ORDONIO, Mark Angelo A. MST 123 GY-3L Lesson Plan for Microteaching I.

TITLE Names and Formulas of Complex Ions OBJECTIVES At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to: 1. Name complex ions and coordination compounds from their formulas; and 2. Write formulas of complex ions and coordination compounds from their names.

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III. MATERIALS/REFERENCES A. MATERIALS Table of common ligands Table of Latin stems used in metal complexes Illustration of sample complex ions Letter-sized coloured papers cut in halves lengthwise B. REFERENCE Smoot, R.C., R.G. Smith, and J. Price. 1990. Chemistry: A Modern Course. 2nd ed. Columbus, Ohio: Merrill Publishing Company. p. 365-366. IV. MAIN IDEAS/CONCEPTS (MIND MAPPING) *Students are expected to have a background on naming compounds and writing chemical formulas. Complex ions are named as follows: 1. Ligands first, in alphabetical order with prefixes, if needed 2. Central ion 3. –ate ending, if the ion is negative 4. Roman numeral, if needed V. INTRODUCTION A. RECALL One of the most important properties of polar molecules is their behavior towards ions in a solution. Given an ionic compound dissolved in water, the surface ions of the crystal become surrounded by polar H2O molecules that adhere to the surface. The water molecule-ion clusters formed enter the solution. The stability of these clusters is greatest when they have at their center a small ion of high charge. Since positive ions are usually smaller than negative ions, the clusters with which we are concerned have a positive ion at the center. When polar molecules or negative ions cluster around a central positive ion, a complex ion is formed.

B. MOTIVATION ACTIVITY Group the class in threes. Present flash cards containing various names and formulas of different chemical compounds. Ask each trio to write either one of the following on their papers for ten seconds: 1. the name or formula of a specific compound 2. the oxidation number of a specific atom in a compound First trio to gain five correct answers wins. VI. LESSON PROPER A. DISCUSSION A complex ion is formed when polar molecules or negative ions cluster around a central positive ion. The polar molecules or negative ions that are attached to the central positive ion are known as ligands. The number of points of attachment of the ligands around a central positive ion in a complex is called the coordination number. The following are examples of complex ions.

PtCl62- - hexachloroplatinate(IV) ion  Contains six chloride ions (ligands) attached to a platinum ion (central ion) with an oxidation number of 4+  Coordination number: 6

Cr(C2O4)33- - tetraoxalatochromate(III) ion  Contains three oxalate ions (bidentate ligands) attached to a chromate ion (central ion) with an oxidation number of 3+  Coordination number: 6

B. APPLICATION 1. Naming a complex ion In naming a complex ion, the ligands are named first, followed by the name of the central ion. The name for each ligand is modified by using a prefix, indicating the number of ligands in the formula. If more than one ligands appear in the formula, the names are listed alphabetically without regard to numerical prefixes. The central ion is named in the usual manner if the whole complex ion has a positive charge; otherwise, use the suffix –ate. Some metal complexes, however, use Latin stems. If the central ion has more than one possible oxidation number, a Roman numeral indicating the correct oxidation number is included in parentheses following the name of the complex ion. Examples: CrCl(NH3)52+ - pentaamminechlorochromium(III) ion IrCl63- - hexachloroiridate(III) ion 2. Writing the formula of a complex ion In writing the formula of a complex ion, the symbol for the central ion is named first, followed by the symbols or formulas for the ligands. Negative ligands are listed first, followed by neutral molecules. Examples: pentaammineaquairidium(III) ion – Ir(NH3)5H2O3+ carbonylpentacyanoferrate(II) ion – Fe(CN)5CO3VII. ASSESSMENT Group the class in threes (members of current group must be different from the previous). Present flash cards containing various names and formulas of different complex ions. Ask each pair to write the name or formula of a specific complex ion on their papers for fifteen seconds. First trio to gain five correct answers wins. SUMMARY Complex ions are named as follows: 1. Ligands first, in alphabetical order with prefixes, if needed 2. Central ion 3. –ate ending, if the ion is negative 4. Roman numeral, if needed ASSIGNMENT 1. Write the formula for each of the following complex ions: a. pentaaminechlorocobalt(III) ion b. hexaaquanickel(II) ion 2. Name the following complex ions: a. GaF52b. CrCl(H2O)4+

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