
of becoming law. Limits on
the size of ammunition maga-
zines also face an uncertain
fate in Congress.
House Democratic lead-
ers were saying little about
their task force’s propos-
als Wednesday. An email
describing a Thursday news
conference at which the pack-
age will be announced said
the principles were “geared
toward reducing gun vio-
lence in America while
also respecting the Second
Amendment rights of law-
abiding citizens.”
One person said Democrats
would use their announce-
ment to call on Republicans
to say what, if any, gun
restrictions they support after
the Newtown massacre.
By KEN THOMAS
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Florida Sen. Marco Rubio
will give the Republican
rebuttal to President Barack
Obama’s State of the Union
address on Tuesday, provid-
ing a direct message to a
growing Hispanic electorate
that shunned the GOP in last
year’s election.
House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, and
Senate Republican leader
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.,
announced the selection of
Rubio on Wednesday, calling
him a strong advocate of con-
servative principles.
Rubio will speak after
Obama’s prime-time address
before Congress, offering a
counterweight to the presi-
dent’s agenda. The high-
profile speech gives Rubio a
broad national audience for
a party that lacks a true stan-
dard-bearer after Obama’s
re-election. Boehner called
Rubio “one of our party’s
most dynamic and inspiring
leaders. He carries our party’s
banner of freedom, opportuni-
ty and prosperity in a way few
others can.” McConnell said
his Senate colleague would
“contrast the Republican
approach to the challenges we
face with President Obama’s
vision of an ever-bigger gov-
ernment and the higher taxes
that would be needed to pay
for it.”
The 41-year-old Cuban-
American lawmaker was
given a prominent speaking
role at last year’s Republican
National Convention and
traveled extensively on behalf
of Republican presidential
candidate Mitt Romney. He
has been touted as a poten-
tial presidential candidate in
2016 for a party that fared
poorly among Latino vot-
ers last year. In a signal of
renewed outreach to Hispanic
voters, Rubio’s address will
be delivered in both English
and Spanish.
Rubio has played a lead-
ing role among Republicans
in seeking changes on immi-
gration, one of the top leg-
islative priorities of the year
for both parties. He has been
part of a bipartisan group of
senators who have proposed a
plan that would allow illegal
immigrants to pursue citizen-
ship after a number of steps
are taken to secure the bor-
der with Mexico. The issue
is expected to be among the
most highly-watched mea-
sures in Congress this year.
On the economy, Rubio
has said tax increases will
not bring down the nation’s
$16 trillion debt and urged
policies to promote economic
growth and changes to entitle-
ment programs.
Rubio said he would dis-
cuss “how limited govern-
ment and free enterprise
have helped make my fam-
ily’s dreams come true in
America.” He said the speech
would help lay out “the
Republican case of how our
ideas can help people close
the gap between their dreams
and the opportunities to real-
ize them.”
Rubio, a former state
house speaker from Miami,
became a popular figure
among tea party activists dur-
ing his improbable rise during
his 2010 Senate campaign. He
defeated Florida Gov. Charlie
Crist, who switched to run
as an independent when it
became clear he would lose
the Republican primary to
Rubio.
By KIMBERLY DOZIER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
President Barack Obama’s
choice to head the CIA faces a
Senate Intelligence Committee
confirmation hearing just
hours after lawmakers are
expected to receive a classi-
fied report providing the ratio-
nale for drone strikes targeting
Americans working with al-
Qaida overseas.
John Brennan, the White
House counterterrorism chief
and Obama’s nominee to run
the nation’s spy agency, helped
manage the drone program.
The confirmation hearing
today sets the stage for a pub-
lic airing of some of the most
controversial programs in the
covert war on al-Qaida, from
the deadly drone strikes to
the CIA’s use of interrogation
techniques like waterboarding
during President George W.
Bush’s administration.
Obama directed the Justice
Department to provide access
to the secret document to
members of the Senate and
House intelligence commit-
tees, an administration official
said Wednesday. Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, D-Calif., the Senate
committee’s chairman, said
the legal opinion would be
provided to her committee by
this morning.
An unclassified memo
leaked this week says it is
legal for the government to
kill U.S. citizens abroad if it
believes they are senior al-
Qaida leaders continually
engaged in operations aimed
at killing Americans, even if
there is no evidence of a spe-
cific imminent attack.
That unclassified memo is
based on classified advice from
the Office of Legal Counsel
that is being made available
to the intelligence committees’
members, the official said. The
official was not authorized to
speak publicly about the deci-
sion and requested anonymity.
Brennan laid out the admin-
istration’s policy for target-
ing al-Qaida with lethal drone
strikes ahead of the hearing,
defending the use of such
strikes but disavowing the
harsh interrogation techniques
used when he was at the CIA.
In answers to pre-hearing
questions released Wednesday by
Senate Intelligence Committee,
Brennan said no further legisla-
tion was necessary to conduct
operations against al-Qaida
wherever it’s operating.
Brennan answered some of
his critics who charged him
with backing the detention and
interrogation policy while he
served at the CIA. Those alle-
gations stymied his attempt to
head the intelligence agency
when the Obama administra-
tion began in 2009.
Brennan said in his written
answers that he was “aware of
the program but did not play a
role in its creation, execution,
or oversight.” He added that
he “had significant concerns
and personal objections” to
the interrogation techniques
and voiced objections to col-
leagues at the agency privately.
Brennan went on to
describe how individuals are
targeted for drone strikes,
saying whether a suspect is
deemed an imminent threat
— and therefore appropriate
for targeting — is made “on a
case-by-case basis through a
coordinated interagency pro-
cess” involving intelligence,
military, diplomatic and other
agencies.
Obama to promote his
agenda to House Dems
Lawmakers
to get drone
report before
CIA hearing
House Dems offer own gun control plan
Rubio to deliver State of Union GOP response
Delphos Welcome Sign
Thursday, February 7, 2013 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Happy Birthday
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
The Delphos Herald
... Your No. 1 source
for local news.
TODAY
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
8:30-11:30 a.m. — St.
John’s High School recycle,
enter on East First Street.
9 a.m. - noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open. Cloverdale
recycle at village park.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. —
Delphos Postal Museum is
open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
WEEK OF FEB. 11-15
MONDAY: Sub sandwich with lettuce and tomato, maca-
roni salad, fruit, coffee and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: Chicken and dumplings, broccoli, slaw, roll,
pumpkin pie, coffee and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Baked ham, sweet potatoes, cabbage,
bread, margarine, pineapple, coffee and 2% milk.
THURSDAY: Beef pot pie, green beans, roll, margarine,
raspberry whip, coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Baked fish with tartar sauce, redskin potatoes,
Cole slaw, bread, margarine, Mandarin oranges, coffee and
2% milk.
FEB. 7-9
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, Theresa Gilden, Mary Rigdon,
Sandy Rigdon, Sue Wiseman, Sarah Miller and Carlene
Gerdeman.
FRIDAY: Sharon Schroeder, Carol Hohman, Mary Jane
Watkins and Mary Lee Miller.
SATURDAY: Doris Lindeman, Cindy Bertling, Carol
Renner and Martha Etzkorn.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m.
Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
Anyone who would like to volunteer should contact
Catharine Gerdemann, 419-695-8440; Alice Heidenescher,
419-692-5362; Linda Bockey 419-692-7145; or Lorene
Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
Split Pea Soup
1 1/2 pounds kielbasa
sausage, diced
1 pound bag green split
peas, washed
1 stalk celery, minced 1
medium onion, minced
1 teaspoon dried parsley
1 teaspoon dried basil
8 cups boiling water (or
ham broth if available)
1 tablespoon ham bouil-
lon
In a kettle, combine
ingredients and simmer the
mixture for 1 hour or until
the peas are almost tender.
2 carrots, peeled and
shredded 2 medium pota-
toes, peeled and diced
Add vegetables to the
soup and cook for 30
minutes more or until the
vegetables are tender. Add
more water to cover the
vegetables, if necessary.
*May put all ingredients
in slow cooker and cook on
low for 4 to 5 hours.
Connie’s Cherry Cake
1 box white cake mix
1 small box cherry jello
+ 1½ cups water
1 can cherry pie filling
1 8-ounce container
cool whip
Follow directions on
cake mix box. Bake. Poke
holes in cake and pour jello
mixture over. Spread cher-
ry pie filling over cake and
frost with cool whip.
If you enjoyed the reci-
pes, made changes or have
one to share, email kitch-
enpress@yahoo.com.
The soup has a better flavor
the next day and the cherry
cake is good any time of the
day.
Smith Optimist Student of the Month
Trey Smith, a freshman at Delphos Jefferson, was honored as the student of the
month by the Delphos Optimist club. Trey received a certificate and silver collector
coin for his accomplishment. Jefferson high school principal, John Edinger, (left)
and Delphos city schools superintendent, Frank Sukup (right) presented the award
to Smith. Trey is the son of Marc and Melisa Smith of Delphos.
CAMPUS NOTE
Area students
graduate
from Toledo
The following local resi-
dents were among the more
than 2,100 candidates for
degrees to graduate from The
University of Toledo during
Fall 2012 commencement
ceremonies:
James Marshall, Elida,
bachelor of science degree in
civil engineering;
Noah Altenburger,
Ottoville, bachelor of science
degree in criminal justice.
Philip Sargent, Ottoville,
bachelor of science degree in
criminal justice.
Kory Hesseling, Delphos,
bachelor of science degree in
exercise science.
Francis Campbell, Elida,
bachelor of science degree in
mechanical engineering.
Burgei on Xavier
dean’s list
Jonathan Burgei of
Delphos, son of Rick and
Barb Burgei, was named to
the Xavier University Dean’s
List for the Fall 2012 semes-
ter.
To be named to the Dean’s
List, a Xavier student must
complete at least six credit
hours for letter grades with
a grade point average of at
least 3.5.
1
0
0
0
5
6
0
7
9
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., FEBRUARY 23rd @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek, granite counters, sinks,
faucets, showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop
in & pedestal sinks, top brand toilets &
sinks. FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm, berbers, plush,
carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼” to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry,
hickory, walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine, marble medal-
lions, laminates. EXTERIOR DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany,
maple, & cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts,
sliding & patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine,
flush, bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace.
TRIM: Casing, baseboard, crown, chair rail,
spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS:
Frame, finish, brad, & floor nailers, air
comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT:
Pavers & stone, light fixtures, lock sets,
lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
YOU’VE GOT TO CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR TONS OF
INVENTORY AND PHOTOS FOR EACH DAY!!
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., FEBRUARY 23rd @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek, granite counters, sinks,
faucets, showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop
in & pedestal sinks, top brand toilets &
sinks. FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm, berbers, plush,
carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼” to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry,
hickory, walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine, marble medal-
lions, laminates. EXTERIOR DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany,
maple, & cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts,
sliding & patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine,
flush, bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace.
TRIM: Casing, baseboard, crown, chair rail,
spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS:
Frame, finish, brad, & floor nailers, air
comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT:
Pavers & stone, light fixtures, lock sets,
lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
YOU’VE GOT TO CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR TONS OF
INVENTORY AND PHOTOS FOR EACH DAY!!
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
YOU’VE GOT TO CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR TONS
OF INVENTORY AND PHOTOS FOR EACH DAY!
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., FEBRUARY 23rd @ 9 AM
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Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
But the April 15 Deadline for IRA
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Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
FEB. 8
Sue Williams
Crystal Klima
Larry Blackburn
Michael Brunswick
Matthew Lause
Victoria J. Redmon
Sue Gerker
Adam Gerker
Coltinn Stabler
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Description­ Last­Price­ Change
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GENERAL­DYNAMICS­ 66.27­ +1.13
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HOME­DEPOT­INC.­ 66.67­ +0.28
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STOCKS
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EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business February 6, 2013
6 – The Herald Thursday, February 7, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@del-
phosherald.com
Wednesday was the offi-
cial first Signing Day for high
school seniors to decide their
fate as to where they would
be playing college football.
Jefferson senior Quentin
Wessell made his decision
when he signed a national let-
ter-of-intent to play football
at the University of Findlay.
That fulfilled a long-time
dream for the soon-to-be
2013 graduate.
“Ever since I can remem-
ber, I dreamed about this; this
is what I wanted to do since
I was little. It’s nice to make
this decision now and know,”
Wessell said. “The fact that it
was Coach (Bub) Lindeman’s
alma mater helped get me in
the door but the place sold
itself.”
A lot of players involved
in the same process talk about
picking the place where they
felt most comfortable to con-
tinue their athletic careers.
Wessell echoed that senti-
ment.
“They called me for a visit
and I went. That’s all it took,
that one visit,” he continued.
“It just felt right. I had con-
sidered the University of St.
Francis and Otterbein but
Findlay just had a comfort
level. The coaches seemed
very personal and I fell in
love with the place.”
Even though Findlay — a
Division II institution — is
only about a 45-minute drive
from Delphos, that never
seemed to be an issue with
Wessell.
“That really wasn’t an
issue. I wanted a place to con-
tinue my career; it was some-
thing that clicked inside,” he
said. “It’s a campus where
everything is pretty close
together.
“I wrestle, so they are pret-
ty much letting me alone for
now. They have told me that
later on, they will send me a
workout schedule and I will
attend the spring game and
get to meet the guys. With the
players they have coming in,
it should be fun.”
As well, the former defen-
sive tackle/fullback for the
Wildcats — who intends to
major in exercise science
with the hope to coach some-
day — will have to make the
transition to linebacker for
next fall.
“That’s what they’re tell-
ing me; they want me to move
to linebacker, which will be
an adjustment,” he added.
For Jefferson coach Bub
Lindeman, Wessell’s signing
is a reward well earned.
“When you think of
Jefferson football, he is the
heart and soul. He is always
one of the first to arrive and
the last to leave, whether in
the weight room or the locker
room,” Lindeman said. “He
is a typical blue-collar player
that we have here. He is not
just a one-sport athlete but
does a lot of things well. He
comes from a great pedigree
and has great character, on
and off the field or mat.
“I like to see kids get
this kind of reward for hard
work.”
Elida had a pair of stal-
warts opt to continue their
careers at the next level in
the Buckeye State: Quentin
Poling to Ohio University
in Athens and Anthony
Sumpter to Ohio Dominican
in Columbus.
“It’s a program on the
rise and I liked that. I had
offers from them, Bowling
Green, Toledo, Ball State and
Kent State, so I had options,”
Poling said. “It was nice to be
part of a class here that helped
Elida rebuild its program and
see that if you work hard
enough, you have a chance to
play at the next level.
“I’m hoping that this is
what I can pass down to the
younger players, that this will
give them incentive to keep
what we’ve started here going
and have this happen more
and more.”
For the 6-0, 215-pound
linebacker, it was all about
feel for his choice.
“That’s the advice a lot
of people give you. Every
time you visit a place, you’re
going to hear all the good
things from everyone,” he
explained. “You just have to
go with your instincts of what
you feel inside. The cam-
pus, the coaches, the players,
everybody I met seemed a
good fit.
“They offered me a
chance to play college foot-
ball, which is what I wanted
to do from the start.” Poling
plans to major in pre-exercise
physiology with the intention
of going on to graduate work
in physical therapy.
However, he has work to
do until then to try and get on
the field as early as possible
for the BCS Bobcats.
“They talked about putting
me at strong safety but that
would have meant me learn-
ing a new position. Instead, it
looks like I will be at weak-
side linebacker in the 4-3,” he
added. “With so many spread
teams (that he faced every
day in practice and during
his high school career) in the
Mid-American Conference
and in college football, I also
have the chance to be out
there when we go to five
defensive backs.
“They told me not to
worry about bulking up as
much as working on my
speed. I’ve been working on
that this winter and will be
running some indoor track
meets later this winter to get
faster because that is what
it will take to get me on the
field sooner.”
For Sumpter, Ohio
Dominican also had the right
feel as he chose the Panthers
over Division I schools such
as Illinois, Ball State and
Eastern Michigan.
“I had gone to those
schools’ Junior Days and also
some Division I camps. Size
was never an issue for me;
the goal was to earn a schol-
arship so I could go to col-
lege and further my educa-
tion and play more football,”
Sumpter said. “It’s just right
for me: it’s not too big as far
as a campus and enrollment
but it’s not too small at 3,500
students.
“What really attracted
me is how they are up-and-
coming in the GLIAC (Great
Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic
Conference). They moved up
from Division III to Division
II a couple of years ago and
it usually takes a while to
be successful. They went 7-4
and 8-3 in their first two
seasons and they have some
great players coming in. It’s
nice to have a chance to be
part of that, just like it was
here.”
He plans on entering the
pre-law program at the uni-
versity.
For now, the only advice
he has been given is pretty
simple.
“Work hard from now
until then and get into camp.
I played wide receiver and
defensive back here at Elida
but chances are I might be
moving to outside lineback-
er; whatever I have to do to
get on the field,” he added.
For their coach at Elida,
Jason Carpenter, this is part
of the building process and
hopefully a sign of more to
come.
“We had a couple of
guys sign last year and now
we have these two. Chance
(Weitz) is contemplating
Division I offers as well,”
he explained. “It’s a reward
for the hard work these guys
and their classmates have put
in the last 4-plus years. If I
had to say what these guys
really bring to the table, what
makes them stand out, it’s
their work ethic. I don’t think
you’ll ever see two guys that
work harder, whether in the
weight room or on the prac-
tice field or in whatever they
are doing. They are great
guys as well.
“I’m thrilled for them to
have this chance to continue
their careers at the next level
and get an education.”
Three local gridiron stars ink LOIs
Wednesday was National Signing Day for college football players. Jefferson senior
Quentin Wessell, center, signs his national letter-of-intent to attended the University of
Findlay and play on the gridiron for the Division II Oilers. With him are his parents,
Joanna and Scott Wessell (seated) and Jefferson head coach Bub Lindeman (standing).
Elida senior Quentin Poling made his verbal commitment to Ohio University official
Wednesday. Alongside him are his parents, Marisha and Kenny Poling; and back, assis-
tant coach Maurice “Mo” Sumpter, head coach Jason Carpenter and assistant coach Allen
Clum.
Elida senior Anthony Sumpter put his signature to a national LOI to attend Division
II Ohio Dominican. Seated from left to right are his brother, Avery Sumpter, dad Mo
Sumpter, Anthony and mom Margaret Sumpter; and back, Carpenter and Clum.
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 10 7 3 0 14 34 24
NewJersey 9 5 1 3 13 23 20
N.Y.Islanders 9 4 4 1 9 29 30
N.Y.Rangers 9 4 5 0 8 20 25
Philadelphia 10 4 6 0 8 23 27
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 9 7 1 1 15 26 20
Ottawa 10 6 3 1 13 29 19
Montreal 9 6 3 0 12 27 19
Toronto 10 5 5 0 10 25 29
Buffalo 10 3 6 1 7 30 37
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
TampaBay 9 6 3 0 12 40 23
Winnipeg 9 4 4 1 9 27 34
Carolina 8 4 4 0 8 22 24
Florida 9 3 5 1 7 22 33
Washington 10 2 7 1 5 23 36
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 10 8 0 2 18 33 23
St.Louis 9 6 3 0 12 32 25
Nashville 9 4 2 3 11 20 21
Detroit 9 4 4 1 9 23 28
Columbus 10 3 6 1 7 20 32
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 9 5 2 2 12 24 22
Edmonton 10 4 3 3 11 24 27
Minnesota 9 4 4 1 9 21 24
Colorado 10 4 6 0 8 21 26
Calgary 7 2 3 2 6 20 25
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 9 7 1 1 15 32 23
SanJose 10 7 2 1 15 34 21
Dallas 11 5 5 1 11 23 27
Phoenix 10 4 4 2 10 29 27
LosAngeles 8 3 3 2 8 20 25
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtimeloss.
Wednesday’s Results
Boston2,Montreal1
Anaheim3,Colorado0
Dallas3,Edmonton2,OT
Today’s Games
MontrealatBuffalo,7p.m.
TampaBayatNewJersey,7p.m.
N.Y.IslandersatN.Y.Rangers,7p.m.
FloridaatPhiladelphia,7p.m.
WashingtonatPittsburgh,7p.m.
CalgaryatColumbus,7p.m.
CarolinaatOttawa,7:30p.m.
TorontoatWinnipeg,8p.m.
DetroitatSt.Louis,8p.m.
LosAngelesatNashville,8p.m.
VancouveratMinnesota,8p.m.
ChicagoatPhoenix,9p.m.
NHL GLANCE
St. John’s matmen
split in final tuneup
MT. BLANCHARD —
The St. John’s wrestling team
had its final tuneup before
the sectional tournament
begins Feb. 15 in a tri-match
Wednesday at Riverdale.
The Blue
Jays bested
Van Buren
42-30 but fell
48-19 to the
host Falcons.
The Jays
will be in the
Division III sectionals at
Lima Central Catholic.
ST. JOHN’S 42, VAN BUREN 30
106- Austin Cory (V), void.
113- Double void.
120- Evan Mohler (S) pinned
Travis Lewis, 5:40.
126- Double void.
132- Justin Siefker (S), void.
138- Alex Haunhorst (S), void.
145- Austin Martin (S), void.
152- Wes Buettner (S) pinned Max
Frost, 2:26.
160- Chance Sonnenberg (V)
pinned Luke Wrasman, 3:29.
170- Derek Anthony (S), void.
182- Will Buettner (S) pinned
Payton Whitacre.
195- Tyler Achison (V), void.
220- Ora Oler (V), void.
285- Isaac Sexton (V), void.
RIVERDALE 48, ST. JOHN’S 19
106- Double void.
113- Kolten Martin (R), void.
120- Mitchel Matheny (R), void.
126- Caleb Hicks (R) pinned Evan
Mohler, 2:56.
132- Justin Siefker (S) pinned
Austin Miller, 2:56.
138- Austin Clark (R) dec. Alex
Haunhorst 4-3.
145- Austin Martin (S) dec. Paul
Frey 7-0.
152- Seth Knoll (R) dec. Wes
Buettner 6-3.
160- Luke Wrasman (S) maj. dec.
Josh Bushong 14-0.
170- Will Buettner (S) pinned Evan
Gladden, 5:40.
182- Tre Headington (R), void.
195- Caleb Tracy (R), void.
220- Dillion Wellar (R), void.
285- Justin Pfiester (R), void.
——-
Graham signs to run
for Lake Erie College
COLUMBUS GROVE
— Columbus
Grove senior
Jake Graham
signed a
national let-
t er-of-i nt ent
Wednesday to continue
his cross country and track
career at Lake Erie College
in Painesville, just east of
Cleveland.
——-
Bluffton handles
Manchester 65-52 to
complete season sweep
By Ryan Schadewald
Sports information assistant
NORTH MANCHESTER,
Ind. — The Bluffton
University men’s basketball
hit the road Wednesday and
defeated the Manchester
University Spartans 65-52,
in a Heartland Conference
battle.
The Beavers improved to
10-12 and 6-9 in HCAC play,
while the Spartans dropped to
4-18 and 1-14 in HCAC play.
Bluffton’s win was crucial
as it pulled the Beavers into a
tie with Mount St. Joseph for
the sixth and final spot in the
upcoming HCAC tournament.
The Beavers also moved a
game ahead of Anderson after
the Ravens fell at Hanover.
The Spartans started the
game hot, opening on a
9-0 run. The spurt was bro-
ken at the 15:51 mark on
a freebie by Thayne Recker
(Arlington). His counter led
to an 8-0 jag for the Beavers,
including a layin by Will
Pope (Somerville/Preble
Shawnee), a 3-ball from Josh
Fisher (Rockford/Parkway)
and another deuce from Pope.
The Beavers tied the game
at 12 on a layup by Recker.
However, a 7-1 run for the
home team pushed their lead
to 19-13 at the 6:44 mark
of the first half. A jumper
from Fisher and a make
from beyond the arc by Nate
Chambers (Miamisburg) cut
the home team’s lead back to
one point.
A 3-ball from Ryan
Ebbeskotte (Fort
Jennings/Delphos
Jefferson) gave the
Beavers their first
lead of the con-
test (23-21) at the 3:55 mark
of the first half. After a trey
from Manchester’s Silas Sims
tied the game, Chambers
drained another deep ball and
Recker hit a free throw to
give the Beavers a 4-point
lead. Following a deuce from
Manchester’s Jared Schrock,
Chambers came back and
hit a buzzer-beating jumper
to end the half and give the
Beavers a 29-25 lead going
into the lockerroom.
After Manchester scored
the opening bucket of the
second half, the Beavers vir-
tually put the game away
by going on an 8-0 run: a
hoop from Pope, followed
by a deuce from Kinn and
two more Pope chip shots;
which made the lead 39-27 at
the 15:30 mark. Manchester
countered with a layup but
the run for the road team con-
tinued from there on a jumper
from Chambers.
Back-to-back makes from
beyond the arc by freshman
Billy Taflinger (Lima/Central
Catholic) extended the Beaver
lead to 18 midway through
the final stanza. Manchester’s
Keith Berry scored a deuce
to cut the lead to 16. The
road team continued to pile
on more, however, as Kinn
would score four straight
points to push the Beaver lead
to 20 points.
The lead went as high as
23 points at the 6:12 mark.
Manchester would try to make
one last run at the Beavers
when they scored nine unan-
swered late in the game, trim-
ming their deficit to
12 points in the final
minute with Bluffton’s
bench getting some
extended action.
Bluffton had three
players in double figures, led
by Pope who scored 14 points
and added eight boards.
Kinn also scored 14 points,
while Chambers added a
career-high 13 markers off
the bench. Fisher handed out
a career-high eight assists.
Recker grabbed eight boards.
Manchester was led by
Brady Dolezal who tallied 14
points in a losing effort.
The Beavers won the bat-
tle of the boards convincingly
35-23. Bluffton hit an out-
standing 53.1 percent (26-of-
49) from the field, including
65.2 percent (15-of-23) in the
second half. The home team
also shot 58.3 percent (7-of-
12) from beyond the arc.
Manchester countered with
just 41.2 percent (21-of-51)
for the contest. Bluffton took
advantage of its height advan-
tage, outscoring the Spartans
32-22 in the paint and 14-2
off offensive rebounds.
The Bluffton men will
be back in action 3 p.m.
Saturday against the Hanover
College Panthers in the
Sommer Center following the
women’s game at 1 p.m.
LOCAL ROUNDUP
The Associated Press
CYCLING
AUSTIN, Texas — Lance Armstrong
was given more time to think about whether
he wants to cooperate with the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency. Separately, he learned that
he’s about to be sued.
USADA, the agency that investigated
the cyclist’s performance-enhancing drug
use and banned him for life from sports, has
given him an extra two weeks to decide if
he’ll speak with investigators under oath.
The agency said cooperating in its cleanup
effort is the only path to Armstrong getting
his ban reduced. The agency extended its
original Wednesday deadline to Feb. 20.
Earlier in the day, SCA Promotions in
Dallas announced it will sue Armstrong
today to recover more than $12 million it
paid him in bonuses for winning the Tour de
France seven times.
NFL
GREEN BAY, Wis. — Donald Driver
found a way to retire in style.
The popular Green Bay Packers wide
receiver celebrated his 14-year career dur-
ing an event at Lambeau Field with family,
friends, a handful of teammates and 1,500
fans who filled the atrium and lined balco-
nies to get a glimpse of him.
Driver had 743 catches for 10,137 yards
after making the team as a seventh-round
draft pick out of Alcorn State in 1999. Driver
praised the fans who stood in line in subzero
temperatures last week for a chance to get
tickets to the event; team president Mark
Murphy said it was the first time in franchise
history a player had held a public retirement
news conference.
NBA
NBA Commissioner David Stern said the
group that has reached agreement to purchase
the Sacramento Kings has formally filed to
relocate the franchise to Seattle. Stern spoke in
Minneapolis before the Timberwolves hosted
San Antonio. He called the Seattle group, led
by Chris Hansen and Steve Ballmer, “very
strong” and added the appropriate committees
have been convened to look over the proposed
sale of the Kings and the prospective move to
Seattle. Deadline for teams to file for reloca-
tion is March 1.
Stern also announced he thinks the NBA
is on track to begin testing its players for
human growth hormone, perhaps as early
as next season. Stern met with media in
Minneapolis and said the league is watching
developments in the NFL and Major League
Baseball as those two leagues try to address
testing for HGH. He says if both leagues get
approval to test players, as he expects them
to, the NBAwill be right there behind them.
Stern added “It’s not a commitment, not a
promise” to have it in place next season.
He praised players on their willingness to
address drug testing.
BASEBALL
BIDDEFORD, Maine — Arare 148-year-
old baseball card discovered at a rural Maine
yard sale has been auctioned for $92,000.
Saco River Auction Co. in Biddeford held
an auction that included a card depicting
the Brooklyn Atlantics amateur baseball club.
Troy Thibodeau, manager and auctioneer at
Saco River Auction, said bidding started at
$10,000 and quickly rose to the final $92,000.
The name of the buyer, who was at the
auction house, was not released.
The card isn’t the same as a modern-day
baseball card, which became common in the
1880s. Rather, it’s an original photograph
from 1865 mounted on a card, showing
nine players and a manager. The Library of
Congress announced last month it was aware
of only two copies of the photo. The other is
in the institution’s collection.
SPORTS BRIEFS
6 – The Herald Thursday, February 7, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@del-
phosherald.com
Wednesday was the offi-
cial first Signing Day for high
school seniors to decide their
fate as to where they would
be playing college football.
Jefferson senior Quentin
Wessell made his decision
when he signed a national let-
ter-of-intent to play football
at the University of Findlay.
That fulfilled a long-time
dream for the soon-to-be
2013 graduate.
“Ever since I can remem-
ber, I dreamed about this; this
is what I wanted to do since
I was little. It’s nice to make
this decision now and know,”
Wessell said. “The fact that it
was Coach (Bub) Lindeman’s
alma mater helped get me in
the door but the place sold
itself.”
A lot of players involved
in the same process talk about
picking the place where they
felt most comfortable to con-
tinue their athletic careers.
Wessell echoed that senti-
ment.
“They called me for a visit
and I went. That’s all it took,
that one visit,” he continued.
“It just felt right. I had con-
sidered the University of St.
Francis and Otterbein but
Findlay just had a comfort
level. The coaches seemed
very personal and I fell in
love with the place.”
Even though Findlay — a
Division II institution — is
only about a 45-minute drive
from Delphos, that never
seemed to be an issue with
Wessell.
“That really wasn’t an
issue. I wanted a place to con-
tinue my career; it was some-
thing that clicked inside,” he
said. “It’s a campus where
everything is pretty close
together.
“I wrestle, so they are pret-
ty much letting me alone for
now. They have told me that
later on, they will send me a
workout schedule and I will
attend the spring game and
get to meet the guys. With the
players they have coming in,
it should be fun.”
As well, the former defen-
sive tackle/fullback for the
Wildcats — who intends to
major in exercise science
with the hope to coach some-
day — will have to make the
transition to linebacker for
next fall.
“That’s what they’re tell-
ing me; they want me to move
to linebacker, which will be
an adjustment,” he added.
For Jefferson coach Bub
Lindeman, Wessell’s signing
is a reward well earned.
“When you think of
Jefferson football, he is the
heart and soul. He is always
one of the first to arrive and
the last to leave, whether in
the weight room or the locker
room,” Lindeman said. “He
is a typical blue-collar player
that we have here. He is not
just a one-sport athlete but
does a lot of things well. He
comes from a great pedigree
and has great character, on
and off the field or mat.
“I like to see kids get
this kind of reward for hard
work.”
Elida had a pair of stal-
warts opt to continue their
careers at the next level in
the Buckeye State: Quentin
Poling to Ohio University
in Athens and Anthony
Sumpter to Ohio Dominican
in Columbus.
“It’s a program on the
rise and I liked that. I had
offers from them, Bowling
Green, Toledo, Ball State and
Kent State, so I had options,”
Poling said. “It was nice to be
part of a class here that helped
Elida rebuild its program and
see that if you work hard
enough, you have a chance to
play at the next level.
“I’m hoping that this is
what I can pass down to the
younger players, that this will
give them incentive to keep
what we’ve started here going
and have this happen more
and more.”
For the 6-0, 215-pound
linebacker, it was all about
feel for his choice.
“That’s the advice a lot
of people give you. Every
time you visit a place, you’re
going to hear all the good
things from everyone,” he
explained. “You just have to
go with your instincts of what
you feel inside. The cam-
pus, the coaches, the players,
everybody I met seemed a
good fit.
“They offered me a
chance to play college foot-
ball, which is what I wanted
to do from the start.” Poling
plans to major in pre-exercise
physiology with the intention
of going on to graduate work
in physical therapy.
However, he has work to
do until then to try and get on
the field as early as possible
for the BCS Bobcats.
“They talked about putting
me at strong safety but that
would have meant me learn-
ing a new position. Instead, it
looks like I will be at weak-
side linebacker in the 4-3,” he
added. “With so many spread
teams (that he faced every
day in practice and during
his high school career) in the
Mid-American Conference
and in college football, I also
have the chance to be out
there when we go to five
defensive backs.
“They told me not to
worry about bulking up as
much as working on my
speed. I’ve been working on
that this winter and will be
running some indoor track
meets later this winter to get
faster because that is what
it will take to get me on the
field sooner.”
For Sumpter, Ohio
Dominican also had the right
feel as he chose the Panthers
over Division I schools such
as Illinois, Ball State and
Eastern Michigan.
“I had gone to those
schools’ Junior Days and also
some Division I camps. Size
was never an issue for me;
the goal was to earn a schol-
arship so I could go to col-
lege and further my educa-
tion and play more football,”
Sumpter said. “It’s just right
for me: it’s not too big as far
as a campus and enrollment
but it’s not too small at 3,500
students.
“What really attracted
me is how they are up-and-
coming in the GLIAC (Great
Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic
Conference). They moved up
from Division III to Division
II a couple of years ago and
it usually takes a while to
be successful. They went 7-4
and 8-3 in their first two
seasons and they have some
great players coming in. It’s
nice to have a chance to be
part of that, just like it was
here.”
He plans on entering the
pre-law program at the uni-
versity.
For now, the only advice
he has been given is pretty
simple.
“Work hard from now
until then and get into camp.
I played wide receiver and
defensive back here at Elida
but chances are I might be
moving to outside lineback-
er; whatever I have to do to
get on the field,” he added.
For their coach at Elida,
Jason Carpenter, this is part
of the building process and
hopefully a sign of more to
come.
“We had a couple of
guys sign last year and now
we have these two. Chance
(Weitz) is contemplating
Division I offers as well,”
he explained. “It’s a reward
for the hard work these guys
and their classmates have put
in the last 4-plus years. If I
had to say what these guys
really bring to the table, what
makes them stand out, it’s
their work ethic. I don’t think
you’ll ever see two guys that
work harder, whether in the
weight room or on the prac-
tice field or in whatever they
are doing. They are great
guys as well.
“I’m thrilled for them to
have this chance to continue
their careers at the next level
and get an education.”
Three local gridiron stars ink LOIs
Wednesday was National Signing Day for college football players. Jefferson senior
Quentin Wessell, center, signs his national letter-of-intent to attended the University of
Findlay and play on the gridiron for the Division II Oilers. With him are his parents,
Joanna and Scott Wessell (seated) and Jefferson head coach Bub Lindeman (standing).
Elida senior Quentin Poling made his verbal commitment to Ohio University official
Wednesday. Alongside him are his parents, Marisha and Kenny Poling; and back, assis-
tant coach Maurice “Mo” Sumpter, head coach Jason Carpenter and assistant coach Allen
Clum.
Elida senior Anthony Sumpter put his signature to a national LOI to attend Division
II Ohio Dominican. Seated from left to right are his brother, Avery Sumpter, dad Mo
Sumpter, Anthony and mom Margaret Sumpter; and back, Carpenter and Clum.
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 10 7 3 0 14 34 24
NewJersey 9 5 1 3 13 23 20
N.Y.Islanders 9 4 4 1 9 29 30
N.Y.Rangers 9 4 5 0 8 20 25
Philadelphia 10 4 6 0 8 23 27
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 9 7 1 1 15 26 20
Ottawa 10 6 3 1 13 29 19
Montreal 9 6 3 0 12 27 19
Toronto 10 5 5 0 10 25 29
Buffalo 10 3 6 1 7 30 37
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
TampaBay 9 6 3 0 12 40 23
Winnipeg 9 4 4 1 9 27 34
Carolina 8 4 4 0 8 22 24
Florida 9 3 5 1 7 22 33
Washington 10 2 7 1 5 23 36
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 10 8 0 2 18 33 23
St.Louis 9 6 3 0 12 32 25
Nashville 9 4 2 3 11 20 21
Detroit 9 4 4 1 9 23 28
Columbus 10 3 6 1 7 20 32
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 9 5 2 2 12 24 22
Edmonton 10 4 3 3 11 24 27
Minnesota 9 4 4 1 9 21 24
Colorado 10 4 6 0 8 21 26
Calgary 7 2 3 2 6 20 25
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 9 7 1 1 15 32 23
SanJose 10 7 2 1 15 34 21
Dallas 11 5 5 1 11 23 27
Phoenix 10 4 4 2 10 29 27
LosAngeles 8 3 3 2 8 20 25
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtimeloss.
Wednesday’s Results
Boston2,Montreal1
Anaheim3,Colorado0
Dallas3,Edmonton2,OT
Today’s Games
MontrealatBuffalo,7p.m.
TampaBayatNewJersey,7p.m.
N.Y.IslandersatN.Y.Rangers,7p.m.
FloridaatPhiladelphia,7p.m.
WashingtonatPittsburgh,7p.m.
CalgaryatColumbus,7p.m.
CarolinaatOttawa,7:30p.m.
TorontoatWinnipeg,8p.m.
DetroitatSt.Louis,8p.m.
LosAngelesatNashville,8p.m.
VancouveratMinnesota,8p.m.
ChicagoatPhoenix,9p.m.
NHL GLANCE
St. John’s matmen
split in final tuneup
MT. BLANCHARD —
The St. John’s wrestling team
had its final tuneup before
the sectional tournament
begins Feb. 15 in a tri-match
Wednesday at Riverdale.
The Blue
Jays bested
Van Buren
42-30 but fell
48-19 to the
host Falcons.
The Jays
will be in the
Division III sectionals at
Lima Central Catholic.
ST. JOHN’S 42, VAN BUREN 30
106- Austin Cory (V), void.
113- Double void.
120- Evan Mohler (S) pinned
Travis Lewis, 5:40.
126- Double void.
132- Justin Siefker (S), void.
138- Alex Haunhorst (S), void.
145- Austin Martin (S), void.
152- Wes Buettner (S) pinned Max
Frost, 2:26.
160- Chance Sonnenberg (V)
pinned Luke Wrasman, 3:29.
170- Derek Anthony (S), void.
182- Will Buettner (S) pinned
Payton Whitacre.
195- Tyler Achison (V), void.
220- Ora Oler (V), void.
285- Isaac Sexton (V), void.
RIVERDALE 48, ST. JOHN’S 19
106- Double void.
113- Kolten Martin (R), void.
120- Mitchel Matheny (R), void.
126- Caleb Hicks (R) pinned Evan
Mohler, 2:56.
132- Justin Siefker (S) pinned
Austin Miller, 2:56.
138- Austin Clark (R) dec. Alex
Haunhorst 4-3.
145- Austin Martin (S) dec. Paul
Frey 7-0.
152- Seth Knoll (R) dec. Wes
Buettner 6-3.
160- Luke Wrasman (S) maj. dec.
Josh Bushong 14-0.
170- Will Buettner (S) pinned Evan
Gladden, 5:40.
182- Tre Headington (R), void.
195- Caleb Tracy (R), void.
220- Dillion Wellar (R), void.
285- Justin Pfiester (R), void.
——-
Graham signs to run
for Lake Erie College
COLUMBUS GROVE
— Columbus
Grove senior
Jake Graham
signed a
national let-
t er-of-i nt ent
Wednesday to continue
his cross country and track
career at Lake Erie College
in Painesville, just east of
Cleveland.
——-
Bluffton handles
Manchester 65-52 to
complete season sweep
By Ryan Schadewald
Sports information assistant
NORTH MANCHESTER,
Ind. — The Bluffton
University men’s basketball
hit the road Wednesday and
defeated the Manchester
University Spartans 65-52,
in a Heartland Conference
battle.
The Beavers improved to
10-12 and 6-9 in HCAC play,
while the Spartans dropped to
4-18 and 1-14 in HCAC play.
Bluffton’s win was crucial
as it pulled the Beavers into a
tie with Mount St. Joseph for
the sixth and final spot in the
upcoming HCAC tournament.
The Beavers also moved a
game ahead of Anderson after
the Ravens fell at Hanover.
The Spartans started the
game hot, opening on a
9-0 run. The spurt was bro-
ken at the 15:51 mark on
a freebie by Thayne Recker
(Arlington). His counter led
to an 8-0 jag for the Beavers,
including a layin by Will
Pope (Somerville/Preble
Shawnee), a 3-ball from Josh
Fisher (Rockford/Parkway)
and another deuce from Pope.
The Beavers tied the game
at 12 on a layup by Recker.
However, a 7-1 run for the
home team pushed their lead
to 19-13 at the 6:44 mark
of the first half. A jumper
from Fisher and a make
from beyond the arc by Nate
Chambers (Miamisburg) cut
the home team’s lead back to
one point.
A 3-ball from Ryan
Ebbeskotte (Fort
Jennings/Delphos
Jefferson) gave the
Beavers their first
lead of the con-
test (23-21) at the 3:55 mark
of the first half. After a trey
from Manchester’s Silas Sims
tied the game, Chambers
drained another deep ball and
Recker hit a free throw to
give the Beavers a 4-point
lead. Following a deuce from
Manchester’s Jared Schrock,
Chambers came back and
hit a buzzer-beating jumper
to end the half and give the
Beavers a 29-25 lead going
into the lockerroom.
After Manchester scored
the opening bucket of the
second half, the Beavers vir-
tually put the game away
by going on an 8-0 run: a
hoop from Pope, followed
by a deuce from Kinn and
two more Pope chip shots;
which made the lead 39-27 at
the 15:30 mark. Manchester
countered with a layup but
the run for the road team con-
tinued from there on a jumper
from Chambers.
Back-to-back makes from
beyond the arc by freshman
Billy Taflinger (Lima/Central
Catholic) extended the Beaver
lead to 18 midway through
the final stanza. Manchester’s
Keith Berry scored a deuce
to cut the lead to 16. The
road team continued to pile
on more, however, as Kinn
would score four straight
points to push the Beaver lead
to 20 points.
The lead went as high as
23 points at the 6:12 mark.
Manchester would try to make
one last run at the Beavers
when they scored nine unan-
swered late in the game, trim-
ming their deficit to
12 points in the final
minute with Bluffton’s
bench getting some
extended action.
Bluffton had three
players in double figures, led
by Pope who scored 14 points
and added eight boards.
Kinn also scored 14 points,
while Chambers added a
career-high 13 markers off
the bench. Fisher handed out
a career-high eight assists.
Recker grabbed eight boards.
Manchester was led by
Brady Dolezal who tallied 14
points in a losing effort.
The Beavers won the bat-
tle of the boards convincingly
35-23. Bluffton hit an out-
standing 53.1 percent (26-of-
49) from the field, including
65.2 percent (15-of-23) in the
second half. The home team
also shot 58.3 percent (7-of-
12) from beyond the arc.
Manchester countered with
just 41.2 percent (21-of-51)
for the contest. Bluffton took
advantage of its height advan-
tage, outscoring the Spartans
32-22 in the paint and 14-2
off offensive rebounds.
The Bluffton men will
be back in action 3 p.m.
Saturday against the Hanover
College Panthers in the
Sommer Center following the
women’s game at 1 p.m.
LOCAL ROUNDUP
The Associated Press
CYCLING
AUSTIN, Texas — Lance Armstrong
was given more time to think about whether
he wants to cooperate with the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency. Separately, he learned that
he’s about to be sued.
USADA, the agency that investigated
the cyclist’s performance-enhancing drug
use and banned him for life from sports, has
given him an extra two weeks to decide if
he’ll speak with investigators under oath.
The agency said cooperating in its cleanup
effort is the only path to Armstrong getting
his ban reduced. The agency extended its
original Wednesday deadline to Feb. 20.
Earlier in the day, SCA Promotions in
Dallas announced it will sue Armstrong
today to recover more than $12 million it
paid him in bonuses for winning the Tour de
France seven times.
NFL
GREEN BAY, Wis. — Donald Driver
found a way to retire in style.
The popular Green Bay Packers wide
receiver celebrated his 14-year career dur-
ing an event at Lambeau Field with family,
friends, a handful of teammates and 1,500
fans who filled the atrium and lined balco-
nies to get a glimpse of him.
Driver had 743 catches for 10,137 yards
after making the team as a seventh-round
draft pick out of Alcorn State in 1999. Driver
praised the fans who stood in line in subzero
temperatures last week for a chance to get
tickets to the event; team president Mark
Murphy said it was the first time in franchise
history a player had held a public retirement
news conference.
NBA
NBA Commissioner David Stern said the
group that has reached agreement to purchase
the Sacramento Kings has formally filed to
relocate the franchise to Seattle. Stern spoke in
Minneapolis before the Timberwolves hosted
San Antonio. He called the Seattle group, led
by Chris Hansen and Steve Ballmer, “very
strong” and added the appropriate committees
have been convened to look over the proposed
sale of the Kings and the prospective move to
Seattle. Deadline for teams to file for reloca-
tion is March 1.
Stern also announced he thinks the NBA
is on track to begin testing its players for
human growth hormone, perhaps as early
as next season. Stern met with media in
Minneapolis and said the league is watching
developments in the NFL and Major League
Baseball as those two leagues try to address
testing for HGH. He says if both leagues get
approval to test players, as he expects them
to, the NBAwill be right there behind them.
Stern added “It’s not a commitment, not a
promise” to have it in place next season.
He praised players on their willingness to
address drug testing.
BASEBALL
BIDDEFORD, Maine — Arare 148-year-
old baseball card discovered at a rural Maine
yard sale has been auctioned for $92,000.
Saco River Auction Co. in Biddeford held
an auction that included a card depicting
the Brooklyn Atlantics amateur baseball club.
Troy Thibodeau, manager and auctioneer at
Saco River Auction, said bidding started at
$10,000 and quickly rose to the final $92,000.
The name of the buyer, who was at the
auction house, was not released.
The card isn’t the same as a modern-day
baseball card, which became common in the
1880s. Rather, it’s an original photograph
from 1865 mounted on a card, showing
nine players and a manager. The Library of
Congress announced last month it was aware
of only two copies of the photo. The other is
in the institution’s collection.
SPORTS BRIEFS
Thursday, February 7, 2013 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
AGRIBUSINESS
Information submitted
The Allen County 4-H Horse Association is pleased to announce
their 9th annual Pancake Day will be held from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Feb. 16 at the F.O.P. Hall, 750 W. Robb Avenue.
Tickets are $7 if in advance or $8 at the door. Children 4-8 are
$4 and 3 & under are free. Pick up tickets at the Allen County
Fairgrounds.
Also featured will be a silent auction and a bake sale.
Continuing with the success of 2010’s completion of the pavilion
at the fairgrounds, this fundraiser helps the horse 4-H program grow
stronger with every passing year.
There are more than 1,000 4-H youth involved in Allen County,
with more than 50 clubs and 200 projects from horses/animals to
robotics.
Clubs are starting to organize now so if you have questions about
joining call the extension office at 419-879-9108 or go online www.
allen.osu.edu.
Van Wert and Paulding County
OSU-Extentions will host Ag
Day on Feb. 27 at the OSU Van
Wert County Extension meeting
room on the Van Wert County
Fairgrounds..
Registration is at 8:30 a.m. with
speakers at 9 a.m.
Guest speakers include:
— Dr. Steven Prochaska, asso-
ciate professor, OSU Extension
Field Specialist explaining the
“4R’s and Dissolved Reactive
Phosphorous Issues”;
— Dr. Ed Lentz, Associate
Professor, Crops Specialist and
OSU Extension Educator on
Micronutrients and Gypsum
Needs and Uses”;
— Van Wert County’s own
Aaron Baker, from Keister &
Baker LLC, Law Office giving
good tips on “Things that you
should know about Taxes and
Estate Planning”;
— “ Field Crops Insects: The
Old, The New and the Coming,”
by Dr. Curtis Young, assistant pro-
fessor and Van Wert County OSU
Extension Educator; and
— Dr. Bob Nielson, profes-
sor of agronomy, corn specialist,
Purdue University, bringing “The
Impacts of Drought on Corn and
Managing Crops for Unpredictable
Weather Stress.”
Continental breakfast, lunch,
and meeting materials are $10
with preregistration; $20 for walk-
ins. Come early and browse our
sponsor booths.
Door prizes will be given at end
of meeting, approximately 3:30 p.m.
Register by calling the OSU
Extension Van Wert County
office 419-238-1214 or the OSU
Extension Paulding County office
419-399-8225 by Feb. 20.
Van Wert, Paulding County
OSU-Extensions to host Ag Day
Allen County 4-H Horse
Assoc. sets Pancake Day
By James J. Hoorman
Assistant Professor
OSU-Extension
Putnam County
This article is adapted from a
new draft fact sheet on the “Benefits
of Cover Crops” written by James
Hoorman.
Cover crops protect the soil from
erosion due to wind and water. Live
plants provide the energy for soil
microbes to recycle and store nutri-
ents to build soil carbon and organic
matter. They improve soil structure
which improves water infiltration
and water holding capacity. Cover
crops may also reduce weed, insect,
and soil disease pressures by adding
diversity. Live plants also provide
ecological services like purifying and
cleaning air and water.
Soil erosion and sedimentation
are major agricultural problems
worldwide. According to Dr. David
Montgomery (2012), even if farmers
lose soil at the USDA-NRCS accept-
able rate of four to five tons/acre/
year, they will lose approximately
one inch of top soil every 60 years.
Montgomery says we are losing 0.5
percent of our arable agricultural
soils every year worldwide due to
soil erosion and it takes almost 500
years to replenish one inch of topsoil.
Cover crops protect the soil by slow-
ing down the wind at ground level.
Blowing snow and dirt, also called
“SNIRT,” is a common problem on
bare or fallow soils. The reduction in
sedimentation from water and wind
erosion is a huge soil conservation
benefit of cover crops (Hoorman,
2008).
Plants and microorganisms are
critical in recycling soil carbon,
nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and
micronutrients. Carbon ties up and
stores major nutrients (water, N, P, S)
and micronutrients (zinc, boron, cop-
per). A recent study at Piketon, Ohio
shows that 65-70 percent of the soil’s
carbon originates from plant roots
(Aziz PhD thesis, 2011). The soils
in Illinois and Iowa are productive
because they are high in soil organic
matter. Carbon is the key to improv-
ing soil productivity because carbon
ties up plant nutrients and still makes
them plant available.
Increasing crop residue and soil
carbon at the soil surface increas-
es water infiltration and soil water
holding capacity (Hoorman, 2013).
Every one percent soil organic mat-
ter holds one to two acre inches of
additional water depending on soil
texture (Hudson, 1994). Hoorman
says, “With the depletion of soil
organic matter levels, our soils are
becoming harder and denser. Without
the continual addition of organic resi-
dues from live plants, water runs off
the soil surface rather than infiltrat-
ing the soil, causing soil compaction
and nutrient rich sediment to flow to
our surface water. Soil organic matter
is needed to improve soil structure
so that our soils become more like a
sponge, soaking up water and stor-
ing soluble soil nutrients” (Hoorman,
2013, pg.23).
Hoorman says “Each soil has a
natural ecosystem of diverse micro-
bial species, predators and soil fauna
that keep each species in balance. By
promoting a healthy soil ecosystem
“with cover crops,” many pests are
kept in balance and the economic
impacts of these pests are greatly
reduced” (Hoorman, 2013 pg 23).
Hoorman adds, “As mankind starts
to rely on manmade solutions like
chemicals (herbicides, insecticides,
fungicides); resistant weeds, dam-
aging insects, and harmful disease
organisms tend to prosper and adapt
to render many of these products less
effective”( Hoorman. 2013 pg 23).
Cover crops promote a healthy soil
by increasing the number and species
of beneficial microorganisms to com-
pete with or consume these harmful
species.
Hoorman says, “Planting a flow-
ering cover crop like buckwheat or
a flowering legume crops around the
edges of fields improves the popula-
tion of beneficial insects and may
reduce the need for some pesticides”
(Hoorman, 2013, pg 24). Cover crops
promote mycorrhizal fungus and
other beneficial microorganism which
inhibit Phytopthora, Rhizoctonia,
Phythium, and Fusarium; which are
soybean disease causing organisms
(Amaranthus and Simpson, 2011).
Ground beetles (Carabidae beetles)
and lightning bugs (Lampyrida)
consume many soft bodied insects
(aphids, slugs, caterpillars) which
may reduce crop yields. A ground
beetle may eat its weight in weed
seed or insect larva per day (Altieri
et al, 2005). Cover crops compete
with weeds for sunlight and nutrients,
reducing weed populations and weed
seed production. By using chemi-
cal inputs less often and only when
needed, farmers promote beneficial
insects and predators and may extend
their useful life so that they do not
become resistant to these products.
For more information, sign up
for the Cover Crops and Soil Health
series being offered at the Putnam
County Extension Office from 7-9
p.m. on Monday, Feb. 20 and 25.
Cost is $20 for refreshments, hand-
outs, and a Cover Crop Field Guide.
Tickets for the Putnam County Pork
Banquet at 6:30 p.m. on Feb. 18 at
Kalida K. C. Hall are $10 at our
office.
The benefits of cover crops
Elida FFA Greenhand Team
places 4th in state contest
The Elida FFA Greenhand Quiz Team
placed 4th out of 122 schools in the Ohio
FFA Greenhand Career Development
Event. This contest is an internet test taken
by 1,649 frst-year Ohio FFA members. The
contest testsa student knowledge about the
Ohio FFA, National FFA, FFA history and
parliamentary procedure skills. Elida team
members are, front from left, Paige Wehrly
who placed 19th; Oliver Fessler, 21st; Brent
Sevitz, 23rd; Kris Mullins, 27th; Torey Car-
roll, 29th; and Deeanna Young, 54th; and
back, Sydney Sexton, 89th; Tabitha Duffy,
98th; Robert Wortman, 134th; Luke Sim-
mons, 137th; Jacob Simmons, 177th; Storm-
ie Mayle, 189th; Miranda Goodman, 190th;
Megan Tracy, 296th; Chris Fox 349th; and
Keith Murphy, 378th.
Local Boys Basketball
Standings – 2012-2013
League All Games
Through Feb. 6
BLANCHARD VALLEY
CONFERENCE
Liberty-Benton 7-0 16-1
Arlington 6-1 15-2
Leipsic 5-2 14-3
McComb 5-2 9-9
Vanlue 4-3 12-5
Cory-Rawson 3-4 9-8
Pandora-Gilboa 2-5 4-14
Van Buren 2-5 3-14
Hardin-Northern 1-6 3-13
Arcadia 0-7 1-16
MIDWEST ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
New Bremen 6-1 15-3
St. Henry 5-1 15-3
St. John’s 5-1 12-4
Versailles 5-2 14-3
Fort Recovery 4-2 15-2
Minster 2-4 10-7
New Knoxville 2-4 9-8
Coldwater 1-4 6-9
Marion Local 0-5 6-10
Parkway 0-6 1-16
NORTHWEST CENTRAL
CONFERENCE
Lima Temple Christian 6-1 13-6
Upper Scioto Valley 5-2 12-4
Ridgemont 4-3 8-11
Fairbanks 3-3 10-7
Perry 3-3 6-11
Waynesfield-Goshen 3-3 6-11
Riverside 2-4 5-14
Marion Catholic 0-7 3-17
NORTHWEST CONFERENCE
Lima Central Catholic 6-0 17-1
Spencerville 5-1 9-6
Crestview 4-2 15-2
Paulding 4-2 14-4
Columbus Grove 4-2 12-6
Lincolnview 3-3 7-12
Bluffton 2-4 8-9
Ada 1-5 5-11
Jefferson 1-5 3-13
Allen East 0-6 2-14
PUTNAM COUNTY LEAGUE
Leipsic 5-0 14-3
Columbus Grove 5-1 12-6
Miller City 4-1 14-4
Kalida 3-2 5-11
Ottoville 2-3 7-11
Fort Jennings 1-4 4-15
Continental 0-4 5-11
Pandora-Gilboa 0-5 4-14
THREE RIVERS ATHLETIC
CONFERENCE
Tol. St. John’s Jes. 9-1 15-3
Tol. Whitmer 8-2 13-5
Tol. Cent. Cath. 7-2 14-2
Findlay 5-4 9-7
Fremont Ross 5-5 10-6
Lima Senior 4-6 7-10
Tol. St. Francis DeS. 1-9 1-15
Oregon Clay 0-10 1-15
WESTERN BUCKEYE LEAGUE
Bath 6-0 15-3
Elida 6-0 11-7
Ottawa-Glandorf 5-1 15-2
Defiance 3-3 12-5
Wapakoneta 3-3 10-8
Celina 3-3 8-9
Kenton 2-4 11-6
Van Wert 2-4 9-8
St. Marys 0-6 5-12
Shawnee 0-6 2-15
Local Girls Basketball
Standings – 2012-2013
League All Games
Through Feb. 6
BLANCHARD VALLEY
CONFERENCE
Arcadia 7-1 16-3
Liberty-Benton 6-2 15-4
Arlington 6-2 12-5
Leipsic 5-2 12-6
McComb 5-3 13-6
Pandora-Gilboa 5-3 12-7
Van Buren 3-5 4-15
Cory-Rawson 1-7 7-12
Vanlue 1-7 5-14
Hardin-Northern 0-7 0-17
MIDWEST ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
Versailles 7-1 17-3
New Knoxville 6-1 17-3
Minster 6-2 12-6
Fort Recovery 5-2 13-5
Marion Local 4-3 12-7
Coldwater 4-3 13-7
New Bremen 2-5 10-10
St. Henry 1-6 8-11
St. John’s 1-6 8-10
Parkway 0-7 2-16
NORTHWEST CENTRAL
CONFERENCE
Waynesfield-Goshen 5-1 13-7
Fairbanks 5-1 10-10
Upper Scioto Valley 4-2 10-8
Perry 4-2 7-13
Riverside 2-4 5-15
Marion Catholic 1-5 2-19
Ridgemont 0-6 0-20
NORTHWEST CONFERENCE
Crestview 7-0 17-2
Lincolnview 5-2 14-5
Ada 5-2 11-8
Allen East 4-3 9-8
Bluffton 4-3 9-8
Lima CC 3-4 9-10
Jefferson 3-4 7-12
Columbus Grove 2-5 4-14
Spencerville 2-5 2-16
Paulding 0-7 4-15
PUTNAM COUNTY LEAGUE
Ottoville 7-0 19-0
Leipsic 5-1 12-6
Continental 4-2 13-6
Pandora-Gilboa 4-2 12-7
Kalida 3-2 11-7
Fort Jennings 2-4 7-12
Columbus Grove 1-5 4-14
Miller City 0-7 4-16
THREE RIVERS
ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
Tol. Notre Dame Acad. 12-0 16-3
Findlay 9-2 14-4
Lima Senior 7-5 11-7
Tol. Cent. Cath. 8-4 12-7
Tol. Whitmer 7-5 14-6
Oregon Clay 3-9 5-16
Toledo St. Ursula 1-10 6-11
Fremont Ross 0-12 5-14
WESTERN BUCKEYE LEAGUE
Bath 7-0 14-5
Celina 6-1 17-2
Wapakoneta 5-2 9-9
Ottawa-Glandorf 4-3 14-6
Shawnee 4-3 8-11
Elida 3-4 8-12
Kenton 2-5 10-8
Van Wert 2-5 9-10
St. Marys 2-5 3-15
Defiance 0-7 1-17
Local High School
Cage Standings
The Super Bowl has come and gone once more
The Super Bowl was definitely an
interesting spectacle.
The Baltimore Ravens seemed to have
everything going their way when the
“blackout” hit in the third period.
Now, if I were a paranoid person
— which I am not but that’s because
everyone is out to get me! — I might
think that the 49ers had something to
do with it. After all, they were seem-
ingly going nowhere fast and the break
seemed to invigorate them and stifle the
Ravens’ momentum. This despite what
Phil Simms had to say that it didn’t, in my
most humble and correct opinion!
An aside — I think he is one of the
best analysts going today, so no one’s
perfect!
Who knows if the 49ers would have
made a comeback anyway; we can always
argue pro and con: they were gathering
steam and putting “it” together; they were
dead in the water; etc., etc.
Here is another issue brought up since:
should the 49ers have considered going to
Alex Smith when Collin Kaepernick was
seemingly ineffective?
If they hadn’t staged that rally when
they did, would the pressure have been on
Jim Harbaugh to make that move — and
thus open up the floodgates for a full-
fledged quarterback controversy in the
off-season?
Fortunately for him, Kaepernick made
that a moot question — but you can still
have some fun arguing the point.
An aside here: where will Smith be
next fall? There are a few teams that
would likely be great candidates for him
because he, at last, seems to be living
up to his No. 1 status. The Chiefs are
one, the Raiders another, perhaps even
the Jets since Mark Sanchez is damaged
goods. Isn’t that what is so great about
being a fan — we can have these “civil”
discussions about what-might-have-been
and never really have a conclusion?
Hopefully, no punches will be thrown!
Then there was this interesting com-
ment by Baltimore quarterback — and
soon-to-be free-agent — Joe Flacco dur-
ing the victory parade about him being a
“Raven for life.”
Does that mean he will take less from
the Ravens during negotiations? I have
heard more than a few pundits make
that case but I don’t know; after all, they
low-balled him last summer during nego-
tiations because he wasn’t considered an
elite quarterback.
Well, he is now!
I know that Ray Lewis was on a lot
of people’s minds one way or another.
There are many that believe he is a
phony that — literally — got away with
murder oh those many years ago, before
the first Super Bowl triumph by the
franchise, only because he is Ray Lewis,
professional football player.
I can’t really blame them. Celebrities
and pro athletes, for example, do seem to
live by another standard; I don’t think that
is wrong to write and there were some …
“interesting” facts.
There are many that gave him the ben-
efit of the doubt as to what he has done
with his life since, which may not be a
really good response to what was a crime
that he was “around”, but it is true.
Again, that is fodder for “civil” argu-
mentation.
However, he chose the right time to
retire and hang up the cleats once and for
all. He is clearly not even close to what
he once was in his heyday — or even two
years ago.
Whatever you think about him, the
game will be lesser with his retirement.
He will go down as one of the greatest
middle/inside linebackers of all time — I
don’t think that is hyperbole — definitely
one of the most passionate (OK, I’d have
done fine without “The Dance”) and is a
first-ballot Hall-of-Famer.
I think that some voters will not vote
for him because of the events that hap-
pened early in his career and I can under-
stand that completely.
However, if they don’t vote for him
because they don’t want a unanimous
vote, that is bush league.
As far as the new inductees into the
— say it with me now in your best John
Facenda intonation — “Pro Football Hall
of Fame,” I really can’t argue with any of
them. They are all deserving.
Bill Parcells, Warren Sapp, Cris “All
he catches are touchdowns” Carter,
Jonathan Ogden, Larry Allen, Curley
Culp and Dave Robinson will join the
other immortals in Canton in August.
In fact, I thought that Culp was already
in: I’m showing my age when I say I
can remember him being one of the best
defensive lineman/nose tackles — when
that was a new position — in the NFL for
many years for the old Houston Oilers.
For Browns’ fans, Art Modell will
blessedly not go in — for now.
Methinks at some point, he will get in.
If Al “Thorn in the side” Davis can get in,
Modell likely will.
As well, guys that did not get in,
especially Charles Haley, Andrew Reed,
Aeneas Williams and Will Shields — a
many-time Pro Bowler offensive lineman
— likely will get in sometime.
With only five available spots, includ-
ing owners, and two possible from the
“seniors” — those retired 25 years or
more — some worthies will get left out
every time.
Maybe next year!
Just think; training camps for the 2013
season open in about 5 months!
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 31 16 .660 —
Brooklyn 29 20 .592 3
Boston 25 23 .521 6 1/2
Philadelphia 21 27 .438 10 1/2
Toronto 17 32 .347 15
Southeast Division
Miami 32 14 .696 —
Atlanta 27 21 .563 6
Orlando 14 35 .286 19 1/2
Washington 13 35 .271 20
Charlotte 11 37 .229 22
Central Division
Indiana 31 19 .620 —
Chicago 29 19 .604 1
Milwaukee 25 23 .521 5
Detroit 18 32 .360 13
Cleveland 15 34 .306 15 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 39 11 .780 —
Memphis 30 18 .625 8
Houston 27 24 .529 12 1/2
Dallas 21 28 .429 17 1/2
New Orleans 16 33 .327 22 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 37 12 .755 —
Denver 31 18 .633 6
Utah 28 22 .560 9 1/2
Portland 25 24 .510 12
Minnesota 18 28 .391 17 1/2
Pacific Division
L.A. Clippers 35 16 .686 —
Golden State 30 19 .612 4
L.A. Lakers 23 26 .469 11
Phoenix 17 33 .340 17 1/2
Sacramento 17 33 .340 17 1/2
———
Wednesday’s Results
Cleveland 122, Charlotte 95
Indiana 88, Philadelphia 69
Boston 99, Toronto 95
L.A. Clippers 86, Orlando 76
Washington 106, New York 96
Atlanta 103, Memphis 92
Brooklyn 93, Detroit 90
Miami 114, Houston 108
New Orleans 93, Phoenix 84
Oklahoma City 119, Golden State 98
Dallas 105, Portland 99
Utah 100, Milwaukee 86
San Antonio 104, Minnesota 94
Today’s Games
L.A. Lakers at Boston, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
1
8 – The Herald Thursday, February 7, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
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Tree Service
SPEARS
LAWN CARE inc.
419-695-8516
NEW AT
FREE ESTIMATES
• Tree Trimming
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419-203-8202
bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured
Mueller Tree
Service
Tree Trimming,
Topping
& Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
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CALL FOR APT. OR DROP OFF
3389 ST. MARYS RD.
DELPHOS, OHIO 45833
Hours: Mon., Tues,
Wed., Fri.: 9-12 & 1-5 p.m.;
Sat. 9-12
Closed Thurs. and Sunday
419-692-4341
Over 20 years of service.
REASONABLE RATES!
Welding
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
Fabrication & Welding Inc.
Q
uality
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd., Delphos
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
Home Improvement
Harrison
Floor Installation
Carpet, Vinyl, Wood,
Ceramic Tile
Reasonable rates
Free estimates
harrisonfoorinstallation.com
Phil 419-235-2262
Wes 567-644-9871
“You buy, we apply”
Miscellaneous
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GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Construction
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
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AMISH
CARPENTERS
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Build or Remodel
For all your metal siding and
roofing needs contact us.
FOR FREE ESTIMATE
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202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
Ruth Baldauf-Liebrecht ... 419-234-5202
Amie Nungester ............... 419-236-0688
Janet Kroeger .................. 419-236-7894
Jodi Moenter ................ 419-296-9561
Lynn Claypool .............. 419-234-2314
Del Kemper .................. 419-204-3500
DOWNTOWN DELPHOS
OPEN HOUSE TOUR
THURSDAY, FEB. 7th • 6:00-8:00 PM
FOR A FULL LIST OF HOMES FOR SALE & OPEN HOUSES:
WWW.SCHRADERREALTY.NET
212 N. Main Street
A must see building! Opportunity to start your business & live
in the beautiful upstairs 3rd floor that has room to roam OR
rent out all the units for income! Roof & windows new within
7 yrs! 3rd floor has master bedroom with master bath, newer
kitchen, fireplace & more! Krista will greet you.
151 W. Second Street
Spacious 17000 square feet 2 story building, high ceilings,
newer roof, usable basement, lots of window space, many
possibilities & more! Jodi will greet you.
SCHRADER
REAlty llC
Krista Schrader ........ 419-233-3737
Have you ever dreamed of starting your own business?
Are you running out of space in your current business?
COME JOIN US!
Do you love the fast-moving media
business? Join our team!
dhi Media is seeking
MEDIA REPRESENTATIVES
This position requires an individual to sell
multi-media products including print,
interactive and specialty publications.
The right candidate will sell our products to
a diverse group of businesses in a defned
geographical territory.
Minimum of 1-2 years previous outside sales
experience a plus.
Must be computer literate,
experienced with MS Offce.
We have one part-time and one full-time
position available now. Both positions offer
excellent compensation packages including
hourly pay, commission, bonus and more.
Interested applicants should email a cover
letter and resume to Don Hemple at
dhemple@delphosherald.com
dhi
MEDIA
PEST CONTROL TECHNICIAN
BUCKEYE
EXTERMINATING
is adding full-time & seasonal Service
Technicians for pesticide application
work. Vehicle, tools, training & uniforms
provided. DFWP enforced. Insurance,
profit sharing, retirement plan, vacation,
attendance bonuses etc.
Applications are being accepted.
24018 US 224, Box 246
Ottoville, OH 45876
419-453-3931 or
1-800-523-1521
QUALITY ASSURANCE ENGINEER
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast
aluminum wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals
America, our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction
has helped us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 24 years
of steady employment. We now have an opportunity for a Quality Assurance
Engineer to assume the following responsibilities:
• Performs analyses, inspection, design, and testing functions to
ensure quality of raw materials and finished products
• Conducts quality engineering reviews of design documentation to
ensure that results meet/exceed customer requirements
• Identifies potential quality issues and recommends changes
in process, procedure, work methods, and other corrective/
preventive actions to support continuous quality improvement
• Prepares various reports for management and customer
representatives
Candidates must have at least three (3) years of related quality assur-
ance engineering experience, including ISO/TS 16949 quality man-
agement systems, root cause analysis tools, SPC, FMEA, and APQP/
PPAP processes. Experience should also include gauging, inspection
processes, blueprint reading, geometric dimensioning/tolerancing, and
excellent computer skills. A related Associate degree is required. A
related Bachelor degree and ASQ certification is preferred.
In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, prof-
it-sharing, and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life,
vision, and disability insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with
Company matching, paid vacation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re
looking for a career opportunity with a growing company, please for-
ward your qualifications and salary history to:
AAP St. Marys Corporation
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, Ohio 45885
Attention: Human Resource-DH
953
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210 Child Care
ARE YOU looking for a
child care provider in
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Call YWCA Child Care
Resource and Referral
at: 1-800-992-2916 or
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WOULD YOU like to be
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provider? Let us help.
Call YWCA Child Care
Resource and Referral
at: 1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465
320 House For Rent
427 HARMON St., Sin-
gle family home. 2BR,
1BA. $500/mo + deposit.
Call 419-235-8022
325
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419-692-3951
RENT OR Rent to Own.
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430
Mfg./Mobile
Homes For Sale
DOUBLEWIDE 44x24.
Excellent condition, 3BR,
2BA, many upgrades. In-
cludes new roof, porch,
windows/treatments,
shed and all appliances.
Must see at Ulm’s II, 227
W. Clime St., Lot 37. Im-
medi ate Possessi on.
$22,000
419-234-5495
419-605-8906
545 Firewood/Fuel
HARDWOOD FIRE-
WOOD for sale. Well
seasoned. Call
419-230-4890
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
620 Child Care
OPENING FOR one to
two children, newborn--
age-3. References, low
rat es, non-smoki ng,
meals provided. Prefer
full-time but part-time
okay. Hours 6am-5pm.
Close to Landeck. Call
419- 692- 1753 or
419-296-7740
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
(419) 223-7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities,
or work at home oppor-
tunities. The BBB will as-
sist in the investigation
of these businesses.
(This notice provided as
a customer service by
The Delphos Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
805 Auto
1997 DODGE Dakota
4x4 V8 with tool box.
Good tires and brakes,
new battery, dri ves
great. $4000/OBO. Call
419-204-3106
810
Auto Parts and
Accessories
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
080 Help Wanted
School Bus
Drivers
for Perry Local
Schools– Class B
with endorsement P
and S preferred but
not necessary.
SUBSTITUTES
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY!
Possibility of full
time positions.
Training available.
Contact NIKI @
567-940-1418
WANTED
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+years OTR expe-
rience! Our drivers aver-
age 42cents per mile &
higher! Home every
weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annu-
ally. Benefits available.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with re-
spect! PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
080 Help Wanted
Now hiring –
at Vancrest of Delphos
Vancrest of Delphos is a long-
term care facility providing
skilled rehabilitation services,
assisted living, post acute
medical care and more. We are
looking for caring, outgoing, en-
ergetic STNA’s to join our team.
We currently have part time
positions available for skilled
STNA’s. Nurse Aide Classes will
be offered in March for those
who wish to begin a rewarding
career as an STNA. Class size
will be limited. Please stop by
our Delphos locations and fill
out an application.
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
We need you...
VANCREST
Health Care Centers
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k.
Home weekends, & most
nights. Call Ulm’s Inc.
419-692-3951
PART-TIME RURAL
Route Driver needed.
Hours vary, Monday-Sat-
urday. Valid driver’s li-
cense and reliable trans-
portation with insurance
required. Applications
available at The Delphos
Herald office 405 N.
Main St., Delphos.
Place Your
Ad Today
419 695-0015
Auctions Ritchie Bros.
Unreserved Agricultural
Equipment Auction
8am Thursday Mar 14,
Columbus, OH. To sell
your farm equipment and
trucks at this auction call
855-331-5729. rbauction.
com.
Business Services
REACH 2 MILLION
NEWSPAPER READERS
with one ad placement.
ONLY $295.00. Ohio’s
best communi t y
newspapers. Call Kathy
at AdOhio Statewide
Classifed Network, 614-
486-6677, or E-MAIL at:
kmccutcheon@adohio.net
or check out our website
at: www.adohio.net.
Business Services REACH
OVER 1 MILLION
OHIO ADULTS with
one ad placement. Only
$975.00. Ask your local
newspaper about our 2X2
Display Network or 2x4
Display Network Only
$1860. or Call Kathy at
614- 486- 6677/ E- mai l
kmccutcheon@adohio.net.
or check out our website:
www.adohio.net
Help Wanted Drivers
- Hiring Experienced/
Inexperienced Tanker
Drivers! Earn up to
$.51per mile! New Fleet
Volvo Tractors! 1 Year
OTR Exp. Req. - Tanker
Training Available. Call
Today 877-882-6537
www.OakleyTransport.
com.
Help Wanted Knight
Refrigerated CDL-A
Truck Drivers Needed.
Get Paid Daily or Weekly,
Consistent Miles, Pay
Incentive & Benefits!
Become a Knight of the
Road. EOE
855-876-6079.
Help Wanted Drivers -
Qualify for any portion
of $.03/mile quarterly
bonus: $0.01 Safety, $.01
Production, $.01 MPG.
Two raises in frst year. 3
months recent experience.
800-414-9569 www.
driveknight.com.
Help Wanted Gordon
Trucking CDL-A Drivers
Needed! Up to $3,000
Sign On Bonus! Home
Weekly Available!
Benefts, 401K, EOE. No
East Coast. Call 7 days/
wk! TeamGTI.com. 866-
954-8836
Help Wanted Owner
Operators: Up to a $5,000
Sign-On Bonus. Great
Pay & paid FSC. Paid OH
& IN Tolls. Fuel & Tire
Discounts. Hometime
throughout the week. 3rd
Party Lease Purchase
program available. Call
Comtrak at 888-703-3889,
or apply online at www.
comtrak.com
Help Wanted Attn CDL-A
Drivers: Van positions,
earn up to 45 cpm with
our new Your Choice Pay
Plan (TM). Great Benefts
& Flexible Hometime.
800-325-5907 AA/EOE.
GoRoehl.com

Help Wanted Western
Ohio Drivers! Exceptional
Pay ($60-$70K annually)
and Benefit package.
Run regionally, be home
weekly! New Trucks!
Call 888-409-6033 or visit
online www.DRIVEJTC.
com
Help Wanted Gypsum
Express Class A CDL
Flatbed Drivers. Hiring
Road & Regional Positions
in your area. Call Jim
866-317-6556 x4 or apply
at gypsumexpress.com
Help Wanted Company
Drivers: $2500 Sign-On
Bonus! Super Service
is hiring solo and team
drivers. Great hometime
options. CDL-A required.
Recent graduates with
CDL-A welcome. Call
888-471-7081 or
apply online at www.
superservicellc.com
Help Wanted “You got
the drive, We Have the
Direction” OTR Drivers.
APU Equipped Pre-
Pass EZ-pass. Passenger
Policy. Newer Equipment.
100% No touch. 1-800-
528-7825.
Help Wanted WOOD
TRUCKING, Inc./MCT.
Job Guaranteed after
FREE 3 week CDL-A
Training. Live within 100
mile radius of Wauseon,
Ohio 1-800-621-4878.
Also, Hiring Drivers!
Help Wanted Drivers -
CDL-A TEAM WITH
TOTAL 50c/ Mile. For
Hazmat Teams. Solo
Drivers Also Needed! 1
yr. exp. req’d. 800-942-
2104 Ext. 7308 or 7307
www.TotalMS.com.
Instruction Attend
College Online from
Home. Medical, Bus-
iness, Criminal Justice,
Hospitality. Job Placement
Assistance. Computer
Available. Financial Aid
if Qualified. SCHEV
authorized. 1-877-295-
1667. www.CenturaOnline.
com.
Misc. Sawmills - from
only $3997.00- Make &
Save Money with your own
bandmill- Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.
com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.
300N

Misc. VACATION
CABINS FOR RENT
IN CANADA. Fish
for walleyes, perch,
northerns. Boats, motors,
gasoline included. Call
Hugh 1-800-426-2550 for
free brochure. website
www.bestfshing.com
Misc. Airlines Are
Hiring - Train for hands
on Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualifed -
Job Placement assistance.
Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance. 1-877-676-
3836.
RV’s For Sale 2006 Gulf
Stream Cavalier Travel
Trailers 8’x32’, Queen
bed + Bunks, Appliances
w/microwave, Furnace
and A/C. Incredible
Buy! ONLY $3,995
1-800-686-1763 www.
williamsburgsquare.com
Schools/Instruction NOT
MAKING ENOUGH $$$?
The average professional
truck driver earn $700+/
wk*! Get CDL training
@ Roadmaster in only
16 days! Truckers are in
demand & Werner Needs
Driver Trainees! CALL
TODAY! 614-962-6405.
Approved for Veterans
Training. Roadmaster
Drivers School of Ohio,
Inc. 4060 Perimeter Dr.,
Columbus, Ohio 43228
*DOL/BLS 2012
Answer to Puzzle
OHIO SCAN NETWORK CLASSIFIEDS
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Cooks shrimp
6 Lollipop cop
11 Of yore
12 Pierre’s school
13 Skullcap
15 Jungle snake
16 Has a rash
18 Fanatic
19 Curly’s friend
21 Ad -- committee
22 Connery of 007 fame
23 Gen. -- Bradley
25 Not many
28 Shade-loving plant
30 Bambi’s aunt
31 -- alai
32 Feel grateful
33 Butter serving
35 Drops anchor
37 Switchback curve
38 “Iliad” city
Is your ad here?
Call today!
419-695-0015
40 “Rule, Britannia” composer
41 Flock member
42 Six-pointers
43 Like the horizon
46 Miniature chicken
48 Planet
50 When mammoths roamed (2
wds.)
54 Take a powder
55 Has the nerve
56 Collie’s charge
57 Usual weather
DOWN
1 Short hairdo
2 Bullring shout
3 Mont. neighbor
4 Indulgent
5 Bad mood
6 Pocket janglers
7 Autumn mo.
8 Oaters’ -- Wayne
9 Baseball family name
10 Superman, incognito
14 Canyon reply
15 Yummy pie
17 Where you’re from
19 Tabby talk
20 Camel halts
22 Loafer
24 Plow into
25 Norway bay
26 Yields, as interest
27 Advisable
29 Likely
34 Places
36 Hot breakfast
39 Sherpa’s sighting
43 Fret and fume
44 Coy
45 Seldom seen
46 Road caution
47 Heavy-metal band
49 Dundee refusal
51 “Exodus” hero
52 Opal or moonstone
53 Vane dir.
* BUY *SELL *TRADE
Place an ad today in the Classifieds!
Call 419-695-0015
SNOW SKIS - Fiberglass,
good shape. Call $50.00.
419-204-8353
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Thursday Evening February 7, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
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BRAVO Shahs of Sunset Shahs of Sunset Kathy Happens Housewives/Atl. Shahs
CMT Reba Reba Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Redneck Vacation Redneck Vacation
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight
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©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Thursday, February 7, 2013 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Moving a bigger
deal for dad
Dear Annie: My fam-
ily wants to move to another
state. The only reason we
haven’t is because of my
dad’s job. He has worked
for the same company for
18 years and doesn’t want to
lose his retirement benefts.
I understand how important
the job is, but the company
could easily allow a transfer
to another branch.
Whenever we try to talk
to Dad about moving, he
gets angry and yells at us or
leaves the room
in frustration. It’s
causing a lot of
tension at home.
We feel stuck and
unhappy here, and
that makes me up-
set with my father
for not putting any
effort into mov-
ing. He has told us
many times that he
wants to go some-
where else, yet he
doesn’t do any-
thing to make it happen.
Dad was looking at real es-
tate prices in a city we vaca-
tioned in this year, but seems
to have forgotten about it.
How do we help him see that
moving is best for all of us?
There is no downside. Other
branches of the company pay
better than the one he works
at now, and there’s also the
possibility that he could fnd
a job with an entirely differ-
ent company that’s even bet-
ter for him.
I think Dad is worried
about selling the house, but
how will he know whether he
can sell it if he doesn’t try?
He is so resistant to change.
How can we help him? —
His Daughter
Dear Daughter: Moving
away may seem like a simple
thing to you, but for your fa-
ther, it is fraught with uncer-
tainty. You don’t know that
his company would offer to
transfer him. You don’t know
that he could fnd a better, or
even an adequate, job some-
where else and start from
scratch to support his family.
You don’t know that he could
sell the house for enough to
buy another one. All of these
things weigh on his mind, and
your constant pressure adds
to his unhappiness and stress.
Here’s how you can help
Dad: Tell him you love him
and you know he is doing
what he thinks is best for the
family. Don’t bring up the
subject again. He knows how
you feel. Decide to make the
best of the situation you have,
and if you don’t move away,
you have the option of leav-
ing on your own when you
are an adult.
Dear Annie: My wife of
54 years passed away fve
years ago. This past year, I re-
married. Here is my problem:
My granddaughter is get-
ting married this summer and
has indicated that she would
like a picture of her
grandmother for
the wedding. I as-
sume she plans to
display the picture.
I have told my
daughter that it is
time for the both
of them to get over
it. I also told her
that it is incorrect
to display a picture
of a dead person at
a wedding. Correct
me if I’m wrong.
— Concerned
Dear Concerned: You’re
wrong. Your granddaughter
wishes to honor her grand-
mother, who did not live long
enough to see her walk down
the aisle. And while it would
be inappropriate to make the
entire wedding about Grand-
ma, a small tribute would be
lovely. You may have fnished
grieving for your late wife,
but your daughter and her
child still wish to remember
her on this occasion. Please
don’t stand in their way.
Dear Annie: This is for
“Not Anti-Social or Addicted
to the Internet,” the 56-year-
old man who is looking to
make new friends. I suggest
taking up the game of tennis,
where the players on the lo-
cal courts are always looking
for people to play and social-
ize with. Local tennis clubs
are a great place to have fun
and meet terrifc people. Ten-
nis also is a fantastic form of
exercise. — Jim
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2013
More than a few of your activities
in the year ahead are
likely to be done on
a much grander scale
than you’ve tried in
the past. This will be
true socially as well
as commercially.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- From time to time, you could
be showered with more material
opportunities than usual. Be both alert
and receptive to any new ideas that
come along.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- This might be one of those days
when it’s OK to toot your own horn to
attract support for a fresh idea. Blow
your bugle loud and clear.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
This could be a good day to enhance
your financial wherewithal. If you
know of anything you can do that
would open such doors, do it now.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Most of your associates had better
step aside when they see you coming,
because once you get on a roll, there
will be no stopping you, regardless of
what’s in your way.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- You will have no trouble
accomplishing whatever you set your
mind to. Obstacles will melt away in
the face of your energetic momentum.
Enjoy the ride.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Putting yourself out for others without
hesitation will make you feel good,
mostly because you won’t make them
feel obligated to you in the process.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t
hesitate to elevate your sights when
establishing your objectives. All
you have to do to perform some
remarkable feats is believe in yourself
to the fullest.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If
there is an important agreement that
you need to negotiate, you’re likely
to find this to be an excellent day to
do so. You stand a good chance of
coming to a quick understanding.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Because your modus operandi is
exceptionally efficient, you won’t
waste any time performing your
assignments, particularly those that
involve a joint interest.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Many times, two heads are better
than one. This is likely to be one of
those days when your efforts could
be doubly effective, all because of
another’s aid.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Because you unselfishly desire
to help another, your efforts could
bear large fruit. As a result, you could
receive some extra rewards that you
didn’t seek.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Someone you recently met is very
anxious to get together to discuss a
matter that he or she believes could
be of interest. A meeting might be
planned.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
Shop the classifieds and
grab a great deal on a
great deal of items!
Autos • Appliances
• Clothing •
Electronics
• Furniture • Jewelry
Musical Instruments
THE DELPHOS
HERALD
(419) 695-0015
10 – The Herald Thursday, February 7, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
The chorus line inspired football legend Knute
Rockne to develop his infamous Notre Dame shift. His
shift, in which all four backs moved simultaneously prior
to the snap, was eventually banned because it was dif-
ficult to defend.
A Texas county mistakenly printed Chile’s flag on
the instruction sheet it distributed with absentee ballots.
Chile’s and the Lone Star State’s flags are incredibly
similar. Both feature a white stripe on top, a red stripe on
bottom and a single white five-pointed star in the middle
of a blue field.
Today’s questions:
What 2009 song had the shortest title of any No. 1 hit
on the Billboard Top 100?
In what year in this century, did Sir Isaac Newton,
the great English scientist, predict the Apocalypse would
come?
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
9 dead, villages destroyed in Solomons tsunami
BY KRISTEN GELINEAU
The Associated Press
SYDNEY — Aid workers struggled to
reach remote, tsunami-ravaged villages in the
Solomon Islands today, as the death toll rose
with more bodies found in wrecked homes
and debris in the South Pacific island chain.
At least nine people, including a child,
were killed when a powerful earthquake set
off a small tsunami that sent 1.5-meter (4
foot, 11-inch) waves roaring inland on Santa
Cruz Island, in the eastern Solomons, on
Wednesday. Around 100 homes across five
villages were damaged or destroyed.
The waves proved deadly for five elderly
villagers and a child, who weren’t fast enough
to outrun the rushing water, said George
Herming, a spokesman for the prime minis-
ter. Three more bodies were found today, but
Herming said details of how those victims
died were not immediately available.
Several others are missing and dozens of
strong aftershocks were keeping frightened
villagers from returning to the coast, Herming
said.
“People are still scared of going back to
their homes because there’s nothing left, so
they are residing in temporary shelters on
higher ground,” Herming said.
The tsunami was generated by an 8.0-mag-
nitude earthquake that struck near the town of
Lata, on Santa Cruz in Temotu, the eastern-
most province in the Solomons. Disaster offi-
cials were en route to the isolated area today
after the local airport, which was flooded by
the tsunami, was finally cleared of debris. The
Solomons comprise more than 200 islands
with a population of about 552,000 people.
They lie on the “Ring of Fire” — an arc of
earthquake and volcanic zones that stretches
around the Pacific Rim and where about 90
percent of the world’s quakes occur. More
than 50 people were killed and thousands
lost their homes in April 2007 when a mag-
nitude-8.1 quake hit the western Solomon
Islands, sending waves crashing into coastal
villages.
Hearts in Motion cheer squads
take home first-place trophies
The Hearts in Motion competitive cheer SweetHearts, ages 6-9, are in the first two rows; and the older HeartBreakers,
ages 10-17, are in the back two rows. Squad members include, front from left, Kaelyn Schram, Morgan Schuck,
Addison Waltmire, Carli Boroff and Ericka Younts; row two, Saige Waltmire, Alexis Schram, Ava Boedicker and Payton
Waltmire; row three, Madilynn Schuck, Caylee Boroff, April Horstman and Maggie Bauer; and back, Taylor Coronado,
Samantha Miller, Kelsi Twining, Kaelin Cotrell, Rayanna Manley and Brielle Dirmeyer. (Submitted photos)
Information submitted
DELPHOS — The Delphos-based
Hearts In Motion Baton, Dance, & Cheer
Center’s competitive cheerleading squads
got off on the right foot when both teams
won first place at the season’s first com-
petition on Jan. 13 at the Cheer Max
Competition in Dayton.
Next, the teams competed on Jan. 19 in
Dayton at the Spirit Round up and earned
a second first-place win for both squads
and have received US Finals bids to com-
pete in the end-of-season event.
This is the first year for the studio’s All
Star competitive cheer teams. The compe-
tition routine the girls perform includes a
two-minute routine composed of dance,
tumbling, jumps and stunts. They practice
two days a week and have been doing so
since October.
The Youth Team, the SweetHearts,
consists of girls ranging in age from 6-9
and the senior team, the HeartBreakers,
consists of girls ranging from 10-17. The
two teams even scored some perfect “10s”
from the judges.
Coaching the squads are Jenna Dancer,
Tonia Twining, Michelle Burgei and Jamie
Crippin.
The squads have three more competi-
tions scheduled as well as a performance
at a Cleveland Cavaliers game.
The season will end in April and try-
outs for the new season will be held in
April/May.
Pa. mistrial declared when prosthetic eye pops out
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA — An
assault trial over a fight that
cost a man his left eye ended
in a mistrial Wednesday when
his prosthetic eye popped out
as he was testifying, startling
jurors.
John Huttick was weep-
ing on the witness stand in
Common Pleas Court as he
testified about the impact of
losing his eye in the August
2011 fight in the park-
ing lot of a bar called the
New Princeton Tavern, The
Philadelphia Inquirer report-
ed.
Suddenly, the $3,000 pros-
thetic blue eye popped out.
Huttick caught it and cried
out as two jurors gasped and
started to rise.
“I couldn’t believe it just
came out,” Huttick said.
Judge Robert Coleman,
who called it an “unfortunate,
unforeseen incident,” granted
a mistrial motion by defense
attorney Eileen Hurley. He
scheduled a new trial for
March 4.
A group of people includ-
ing Huttick and defen-
dant Matthew Brunelli had
been drinking at the bar,
Assistant District Attorney
Mark Gilson said. Brunelli
left with a girlfriend but
got into an argument with
another patron that turned
into a fight in the park-
ing lot, and when Huttick
tried to separate the pair
Brunelli threw a punch that
hit Huttick’s left eye, Gilson
said.
Hurley said her client,
who’s charged with aggra-
vated assault, struck Huttick
with a fist, but Gilson said
he “stabbed” Huttick with
a metal key sticking out
between his fingers.
Huttick, who’s suing
Brunelli, said that he lost his
job because of the injury and
that depression drained his
finances and nearly broke up
his relationship with his girl-
friend.
“A year later,” Huttick
said, “I have no place to live,
and I ran out of money.”
Boy Scouts delay decision
on policy excluding gays
Camel OK after enclosure
escape, clipped by van
The Associated Press
CONCORD, Calif. — Officials believe a camel that escaped
its enclosure twice Tuesday before being clipped by a minivan
probably just wanted to be around some other animals.
The Contra Costa Times reports the single-humped camel
was hit by the van as it walked along a road in Concord around
6:45 p.m. Tuesday.
It was the second time Tuesday the 10-year-old camel
named “Phil” escaped its enclosure. Earlier in the day citizens
helped California Highway Patrol officers shepherd the camel
off the roadway.
Raymond Ferrante — a land manager for a company over-
seeing property where the camel is being kept — says UC
Davis veterinarians have examined it and said the camel did
not suffer any broken bones, or other injuries.
Ferrante says because camels are “very social” he believes
that’s why Phil escaped its enclosure twice in one day.
BY NOMAAN MERCHANT and DAVID CRARY
The Associated Press
IRVING, Texas — Caught in an ideological crossfire, the
Boy Scouts of America is putting off until May a decision on
whether to ease its policy of excluding gays. Whatever the
organization eventually does, it’s likely to anger major constitu-
encies and worsen schisms within Scouting.
The delay, which the Scouts attributed to “the complexity of
this issue,” was announced Wednesday after closed-door delib-
erations by the BSA’s national executive board. Under consid-
eration was a proposal to ease the longstanding ban on gays by
allowing sponsors of local troops to decide for themselves on
the membership of gay Scouts and adult leaders.
As the board met over three days at a hotel near Dallas, it
became clear that the proposal would be unacceptable to large
numbers of impassioned Scouting families and advocacy groups
on both the left and right.
The iconic youth organization is now deeply entangled in
the broader cultural and political conflicts over such issues as
same-sex marriage and religious freedom. Tilting toward either
side will probably alienate the other, and a midway balancing
act will be difficult.
Gay-rights supporters contend that no Scout units anywhere
should exclude gays, and vowed to maintain pressure on the
BSA’s corporate donors to achieve that goal. Some conserva-
tives, including religious leaders whose churches sponsor
troops, warned of mass defections if the ban were even partially
eased. They urged supporters to flood headquarters with phone
calls.
“In the past two weeks, Scouting has received an outpouring
of feedback from the American public,” said the BSA’s national
spokesman, Deron Smith. “It reinforces how deeply people care
about Scouting and how passionate they are about the organiza-
tion.”
The BSA “needs time for a more deliberate review of its
membership policy,” Smith added. He said the board would pre-
pare a resolution to be voted on by the 1,400 voting members of
the BSA national council at a meeting during the week of May
20 in Grapevine, Texas.
The organization had announced last week that it was con-
sidering allowing Scout troops to decide whether to allow gay
membership, ensuring that the executive board meeting would
be in the national spotlight.
Learning that a decision would be deferred, gay-rights lead-
ers assailed the BSA.
“Every day that the Boy Scouts of America delay action is
another day that discrimination prevails,” said Chad Griffin,
president of the Human Rights Campaign. “Young Americans,
gay and straight, are hurt by the inaction associated with today’s
news.”
“A Scout is supposed to be brave, and the Boy Scouts failed
to be brave today,” said Jennifer Tyrrell, an Ohio mother ousted
as a den leader of her son’s Cub Scout pack because she’s a
lesbian.
Ex-officer suspect in cop killing
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Police east of Los Angeles in
Riverside say two officers were ambushed overnight and the
suspect is a former LAPD cop who’s still on the loose.
Riverside Lt. Guy Toussaint says the officers were stopped at
a red light while on routine patrol around 1:30 a.m. today when
someone shot them. One of the officers was killed and the other
was critically wounded. Toussaint says investigators believe the
shooter was former LA police officer Christopher Dorner, who’s
also the main suspect in the weekend killing of a couple whose
bodies were found in Irvine. Police say Dorner implicated him-
self in the killings in a “manifesto” that included threats against
several people, including members of the LAPD.
Toussaint says police don’t know where Dorner is but think
he left the area.

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