You are on page 1of 173

Level 2 Certificate in Basic Plumbing Studies Level 3 Certificate in Domestic Plumbing Studies

6129
Scheme Handbook

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 1

Publications and enquiries Publications Sales City & Guilds 1 Giltspur Street London EC1A 9DD Telephone Facsimile 020 7294 2468 020 7294 2400

General information about City & Guilds may be obtained from the Customer Relations at the above address, or on 020 7294 2800. Equal opportunities City & Guilds fully supports the principle of equal opportunities and we are committed to satisfying these principles in all our activities and in all our published material. For a copy of our equal opportunities policy statement please contact Customer Relations.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this publication is true and correct at the time of going to press. However, City & Guilds products and services are subject to continuous development and improvement and the right is reserved to change products and services from time to time. City & Guilds cannot accept liability for loss or damage arising from the use of information in this publication. 2005 The City & Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved. City & Guilds is a trademark of the City and Guilds of London Institute. 1 Giltspur Street London EC1A 9DD Telephone 020 7294 2468 Facsimile 020 7294 2400 Web site http:/www.city-and-guilds.co.uk

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 2

Contents

Page

1. Foreword 2. Introduction 3. The Technical Certificate Scheme 6129 and Plumbing NVQ Scheme 6089 Qualification Structure Plumbing Level 2 Plumbing Level 3 4. The Technical Certificate Standards 4.1 Scheme standards 4.2 Operating procedures 4.3 Centre staff qualifications 5. Assessment Procedures 5.1 Knowledge assessments general requirements 5.2 Centrally set and locally marked multiple-choice papers 5.3 General introduction 5.4 Administration and security 5.5 Examination papers 5.6 The delivery and marking of examinations (closed book tests) 5.7 Conducting the examination 5.8 Marking the examination 5.9 The delivery and marking of examinations (open book tests) 5.10 Guidance on oral questioning 5.11 Scheme quality assurance 5.12 Completion of the locally marked test papers 5.13 Copyright & ownership details

4 4 6

7 7 11 12 14 14 14 16 16 17 17 17 18 19 20 20 21 21

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 3

6. Practical Task Assessment 6.1 General requirements 6.2 The practical tasks at Level Two 6.3 The practical tasks at Level Three gas route 6.4 The practical tasks at Level Three oil route 6.5 Conditions for practical task assessment 6.6 Assessing practical tasks 6.7 Collecting and recording the outcomes of practical assessments 6.8 Use of NVQ evidence towards 6129 scheme practical tasks 7. Exemptions from practical and knowledge assessments 8. Appeals and Equal Opportunities 9. Further information

22 22 23 26 28 30 30 31 31 32 33 34

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 4

Plumbing Technical Certificate Scheme Handbook & Scheme Standards


1. Foreword This document should be read in conjunction with Providing City & Guilds Qualifications which details the general requirements for approved centres in offering plumbing awards and which must be adhered to, to offer the plumbing scheme. Detail that follows is specific to the plumbing technical certificate (6129) scheme. Technical Certificates in Plumbing (6129 scheme) are named as below City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate in Basic Plumbing Studies City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate in Domestic Plumbing Studies

They have been developed to provide the basic training (in college or centre) for plumbing new entrants including those on Apprenticeship Programmes, or other new entrants, the detail contained in this handbook must be applied by all centres on a mandatory basis. This handbook describes the schemes at Levels Two and Three, being implemented from 2003. Appendices A-C detail the technical certificate scheme standards these are particularly important to centres as they detail the scheme requirements against which the assessments have been developed and moreover provide a brief to centres on developing training programmes to support the scheme. The scheme standards are produced in a systems unit format for ease of programme delivery profiled against the NVQ units to demonstrate effective NVQ coverage. When referring to technical certificates this is a generic term only and centres must use correct accredited titles when referring to these qualifications. The name technical certificate may be used within this document for ease of use when referring to the 6129 scheme. 2. Introduction The Technical Certificate Competences The Level 2 and 3 Technical Certificates described in this Handbook cover the competences required by the Plumbing NVQ units in the following areas: Practical systems installation, commissioning & maintenance skills the material and tool skills required to measure cut bend join prefabricate install the systems materials and components, commission and maintain systems within the range of the qualification units Underpinning or supporting knowledge the essential knowledge required to work safely in plumbing activities work with and install systems materials and components install systems in compliance with current legislation and the industry standards for good practice The Technical Certificates also cover the knowledge required to work with other people

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 5

Technical Certificates as a source of NVQ evidence The Technical Certificates have been designed to provide a basis for the training required to support the NVQs in Plumbing, and knowledge and practical assessments undertaken by Technical Certificate candidates can contribute to the evidence requirements of the NVQs in Plumbing for which candidates will register where designated by the awarding body. The importance of training in current practices It is important to candidates that their Technical Certificate programme provides them with training in current plumbing practices - with materials, components, and equipment of types that are in current use within the industry. Centres are therefore required to provide installation facilities which realistically simulate workplace conditions, and to ensure that as far as possible candidates carry out practical task assessments in a manner that reflects the actual working procedures employed in the workplace. Detailed requirements in relation to practical facilities are therefore laid down by the awarding body; these requirements must be followed by each centre on a mandatory basis.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 6

3. The Technical Certificate Scheme 6129 and Plumbing NVQ Scheme 6089 Qualification Structure The relationships between the Plumbing Technical Certificates and the Plumbing NVQs are as shown below. Candidates will be permitted to carry the results of Technical Certificate knowledge assessments and a number of practical assessments forward as evidence to be set against NVQ requirements. However all NVQ Candidates must produce evidence from their workplace on a mandatory basis (laid down in NVQ scheme documentation) and undertake additional independent assessments (for Gas ACS, Water Regulations, Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems) The same knowledge assessment tests apply for the Technical Certificate and NVQs, with the exception of those competences for which independent assessments are undertaken. Performance evidence from the Technical Certificate Practical Tasks can contribute to the performance evidence requirements of the NVQs (further detail is identified in the Plumbing NVQ scheme documentation).

CERTIFICATE IN PLUMBING STUDIES LEVEL THREE

LEVEL THREE NVQ

CERTIFICATE IN BASIC PLUMBING STUDIES LEVEL TWO

LEVEL TWO NVQ

PLUS EVIDENCE OF CANDIDATE PEERFORMANCE IN THE WORKPLACE

PLUS INDEPENDENT ASSESSMENTS

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 7

4. The Technical Certificate Standards The content of the Technical Certificate units has been mapped to the NVQs on which they are based so that the links between the Technical Certificate and the NVQs are readily identifiable. However Technical Certificate assessments are freestanding and for Technical Certificate purposes Centres do not have to concern themselves with any cross mapping of outcomes against NVQ performance criteria and range. 4.1 Scheme standards Technical Certificate at Level Two (Certificate in Basic Plumbing Studies) Technical Certificate Unit Knowledge Units 201 Safety in Plumbing activities 202 - Key Plumbing Principles 203 - Common Plumbing Processes 204 - Cold Water Systems Unit 21 Maintain the Safe Working Environment when Undertaking Plumbing Work Activities General coverage of systems covered by the NVQ units at Level Two General coverage of common system competences from the systems range at Level Two Unit 7 Install Non-complex Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 12 Decommission Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 16 Maintain Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 7 Install Non-complex Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 12 Decommission Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 16 Maintain Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 7 Install Non-complex Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 12 Decommission Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 16 Maintain Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 7 Install Non-complex Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 12 Decommission Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 16 Maintain Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 7 Install Non-complex Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 12 Decommission Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 16 Maintain Non-complex Plumbing Systems NVQ Units of Competence from which the Technical Certificate units have been derived

205 - Domestic Hot Water Systems

206 - Sanitation Systems

207 - Central Heating Systems (Pipework only)

208 - Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 8

209 - Sheet Lead Weathering 210 - Environmental Awareness in Plumbing 211 - Effective Working Relationships in the Plumbing Industry 212 Basic Plumbing Studies Core Underpinning Knowledge (Question Paper) 213 - Basic Plumbing Studies Practical Tasks

Unit 7 Install Non-complex Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 16 Maintain Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 22 Contribute to the Improvement of the Plumbing Work Environment Unit 24 Maintain Effective Working Relationships Knowledge assessed across the range of units/ systems Practical tasks across the system range for units Unit 7 Install Non-complex Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 12 Decommission Non-complex Plumbing Systems Unit 16 Maintain Non-complex Plumbing Systems

Technical Certificate at Level Three (Certificate in Domestic Plumbing Studies) Technical Certificate Unit 300 Systems Planning (Underpinning knowledge question paper assessment) 301 Complex Cold Water Systems NVQ Units of Competence from which the Technical Certificate units have been derived Knowledge assessed across the range of units/ systems Unit 3 Plan Complex Domestic Plumbing Work Activities Unit 13 Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 3 Plan Complex Domestic Plumbing Work Activities Unit 8 Install Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 13 Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 17 Service and Maintain Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Unit 3 Plan Complex Domestic Plumbing Work Activities Unit 17 Service and Maintain Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Unit 3 Plan Complex Domestic Plumbing Work Activities Unit 8 Install Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Components Unit 13 Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 17 Service and Maintain Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems

302 Complex Domestic Hot Water Systems

303 Complex Sanitation Systems

304 - Central Heating Systems (Boilers and controls)

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 9

305 - Domestic Gas Supply Systems (Natural or LPG)

306 - Improvement of Business Products and Services in the Plumbing Industry 307 Plumbing Studies Core Underpinning Knowledge (Question Paper) (Gas) 308 Plumbing Studies Practical Tasks (Gas)

034 Plan Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems Work Activities 035 Install Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components 036 Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems 037 Service and Maintain Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components Unit 23 Contribute to the Improvement of Business Products and Services Knowledge assessed across the range of Systems/units Practical Tasks across the system range for Unit 8 Install Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 13 Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 17 Service and Maintain Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems 034 Plan Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems Work Activities 035 Install Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components 036 Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems 037 Service and Maintain Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components Knowledge assessed across the range of Systems/units 030 Plan Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems Work Activities 031 Install Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems and Components 032 Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems 033 Service and Maintain Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems and Components

309 - Plumbing studies core underpinning knowledge (OiL) 310 - Domestic oil supply systems (Oil)

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 10

311 - Plumbing studies practical tasks (Oil)

Practical Tasks across the system range for Unit 8 Install Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 13 Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Unit 17 Service and Maintain Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems 030 Plan Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems Work Activities 031 Install Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems and Components 032 Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems 033 Service and Maintain Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems and Components

Additional units are required as follows As a mandatory requirement of the Apprenticeship Frameworks in Plumbing, apprentices must complete the following additional unit on a mandatory basis Additional Unit 1 Employment Rights and Responsibilities

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 11

General scope of systems Systems at this level are limited to systems and components for dwellings or small commercial or industrial premises with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling. For registration purposes the following matrix may be used to identify the scheme complexes and units required to be completed under that complex
6129 Technical Certificates in Plumbing Level 2 6129 22 Level 2 (England, Wales & Northern Ireland) Level 3 6129-33 Level 3 Gas Route (England, Wales & Northern Ireland) 6129-55 Level 3 Oil Route (Northern Ireland only) Level 3 6129-44 Level 3 Direct access to gas route (England & Wales only) UNITS 13 units 201 to 213 plus unit 401 (apprenticeship programmes)

UNITS 9 units 300 to 308 plus unit 401 (apprenticeship programmes if not completed at level 2)

9 units - 300, 301, 302, 303, 304,306, 309, 310, 311 (apprenticeship programmes if not completed at level 2)

Direct Entry Advanced Apprenticeships 13 units 210 to 213 plus 9 units 300 to 308 plus unit 401 (apprenticeship programmes)

4.2 Operating procedures general requirements All Centres offering the Plumbing Technical Certificate Schemes at Level Two /Three will have to meet the full requirements for the training and assessment procedures of the scheme as detailed in this Handbook This includes the provision of appropriately qualified staff to carry out training and assessment facilities in which the training required can be carried out to permit candidates to achieve industry standards facilities for knowledge assessments to be undertaken at appropriate times within the training programme, under conditions required by the Awarding Body

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 12

facilities for the training and assessment of candidates on the practical requirements of the scheme to be undertaken at appropriate times within the training programme, under conditions required by the Awarding Body

NOTE The use of Technical Certificate knowledge and practical assessments as NVQ evidence imposes upon Technical Certificate Centres a requirement to apply the same stringent controls and conditions to the assessment procedures as are required by the NVQ assessments. 4.3 Centre Staff Qualifications Assessors Technical Certificate centres must provide the following in relation to competent staff in order to be approved by the Plumbing Awarding Body General requirements The Centre will nominate Assessors to the Awarding Body for their check on qualifications and approval. The centre is required to maintain a record of proof of competence of each assessor on a mandatory basis; such record must be accessible to the External verifier for confirmation purposes. Assessor competence details should be produced in the form of a CV for each assessor; the CV should be supported by copies of technical certificates and previous employer endorsements (where relevant). Assessor qualifications Centre Assessors must: hold the appropriate D units D32 and D33 or their successor units (A-1, and A-2). (Assessors working towards the above award should complete them within a maximum period of 18 months following their appointment or to action plans implemented by the Awarding Body) be technically qualified in plumbing - holding: an Advanced Craft Certificate in Plumbing (or comparable level) of the City and Guilds of London Institute, or a Level 3 NVQ in Plumbing

have a minimum period of 2 years work experience in plumbing, or similar mechanical services employment (after successfully completing the above technical plumbing qualifications) However, it is acceptable for mature/experienced persons to demonstrate that a minimum of 2 years suitable work experience has been gained PRIOR to the completion of a qualification. This work experience must be varied, reflect a range of systems and be documented on the CV in the centre course file

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 13

have satisfactorily completed the training for centre assessors, laid down by the awarding body to cover the detailed assessment requirements and procedures of the Plumbing NVQ.

Centre Staff carrying out training and assessment in preparation for independent assessments The Technical Certificate units at Level Three include training and assessment in preparation for independent assessments in Gas ACS assessments Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems Water Regulations Electricity and Earthing Systems for Plumbers It is a requirement of centre approval that Technical Certificate Centre Staff are qualified when delivering training or assessment in these areas. Internal Verifiers General requirements Centres will nominate Internal Verifiers to monitor and co-ordinate assessments in plumbing. Internal Verifier qualifications Internal Verifiers will hold the appropriate D units D34 or its successor unit V-1 as a minimum, with a recommendation that they additionally hold D32 and D33, or their successor units. or the Teaching Qualification for Secondary Education (TQSE) or the Teaching Qualification for Further Education (TQFE) (which is recognised in Scotland) (Internal Verifiers working towards the above awards should complete them within a maximum period of 18 months following their appointment or to action plans implemented by the Awarding Body) be occupationally competent in the technical aspects of the plumbing units that are being verified hold an Advanced Craft Certificate in Plumbing (or comparable level) of the City and Guilds of London Institute in Plumbing, or a certificate at the same level in Heating and Ventilating Fitting, or Gas Fitting, or a Level 3 NVQ/SVQ in Plumbing, or an NVQ/SVQ at Level 3 in Heating and Ventilating, or Gas Fitting

have a minimum period of 4 years experience in the area of competence that is being assessed, or related area (as detailed above) (after completing the above technical qualifications) have undertaken any training in the role of Plumbing Internal Verifier that the Awarding Body may require.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 14

5. Assessment Procedures 5.1 Knowledge assessments general requirements The Technical Certificates at Levels Two and Three require candidates to undertake knowledge assessments which include: Multiple-choice questions centrally set and locally marked Multiple choice questions centrally set and centrally marked Assignment on Job Planning requiring short written answers - paper centrally set and locally marked

Candidates should undertake these assessments when they have completed the training in the appropriate subject areas to a satisfactory standard the assessments are not intended to be end assessments (with the exception of the centrally set, centrally marked papers) 5.2 Centrally Set and Locally Marked Multiple-Choice Papers The Awarding Body will provide for all Technical Certificate/NVQ Assessment Centres three series of multiple-choice question papers (Series A Series B Series C) Each series includes a number of question papers which in total cover all the knowledge requirements of all the units and system ranges within the qualifications at Level Two and Three (with an exception at Level Three for certain knowledge competences which are covered by assignment style short written answer papers) Timing of knowledge assessments The multiple-choice question assessment and written assessments should be taken by candidates at times which suit the individual candidates training progress. The Assessor will make a decision as to whether individual candidates are at a stage of training, or previous experience in the case of mature candidates, which indicates that the candidate has a high potential for success in the papers that he or she is to undertake. Centres must not accumulate the knowledge assessments to offer them as an end assessment. Within that provision: 1. Candidates may take one or more papers at the same time, up to a limit of 3 separate papers 2. Different candidates may take different papers according to their individual assessment needs at the time 3. Groups of candidates may take the same paper(s) at the same time, or a range of different papers The basis of assessment for the range of locally marked plumbing knowledge assessment tests is as follows and as detailed in Version 3 of Specific instructions on the conduct, administration and marking of centrally set locally marked assessments provided to approved centres on CD with C&G developed question papers for the plumbing schemes.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 15

These papers assess the knowledge requirement of the following plumbing qualifications: 6129 Certificate in Basic Plumbing Studies Level 2 6129 Certificate in Domestic Plumbing Studies Level 3 6089 Levels 2 & 3 National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) in Plumbing.

These instructions cover the conduct, administration and marking of the following 6129 Level 2 & 3 assessment tests (all closed book except for those shown in italics below): Level 2 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 Level 3 300 301 302 302 303 304 305 305 306 Systems planning (underpinning knowledge question paper assessment) Complex cold water systems Part 1 Complex domestic hot water systems Part 2 Complex domestic hot water systems Complex sanitation systems Central heating systems (boilers and controls) Part 1 Domestic gas supply systems (natural or LPG) Part 2 Domestic gas supply systems (natural or LPG) Improvement of business products and services in the plumbing industry Safety in plumbing activities Key plumbing principles Common plumbing processes Cold water systems Domestic hot water systems Sanitation systems Central heating systems Electrical supply and earth continuity Sheet lead weathering Environmental awareness in plumbing Effective working relationships in the plumbing industry

Northern Ireland Oil Route 310 401 Note: Unit 401 is an additional unit that is a mandatory requirement for those candidates completing an apprenticeship scheme. As a guide training and assessment of this unit should occur early in the delivery programme as the topic primarily supports the apprentice induction process. Domestic oil supply systems (Oil) Additional unit (Apprenticeships) Employment rights and Responsibilities

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 16

5.3

General introduction

The instructions given supplement the general requirements laid down for the conduct of knowledge based assessments in the document Providing City & Guilds Qualifications Edition 4 October 2004. Assessment consists of multiple-choice tests (see the aforementioned list for detail on which papers are open or closed book), with the exception of unit 300 which is an underpinning knowledge question based assignment. Centres will have particular responsibility with regard to the administration and conduct of these examinations as follows: 5.3.1 5.3.2 Centres are responsible for ensuring that the standard rules with regard to the conduct of written examinations are complied with. Under current arrangements a separate examination paper is provided for each unit. A CDROM containing a bank of test papers will be provided, on receipt of a written order on the pro forma provided. The CDs will only be issued to centres with 6129/6089 Level 2 and / or 3 scheme approval. Centres will be responsible for marking all assessments and it is the responsibility of the centre to conduct examinations according to the rules and procedures detailed by City & Guilds. Administration and Security

5.3.3

5.4

All centres must have an Examinations Secretary who is responsible for the security of the CDROM. Centres may nominate an additional member of staff who will have monitored access to the papers and answer keys. This individual could be a plumbing scheme assessor internal verifier co-ordinator.

The purpose of this second nominated member of staff is to provide additional support to the Examinations Secretary, resulting in a simpler examination process. If a centre chooses to use a second nominated member of staff, particular attention must be paid to the following points: the Examinations Secretary is responsible for the security of the CD-ROM and the printing of examination papers the second nominated member of staff must complete and sign the release form (as shown at Appendix G of Specific instructions on the conduct, administration and marking of centrally set locally marked assessments) when taking examination papers and/or answer keys from the Examinations Secretary. when the second nominated member of staff has signed for the papers, they are responsible for their safe keeping and security. All examination papers and answer keys that have been signed out must be returned to the Examinations Secretary and signed back in on their return. This is to ensure that there is an auditable trail of all occasions when examination papers are handed over by the Examinations Secretary while in possession of the examination papers and/or answer keys, the second nominated member of staff must deliver them directly to the examination invigilator. They must not disclose their contents to any other person, or make any further copies

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 17

5.5

Examination papers

City & Guilds will issue approved centres with a CD-ROM containing test papers. There will be only three active versions of each paper at any time (Versions A, B and C). When a new set of assessments (revised versions) becomes available they will be automatically issued to all approved centres at each level 2 or 3. It is essential to maintain the integrity and security of the tests, secure storage and handling of the papers is most important. The nominated individual (see 5.4) is responsible for ensuring that the following precautions are taken: 5.5.1 Papers are printed from the CD-ROM under secure conditions and stored securely until the time of the test. An inventory of papers printed and stored is set up and kept up to date, when new copies are printed and used papers are destroyed. No papers are ever to be printed and handed to candidates except for test purposes. The CD-ROM and printed papers are kept under secure conditions at all times in a safe or secure cabinet. Papers held by an examination invigilator must be kept secure at all times and only be issued to candidates for the duration of the examination. All papers must be accounted for at the completion of the examination. There must be no possibility that any unauthorised person is able to take a copy of an examination paper or to obtain or remove any such copy. Controlled access to each assessment paper may be provided to scheme assessors and internal verifiers, in order that they can prepare for undertaking marking of question papers and oral questioning. This access can only be granted by the Examinations Secretary. The second nominated person (see 5.4) does not have the authority to do this. The delivery and marking of examinations (closed book tests)

5.5.2 5.5.3 5.5.4

5.5.5 5.5.6

5.6

Invigilation of the testing process is a requirement of the scheme. It is preferable that invigilation and subsequent marking of test papers is conducted by a qualified plumbing scheme assessor who has / will not be involved in the training or internal verification of the particular unit being assessed. This is in order that the marking process may be streamlined and simplified for the Candidate. In situations where a non-technical invigilator is being utilised then satisfactory arrangements need to be in place to facilitate timely marking of papers, re-sit arrangements and any subsequent oral questioning. The centre must be able to provide qualified plumbing scheme assessors to mark question papers and implement oral questioning arrangements. 5.7 Conducting the examination

This element of the guidance note is largely based on the Providing City & Guilds Document Edition 4 (October 2004). Specific points worthy of note are The scheme assessor must confirm the key details of the assessment with the Examinations Secretary well in advance of the assessment taking place in order that Candidates have suitable time to prepare for the assessment and the papers to undertake the assessment can be made ready. The Examinations Secretary must ensure that the different versions of the question papers are rotated and a record is kept each time a test is used for a particular candidate.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 18

It is then the responsibility of the invigilator / scheme assessor to ensure that the examination is conducted under examination conditions including candidates must be seated in such a way that there is no possibility of interference or collusion and to conform to City & Guilds written examination requirements any course notes and reference material must be kept out of sight of candidates. See exceptions for Level 3 papers in the guidance notes all candidates must have appropriate pens, pencils, etc as listed on the test paper and a City & Guilds multiple choice answer sheet MA the answer sheets must have the candidates name, date of examination, paper number and version number examination regulations include how to complete the answer sheets and must be clearly explained by the invigilator.

At the conclusion of the examination all the question papers and answer sheets must be collected. The invigilator must not discuss with any candidates the answers or any other details relating to the test prior to marking the test. 5.8 Marking the examination It is preferable that the marking of the examination is conducted by a qualified plumbing scheme assessor who has not been involved in the training or will not be involved in the internal verification for that particular unit. Ideally this person would be the second nominated member of staff (see 5.4). It is also preferable that the marking of papers takes place during the particular session so that a conclusion to the test is reached and the candidate has immediate feedback as to the outcome of the test. Each test paper has an associated answer key grid that states the correct answer to all questions: a, b, c or d. The answer keys should be kept under the same secure conditions as the question papers, but must be stored separately. Marking is based on the following Candidates who achieve 80% or more are deemed to have passed the test Candidates who achieve between 70 and 79% should receive feedback (preferably during the same examination session) on the questions that were incorrectly completed. That feedback should be in the form of a new blank answer grid indicating (by circling with pen) the question numbers that have been incorrectly answered. The Candidate should then be permitted the opportunity of re-taking those particular questions without reference to the answers given in the first attempt. If the candidate then achieves 80% or more the assessment is deemed to have been passed overall score still remains between 70 & 79% then oral questioning can take place. That oral questioning must relate to the question in the paper that has been posed in terms of re-phrasing the question, a completely new question must not be devised by the assessor. If the overall score under oral questioning rises to 80% or more then the assessment is deemed to have been passed. If the score following oral questioning remains at between 70 & 79% then the assessment is deemed to have been failed and a complete new paper will have to be re-taken at a later date.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 19

Candidates who achieve 69% or less are deemed to have failed the test and a complete new paper will have to be taken at a later date.

Feedback must be provided to candidates on whether they have been successful in the test within a 7 day period, the re-sit of a full paper must not occur within 7 days of the previous paper being taken. Appendix A & B of Specific instructions on the conduct, administration and marking of centrally set locally marked assessments contains example recording sheets for centres to record details of completion of the test papers. 5.9 The delivery and marking of examinations (open book tests) The procedures for the delivery and marking of open book examination papers are as detailed for closed book examinations, with the following additions the invigilator must co-ordinate the use of open book resource materials to support each of the tests in a manner that will ensure that the required examination conditions are not impaired i.e. laying down a procedure for candidates to gain access to technical publications and return those publications for other candidates to use, and the provision of suitable number of resource documents commensurate with the number of candidates being assessed Level 3 Paper 305 Domestic Gas Safety Parts 1 & 2 This paper has been split into two parts due to the number of questions. Each part contains 60 questions and can be delivered in one session but it is recommended that the candidates have a break after taking 305 Part 1. It is recommended that this paper is split into a morning and afternoon session. Candidates are allowed reference material for both Part 1 and 2 (open book). The only reference material allowed is: CORGI Essential Gas Safety 4th edition (at time of these notes being published) Gas Installers Manual Series ISBN; 1-902632-00-1 CORGI Website: www.corgi.com Level 3 Paper 300 - Systems Planning Assignment The marking scheme for this assignment is based on the candidate achieving the key points for each question as indicated on the model answer sheet provided. Each question is worth one mark. Refer to Appendix C of Specific instructions on the conduct, administration and marking of centrally set locally marked assessments for a list of acceptable resource materials that can be used during the examination. Additional Unit Paper 401 - Employment rights and responsibilities Refer to Appendix D of Specific instructions on the conduct, administration and marking of centrally set locally marked assessments for a list of acceptable resource materials that can be used during the examination.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 20

5.10

Guidance on oral questioning

If a candidate has to be assessed / questioned verbally to try and obtain a pass, a qualified Plumbing Assessor (preferably not involved in the teaching or internal verification of the particular unit being assessed) must conduct oral questioning under controlled conditions with detail of responses written down and recorded (See Appendix E of Specific instructions on the conduct, administration and marking of centrally set locally marked assessments for example recording sheet). The answers given by the candidate must not be as a result of coaxing by the assessor and must truly reflect the candidate knowledge in the area being questioned / assessed. This also ensures that if a pass is gained through verbal question assessment the quality and integrity of the award is upheld. The response sheet once signed by the Assessor is placed with the answer paper so that when the External Verifier visits there is an auditable trail that can be followed and integrity maintained. When using verbal / oral assessment, Assessors should be mindful of the effect their behaviour can have on candidate performance. Questions should be asked in the spirit of gaining information rather than pressurising a candidate by creating the atmosphere of a test or making the candidate feel inhibited or intimidated by the verbal assessment method. Assessors should also take care to ask questions clearly. The following list provides a brief overview of phrases typically used in verbal / oral questioning and are provided as a guide to Assessors. They are not mandatory and may not be applicable according to the specific unit questions that are being verbally assessed: Question List / name State Describe briefly Outline Compare/contrast Define Explain why Sketch Required Response Give a list rather than sentences as your answer Give the relevant facts briefly and to the point Give a brief but full account with examples of the procedure, term etc. specified in the question Briefly give all the essential points Point out similarities and differences, advantages and disadvantages of the items mentioned in the question Give the exact meaning e.g. of a term, principle or procedure Give the reason for Do a freehand drawing

Assessors are reminded that these guidelines are for assessment use in determining the candidates knowledge of the area covered by the question. The original test questions are in a multiple choice format so Assessors will need to adapt and approach the verbal assessment of the question in the most appropriate way. Assessors are reminded that the oral questioning of candidates must relate to the original question being posed, as an example it is not appropriate to ask an oral question of a different technical nature. 5.11 Scheme quality assurance The centre must implement suitable quality assurance arrangements to ensure the consistent and rigorous application of scheme requirements on all occasions that examinations are being conducted. The centre must therefore implement documented internal verification procedures commensurate with the number of candidates being assessed to ensure -

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 21

spot-checking of the invigilation process marking of assessment papers including attendance during marking procedures being undertaken effective application of oral questioning techniques by assessors again including attendance during oral questioning sessions.

A further check and a sampling of examination procedures and processes will be conducted by City & Guilds appointed External Verifiers each time during their visits. The integrity of the complete examination process is also subject to further ad hoc inspections by representatives of the Awarding Body. 5.12 Completion of the locally marked test papers A candidate should have satisfactorily completed all of the locally marked assessments before entering the GOLA end test at each level. Candidates who have been successful can have their grades entered on Form S or via the City & Guilds Walled Garden. The grade must be entered as P (pass). Form S should be forwarded to City & Guilds for results processing. The centre must retain all test material for a period of one year after the candidate has completed the course. Records must be retained for three years after completion of the award. 5.13 Copyright and ownership details The multiple-choice question papers are the copyright of City & Guilds. The contents of the examination papers including the wording of individual questions shall not be disclosed without the written authorisation of City & Guilds. Neither may such multiple-choice questions be published or used in any other form other than for their intended purpose. If a centre wishes to query an examination paper or question they should only do so in writing to City & Guilds (see Appendix F of Specific instructions on the conduct, administration and marking of centrally set locally marked assessments) and post to: Assessment Manager - Scheme 6129 Construction and Engineering Sector Building Services Team 1 Giltspur Street London EC1A 9DD All queries will be logged and investigated and referred to expert examiner/s if necessary.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 22

5.14 Centrally set and centrally marked (independent assessment tests) The technical certificate knowledge assessment arrangements require the application of an independent assessment element comprising of two Centrally set and marked papers operated via the City & Guilds on-line GOLA system Level Two a 50 question multiple-choice paper covering a sample of all systems in the Level 2 range Cold Water, Domestic Hot Water etc. from the centrally set and locally marked papers Level Three a 50 question multiple-choice paper covering a sample of all systems papers in the Level 3 range Cold Water, Domestic Hot Water etc., from the centrally set and locally marked papers

The Awarding Body will set and mark, and issue results for these papers. The procedures that must be operated for these papers are as detailed for operation under the GOLA assessment system. 6. Practical Task Assessment 6.1 General Requirements All Technical Certificate practical training activities are aimed at providing candidates with the practical competences to successfully complete the practical assessments required by the scheme. The awarding body has therefore developed a complete schedule of practical tasks which candidates must complete on a mandatory basis to successfully complete the practical units. All the assessment criteria in the practical tasks must be successfully met to complete the unit and achieve the award, additionally the assessment activity includes a maximum time duration within which the assessment activity must be conducted. Failure to complete in the time duration means that further training is required and the assessor will require the candidate to re-take the assessment activity. The task requirements are laid down in City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate in Basic Plumbing Studies - Practical Task Manual Level 2 Units City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate in Domestic Plumbing Studies - Practical Task Manual Level 3 Units

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 23

6.2 The Practical Tasks at Level Two

SAFETY REF. S-1A S-1B S-2 S-3 S-4 S-5A S-5B S-6 S-7A S-7B S-7C S-8 S-9 TASK COMPETENCE Kinetic lifting Lifting equipment Safe use of ladders Safe use of stand steps Safe use of mobile scaffolds Safe assembly of LPG equipment Safe use of LPG equipment Fire fighting Hazardous materials sheet lead Hazardous materials asbestos Hazardous materials solvents Working safely with hand tools Working safely with power tools DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

COPPER TUBE REF. CT-1 CT-2 CT-3 CT-4 CT-5 CT-6A CT-6B CT-6C CT-7 CT-8 CT-9 TASK COMPETENCE Copper tube component positions Copper tube fixing positions Copper tube pipe & fitting dimensions Copper tube pipe & fitting dimensions Copper tube marking & cutting Copper tube machine bending (1) Copper tube machine bending (2) Copper tube machine bending (3) Copper tube jointing & testing Copper tube making fixings Copper tube fabrication & installation DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

PLASTIC PIPEWORK REF. PP-1 PP-2 PP-3 PP-4 AIR TESTING REF. AT-1 Air test soil pipe TASK COMPETENCE DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED TASK COMPETENCE Soil & waste pipe & fitting dimensions Soil & waste fabrication & installation Rainwater system Pressure pipe pipe & fitting dimensions

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 24

LOW CARBON STEEL (LCS) REF. SP-1 SP-2 SP-3 SP-4 SP-5 SP-6A SP-6B SP-7 SP-8 TASK COMPETENCE LCS pipe & fitting requirements LCS component positions LCS fixing positions LCS pipe & fitting dimensions LCS marking & cutting LCS machine bending (1) LCS machine bending (2) LCS jointing & testing LCS fabrication & installation DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

SHEET LEAD WEATHERING REF. SW-1 SW-2 SW-3 SW-4 SW-5 SW-6 SW-7 TASK COMPETENCE Sheet lead identifying components Sheet lead - measuring components Sheet lead cutting lead Sheet lead forming components Sheet lead lead slate Sheet lead chimney weathering set Basic maintenance DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

AIRING CUPBOARD INSTALLATION REF. AC-1 AC-2 TASK COMPETENCE Airing cupboard storage cistern Airing cupboard hot water cylinder DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

BATHROOM INSTALLATION REF. BI-1 BI-2 BI-3 BI-4 BI-5 TASK COMPETENCE Bathroom WC suite Bathroom bath Bathroom basin Bathroom radiator Bathroom combi jig DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

DECOMMISSIONING REF. DC-1 DC-2 TASK COMPETENCE Decom hot & cold water system Decom sanitation system

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 25

ROUTINE MAINTENANCE REF. RM-1 RM-2 RM-3 RM-4 TASK COMPETENCE Maintenance pillar tap & float valve Maintenance shower mixer valve Maintenance radiator valve Maintenance WC siphon DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS REF. EA-1 TASK COMPETENCE Economic use of materials DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

TEMPORARY CONTINUITY BONDING REF. TB-1 TASK COMPETENCE Application of temporary earth bonding

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 26

6.3 The Practical Tasks at Level Three - Gas Route

GAS CENTRAL HEATING & UNVENTED INSTALLATION & COMMISSIONING DATE SUCCESSFULLY REF. TASK COMPETENCE COMPLETED GCHUV-1 Unvented system installation GCHUV-2 Gas boiler installation Control component and feed & vent apparatus GCHUV-3 installation GCHUV-4 Commissioning - hot & cold water GCHUV-5 Commissioning central heating GAS APPLIANCE INSTALLATION & COMMISSIONING REF. GAI-1 GAI-2 TASK COMPETENCE Gas space heater installation Gas cooker installation DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

UNVENTED SYSTEMS REF. UV-1 UV-2 UV-3 TASK COMPETENCE Unvented system service procedure Unvented system fault diagnostics Unvented system - decommissioning DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

GAS APPLIANCE SERVICE PROCEDURE REF. GASM -1 GASM-2 GASM-3 GASM-4 TASK COMPETENCE Gas boiler service procedure Gas water heater service procedure Gas space heater service procedure Gas cooker service procedure DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

FAULT DIAGNOSTICS REF. GAFD-1 GAFD-2 GAFD-3 GAFD-4 CHFD-1 TASK COMPETENCE Gas boiler fault diagnostics Gas water heater fault diagnostics Gas space heater fault diagnostics Gas cooker fault diagnostics Central heating fault diagnostics DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

GAS APPLIANCE DECOMMISSIONING REF. GAD-1 GAD-2 GAD-3 GAD-4 TASK COMPETENCE Gas boiler decommissioning Gas water heater decommissioning Gas space heater decommissioning Gas cooker decommissioning

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 27

COMMISSIONING REF. COM-1 COM-2 COM-3 TASK COMPETENCE Commissioning above ground sanitation system Commissioning boosted shower Commissioning macerator type WC DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 28

6.4 The Practical Tasks at Level Three - Oil Route (Northern Ireland Only)

OIL HEATING INSTALLATION & COMMISSIONING REF. OILH-1 OILH-2 OILH-3 OILH-4 TASK COMPETENCE Oil supply installation (one pipe system) Oil supply installation (one pipe system with de-aerator) Oil supply installation (two pipe system) Oil fired boiler installation and commissioning ADDITIONAL GUIDANCE Selection of a minimum of 2 fuel supply systems MUST be completed from the 3 listed DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

OIL APPLIANCE SERVICE PROCEDURE REF. OILH-5 TASK COMPETENCE Oil fired boiler service procedure DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

OIL APPLIANCE FAULT DIAGNOSTICS REF. OILH-6 TASK COMPETENCE Oil fired boiler fault diagnostics DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

OIL APPLIANCE DECOMMISSIONING REF. OILH-7 TASK COMPETENCE Oil fired boiler decommissioning DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

UNVENTED SYSTEM AND CENTRAL HEATING INSTALLATION & COMMISSIONING REF. UVCH-1 UVCH-2 UVCH-3 UVCH-4 TASK COMPETENCE Unvented system installation Control component and feed & vent apparatus installation Commissioning - hot & cold water Commissioning central heating DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

CENTRAL HEATING FAULT DIAGNOSTICS REF. CHFD-1 TASK COMPETENCE Central heating fault diagnostics DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

UNVENTED SYSTEMS REF. UV-1 UV-2 UV-3 TASK COMPETENCE Unvented system service procedure Unvented system fault diagnostics Unvented system - decommissioning

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 29

COMMISSIONING REF. COM-1 COM-2 COM-3 TASK COMPETENCE Commissioning above ground sanitation system Commissioning boosted shower Commissioning macerator type WC DATE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 30

6.5 Conditions for Practical Task Assessments The Practical Task Assessments within the Technical Certificate schedules in certain cases can contribute to evidence that is required to prove that the candidate is competent in the job performance requirements of the NVQs (see NVQ Handbook / Candidate Workplace Evidence Records for further details). The criteria for the Practical Task Assessments is detailed in the technical certificate document Application of Practical tasks Requirements for Centres, the requirements of this document must be strictly adhered to by centres as a mandatory requirement of scheme approval and should be used alongside this scheme handbook. This criteria has been developed based on the guidance laid down in the Plumbing NVQ Assessment Strategy. 6.6 Assessing Practical Tasks Compliance with the Assessment Criteria For each Practical Task within the Technical Certificate schedules there are set assessment criteria. These are the minimum and only criteria for the successful completion of the task when a candidate has met these criteria he/she has successfully met the requirements of the task. Combining Practical Tasks The Practical Task Schedules indicate where tasks may be combined. In certain cases the task must be completed as a combined activity e.g. bathroom installation, it is not permissible for centres to adapt or modify the tasks and associated guidance in any way, in such a case the full bathroom activity must be undertaken as a single task. Where tasks are combined all the assessment criteria for all the separate tasks within the combined task must be met. Candidates failing to meet Assessment Criteria Where a candidate fails to meet all assessment criteria on a particular task he/she should be required to redo any defective installation (where this is feasible), to permit him/her to be reassessed on the failed assessment criteria. Where it is not feasible for the candidate to redo part of a task, or where there is a failure on the candidates part on the majority of assessment criteria for a task, then the candidate should redo the complete task.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 31

Observed assessments Certain tasks require the candidate to carry out procedures that Require a particular sequence of operations to be followed to achieve the intended task outcome Have a potential safety hazard if not carried out correctly e.g. gas safety

Tasks within this category must be observed by a person who has a certificated competence in the work process being assessed in addition to the assessor qualifications detailed earlier. Where a candidate fails any assessment criteria in this task category he/she should be required to repeat the complete assessment task 6.7 Collecting and Recording the Outcomes of Practical Assessments The Technical Certificate support documentation includes: Task Assessment Sheets which provide an outline of the task, the assessment criteria, and space for recording the candidates achievement of the task criteria A Summary Task Achievement Record (Technical Certificate) on which can be recorded the individual candidates listed task achievements

These documents should be retained by the Centre in secure storage. The information on these records (where relevant) will be transferred to NVQ Record Documents at an appropriate point. 6.8 Use of NVQ Evidence towards 6129 Scheme Practical Tasks Practical Assessment tasks BI (bathroom installation) & AC (airing cupboard installation) These assessment activities may be provided as site based assessment activities as an alternative to plumbing centre based activities (through evidence produced from the 6089 scheme) subject to the following conditions Bathroom Installation (BI) Task The on-site installation must comprise a minimum of bath, basin and WC which must be a part of a new installation or replacement of an existing bathroom suite. This must include the complete replacement of all hot and cold pipework within the bathroom (other than hot and cold supply tails entering the room). The assessment activity must demonstrate activities are progressed to assessment standards laid down for the BI task The installation of one appliance from the BI task must be subject to on-site direct observation by a qualified plumbing scheme assessor

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 32

The remaining evidence (including testing) can either be produced by: on-site direct observation or product assessment by a qualified plumbing scheme assessor job record/supplementary evidence which must be signed by an in-company workplace recorder who meets the requirements laid down in the Candidate Workplace Evidence Record for the 6089 award

All supplementary evidence requirements laid down for the BI assessment must be met in full if evidence from on-site is used

Airing Cupboard (AC) Task The on-site installation must comprise the installation of a hot water storage cylinder and cold water storage cistern which must be a part of a new installation or replacement of components which must include the replacement of the majority of the pipework in the airing cupboard location The assessment activity must demonstrate activities are progressed to assessment standards laid down for the AC task The installation of one component (either cistern or cylinder) and its subsequent pipework connections from the AC task must be subject to on-site direct observation by a qualified plumbing scheme assessor The remaining evidence (including testing) can either be produced by on-site direct observation or product assessment by a qualified plumbing scheme assessor or be in the form of a job record/supplementary evidence which must be signed by an in-company workplace recorder who meets the requirements laid down in the Candidate Workplace Evidence Record for the 6089 scheme

Note: Any supplementary evidence produced in support of either task must be subject to confirmation and checking by the plumbing scheme assessor using normal procedures carried out for validating evidence. 7. Exemptions from practical & knowledge assessment tests There are no exemptions from technical certificate practical & knowledge assessment tests e.g. external ACS or unvented system assessment tests, as the technical certificate programmes provide the essential under-pinning learning to these programmes. Centres should therefore make recommendation to candidates/ their employers that course programmes are progressed in a logical sequence.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 33

8. Appeals and Equal Opportunities Centres must have their own, auditable, appeals procedure. If a candidate is not satisfied with the assessors judgement of his/her competence during the assessment process, or a candidate feels that the opportunity for assessment is being denied, the internal verifier and centre co-ordinator should, in the first instance, address the problem. If, however, the problem cannot be resolved, City & Guilds will arbitrate and the external verifier may be approached to offer independent advice. All appeals must be clearly documented by the centre co-ordinator and made available to the external verifier or City & Guilds if advice is required. Should occasions arise when centres are not satisfied with any aspect of the external verification process, they should contact City & Guilds regional or national office. Access to the NVQ framework is open to all, irrespective of gender, race, creed, age or special needs and there are no formal entry requirements. The centre co-ordinator should ensure that no candidate is subjected to unfair discrimination on any grounds in relation to access to assessment and to the fairness or the assessment. QCA requires City & Guilds to monitor centres to check whether equal opportunities policies are being adhered to. The City & Guilds equal opportunities policy appears in the Directory of NVQ Awards.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 34

9. Further information Further information regarding centre/scheme approval or any aspect of assessment of the Plumbing Technical certificates should be referred to the relevant City & Guilds regional/national office: Region City & Guilds Scotland City & Guilds Newcastle City & Guilds Warrington City & Guilds Leeds City & Guilds Wales City & Guilds Birmingham City & Guilds Derby City & Guilds Taunton City & Guilds London and South East England City & Guilds Southern England City & Guilds Eastern City & Guilds Northern Ireland/ Ireland City & Guilds Head Office Customer Service Enquiry Unit City & Guilds Publication Sales Telephone 0131 226 1556 0191 402 5100 01925 897900 0113 380 8500 02920 838700 0121 359 6667 01773 842900 01823 722200 020 7294 2820 020 7294 2603 01480 308300 028 9032 5689 020 7294 2800 Facsimile 0131 226 1558 0191 402 5101 01925 897950 0113 380 8525 02920 838725 0121 359 7734 01773 842940 01823 444231 020 7294 2419 020 7294 2412 01480 308325 028 9031 2917 020 7294 2400

020 7294 2850

020 7294 3387

Website http://www.city-and-guilds.co.uk ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------End

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 35

Appendix A

Level 2 Certificate in Basic Plumbing Studies


6129

Scheme Standards (Job Knowledge) Level 2 Units

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 1

Contents

Page

Unit 201 Unit 202 Unit 203 Unit 204 Unit 205 Unit 206 Unit 207 Unit 208 Unit 209 Unit 210 Unit 211

Safety Key Principles Common Plumbing Processes Cold Water Systems Domestic Hot water Systems Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems Central Heating Systems Pipework Electrical Supply & Earth Continuity Systems Sheet Lead Weathering Systems Environmental Awareness Effective Working Relationships

3 9 14 21 29 37 47 53 58 62 64

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 2

Level 2

Unit 201 - Safety

General Range: the systems associated activities in which the candidate has to demonstrate safety to meet the requirements of this unit are: Activities on non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling, as covered by the technical units at Level 2 Unit 21 Activities Maintain the Safe Working Environment When Undertaking Plumbing Work

Element 21.1 Use Safe Procedures When Working With Others Knowledge Outcomes 1. the general responsibilities of the employer and employee for ensuring safety in the work place (PC 21.1.1, 21.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) 1.1 1.2 1.3 the general requirements of health and safety legislation for the employers responsibilities for safety in the workplace the employees responsibilities for his/her own and others safety at work the employers responsibilities for the provision of personal protective equipment

2. the requirements of current safety legislation for the range of work operations (PC 21.1.1) (Range 1, 3, 4) 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 the general requirements of construction safety legislation for safety in work locations where plumbing operations may be carried out the general requirements of safety legislation for the safe handling and lifting of materials and components the general requirements of current legislation regarding safe working with electrically operated tools and equipment, including temporary electrical supplies in work locations the general requirements of current legislation regarding safe working with hazardous materials the general requirements of current legislation regarding safe working with lead the general requirements of current legislation regarding working in excavations

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 3

3. the potential hazards or risks associated with the range of work locations in which work on systems is undertaken, the measures to be taken to reduce risk (PC 21.1.2) (Range 3, 4) 3.1 the particular risks associated with different types of work location, including new building sites, occupied buildings, service and maintenance sites, working at heights, in excavations and confined spaces, with hazardous materials the types of personal protective equipment used in plumbing work the safety signs and notices used in work locations in which plumbing work is carried out the typical measures used to prevent accidents in plumbing work locations the measures used in and around plumbing work locations to protect the workforce and the public the special measures to be taken to protect plumbing operatives working on drains and sanitary appliances the measures to be taken to protect the workforce when working with lead the measures to be taken to protect the workforce and property when using heating gases/ heating appliances the essential personal hygiene procedures to protect the health of the workforce minimum provisions for toilet and washing facilities in the workplace the minimum provisions for first aid facilities in the workplace the types of fire fighting equipment appropriate for use in plumbing work correct methods of use the measures to be taken within work locations to provide safe access routes for the movement of the workforce and materials correct handling and lifting techniques to be employed for the range of materials and equipment used in plumbing work

3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13

4. general measures to be taken to create safety awareness company on site policies applying and supervising site safety practices including measures to report potential safety hazards (PC 21.1.1, 21.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3) 4.1 the purpose and content of company safety policies 4.2 the range of safety signs and notices used in construction locations 4.3 the importance or reporting to an appropriate person any defects in safety equipment, or potential hazards in the workplace

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 4

5. accident reporting procedures (PC 21.1.1) 5.1 the statutory requirements for reporting accidents in the workplace 5.2 methods of reporting and recording accidents 5.3 the importance of safe keeping of accident records

(Range 1, 3)

6. basic first aid procedures (PC 21.1.2) 6.1 6.2 the basic first aid procedures for minor injuries in the workplace

(Range 3)

the immediate actions to take in the event of serious injury to persons in the workplace, resulting from cuts, contact with heat source, contact with electrical supply, falls, foreign substances in the eye

Unit 21 Element 21.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1.

Maintain the Safe Working Environment When Undertaking Plumbing Work Activities Use Safe Work Practices

how to work from general risk assessments and how to apply them in the workplace (PC 21.2.1) (Range 1) the purpose of a risk assessment levels of risk the importance of complying with the requirements of a risk assessment the general risks associated with work locations, tools and equipment, hazardous materials hazardous processes

1.1 1.2

2.

safe practices when carrying out work on the range of systems and components (PC 21.1.1, 21.2.3, 21.2.5, 21.2.6, 21.2.8) (Range 1, 2, 3, 6)

2.1 the sources of information of safety in installation and maintenance work for the range of systems and components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 5

3.

the range of tools and equipment for installation or maintenance work their safe use maintenance requirements safety equipment (PC 21.2.3, 21.2.4) (Range 2) the maintenance requirements for the range of tools required for installation and maintenance of plumbing components, including hand tools, power operated tools, test equipment, the care and maintenance requirements for access equipment used in plumbing operations the care and maintenance requirements for safety equipment used in the installation and maintenance of plumbing components

3.1

3.2 3.3

4.

the range of tools and equipment whose use is controlled by legislation (PC 21.2.3, 21.2.4) (Range 2)

4.1 the tools and equipment whose use is controlled by legislation, including cartridge operated fixing tools. 4.2 the tools and equipment whose maintenance is controlled by legislation, including abrasive wheels

5.

the range of potentially hazardous materials used for system installation or maintenance work (PC 21.2.6) (Range 3)

5.1 the potential hazards arising from the incorrect assembly and use of LPG or other gas fired heating equipment 5.2 the potential hazards arising from the use of cleaning agents 5.3 the potential hazards arising from the use of lead 5.4 the potential hazards which could arise from the presence of asbestos 5.5 the main requirements of COSHH Regulations

6.

the methods of identifying potentially hazardous materials and level of risk including asbestos (PC 21.2.6) (Range 3) how to identify the hazardous substances that may commonly be encountered in the workplace, the level of risk that each presents, including cleaning agents, lead, asbestos the physical properties/characteristics of commonly occurring hazardous materials

6.1 6.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 6

7. 7.1 7.2 7.3

safety precautions including the use of personal protective equipment (PC 21.2.1, 21.2.3, 21.2.5, 21.2.6) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the range of safety checks for the presence of hazardous materials, and precautions that should be undertaken in a typical work location the importance of selecting the types of PPE, checking for safe condition at each occasion of use, and wearing at all times when there is a risk the importance of handling potentially hazardous materials in an appropriate and safe manner

8.

the legislation or recommendations governing the safe use or disposal of hazardous materials (PC 21.2.6) (Range 3)

8.1 the hazardous materials used in plumbing systems, including materials that could provide a threat to the environment 8.2 the recommendations of safety directives for the safe disposal of hazardous materials

9.

the methods of protecting customers property within the range of locations in which system installation or maintenance work is carried out (PC 21.2.7) (Range 4, 5) the range of customers property for which it may be necessary to provide protection, including external building fabric, internal building fabric, furnishings and fitting, ornaments and accessories, motor vehicles methods of protecting customers property during work operations on plumbing systems, including covering, removal to safe storage.

9.1

9.2

10. how to liaise with the customer, pre-work inspection, reporting existing damage or identifying damage arising from work operations (PC 21.2.7) (Range 4, 5) 10.1 the importance of liaising with the customer at the appropriate times, on measures to be taken to protect property 10.2 the importance of carrying out an inspection of any customers property in the work location and recording and reporting any existing damage, before plumbing operations commence 10.3 the importance of promptly recording and reporting any damage that occurs during work operations

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 7

11. the procedures for summoning the different emergency services. The information required by the emergency services to permit them to respond promptly (PC 21.2.7) (Range 4) 11.1 the responsibilities of the three emergency services typical situations when each may be required 11.2 procedures for summoning the emergency services and the types of information that each will require to permit them to respond promptly 11.3 any actions that could be taken while awaiting the arrival of the emergency services to assist their actions on arrival

12. the range of fire extinguishers used for different types of fire and how to extinguish small fires in a safe manner (PC 21.2.7) (Range 4) 12.1 the different classes of fire and their fuel sources 12.2 the types of fire extinguisher and their uses for the different classes of fire 12.3 circumstance when it would be appropriate to fight a fire, and circumstances when it would not

13 . typical evacuation procedures for work locations in which system installation or maintenance work may be carried out (PC 21.2.5) (Range 4) 13.1 the reasons why it may become necessary to evacuate a building in which work is being carried out including fire, and toxic atmosphere 13.2 typical evacuation procedures and the precautions to be observed during evacuation 13.3 the purpose of an assembly point for building evacuation, and the importance of complying with any instructions relating to assembly upon the evacuation of a building

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 8

Level 2

Unit 202 - Key Plumbing Principles

General Range: the systems associated activities in which the candidate has to demonstrate knowledge of key plumbing principles to meet the requirements of this unit are: Activities on non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling, as covered by the technical units at Level 2 Key principles are the basic plumbing science and mathematics underpinning the installation, decommissioning and maintenance of plumbing systems. The Units/Elements/ Knowledge items to which the Key Principles are related are identified as follows, For example: The knowledge item on the principles of combustion (item 2 below) is referenced as follows Unit 21.2/12 PC 21.2.5 Range 4 This identifies the knowledge item as a requirement of Unit 21 Element 21.2 Knowledge item 12 PC 21.2.5 Range 4 Knowledge Outcomes Maintain the safe working environment when undertaking plumbing work activities Use Safe Work Practices The range of fire extinguishers used for different types of fire and how to extinguish small fires in a safe manner The PC that is linked to the Knowledge item in the unit/element the range item that is linked to the knowledge item in the unit/element

1. Properties of heating gases Unit 21.2/1 PC 21.2.1 Unit 21.2/2 PC 21.2.1, 21.2.3, 21.2.5, 21.2.6, 21.2.8 Unit 21.2/5 PC 21.2.6 Unit 7.1/11 PC 7.1.1

Range 1 Range 1, 2, 3, 6 Range 3 Range 1

1.1 The properties of gases used for heating purposes in plumbing activities LPG propane butane 1.2 The properties of gases used as fuels in hot water and heating systems Natural gas and LPG

2. Principles of combustion Unit 21.2/12 PC 21.2.5 2.1 The three requirements for combustion - fuel oxygen ignition 2.2 The combustion temperatures of common materials

Range 4

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 9

3. Properties of water relative density max. density and changes of state latent heat of fusion of ice latent heat of vaporization Unit 7.2/3 PC 7.1 3.1 boiling point freezing point 3.2 behaviour at various temperatures

4. Properties of water relative density max. density and changes of state latent heat of fusion of ice latent heat of vaporization Unit 7.2/3 PC 7.1 4.1 the relative density of water 4.2 the maximum density of water and what happens when water changes state 4.3 the concept of latent heat heat lost/gained when water changes state - latent heat of fusion of ice latent heat of vaporization of water

5. Force and pressure in water intensity of pressure pressure head - units of measurement Unit 7.2/3 PC 7.1 Unit 7.2/8 PC 7.2.8, 7.2.9 Range 2, 5, 8, 9 5.1 The concept of head of water static head intensity of pressure 5.2 The concept of gravitational acceleration - units of measurement of pressure Pascal bar - Newton 5.3 Procedures for calculation pressure and intensity of pressure using standard units of measurement

6. Flow of water in pipes and channels frictional resistance principles of self-cleansing velocity Unit 7.2/2 PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5 Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Unit 7.2/3 PC 7.2.3, 7.2.4 Range 2, 3, 4 6.1 The concept of frictional resistance to water flow in pipes and channels principles of selfcleansing velocity

7. Atmospheric pressure principles of the siphon Unit 16.3/1 PC 16.3.1 Unit 16.3/2 PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4

Range 1, 2, 3, 4 Range 4, 5, 2, 3

7.1 The principles of siphonic action and their application in plumbing systems and components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 10

8. Measurement of temperature Unit 16.3/1 PC 16.3.1 Unit 16.3/2 PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4

Range 1, 2, 3, 4 Range 4, 5, 2, 3

8.1 Procedures for measuring the temperatures of solid, liquids, and gases using the Celsius temperature scale

9. Specific heat capacity Unit 16.3/1 PC 16.3.1 Unit 16.3/2 PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4 9.1 The concept of specific heat capacity

Range 1, 2, 3, 4 Range 4, 5, 2, 3

9.2 The specific heat capacity of water and its application to plumbing systems

10. Methods of heat transfer conduction convection radiation Unit 16.3/1 PC 16.3.1 Unit 16.3/2 PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4

Range 1, 2, 3, 4 Range 4, 5, 2, 3

10.1 The concept of heat transfer by conduction good and bad conductors positive and negative aspects of conduction in plumbing systems properties of insulators and their application in plumbing systems 10.2 The concept of heat transfer by convection application of the principles of convection to plumbing system design and operation 10.3 The concept of heat transfer by radiation effectiveness of different surfaces and finishes as good or bad radiators

11. Hardness in water- PH values Temporary and permanent hardness Unit 16.3/1 PC 16.3.1 Range 1, 2, 3, 4 Unit 16.3/2 PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4 Range 4, 5, 2, 3 11.1 The concept of the water cycle properties of water from different sources acidity and alkalinity in water 11.2 The concept of the PH value of water 11.3 Causes of temporary and permanent hardness in water

12. Effects of hardness in water on plumbing systems water treatment water softeners Unit 16.3/1 PC 16.3.1 Range 1, 2, 3, 4 Unit 16.3/2 PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4 Range 4, 5, 2, 3 12.1 Effects of hardness in water on plumbing systems and components 12.2 Methods of water treatment principles of operation of water softeners

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 11

13. Electrolytic action and corrosion in systems methods of preventing corrosion Unit 16.3/1 PC 16.3.1 Range 1, 2, 3, 4 Unit 16.3/2 PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4 Range 4, 5, 2, 3 13.1 The causes of corrosion in systems the electromotive series good and bad combinations of metals 13.2 Corrosion troublespots in plumbing systems 13.3 Methods of preventing corrosion in plumbing systems selection of combinations of metals use of sacrificial anodes - use of coatings to prevent corrosion e.g. galvanising

14. Capillarity in liquids adhesion and cohesion surface tension positive and negative effects of capillarity in plumbing systems Unit 16.3/1 PC 16.3.1 Range 1, 2, 3, 4 Unit 16.3/2 PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4 Range 4, 5, 2, 3 Unit 7.2/2 PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5 Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 14.1 The concept of capillarity in liquids the role of adhesion and cohesion and surface tension in capillarity 14.2 Positive and negative effects of capillarity in plumbing systems and components

15. Properties of plumbing materials mass/weight relative density specific heat capacity Unit 7.2/2 PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5 Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 15.1 Properties of plumbing materials mass/weight relative density 15.2 Properties of plumbing materials malleability ductility hardness tensile strength 15.3 Properties of plumbing materials specific heat capacity

16. Properties of plumbing materials coefficient of linear expansion heat conductivity specific heat capacity Unit 7.2/2 PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5 Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 16.1 Properties of plumbing materials coefficient of linear expansion 16.2 Properties of plumbing materials heat conductivity 16.3 Properties of plumbing materials specific heat capacity

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 12

17. Principles of electrical supply AC /DC current units of measurement of voltage, current, resistance, single and three phase supply domestic supplies earth continuity bonding circuit protection devices Unit 7.2/2 PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5 Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Unit 7.2/3 PC 7.2.3, 7.2.4 Range 2, 3, 4 Unit 7.2.4 PC 7.2.5 Range 2, 3, 5, 6 Unit 12.2/3 PC 12.1.4 Range 2, 5 Unit 12.2/4 PC 12.1.3 Range 2, 3 Unit 12.2/5 PC 12.1.4 Range 2, 3, 5 17.1 the principles of electricity generation flow of electricity electromotive force - electrical resistance AC and DC current conductors and insulators 17.2 the principles of single and three phase supply series and parallel circuits 17.3 the principles of design of layouts of electrical supplies to domestic premises mains supplies and connections consumer units and use of fuses cables and components including jointing components power and lighting circuits earthing procedures and requirements. 17.4 the principles of operation of circuit protection devices fuses miniature circuit breakers residual current devices 17.5 the supply, connection, and protection requirements of electrically powered plumbing components 17.6 the principles and procedures for applying temporary earth continuity bonding

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 13

Level 2

Unit 203 Common Plumbing Processes

General Range of systems Non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling This unit covers a range of common plumbing installation, decommissioning & maintenance processes that apply to the range of plumbing systems covered in the Level 2 units. Unit 7 Element 7.1 Knowledge Outcomes Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

1.

the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 7.1.1, 7.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) sources of information on the layout of buildings, including their construction details and materials, and provisions for systems installation the sources of information on the requirements of health and safety legislation governing safety in work locations that information for smaller installations, or additions or amendments to systems, may be in the form of verbal instructions from the customer, and the importance of confirming such instructions. methods of accommodating systems pipework within walls, floors, roof spaces the preparatory work to be carried out by other trades (when in attendance)

1.1 1.2 1.3

1.4 1.5

2.

regulations, recommendations governing safety in the workplace. General responsibilities of the operative for his/her own safety and that of others (PC 7.1.1, 7.1.2) (Range 1, 2) the general requirements of health and safety legislation for the safety of work locations general responsibilities of operatives for their own safety and the safety of others requirements of health and safety legislation for the safe movement of the workforce, materials, site visitors, and members of the public

2.1 2.2 2.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 14

3.

the equipment necessary to provide safe access to work at heights, or in confined spaces (PC 7.1.2, 7.1.9) (Range 2, 9, 10) the equipment necessary to provide safe access to work at heights, including ladders, trestles, fixed and mobile scaffolds, checks for safe condition, erection, dismantling, and safe and secure storage, appropriate warning notices, and barriers checking the safety of temporary walkways for access to work locations, and the movement of materials and system components ensuring the provision of adequate lighting levels within work locations

3.1

3.2 3.3

4. 4.1 4.2 4.3

how to protect customers property or the building fabric prior to the work commencing (PC 7.1.4, 7.1.3) (Range 3, 4) the importance of checking work locations to identify any existing damage to customers property, including building fabric, furnishings and fittings, ornaments and accessories. the importance of recording and reporting any existing damage to the customers property, before commencing any work the importance of taking appropriate measures to protect customers property including the use of protective sheeting and the removal and safe storage of items that might be damaged during installation work the importance of liaising with the customer on temporary storage arrangements for property that could be damaged by work activities the importance of liaising with other trades on measures to protect work in progress, or materials ready to be fitted

4.4 4.5

7.

how to ensure that the customer is fully briefed on all aspects of the installation programme (PC 7.1.6) (Range 6) the persons whose activities may be affected by the system installation work the types of information that it is appropriate to pass to the customer, or other persons, including work schedules and operating instructions for systems and components the importance of ensuring that information is passed to the customer, or other person at the appropriate time

7.1 7.2 7.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 15

8.

the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures (PC 7.1.7, 7.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10) procedures for ordering materials and components the purpose of supply and delivery documents the importance of checking deliveries of materials and components for compliance with the supply order, and noting and reporting any deficiencies or damage the importance of ensuring that material orders and supply dates will meet the job schedule

8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4

9.

the actions to be taken should materials not be available at site to commence the installation activity (PC 7.1.7, 7.1.9) (Range 7, 8, 9, 10) the importance of checking that tools, equipment, materials and components will be on site before job commencement the importance of reporting promptly to the appropriate persons any anticipated delays in deliveries of tools, equipment, materials, and components

9.1 9.2

9.3 the importance of liaising with other trades whose work may be affected by delays in tools, equipment, material or component delivery

10. secure storage procedures for tools, equipment, materials and componentsbasic stores procedures to ensure security and to minimise loss or wastage. (PC 7.1.8 7.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10) 10.1 the types of secure storage provision that may be required for tools, equipment, materials, and components for systems installations 10.2 the importance of arranging storage provision before deliveries

11. the actions to take in the event of a suspected gas danger incorrectly installed appliances incorrect discharge of products of combustion/ incorrect combustion leakage (PC 7.1.1) (Range 1) 11.1 the dangers from incorrectly installed appliances 11.2 the dangers from incorrectly installed or leaking flues 11.3 the persons to whom suspected gas dangers should be reported

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 16

Unit 7

Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 7.2 Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 7.2.2) (Range 2, 3) 1.1 methods of measuring locations into systems pipework and components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of pipework for prefabrication purposes

2. the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) 2.1 methods of cutting, bending, jointing, and installing materials used for Systems installations

3. the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 7.2.3, 7.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) 3.1 3.2 how to fix system components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements the methods of making fixings to the range of structural materials

5. methods of working which protect the building dcor, customer property and existing systems or components (PC 7.2.6) (Range 7, 9) 5.1 5.2 the importance of liaising with the customer on measures to protect property during work operations the importance of taking appropriate measures to protect customers property including the use of protective sheeting and the removal and safe storage of items that might be damaged during installation work the importance of checking and reporting any existing damage to customers property before commencing work activities the importance of keeping work locations clean and tidy

5.3 5.4

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 17

6. job management structures and methods of reporting and recording job progress or problems delaying progress (PC 7.2.7) (Range 9) 6.1 6.2 6.3 typical job management structures in plumbing companies reporting procedures within plumbing companies reporting procedures when plumbing company is sub-contracted to a main contractor

7. the care and maintenance requirements of tools and equipment and checks for safe condition. (PC 7.2.1) (Range 1) 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 the maintenance requirements for hand and power tools used for the installation of systems and components the checks for safe condition for hand power tools used for the installation of systems and components the maintenance requirements for access equipment, including steps, ladders, trestles the checks for safe condition of access equipment, including steps, ladders, trestles Decommission Non-Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Unit 12

Element 12.1 Decommission Systems Knowledge Outcomes 6 how to safely collect and dispose of system contents that may be hazardous to health or the environment. (PC 12.1.3, 12.1.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) 6.1 6.2 the types of system content that could prove hazardous to health or the environment how to ensure that systems contents are disposed of safely to appropriate drainage provisions when decommissioning systems

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 18

Unit 16 Element 16.1

Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Establish Maintenance Requirements for Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes 1. the range of information that should be available on the routine and non-routine service and maintenance requirements of systems and components (PC 16.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3) 1.1 the range of information that should be available on systems component maintenance including specifications and schedules, manufacturers information, services and maintenance schedules the details that may be obtained from the different information sources

1.2

3. how to plan maintenance procedures to minimise interference with system operation and customer routines (PC 16.1.2, 16.1.3, 16.1.4, 16.1.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5) 3.1 the other persons, including the customer and co-contractors whose work or routines may be affected by maintenance activities on systems component

4. how and when to liaise with others during maintenance activities (PC 16.1.5) 4.1 4.2

(Range 5)

how to identify other users of the system, or the building, with whom it would be appropriate to liaise, including customers and other trades the points within the maintenance activities at which t would be appropriate to liaise with others Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Carry out the Maintenance of Systems and Components

Unit 16 Element 16.2

Knowledge Outcomes 3. how to complete records and reports of the maintenance of systems and components (PC 16.2.3) (Range 3, 2)

3.1 the information that should be included on a maintenance record

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 19

Unit 16 Element 16.3

Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes 2. the work procedures for the rectification of faults in systems or components which will ensure minimum disruption to customers and routines (PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4) (Range 4, 5, 2, 3) the persons, including customers, co-workers, other system users, with whom it may be necessary to liaise when carrying out routine maintenance of systems & components the points within the maintenance process when liaison with others will be necessary the importance of advising appropriate persons of the completion of maintenance activities, and the intention to re-activate systems

2.1 2.2 2.3

3.

how to liaise with others to ensure co-operation in the fault rectification process (PC 16.3.2) (Range 5)

3.1 methods of communication appropriate to liaising with customers, co-contractors, other system users 3.2 the actions to take if others are not co-operative

6.

the actions to be taken when the system or component cannot be restored to full performance (PC 16.3.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 6) the persons to be advised when systems or components cannot be restored to full working order the importance of agreeing with the customer, or other system users, the temporary actions to be taken when systems cannot be restored to full working order

6.1 6.2

6.3 circumstances where it may be necessary to obtain a written instruction for further action when systems cannot be restored to full working order

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 20

Level 2

Unit 204 - Cold Water Systems

General Range: Non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling The range covered is direct and indirect systems. Unit 7 Element 7.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1. the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 7.1.1, 7.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) 1.1 the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for Direct and Indirect Cold Water Systems, including pipe materials, fittings, controls, storage cisterns, and incoming services sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for Cold Water Systems components Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

1.2

5. the input services or supplies required for new systems or components, or for extending systems or adding components to existing systems - how to confirm that input services are adequate (PC 7.1.5) (Range 5) 5.1 5.2 methods of identifying the water supply requirements of Direct or Indirect Cold Water Systems or components methods of confirming that incoming water services or existing supply meet the requirements of the system or components

6. the persons to whom deficiencies in input services should be reported and procedures for isolating input services (PC 7.1.5) (Range 5) 6.1 6.2 the persons to whom deficiencies in input water services should be reported, including the customer, co-contractors, or other building users the importance of ensuring that appropriate actions are taken to remedy deficiencies in services or supply before the connection of the system or component

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 21

8. the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures. (PC 7.1.7, 7.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10) 8.1 8.2 the range of tools and equipment required for the installation of Cold Water Systems and components the range of materials and components required for the installation of Cold Water Systems, including pipe materials, pipe fittings, controls, fixings, storage cisterns Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Unit 7

Element 7.2 Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 7.2.2) (Range 2, 3) 1.1 1.2 how to interpret drawings of Cold Water Systems installations to establish positions of pipework, fittings, fixings, controls, storage cisterns methods of measuring locations into which Cold Water Systems pipework and components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of pipework for prefabrication purposes

2. the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 methods of cutting, bending, jointing, and installing all materials used for Cold Water Systems installations approved methods of cutting storage cistern materials the industry standards of workmanship for Cold Water Systems installations the safety practices appropriate to fabrication and installation work on Cold Water Systems how to interpret system design information on the positioning requirements for Cold Water System components how to interpret information on the fixing requirements of Cold Water System components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 22

3. the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 7.2.3, 7.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) 3.1 3.2 3.3 layouts of Cold Water Systems to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of Cold Water System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix Cold Water System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of pipework, controls, storage cisterns, insulation sets

4. the procedures required for connecting to input services or connecting pipework into existing systems (PC 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 5, 6) 4 .1 how to connect Cold Water Systems components to input services using methods that conform to industry requirements, including positioning of control valves, and system drainage provisions 4.2 4.3 4.4 how to connect Cold Water Systems components to existing systems pipework using methods that conform to industry requirements how to connect Cold Water Systems pipework to storage cisterns, including connection and termination of overflow and warning pipes. the jointing methods and materials approved for use on Cold Water Systems components

8.

the range of tests used to confirm the soundness of systems and components and how to use the range of soundness test equipment (PC 7.2.8, 7.2.9) (Range 2, 5, 8, 9) the different types of test used for Cold Water Systems installations including pressure, static pressure, and air tests, and procedures and work sequences for each type of test the hygiene and charging procedures for newly installed, or extensions to existing Cold Water Systems methods of preventing the unauthorised/inadvertent use of Cold Water Systems installations that are not ready for use, including sealing all open ends on pipework, securing controls on incoming service or supply, placing warning notices on controls, advising customers or other trades the importance of advising customers or line managers when testing is about to take place, when testing has been completed, and when the system is ready for use

8.1 8.2 8.3

8.4

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 23

Unit 12

Decommission Non-Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 12.1 Decommission Systems Knowledge Outcomes 1. the importance of confirming the system design, specification, functions and outcomes of suspending the operation of the system (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.3, 12.1.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) 1.1 the importance of interpreting information on the Cold Water System or component, including information gained from site inspection, to confirm the outcomes of decommissioning the system or component the persons with whom liaison should take place before, during and after the decommissioning process, including customers, other appropriate trades, line manager the industry requirements, standards, and tests and procedures used for decommissioning Cold Water Systems

1.2 1.3

2. the need to liaise with others whose procedures or routines may be affected by the suspension of the system operation (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.2) (Range 1) 2.1 2.2 how to identify other persons, including customers, and other trades whose work or routines may be affected by the decommissioning procedures how to liaise with other persons to minimise disruption to their work or routines

3. the potential hazards that could arise from de-commissioning activities and the checks to be carried out before de-commissioning takes place (PC 12.1.4) (Range 5, 2) 3.1 3.2 the potential safety hazards that could arise from the decommissioning of Cold Water Systems, including the interruption of supply to other systems the checks to be carried out in advance of system decommissioning to ensure that any potential hazards that could arise, have been removed

4. de-commissioning procedures for temporary and permanent de-commissioning of systems (PC 12.1.3) (Range 2, 3) 4.1 4.2 identify the differences between the tests and procedures for temporary and permanent decommissioning of Cold Water Systems the different actions and procedures to be used when a full or part system, or individual component is being decommissioned

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 24

5. the precautions to ensure that de-commissioned systems do not prove a safety hazard measures to prevent systems being brought into operation safety and warning notices (PC 12.1.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) 5.1 the precautionary actions including liaison with customer or other system or building users, sealing of open pipework, labelling of controls, to ensure that decommissioned Cold Water Systems do not become a hazard the types of warning notices that are appropriate for use on temporarily or permanently decommissioned systems

5.2

7. 7.1 7.2

how to complete systems de-commissioning records (PC 12.1.3)

(Range 2, 3, 4)

how to identify situations where it would be appropriate to complete records of the decommissioning of Cold Water Systems the types of information that a decommissioning record should contain Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Establish Maintenance Requirements for Systems and Components

Unit 16 Element 16.1 Knowledge Outcomes

1. the range of information that should be available on the routine and non-routine service and maintenance requirements of systems and components (PC 16.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3) 1.1 the range of information that should be available on Cold Water Systems components including specifications and schedules, manufacturers information, services and maintenance schedules 1.2 the details that may be obtained from the different information sources

2. the maintenance procedures across the range of systems and components (PC 16.1.2, 16.1.5, 16.1.6) (Range 2, 4, 5, 6) 2.1 the activities that make up routine maintenance schedules for Cold Water Systems components 2.2 the industry standards for routine maintenance of Cold Water Systems components, including compliance with Codes of Practice, BS Recommendations, Manufacturers specifications. 2.3 the requirements of health and safety legislation for safety in the routine maintenance of Cold Water Systems components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 25

3. how to plan maintenance procedures to minimise interference with system operation and customer routines (PC 16.1.2, 16.1.3, 16.1.4, 16.1.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5) 3.1 3.2 3.3 the other persons, including the customer and co-contractors whose work or routines may be affected by maintenance activities on Cold Water Systems components how to plan the maintenance of Cold Water Systems components to minimise system downtime the importance of ensuring that all tools, equipment, and materials will be available as required, and the costs of delays

5. 5.1 5.2

the materials required for routine maintenance (PC 16.1.4)

(Range 4)

the consumable materials required for the maintenance of Cold Water System components, including replacement parts for controls, gland packings, floats, washers. the sources of information on the materials required for routine maintenance of Cold Water Systems components

6. the tools and equipment required for routine maintenance operations (PC 16.1.4)

(Range 4)

6.1 the tools and equipment required for maintenance operations, including hand and powered tools 6.2 the access equipment used for routine maintenance operations on Cold Water Systems components including stand steps, ladders, and trestle Unit 16 Element 16.2 Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Carry out the Maintenance of Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to use performance specifications for systems and components, and maintenance procedures necessary to restore or maintain the continued performance of systems and components (PC 16.2.1) (Range 1, 2) 1.1 1.2 the Cold Water Systems components that require routine maintenance, including pipe materials, controls, and storage cisterns how to interpret the required performance of Cold Water Systems and components using performance specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations the routine maintenance procedures necessary to maintain Cold Water System component performance

1.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 26

2. the maintenance procedures necessary to ensure compliance with industry requirements for routine and non-routine maintenance activities (PC 16.2.1, 16.2.2) (Range 1, 2) 2.1 the industry requirements for routine maintenance of Cold Water Systems pipe materials and components, including compliance with specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations how to ensure compliance with the requirements of safety legislation in carrying out routine maintenance of Cold Water Systems components

2.2

3. how to complete records and reports of the maintenance of systems and components (PC 16.2.3) (Range 3, 2) 3.1 the types of maintenance activity for which it will be necessary to complete records of maintenance work 3.2 the information that should be included on a maintenance record

4. the action to take when the system or component does not work to full performance specification (PC 16.2.1) (Range 1) 4.1 procedures for reporting the continued failure of the Cold Water Systems component 4.2 the persons to whom it would be necessary to report continued failure of a Cold Water Systems component 4.3 circumstances in which it might be necessary to implement emergency or temporary provisions for Cold Water Supply due to delay in correcting faults Unit 16 Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 16.3 Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to interpret information on system or component performance, including advice from users, visual inspections or checks or diagnosis tests to locate faults (PC 16.3.1) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 the types of information sources on Cold Water System or component performance how to carry out visual inspections of Cold Water Systems components to check their performance against specifications how to obtain information on component performance from customers or system users how to carry out diagnostic tests to determine the causes of faults in Cold Water Systems components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 27

1.5 the causes of faults in Cold Water Systems including inadequate supply, air locks, noise, discharge from warning pipes, leaks in system components, control malfunction, corrosion of system components

4.

the work action and sequences required to rectify faults in systems and components (PC 16.3.1, 16.3.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) work sequences required to rectify faults in Cold Water System pipework or components, including inadequate supply, air locks, noise, discharge from warning pipes, leaks in system components, control malfunction, corrosion of system components

4.1

5. the measures to ensure that systems do not present a safety hazard to potential users, or the workforce, when carrying out rectification procedures (PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4) (Range 5, 6, 2, 3) 5.1 the importance of ensuring that appropriate liaison has taken place before, during, and after maintenance activities

5.2 the measures to be taken to prevent the unauthorised use of systems or components on which maintenance work is being carried out, including safe isolation of the system component, sealing of any open pipework, labelling of controls

7. how to isolate unsafe systems and components (PC 16.3.4) 7.1

(Range 6, 2, 3)

how to interpret information, including that gained by visual inspection, and information given by customers or persons in authority, to determine systems layouts, including the positions of pipework, controls, storage cisterns methods of ensuring that unsafe systems cannot be used, including securing of controls, labelling controls, draining sections of pipework, posting warning notices, informing system users

7.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 28

Level 2

Unit 205 - Domestic Hot Water Systems

General Range: Non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling The range covered is direct & indirect systems fed from storage (excludes unvented hot water systems). Unit 7 Element 7.1 Knowledge Outcomes Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

1.

the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 7.1.1, 7.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for Direct and Indirect Domestic Hot Water Systems, including pipe materials, fittings, controls, storage cisterns and cylinders, and incoming services sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for Domestic Hot Water Systems components

1.1

1.2

5.

the input services or supplies required for new systems or components, or for extending systems or adding components to existing systems - how to confirm that input services are adequate (PC 7.1.5) (Range 5) methods of identifying the water supply requirements of Direct or Indirect Domestic Hot Water Systems or components methods of confirming that input water supply or existing supply meets the requirements of the system or components

5.1 5.2

6. the persons to whom deficiencies in input services should be reported and procedures for isolating input services (PC 7.1.5) (Range 5) 6.1 6.2 the persons to whom deficiencies in input water supply should be reported, including the customer, co-contractors, or other building users the importance of ensuring that appropriate actions are taken to remedy deficiencies in input water supply before the connection of the system or component

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 29

8.

the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures (PC 7.1.7, 7.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10)

8.1 the range of tools and equipment required for the installation of Domestic Hot Water Systems and components 8.2 the range of materials and components required for the installation of Domestic Hot Water Systems, including pipe materials, pipe fittings, controls, fixings, storage cisterns and cylinders Unit 7 Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 7.2 Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1. 1.1 1.2 how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 7.2.2) (Range 2, 3) how to interpret drawings of Domestic Hot Water Systems installations to establish positions of pipework, fittings, fixings, controls, storage cisterns & cylinders methods of measuring locations into which Domestic Hot Water Systems pipework and components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of pipework for prefabrication purposes

2. the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 methods of cutting, bending, jointing, and installing all materials used for Domestic Hot Water Systems installations the industry standards of workmanship for Domestic Hot Water Systems installations the safety practices appropriate to fabrication and installation work on Domestic Hot Water Systems how to interpret system design information on the positioning requirements for Domestic Hot Water System components how to interpret information on the fixing requirements of Domestic Hot Water System components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 30

3. the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 7.2.3, 7.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) 3.1 3.2 3.3 layouts of Domestic Hot Water Systems to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of Domestic Hot Water System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix Domestic Hot Water System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of pipework, controls, storage vessels, and insulation sets

4. the procedures required for connecting to input services or connecting pipework into existing systems (PC 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 5, 6) 4.1 how to connect Domestic Hot Water Systems components to input supply using methods that conform to industry requirements, including positioning of control valves, and system drainage provisions how to connect Domestic Hot Water Systems components to existing systems pipework using methods that conform to industry requirements how to connect Domestic Hot Water Systems pipework to storage vessels, including connection and termination of overflow and warning pipes. the jointing methods and materials approved for use on Domestic Hot Water Systems components

4.2 4.3 4.4

8.

the range of tests used to confirm the soundness of systems and components and how to use the range of soundness test equipment (PC 7.2.8, 7.2.9) (Range 2, 5, 8, 9) the different types of test used for Domestic Hot Water Systems installations including pressure, static pressure, and air tests, and procedures and work sequences for each type of test the hygiene and charging procedures for newly installed, or extensions to existing Domestic Hot Water Systems methods of preventing the unauthorised/inadvertent use of Domestic Hot Water Systems installations that are not ready for use, including sealing all open ends on pipework, securing controls on input supply, placing warning notices on controls, advising customers or other trades the importance of advising customers or line managers when testing is about to take place, when testing has been completed, and when the system is ready for use

8.1

8.2 8.3

8.4

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 31

Unit 12

Decommission Non-Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 12.1 Decommission Systems Knowledge Outcomes 1. the importance of confirming the system design, specification, functions and outcomes of suspending the operation of the system (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.3, 12.1.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4)

1.1 the importance of interpreting information on the Domestic Hot Water System or component, including information gained from site inspection, to confirm the outcomes of decommissioning the system or component 1.2 1.3 the persons with whom liaison should take place before, during and after the decommissioning process, including customers, other appropriate trades, line manager the industry requirements, standards, and tests and procedures used for decommissioning Domestic Hot Water Systems

2.

the need to liaise with others whose procedures or routines may be affected by the suspension of the system operation (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.2) (Range 1) how to identify other persons, including customers, and other trades whose work or routines may be affected by the decommissioning procedures how to liaise with other persons to minimise disruption to their work or routines

2.1 2.2

3.

the potential hazards that could arise from de-commissioning activities and the checks to be carried out before de-commissioning takes place (PC 12.1.4) (Range 5, 2) the potential safety hazards that could arise from the decommissioning of Domestic Hot Water Systems, including the interruption of supply to other systems the checks to be carried out in advance of system decommissioning to ensure that any potential hazards that could arise, have been removed

3.1 3.2

4.

de-commissioning procedures for temporary and permanent de-commissioning of systems (PC 12.1.3) (Range 2, 3) identify the differences between the tests and procedures for temporary and permanent decommissioning of Domestic Hot Water Systems the different actions and procedures to be used when a full or part system, or individual component is being decommissioned

4.1 4.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 32

the precautions to ensure that de-commissioned systems do not prove a safety hazard measures to prevent systems being brought into operation safety and warning notices (PC 12.1.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the precautionary actions including liaison with customer or other system or building users, sealing of open pipework, labelling of controls, to ensure that decommissioned Domestic Hot Water Systems do not become a hazard the types of warning notices that are appropriate for use on temporarily or permanently decommissioned systems

5.1

5.2

7. 7.1 7.2

how to complete systems de-commissioning records (PC 12.1.3)

(Range 2, 3, 4)

how to identify situations where it would be appropriate to complete records of the decommissioning of Domestic Hot Water Systems the types of information that a decommissioning record should contain Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Establish Maintenance Requirements for Systems and Components

Unit 16 Element 16.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1.

the range of information that should be available on the routine and non-routine service and maintenance requirements of systems and components (PC 16.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3)

1.1 the range of information that should be available on Domestic Hot Water Systems components including specifications and schedules, manufacturers information, services and maintenance schedules 1.2 the details that may be obtained from the different information sources

2.

the maintenance procedures across the range of systems and components (PC 16.1.2, 16.1.5, 16.1.6) (Range 2, 4, 5, 6)

2.1 the activities that make up routine maintenance schedules for Domestic Hot Water Systems components 2.2 the industry standards for routine maintenance of Domestic Hot Water Systems components, including compliance with Codes of Practice, BS Recommendations, Manufacturers specifications. 2.3 the requirements of health and safety legislation for safety in the routine maintenance of Domestic Hot Water Systems components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 33

3.

how to plan maintenance procedures to minimise interference with system operation and customer routines (PC 16.1.2, 16.1.3, 16.1.4, 16.1.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5) the other persons, including the customer and co-contractors whose work or routines may be affected by maintenance activities on Domestic Hot Water Systems components how to plan the maintenance of Domestic Hot Water Systems components to minimise system downtime the importance of ensuring that all tools, equipment, and materials will be available as required, and the costs of delays

3.1 3.2 3.3

5. the materials required for routine maintenance (PC 16.1.4) 5.1 5.2

(Range 4)

the consumable materials required for the maintenance of Domestic Hot Water System components, including replacement parts for controls, gland packings, floats, washers. the sources of information on the materials required for routine maintenance of Domestic Hot Water Systems components

6.

the tools and equipment required for routine maintenance operations (PC 16.1.4) (Range 4)

6.1 the tools and equipment required for maintenance operations, including hand and powered tools 6.2 the access equipment used for routine maintenance operations on Domestic Hot Water Systems components including stand steps, ladders, and trestles Unit 16 Element 16.2 Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Carry out the Maintenance of Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes

1.

how to use performance specifications for systems and components, and maintenance procedures necessary to restore or maintain the continued performance of systems and components (PC 16.2.1) (Range 1, 2) the Domestic Hot Water Systems components that require routine maintenance, including pipe materials, controls, and storage vessels how to interpret the required performance of Domestic Hot Water Systems and components using performance specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations the routine maintenance procedures necessary to maintain Domestic Hot Water System component performance

1.1 1.2

1.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 34

2.

the maintenance procedures necessary to ensure compliance with industry requirements for routine and non-routine maintenance activities (PC 16.2.1, 16.2.2) (Range 1, 2) the industry requirements for routine maintenance of Domestic Hot Water Systems pipe materials and components, including compliance with specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations how to ensure compliance with the requirements of safety legislation in carrying out routine maintenance of Domestic Hot Water Systems components

2.1

2.2

3.

how to complete records and reports of the maintenance of systems and components (PC 16.2.3) (Range 3, 2)

3.1 the types of maintenance activity for which it will be necessary to complete records of maintenance work 3.2 the information that should be included on a maintenance record

4.

the action to take when the system or component does not work to full performance specification (PC 16.2.1) (Range 1)

4.1 procedures for reporting the continued failure of the Domestic Hot Water Systems component 4.2 the persons to whom it would be necessary to report continued failure of a Domestic Hot Water Systems component 4.3 circumstances in which it might be necessary to implement emergency or temporary provisions for Domestic Hot Water supply due to delay in correcting faults Unit 16 Element 16.3 Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to interpret information on system or component performance, including advice from users, visual inspections or checks or diagnosis tests to locate faults (PC 16.3.1) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the types of information sources on Domestic Hot Water System or component performance how to carry out visual inspections of Domestic Hot Water Systems components to check their performance against specifications how to obtain information on component performance from customers or system users

1.1 1.2 1.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 35

1.4 1.5

how to carry out diagnostic tests to determine the causes of faults in Domestic Hot Water Systems components the causes of faults in Domestic Hot Water Systems including inadequate supply, air locks, noise, discharge from warning pipes, leaks in system components, control malfunction, corrosion of system components

4. 4.1

the work action and sequences required to rectify faults in systems and components (PC 16.3.1, 16.3.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) work sequences required to rectify faults in Domestic Hot Water System pipework or components, including inadequate supply, air locks, noise, discharge from warning pipes, leaks in system components, control malfunction, corrosion of system components

5.

the measures to ensure that systems do not present a safety hazard to potential users, or the workforce, when carrying out rectification procedures (PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4) (Range 5, 6, 2, 3) the importance of ensuring that appropriate liaison has taken place before, during, and after maintenance activities the measures to be taken to prevent the unauthorised use of systems or components on which maintenance work is being carried out, including safe isolation of the system component, sealing of any open pipework, labelling of controls

5.1 5.2

7. how to isolate unsafe systems and components (PC 16.3.4) 7.1

(Range 6, 2, 3)

how to interpret information, including that gained by visual inspection, and information given by customers or persons in authority, to determine systems layouts, including the positions of pipework, controls, storage vessels methods of ensuring that unsafe systems cannot be used, including securing of controls, labelling controls, draining sections of pipework, posting warning notices, informing system users

7.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 36

Level 2

Unit 206 - Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems

General Range: Non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling The systems range for this unit includes the knowledge of Below Ground Drainage Pipework Systems that is required to permit the connection of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems (including sanitary appliances) Single Stack Systems Ventilated Systems Ventilated Stack Systems Rainwater pipe and gutter systems (in plastics) Below Ground Drainage Systems Separate Systems Combined Systems Unit 7 Element 7.1 Knowledge Outcomes Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

1. the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 7.1.1, 7.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) 1.1 the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, including pipe materials, fittings, components, and appliances sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, components and appliances

1.2

5.

the supply and discharge provisions required for new systems or components, or for extending systems or adding components to existing systems - how to confirm that supply and discharge provisions are adequate (PC 7.1.5) (Range 5) methods of identifying the water supply and discharge requirements of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems or components methods of confirming that water supply and discharge provision or existing water supply and discharge provisions meet the requirements of the system or components

5.1

5.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 37

6.

the persons to whom deficiencies in water supply or discharge provisions should be reported and procedures for isolating supply or discharge provisions (PC 7.1.5) (Range 5)

6.1 the persons to whom deficiencies in water supply or discharge provisions should be reported, including the customer, co-contractors, or other building users 6.2 the importance of ensuring that appropriate actions are taken to remedy deficiencies in water supply or discharge provisions before the connection of the system or component

8.

the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures (PC 7.1.7, 7.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10) the range of tools and equipment required for the installation of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems and components

8.1

8.2 the range of materials and components required for the installation of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, including pipe materials, pipe fittings, fixings, components and sanitary appliances Unit 7 Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 7.2 Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1. 1.1 how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 7.2.2) (Range 2, 3) how to interpret drawings of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems installations to establish positions of pipework, fittings, fixings, components, and sanitary appliances methods of measuring locations into which Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems pipework and components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of pipework for prefabrication purposes

1.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 38

2. the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) 2.1 methods of cutting, jointing, and installing all materials used for Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and cutting materials to make connections to Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems installations the industry standards of workmanship for Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems installations the safety practices appropriate to fabrication and installation work on Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and connections to Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems how to interpret system design information on the positioning requirements for Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and connection to Below Ground Discharge Pipework System components how to interpret information on the fixing requirements of Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and connection to Below Ground Discharge Pipework System components

2.2 2.3

2.4

2.5

3. the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 7.2.3, 7.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) 3.1 3.2 layouts of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of pipework, components, and appliances the preparatory, positioning and fixing requirements of all types of sanitary appliances installed in domestic premises

3.3

3.4

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 39

4. the procedures required for connecting to supply or discharge provisions or connecting pipework into existing systems (PC 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 5, 6) 4.1 how to connect Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components to supply and discharge provisions using methods that conform to industry requirements, including positioning of controls for sanitary appliances, and connections to system drainage provisions how to connect Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components to existing systems pipework using methods that conform to industry requirements how to connect Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems to sanitary appliances and to Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems pipework, including connection and termination of overflow and warning pipes. the jointing methods and materials approved for use on Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components

4.2

4.3

4.4

8.

the range of tests used to confirm the soundness of systems and components and how to use the range of soundness test equipment (PC 7.2.8, 7.2.9) (Range 2, 5, 8, 9) the different types of test used for Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems installations including pressure, static pressure, and air tests, and procedures and work sequences for each type of test the hygiene and charging procedures for newly installed, or extensions to existing Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems methods of preventing the unauthorised/inadvertent use of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems installations that are not ready for use, including sealing all open ends on pipework, securing controls on system supply, placing warning notices on controls, advising customers or other trades the importance of advising customers or line managers when testing is about to take place, when testing has been completed, and when the system is ready for use procedures for checking and testing that sanitary appliances are leak free

8.1

8.2 8.3

8.4 8.5

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 40

Unit 12

Decommission Non-Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 12.1 Decommission Systems Knowledge Outcomes 1. the importance of confirming the system design, specification, functions and outcomes of suspending the operation of the system (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.3, 12.1.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4)

1.1 the importance of interpreting information on the Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework System or component, including information gained from site inspection, to confirm the outcomes of decommissioning the system or component 1.2 1.3 the persons with whom liaison should take place before, during and after the decommissioning process, including customers, other appropriate trades, line manager the industry requirements, standards, and tests and procedures used for decommissioning Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems

2.

the need to liaise with others whose procedures or routines may be affected by the suspension of the system operation (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.2) (Range 1) how to identify other persons, including customers, and other trades whose work or routines may be affected by the decommissioning procedures how to liaise with other persons to minimise disruption to their work or routines

2.1 2.2

3.

the potential hazards that could arise from de-commissioning activities and the checks to be carried out before de-commissioning takes place (PC 12.1.4) (Range 5, 2) the potential safety hazards that could arise from the decommissioning of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, including the interruption of supply, or discharge provisions to other systems the checks to be carried out in advance of system decommissioning to ensure that any potential hazards that could arise, have been removed

3.1

3.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 41

4. de-commissioning procedures for temporary and permanent de-commissioning of systems (PC 12.1.3) (Range 2, 3) 4.1 identify the differences between the tests and procedures for temporary and permanent decommissioning of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems the different actions and procedures to be used when a full or part system, or individual component is being decommissioned the precautions to ensure that de-commissioned systems do not prove a safety hazard measures to prevent systems being brought into operation safety and warning notices (PC 12.3.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the precautionary actions including liaison with customer or other system or building users, sealing of open pipework, labelling of supply controls, to ensure that decommissioned Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems do not become a hazard the types of warning notices that are appropriate for use on temporarily or permanently decommissioned systems Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Establish Maintenance Requirements for Systems and Components

4.2

5.

5.1

5.2

Unit 16 Element 16.1

Knowledge Outcomes 1. the range of information that should be available on the routine and non-routine service and maintenance requirements of systems and components (PC 16.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3)

1.1 the range of information that should be available on Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components including specifications and schedules, manufacturers information, services and maintenance schedules 1.2 the details that may be obtained from the different information sources 2. the maintenance procedures across the range of systems and components (PC 16.1.2, 16.1.5, 16.1.6) (Range 2, 4, 5, 6)

2.1 the activities that make up routine maintenance schedules for Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components 2.2 the industry standards for routine maintenance of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components, including compliance with Codes of Practice, BS Recommendations, Manufacturers specifications.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 42

2.3 the requirements of health and safety legislation for safety in the routine maintenance of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components

3.

how to plan maintenance procedures to minimise interference with system operation and customer routines (PC 16.1.2, 16.1.3, 16.1.4, 16.1.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5) the other persons, including the customer and co-contractors whose work or routines may be affected by maintenance activities on Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components the types of commercial or industrial operations that may be affected by maintenance activities on Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components how to plan the maintenance of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components to minimise system downtime the importance of ensuring that all tools, equipment, and materials will be available as required, and the costs of delays

3.1

3.2

3.3 3.4

5. the materials required for routine maintenance (PC 16.1.4) 5.1

(Range 4)

the consumable materials required for the maintenance of Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework System components, including replacement parts supply systems components, including WC cisterns

5.2 the sources of information on the materials required for routine maintenance of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components, including WC cisterns

6. the tools and equipment required for routine maintenance operations (PC 16.1.4)

(Range 4)

6.1 the tools and equipment required for maintenance operations, including hand and powered tools 6.2 the access equipment used for routine maintenance operations on Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components including stand steps, ladders, and trestle

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 43

Unit 16 Element 16.2

Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Carry out the Maintenance of Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to use performance specifications for systems and components and maintenance procedures necessary to restore or maintain the continued performance of systems and components (PC 16.2.1) (Range 1, 2) the Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components that require routine maintenance, including pipe materials, supply controls to appliances, including WC Cisterns. how to interpret the required performance of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems and components using performance specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations the routine maintenance procedures necessary to maintain Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework System component performance

1.1

1.2

1.3

the maintenance procedures necessary to ensure compliance with industry requirements for routine and non-routine maintenance activities (PC 16.2.1, 16.2.2) (Range 1, 2) 2.1 the industry requirements for routine maintenance of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems pipe materials and components, including compliance with specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations 2.2 how to ensure compliance with the requirements of safety legislation in carrying out routine maintenance of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components

2.

4.

the action to take when the system or component does not work to full performance specification (PC 16.2.1) (Range 1)

4.1 procedures for reporting the continued failure of the Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components 4.2 the persons to whom it would be necessary to report continued failure of an Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, or Below Ground Discharge Pipework System component 4.3 circumstances in which it might be necessary to implement emergency or temporary provisions for Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, or Below Ground Discharge Pipework System due to delay in correcting faults

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 44

Unit 16 Element 16.3

Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to interpret information on system or component performance, including advice from users, visual inspections or checks or diagnosis tests to locate faults (PC 16.3.1) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the types of information sources on Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework System or component performance how to carry out visual inspections of Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components to check their performance against specifications how to obtain information on component performance from customers or system users how to carry out diagnostic tests to determine the causes of faults in Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems components

1.1 1.2

1.3 1.4

1.5 the causes of faults in Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework Systems including inadequate supply, discharge from warning pipes, leaks in system components, loss of trap seals, corrosion of system components, inadequate performance of appliances

4. the work action and sequences required to rectify faults in systems and components (PC 16.3.1, 16.3.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) 4.1 work sequences required to rectify faults in Above Ground Discharge Pipework System, and Below Ground Discharge Pipework System pipework or components, including inadequate supply, discharge from warning pipes, leaks in system components, loss of trap seals, corrosion of system components, inadequate performance of appliances

5.

the measures to ensure that systems do not present a safety hazard to potential users, or the workforce, when carrying out rectification procedures (PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4) (Range 5, 6, 2, 3) the importance of ensuring that appropriate liaison has taken place before, during, and after maintenance activities the measures to be taken to prevent the unauthorised use of systems or components on which maintenance work is being carried out, including safe isolation of the system component, sealing of any open pipework, labelling of controls

5.1 5.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 45

7. 7.1

how to isolate unsafe systems and components (PC 16.3.4)

(Range 6, 2, 3)

how to interpret information, including that gained by visual inspection, and information given by customers or persons in authority, to determine systems layouts, including the positions of pipework, supply controls, system discharge connections methods of ensuring that unsafe systems cannot be used, including securing of supply controls, labelling controls, disconnecting appliances, stopping up sections of pipework, posting warning notices, informing system users

7.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 46

Level 2

Unit 207 - Central Heating Systems (Pipework Systems Only)

General Range: Non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling Central Heating Systems systems pipework and components only systems up to 45kW heat input, open vented systems only, competences related to controls systems only relates to the installation of controls and the replacement of defective individual controls full controls principles and fault diagnostics are covered at Level 3. Unit 7 Element 7.1 Knowledge Outcomes Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

1.

the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 7.1.1, 7.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for Central Heating Pipework Systems, including pipe materials, fittings, controls, feed and expansion cisterns, and supply sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for Central Heating Pipework Systems components

1.1

1.2

5. the water supplies required for new systems or components, or for extending systems or adding components to existing systems - how to confirm that water supplies are adequate (PC 7.1.5) (Range 5) 5.1 5.2 methods of identifying the water supply requirements of Central Heating Pipework Systems or components methods of confirming that the system water supply or existing system feed meet the requirements of the system or components

8.

the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures (PC 7.1.7, 7.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10) the range of tools and equipment required for the installation of Central Heating Pipework Systems and components

8.1

8.2 the range of materials and components required for the installation of Central Heating Pipework Systems, including pipe materials, pipe fittings, controls, fixings, feed and expansion cisterns

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 47

Unit 7

Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 7.2 Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1. 1.1 1.2 how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 7.2.2) (Range 2, 3) how to interpret drawings of Central Heating Pipework System installations to establish positions of pipework, fittings, fixings, controls, feed and expansion cisterns methods of measuring locations into which Central Heating Pipework Systems pipework and components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of pipework for prefabrication purposes

2. the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 methods of cutting, bending, jointing, and installing all materials used for Central Heating Pipework Systems installations approved methods of cutting feed and expansion cistern materials the industry standards of workmanship for Central Heating Pipework Systems installations the safety practices appropriate to fabrication and installation work on Central Heating Pipework Systems how to interpret system design information on the positioning requirements for Central Heating Pipework System components how to interpret information on the fixing requirements of Central Heating Pipework System components

3. the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 7.2.3, 7.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) 3.1 3.2 3.3 layouts of Central Heating Pipework Systems to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of Central Heating Pipework System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix Central Heating Pipework System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of pipework, controls, feed and expansion cisterns, insulation sets

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 48

4. the procedures required for connecting to input supply or connecting pipework into existing systems (PC 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 5, 6) 4.1 how to connect Central Heating Pipework Systems components to input supply using methods that conform to industry requirements, including positioning of control valves, and system drainage provisions how to connect Central Heating Pipework Systems components to existing systems pipework using methods that conform to industry requirements how to connect Central Heating Pipework Systems pipework to feed and expansion cisterns, including connection and termination of overflow and warning pipes. the jointing methods and materials approved for use on Central Heating Pipework Systems components

4.2 4.3 4.4

8.

the range of tests used to confirm the soundness of systems and components and how to use the range of soundness test equipment (PC 7.2.8, 7.2.9) (Range 2, 5, 8, 9) the different types of test used for Central Heating Pipework System installations including pressure, static pressure, and air tests, and procedures and work sequences for each type of test the hygiene and charging procedures for newly installed, or extensions to existing Central Heating Pipework Systems methods of preventing the unauthorised/inadvertent use of Central Heating Pipework Systems installations that are not ready for use, including sealing all open ends on pipework, securing controls on incoming supply, placing warning notices on controls, advising customers or other trades the importance of advising customers or line managers when testing is about to take place, when testing has been completed, and when the system is ready for use Decommission Non-Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

8.1

8.2 8.3

8.4

Unit 12

Element 12.1 Decommission Systems Knowledge Outcomes 1. the importance of confirming the system design, specification, functions and outcomes of suspending the operation of the system (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.3, 12.1.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the importance of interpreting information on the Central Heating Pipework System or component, including information gained from site inspection, to confirm the outcomes of decommissioning the system or component the persons with whom liaison should take place before, during and after the decommissioning process, including customers, other appropriate trades, line manager

1.1

1.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 49

1.3

the industry requirements, standards, and tests and procedures used for decommissioning Central Heating Pipework Systems

2. the need to liaise with others whose procedures or routines may be affected by the suspension of the system operation (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.2) (Range 1) 2.1 2.2 how to identify other persons, including customers, and other trades whose work or routines may be affected by the decommissioning procedures liaison with other persons to minimise disruption to their work or routines

3.

the potential hazards that could arise from de-commissioning activities and the checks to be carried out before de-commissioning takes place (PC 12.1.4) (Range 5, 2) the potential safety hazards that could arise from the decommissioning of Central Heating Pipework Systems, including the interruption of supply to other systems, and the interruption of supply to industrial processes the checks to be carried out in advance of system decommissioning to ensure that any potential hazards that could arise, have been removed

3.1

3.2

4.

the precautions to ensure that de-commissioned systems do not prove a safety hazard measures to prevent systems being brought into operation safety and warning notices (PC 12.1.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the precautionary actions including liaison with customer or other system or building users, sealing of open pipework, labelling of controls, to ensure that decommissioned Central Heating Pipework Systems do not become a hazard the types of warning notices that are appropriate for use on temporarily or permanently decommissioned systems Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Establish Maintenance Requirements for Systems and Components

4.1

4.2

Unit 16 Element 16.1

Knowledge Outcomes the maintenance procedures across the range of systems and components (PC 16.1.2, 16.1.5, 16.1.6) (Range 2, 4, 5, 6) 2.1 the activities that make up routine maintenance schedules for Central Heating Pipework Systems components 2.2 the industry standards for routine maintenance of Central Heating Pipework Systems components, including compliance with Codes of Practice, BS Recommendations, Manufacturers specifications.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 50

2.3 the requirements of health and safety legislation for safety in the routine maintenance of Central Heating Pipework Systems components Unit 16 Element 16.3 Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to interpret information on system or component performance, including advice from users, visual inspections or checks or diagnosis tests to locate faults (PC 16.3.1) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the types of information sources on Central Heating Pipework System or component performance how to carry out visual inspections of Central Heating Pipework Systems components to check their performance against specifications how to obtain information on component performance from customers or system users how to carry out diagnostic tests to determine the causes of faults in Central Heating Pipework Systems components

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4

1.5 the causes of faults in Central Heating Pipework Systems including inadequate supply, air locks, noise, discharge from warning pipes, leaks in system components, control malfunction, corrosion of system components

4. 4.1

the work action and sequences required to rectify faults in systems and components (PC 16.3.1, 16.3.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) work sequences required to rectify faults in Central Heating Pipework System pipework or components, including inadequate supply, air locks, noise, discharge from warning pipes, leaks in system components, control malfunction, corrosion of system components

5. the measures to ensure that systems do not present a safety hazard to potential users, or the workforce, when carrying out rectification procedures (PC 16.3.2, 16.3.4) (Range 5, 6, 2, 3) 5.1 the importance of ensuring that appropriate liaison has taken place before, during, and after maintenance activities

5.2 the measures to be taken to prevent the unauthorised use of systems or components on which maintenance work is being carried out, including safe isolation of the system component, sealing of any open pipework, labelling of controls

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 51

7. 7.1

how to isolate unsafe systems and components (PC 16.3.4)

(Range 6, 2, 3)

how to interpret information, including that gained by visual inspection, and information given by customers or persons in authority, to determine systems layouts, including the positions of pipework, controls, feed and expansion cisterns methods of ensuring that unsafe systems cannot be used, including securing of controls, labelling controls, draining sections of pipework, posting warning notices, informing system users

7.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 52

Level 2 Note: 1

Unit 208 - Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems

It is emphasised that this unit is intended to provide the essential knowledge that is required to permit Level Two candidates to work safely within the limits of their own competence with electrical supply and continuity systems, and to offer appropriate advice to customers Possession of the knowledge and understanding outlined above does not confer competence in the installation, decommissioning, or servicing and maintenance of electrical systems, or in work on earth continuity systems

General Range: Non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling 1 Electrical supply to domestic appliances Dishwashers Washing machines Macerator type WC Electric water heaters Electric showers Electrical immersion heaters Waste disposal units 3 Earth continuity systems Main and supplementary bonding of extraneous metallic parts of plumbing systems Temporary earth continuity bonding to permit work on system Unit 7 Element 7.1 Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components 2 Controls for central heating systems Connections to central heating control components

Knowledge Outcomes 1. the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 7.1.1, 7.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) 1.1 the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems, including cables, controls, consumer units, earthing provisions sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems components

1.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 53

5.

the input supplies or earthing provision required for new systems or components, or for extending systems or adding components to existing systems - how to confirm that input services are adequate (PC 7.1.5) (Range 5) methods of identifying the electrical supply and earthing requirements of systems or components methods of confirming that the electrical supply and earthing provisions meet the requirements of the system or components

5.1 5.2

6.

the persons to whom deficiencies in electrical supply and earthing provisions should be reported and procedures for isolating electrical supply (PC 7.1.5) (Range 5)

6.1 the persons to whom deficiencies in electrical supply and earthing provisions should be reported, including the customer, co-contractors, or other building users 6.2 the importance of ensuring that appropriate actions are taken to remedy deficiencies in electrical supply and earthing provisions before the connection of the system or component

8.

the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the electrical supply and earthing system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures (PC 7.1.7, 7.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10) the range of tools and equipment required for the installation of Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems and components the range of materials and components required for the installation of Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems, including cables, fixings, controls, jointing components Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

8.1 8.2

Unit 7

Element 7.2 Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1. 1.1 1.2 how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 7.2.2) (Range 2, 3) how to interpret drawings of Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems installations to establish positions of cables, fixings, controls, jointing components methods of measuring locations into which Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems cables, fixings, controls, jointing components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of cables/conduit for prefabrication purposes

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 54

2.

the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) methods of cutting, bending, jointing, and installing all materials used for Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems installations the industry standards of workmanship for Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems installations the safety practices appropriate to fabrication and installation work on Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems how to interpret system design information on the positioning requirements for Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity System components how to interpret information on the fixing requirements of Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity System components

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

3. the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 7.2.3, 7.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) 3.1 3.2 3.3 layouts of Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of cables, fixings, controls, jointing components

4. the procedures required for connecting to electrical supply or earthing provisions or connecting into existing provisions (PC 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 5, 6) 4 .1 how to connect Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems components to input services using methods that conform to industry requirements 4.2 4.3 how to connect Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems components to existing systems pipework using methods that conform to industry requirements the jointing methods and materials approved for use on Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems components

8. the range of tests used to confirm the soundness of systems and components and how to use the range of soundness test equipment (PC 7.2.8, 7.2.9) (Range 2, 5, 8, 9) 8.1 the different types of test used for Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems installations including earth continuity, polarity, insulation resistance, over current protection devices
Page 55

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

8.2

methods of preventing the unauthorised/inadvertent use of Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems installations that are not ready for use safe isolation procedure for electrical systems the importance of advising customers or line managers when testing is about to take place, when testing has been completed, and when the system is ready for use Decommission Non-Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

8.3

Unit 12

Element 12.1 Decommission Systems Knowledge Outcomes 1. the importance of confirming the system design, specification, functions and outcomes of suspending the operation of the system (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.3, 12.1.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the importance of interpreting information on the Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity System or component, including information gained from site inspection, to confirm the outcomes of decommissioning the system or component the persons with whom liaison should take place before, during and after the decommissioning process, including customers, other appropriate trades, line manager the industry requirements, standards, and tests and procedures used for decommissioning Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems safe electrical system isolation procedure

1.1

1.2 1.3

2.

the need to liaise with others whose procedures or routines may be affected by the suspension of the system operation (PC 12.1.1, 12.1.2) (Range 1) how to identify other persons, including customers, and other trades whose work or routines may be affected by the decommissioning procedures liaison with other persons to minimise disruption to their work or routines the potential hazards that could arise from de-commissioning activities and the checks to be carried out before de-commissioning takes place (PC 12.1.4) (Range 5, 2) the potential safety hazards that could arise from the decommissioning of Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems, including the interruption of supply to other systems the checks to be carried out in advance of system decommissioning to ensure that any potential hazards that could arise, have been removed

2.1 2.2 3.

3.1 3.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 56

4.

de-commissioning procedures for temporary and permanent de-commissioning of systems (PC 12.1.3) (Range 2, 3) identify the differences between the tests and procedures for temporary and permanent decommissioning of Electrical Supply and Earth Continuity Systems the different actions and procedures to be used when a full or part system, or individual component is being decommissioned the purpose of temporary continuity bonding and where it would be used need to be used when carrying out decommissioning, maintenance or installation activities on systems

4.1 4.2 4.3

5.

the precautions to ensure that de-commissioned systems do not prove a safety hazard measures to prevent systems being brought into operation safety and warning notices (PC 12.1.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the precautionary actions including liaison with customer or other system or building users safe isolation procedures for use on electrical systems the types of warning notices that are appropriate for use on temporarily or permanently decommissioned systems

5.1 5.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 57

Level 2

Unit 209 - Sheet Lead Weathering Systems

General Range: Sheet weathering systems in lead for chimneys, abutments, roof penetrations to slated, tiled roof surfaces Unit 7 Element 7.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1. the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 7.1.1, 7.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for sheet weathering systems, including lead sheet materials, fixings, underlays sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for sheet weathering systems components sizes and locations of sheet lead weathering components that have to be accommodated by the building structure methods of accommodating sheet lead weathering components on roofs, walls, and other surfaces the preparatory work to be carried out by other trades, when in attendance Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

2 regulations, recommendations governing safety in the workplace. General responsibilities of the operative for his/her own safety and that of others (PC 7.1.1, 7.1.2) (Range 1, 2) 2.1 2.2 2.3 the general requirements of health and safety legislation for the safety of work locations general responsibilities of operatives for their own safety and the safety of others requirements of health and safety legislation for the safe movement of the workforce, materials, site visitors, and members of the public

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 58

4 4.1 4.2 4.3

how to protect customers property or the building fabric prior to the work commencing (PC 7.1.4, 7.1.3) (Range 3, 4) the importance of checking work locations to identify any existing damage to customers property, including building fabric, furnishings and fittings, ornaments and accessories. the importance of recording and reporting any existing damage to the customers property, before commencing any work the importance of taking appropriate measures to protect customers property including the use of protective sheeting and the removal and safe storage of items that might be damaged during installation work the importance of liaising with the customer on temporary storage arrangements for property that could be damaged by work activities the importance of liaising with other trades on measures to protect work in progress, or materials ready to be fitted

4.4 4.5

the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures (PC 7.1.7, 7.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10) the range of tools and equipment required for the installation of sheet weathering systems and components the range of materials and components required for the installation of sheet weathering systems, including sheet lead, underlays, fixings Install Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

8.1 8.2

Unit 7

Element 7.2 Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1. 1.1 1.2 how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 7.2.2) (Range 2, 3) how to interpret drawings of sheet weathering systems installations to establish positions of sheet lead components, underlays and fixings methods of measuring locations into which sheet weathering systems components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of sheet for prefabrication purposes

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 59

2.

the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 7.2.2, 7.2.3, 7.2.4, 7.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) methods of cutting, bending, jointing, and installing all materials used for sheet lead weathering systems installations approved methods of cutting sheet lead the industry standards of workmanship for sheet lead weathering systems installations the safety practices appropriate to fabrication and installation work on sheet weathering systems how to interpret system design information on the positioning requirements for sheet weathering system components how to interpret information on the fixing requirements of sheet weathering system components

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6

3.

the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 7.2.3, 7.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) layouts of sheet weathering systems to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of sheet weathering system components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix sheet weathering system components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of sheet lead, and underlays Maintain Non - Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components

3.1 3.2 3.3

Unit 16 Element 16.3

Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to interpret information on system or component performance, including advice from users, visual inspections or checks or diagnosis tests to locate faults (PC 16.3.1) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the types of information sources on sheet weathering system or component performance how to carry out visual inspections of sheet weathering systems components to check their performance against specifications how to obtain information on component performance from customers or system users

1.1 1.2 1.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 60

1.4

the causes of faults in sheet weathering systems including water penetration into buildings, blocked gutters, lead staining of building fabric, corrosion of components, lead damage from debris, wind lift, lead damage from thermal movement, lead damage from incorrect sizing, lead damage from inadequate expansion allowances

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 61

Level 2

Unit 10 - Environmental Awareness

General Range: the systems associated activities in which the candidate has to demonstrate environmental awareness to meet the requirements of this unit are: Activities on non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling, as covered by the technical units at Level 2. This unit provides the knowledge to undertake the installation, decommissioning & maintenance of the systems in an environmentally friendly manner. Unit 22 Contribute to the Improvement of the Plumbing Work Environment

Element 22.1 Demonstrate Environmental Awareness within the Workplace Knowledge Outcomes 1. the potential implications for the environment of the work procedures used in installing or maintaining systems or components (PC All) (Range 1, 2) 1.1 1.2 1.3 the plumbing processes, including production of materials, that use non-renewable sources the energy consumption of processes used in plumbing installations the plumbing processes that result in exhaust gases, and the characteristics of exhaust gases

2. alternative low risk materials, products and procedures (PC 22.1.1, 22.1.3) 2.1 2.2

(Range 1, 2)

plumbing products/materials for which there is an environmentally friendly option plumbing procedures and methods of working which minimise harmful emissions

3. prefabrication and installation methods that reduce material wastage (PC 22.1.1) (Range 1, 2) 3.1 3.2 work procedures that minimise waste of consumable materials the importance of accurate measurement of material requirements

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 62

4. the importance of reporting hazards to the environment that arise from work procedures within the scope of the candidates area of responsibility and ensuring that appropriate actions are taken (PC 22.1.2) (Range 1, 2) 4.1 4.2 4.3 how to identify any potential hazard to the environment in routine or non-routine plumbing procedures the persons to whom potential or actual hazards to the environment should be reported the importance of ensuring that action has been taken to remedy situations that provide a hazard to the environment

5. the range of information that needs to be passed to the customer to ensure the correct and economical use of energy dependant systems (PC 22.1.1) (Range 1, 2) 5.1 the importance of ensuring that all information necessary to the correct operation of appliances is available to the customer 5.2 the importance of ensuring that all appliance and system controls are correctly adjusted on hand over of the system or component

the general advice that can be given to customers on methods of reducing waste of resources, and effecting savings (PC 22.1.3) (Range 1, 2) the types of advice that would assist the customer to minimise use of resources, including minimum operating times for appliances, optimum settings for appliance controls the cost savings arising from insulation, or additional insulation of properties

6.1 6.2

the disposal methods used by the organisation for waste materials (PC 22.1.1) (Range 1, 2)

7.1 the content of typical company policies on collection and disposal of waste materials 7.2 the importance of complying with local authority re-cycling facilities for waste materials

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 63

Level 2

Unit 11 - Effective Working Relationships

General Range: the systems associated activities in which the candidate has to demonstrate effective working relationships to meet the requirement of this unit are: Activities on non-complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement to a dwelling, as covered by the technical units at Level Two. This unit provides the knowledge to support developing effective working relationships with customers, colleagues and co-contractors whilst undertaking the installation, decommissioning & maintenance of the range of plumbing systems. Unit 24 Element 24.1 Maintain Effective Plumbing Working Relationships Establish, Develop and Maintain Effective Working Relationships with Others

Knowledge Outcomes 1 the range of other people encountered within the work environment with whom it may be necessary to establish working relationships (PC 24.1.1) (Range 1) 1.1 1.2 the general range of other people likely to be encountered on a large building site, where the plumbing work is sub-contracted the other people likely to be encountered on domestic installation or maintenance work where the plumbing employer is the main contractor

the different types of management structures for organisations employing M.E.S labour the roles and responsibilities of the different individuals within the structure (PC 24.1.1, 24.1.2, 24.1.4) (Range 1, 2) typical management structures for a large building company main roles and responsibilities typical management structures for a small plumbing company main roles and responsibilities typical management structures for a large building site main roles and responsibilities, including responsibilities of sub-contractors

2.1 2.2 2.3

other persons expectations of a good working relationship (PC 24.1.4)

(Range 1)

3.1 the different expectations of the range of persons within the work situation

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 64

the types of job information that may be requested by others in the workplace sources of information methods of accessing information and possible restrictions on passing information to others (PC 24.1.2) (Range 2) the range of job information the range of job information that may be requested by other trades the range of job information that may be requested by the immediate supervisor/site management

4.1 4.2 4.3

the forms of communication used for the range of job or company information best suited to its purpose using the key principles of good communication in work situations, including methods of confirming that the communication has been understood (PC 24.1.3) (Range 3, 2) the different forms of communication, including verbal, written, diagrams and sketches the most appropriate form of communication for passing detailed technical information the importance of confirming that the information has been understood

5.1 5.2 5.3

The actions that are necessary to begin to develop, and maintain good working relationships, or restore working relationships (PC 24.1.1, 24.1.4) (Range 1) the initial actions necessary to begin the development of good working relationships, including being helpful to others, co-operating with other trades, listening to others, using appropriate forms of communication

6.1

the principles of good working relationships and reasons why relationships may break down (PC All) (Range All) the ongoing actions necessary to continue good relationships recognising the signs of a potential breakdown in working relationships

7.1 7.2

8 8.1 8.2

the actions to take to restore working relationships where a breakdown occurs (PC All) (Range All) how to establish the underlying reasons for the other persons discontent when and how to seek the help of a third party as intermediary

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 65

Appendix B

Level 3 Certificate in Plumbing Studies


6129

Scheme Standards (Job Knowledge) Level 3 Units

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 1

Contents

Page

Unit 301 Unit 302 Unit 303 Unit 304 Unit 305 Unit 306 Unit 310

Cold water Systems Hot Water Systems (Parts 1&2) Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems Central Heating Systems Including Boilers & Controls Gas Supply Systems (Parts 1&2) Improvement of Business Products and Services Oil Supply Systems (Parts 1&2) Northern Ireland Only

3 9 22 27 35 50 54

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 2

Level 3

Unit 301 - Cold Water Systems

Pre requisite to this unit Level 2 Unit 204 Cold Water Systems General Range: Direct and Indirect systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings Unit 3 Element 3.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1. the system types and their intended functions - system components and layouts (PC 3.1.1, 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3) Plan Complex Domestic Plumbing Work Activities Plan the Work Activities to be Carried Out

1.1 the types of systems within the unit range 1.2 the functions of the different types of systems and factors affecting the choice of systems for particular circumstances 1.3 the range of components for the systems including systems pipework, fittings, fixings, controls, storage vessels. 1.4 the layouts of different systems, including the positioning of components 1.5 the sources of information on systems within the range

2.

the regulations governing system design, installation and operation (PC 3.1.3) (Range 1, 4)

2.1 the range of current legislation governing system design, layout, positioning of components, materials for and types of components 2.2 the requirements of current legislation for systems design, layout, and positioning of components 2.3 the requirements of current legislation for materials and component types 2.4 the requirements of industry for systems installations layouts, component positions

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 3

3. 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4

the main construction features of buildings into which the systems are installed. (PC 3.1.4) (Range 5, 3) main construction features of buildings into which the systems or components are to be installed, including foundations, floors, walls, roof constructions provisions within buildings for the accommodation of systems components, including underfloor/in floor, chases and ducts, roof spaces provisions for entry into the building of the service to the systems how to inspect buildings to confirm that provisions for the system or component are suitable

4.

the sources of information on the design of specific systems plans and drawings specifications (PC 3.1.1) (Range 1, 4) the range of information which provides the details required for a specific system installation, including the specification, plans and drawings, material and component details

4.1

4.2 how to access information to find the types of materials and components that are specified for a system 4.3 how to confirm that the materials and components specified for an installation meet the requirements of industry standards, including compliance with current legislation

5.

the installation requirements for systems installation sequences and routine liaison with others in the overall construction programme (including) the customer (PC 3.1.1, 3.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) typical installation procedures for systems the range and sizes of components positions into which they are to be installed the preparatory work necessary before installation commences the persons with whom liaison should take place requirements for work by, or attendance by other trades, and how to negotiate this measures to protect work in progress from damage by building operations

5.1

5.2 5.3 5.4

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 4

6.

how to obtain detail from installation programmes and how to monitor progress against the programme (PC 3.1.5, 3.1.7) (Range 1, 7) the purpose of installation programmes and the information that they contain how to locate within an installation programme the timing of the plumbing system installation how and when to check the system installation is meeting the requirements of the work programme

6.1 6.2 6.3

7.

how to negotiate variations to work programmes and the need to obtain written acceptance to major work or material variations (PC 3.1.6, 3.1.8) (Range 6) the persons with whom variations to an installation programme should be agreed, for single trade (plumbing) contracts, and multi-trade contracts the importance of ensuring that agreement has been reached and confirmed with all whose activities may be affected by the variation. the purpose of a formal variation order what it is, what it does, who signs it the importance of notifying the line supervisor or manager of the variation, and issue of a variation order the role of a Clerk of Works on larger contracts

7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5

8.

how to calculate the size of system components including pipework and appliances (PC 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3)

8.1 how to calculate the sizes of systems pipework 8.2 how to select systems pipe sizes to comply with the requirements of statutory regulations or recommendations 8.3 how to calculate the sizes of storage vessels

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 5

Unit 13 Element 13.1 Knowledge Outcomes

Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Carry out Pre-Commissioning Checks and Tests on Systems

1. the procedures, equipment and legislative requirements for applying soundness tests to systems (PC 13.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 5) 1.1 the industry procedures for applying soundness tests to systems 1.2 the sequences of actions for carrying out soundness tests on systems 1.3 the tests and checks to be carried out before testing of systems 1.4 the equipment required to carry out soundness tests on systems 1.5 requirements of current legislation on soundness testing of systems

2. the methods of establishing that input services adequately supply all components within the system (PC 13.1.2) (Range 4, 2) 2.1 how to check that input supply to systems components meet the requirements of the system component or system specification 2.2 how to check that water levels within systems components are correctly set 2.3 how to check that discharge connections meet the system component or system specification

3. the methods of connecting components to systems (PC 13.1.1)

(Range 2, 3)

3.1 how to check that systems components are correctly connected to systems pipework 3.2 how to check that systems pipework is correctly connected to system supply

4. the actions to take where pre-commissioning checks or tests reveal system or component defects (PC All) (Range All) 4.1 the actions to take when systems or systems components do not comply with specification 4.2 the persons to be advised when corrective actions to faulty components or systems is ineffective

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 6

5. how to complete commissioning documentation confirming the safe commissioning of systems and components (PC 13.1.4) (Range 5) 5.1 situations in which it may be necessary to complete records of pre-commissioning tests and checks 5.2 the details that a record of pre-commissioning tests and checks should contain Unit 13 Element 13.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1. the sources of information on the performance of systems or components (PC 13.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3) 1.1 the sources of information on system or component performance, including job specifications, manufacturers specifications or catalogues, contract specifications for commissioning installations the minimum requirements for system or component compliance with industry requirements when a formal specification is not available Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Commission Systems

1.2

2. the procedures for establishing correct system or component performance and checking against the design specification (PC 13.2.3, 13.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) 2.1 2.2 the procedures for checking and making adjustments to systems or system component controls to establish correct system performance the procedures for measuring pressure/flow/discharge rates at taps and valves, or at inputs to components

3. the routines and sequences for commissioning systems or components (PC 13.2.2) (Range 2, 3, 4) 3.1 the sequence of actions to be followed when commissioning systems or system components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 7

4. the points in the commissioning process where co-operation and liaison with other trades and customers may be required (PC 13.2.2) (Range 4) 4.1 situations in which the commissioning process may affect the activities of other customers or systems users 4.2 the points within the commissioning activities where it might be necessary to liaise with other persons, including customers and other trades

5. where to access user information appropriate to different systems and components (PC 13.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3) 5.1 how to identify the range of information that the customer or system user will need to operate the systems or component efficiently 5.2 the importance of ensuring that system or component information is in a format that can be understood by the non-technical person

6. how to complete commissioning documentation confirming the safe commissioning of systems and components (PC 13.2.5) (Range 1) 6.1 situations in which it may be necessary to keep or complete records of commissioning that has been carried out 6.2 the details that might typically be required on a commissioning record

7. system handover procedures and demonstrating the operation of systems and components to end users (PC 13.2.5) (Range 1) 7.1 the importance of ensuring that handover procedures provide the customer, or other system user with all the necessary information on the operation of the system or component 7.2 the types of information that a customer or other system user will need to ensure that they can operate the system or component correctly 7.3 systems or components for which it might be appropriate to demonstrate the correct operation for a customer or other systems user

8. the actions to take when components being commissioned do not meet design requirements (PC 13.2.2, 13.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) 8.1 the actions to take when systems or components do not meet the design specification. 8.2 the persons to be advised on jobs where the plumber is the sole contractor, and where the plumber is sub-contractor to a main contractor

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 8

Level 3

Unit 302 - Part 1

Domestic Hot Water Systems

Pre requisite to part 1 of this unit Level 2 Unit 205 Hot Water Systems Systems other than Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems, which is presented in Part 2 of this unit. General Range: Direct and indirect systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings Unit 3 Plan Complex Domestic Plumbing Work Activities

Element 3.1 Plan the Work Activities to be Carried Out Knowledge Outcomes 1 the system types and their intended functions - system components and layouts (PC 3.1.1, 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3) the types of systems within the unit range the functions of the different types of systems and factors affecting the choice of systems for particular circumstances the range of components for the systems including systems pipework, fitting, fixings, controls, storage vessels, boilers the layouts of different systems, including the positioning of components the sources of information on systems within the range

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

2 2.1 2.2 2.3

the regulations governing system design, installation and operation (PC 3.1.3) (Range 1, 4) the range of current legislation governing system design, layout, positioning of components, materials for and types of components the requirements of current legislation for systems design, layout, and positioning of components the requirements of current legislation for materials and component types

2.4 the requirements of industry for systems installations layouts, component positions

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 9

the main construction features of buildings into which the systems are installed (PC 3.1.4) (Range 5, 3)

3.1 main construction features of buildings into which the systems or components are to be installed, including foundations, floors, walls, roof constructions 3.2 provisions within buildings for the accommodation of systems components, including underfloor/in floor, chases and ducts, roof spaces 3.3 how to inspect buildings to confirm that provisions for the system or component are suitable

the sources of information on the design of specific systems plans and drawings specifications (PC 3.1.1) (Range 1, 4) the range of information which provides the details required for a specific system installation, including the specification, plans and drawings, material and component details how to access information to find the types of materials and components that are specified for a system how to confirm that the materials and components specified for an installation meet the requirements of industry standards, including compliance with current legislation

4.1 4.2 4.3

5 the installation requirements for systems installation sequences and routine liaison with others in the overall construction programme (including) the customer. (PC 3.1.1, 3.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) 5.1 typical installation procedures for systems the range and sizes of components positions into which they are to be installed the preparatory work necessary before installation commences 5.2 the persons with whom liaison should take place 5.3 requirements for work by, or attendance by other trades, and how to negotiate this

6.

how to obtain detail from installation programmes and how to monitor progress against the programme (PC 3.1.5, 3.1.7) (Range 1, 7) the purpose of installation programmes and the information that they contain how to locate within an installation programme the timing of the plumbing system installation how and when to check the system installation is meeting the requirements of the work programme

6.1 6.2 6.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 10

7.

how to negotiate variations to work programmes and the need to obtain written acceptance to major work or material variations (PC 3.1.6, 3.1.8) (Range 6) the persons with whom variations to an installation programme should be agreed, for single trade (plumbing) contracts, and multi-trade contracts the importance of ensuring that agreement has been reached and confirmed with all whose activities may be affected by the variation. the purpose of a formal variation order what it is, what it does, who signs it the importance of notifying the line supervisor or manager of the variation, and issue of a variation order the role of a Clerk of Works on larger contracts

7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5

8.

how to calculate the size of system components including pipework and appliances (PC 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3)

8.1 how to calculate the sizes of systems pipework 8.2 how to select systems pipe sizes to comply with the requirements of statutory regulations or recommendations 8.3 how to calculate the sizes of storage vessels

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 11

Unit 13 Element 13.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1.

Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Carry out Pre-Commissioning Checks and Tests on Systems

the procedures, equipment and legislative requirements for applying soundness tests to systems (PC 13.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 5)

1.1 the industry procedures for applying soundness tests to systems 1.2 the sequences of actions for carrying out soundness tests on systems 1.3 the tests and checks to be carried out before testing of systems 1.4 the equipment required to carry out soundness tests on systems 1.5 requirements of current legislation on soundness testing of systems

Unit 13 Element 13.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1. 1.1

Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Commission Systems

the sources of information on the performance of systems or components (PC 13.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3) the sources of information on system or component performance, including job specifications, manufacturers specifications or catalogues, contract specifications for commissioning installations the minimum requirements for system or component compliance with industry requirements when a formal specification is not available

1.2

2.

the procedures for establishing correct system or component performance and checking against the design specification (PC 13.2.3, 13.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the procedures for checking and making adjustments to systems or system component controls to establish correct system performance

2.1

2.2 the procedures for measuring pressure/flow/discharge rates at taps and valves, or at inputs to components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 12

3.

the routines and sequences for commissioning systems or components (PC 13.2.2) (Range 2, 3, 4)

3.1 the sequence of actions to be followed when commissioning systems or system components

4.

the points in the commissioning process where co-operation and liaison with other trades and customers may be required (PC 13.2.2) (Range 4) situations in which the commissioning process may affect the activities of other customers or system users the points within the commissioning activities where it might be necessary to liaise with other persons, including customers and other trades where to access user information appropriate to different systems and components (PC 13.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3)

4.1 4.2

5.

5.1 how to identify the range of information that the customer or system user will need to operate the system or components efficiently 5.2 the importance of ensuring that system or component information is in a format that can be understood by the non-technical person

7. system handover procedures and demonstrating the operation of systems and components to end users (PC 13.2.5) (Range 1) 7.1 the importance of ensuring that handover procedures provide the customer, or other system user with all the necessary information on the operation of the system or component 7.2 the types of information that a customer or other system user will need to ensure that they can operate the system or component correctly 7.3 systems or components for which it might be appropriate to demonstrate the correct operation for a customer or other systems user

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 13

Level 3

Unit 302 - Part 2 Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems

General Range: Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems units or packages to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings, or in buildings (or parts of buildings) with a similar systems requirement maximum 44kW heat input or 500 litres storage capacity Unit 3 Plan Complex Domestic Plumbing Work Activities

Element 3.1 Plan the Work Activities to be Carried Out Knowledge Outcomes 1 the system types and their intended functions - system components and layouts (PC 3.1.1, 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3) the types of systems within the unit range the functions of the different types of systems and factors affecting the choice of systems for particular circumstances the range of components for the systems including systems pipework, fittings, fixings, controls, storage cylinders the layouts of different systems, including the positioning of components the sources of information on systems within the range

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

the regulations governing system design, installation and operation (PC 3.1.3) (Range 1, 4)

2.1 the range of current legislation governing system design, layout, positioning of components, materials for and types of components 2.2 the requirements of current legislation for systems design, layout, and positioning of components 2.3 the requirements of current legislation for materials and component types 2.4 the requirements of industry for systems installations layouts, component positions

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 14

3 3.1

the main construction features of buildings into which the systems are installed. (PC 3.1.4) (Range 5, 3) main construction features of buildings into which the systems or components are to be installed, including foundations, floors, walls, roof constructions

3.2 provisions within buildings for the accommodation of systems components, including underfloor/in floor, chases and ducts, roof spaces 3.3 provisions for entry into the building of the service to the systems

3.4 how to inspect buildings to confirm that provisions for the system or component are suitable

the sources of information on the design of specific systems plans and drawings specifications (PC 3.1.1) (Range 1, 4) the range of information which provides the details required for a specific system installation, including the specification, plans and drawings, material and component details

4.1

4.2 how to access information to find the types of materials and components that are specified for a system 4.3 how to confirm that the materials and components specified for an installation meet the requirements of industry standards, including compliance with current legislation

5 the installation requirements for systems installation sequences and routine liaison with others in the overall construction programme (including) the customer. (PC 3.1.1, 3.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) 5.1 typical installation procedures for systems the range and sizes of components positions into which they are to be installed the preparatory work necessary before installation commences 5.2 the persons with whom liaison should take place 5.3 requirements for work by, or attendance by other trades, and how to negotiate this 5.4 measures to protect work in progress from damage by building operations

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 15

how to calculate the sizes of system components including pipework and appliances (PC 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3)

8.1 how to calculate systems pipework sizes from information provided 8.2 how to calculate component sizes including storage vessels Unit 8 Element 8.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1 the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 8.1.1, 8.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems, including pipe materials, fittings, controls, storage cisterns, and incoming services sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components Install Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

1.1

1.2

the input services or supplies required for new systems or components, or for extending systems or adding components to existing systems - how to confirm that input services are adequate (PC 8.1.5) (Range 5) methods of identifying the water supply requirements of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems or components methods of confirming that input water supply or existing supply meet the requirements of the system or components

5.1 5.2

the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures. (PC 8.1.7, 8.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10) the range of tools and equipment required for the installation of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems and components the range of materials and components required for the installation of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems, including pipe materials, pipe fittings, controls, fixings, storage cylinders

8.1 8.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 16

Unit 8

Install Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 8.2 Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1 1.1 1.2 how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 8.2.2) (Range 2, 3) how to interpret drawings of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems installations to establish positions of pipework, fittings, fixings, controls, storage cylinders methods of measuring locations into which Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems pipework and components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of pipework for prefabrication purposes

the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 8.2.2, 8.2.3, 8.2.4, 8.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) methods of cutting, bending, jointing, and installing materials used for Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems pipework installations the industry standards of workmanship for Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems installations the safety practices appropriate to fabrication and installation work on Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems how to interpret system design information on the positioning requirements for Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage System components how to interpret information on the fixing requirements of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage System components

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 8.2.3, 8.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) layouts of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of pipework, controls and storage vessels

3.1 3.2 3.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 17

the procedures required for connecting to input services or connecting pipework into existing systems (PC 8.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 5, 6) how to connect Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components to input supply using methods that conform to industry requirements, including positioning of control valves, and system drainage provisions how to connect Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components to existing systems pipework using methods that conform to industry requirements how to connect Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems pipework to storage vessels, including connection and termination of relief pipes. the jointing methods and materials approved for use on Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components

4.1

4.2 4.3 4.4

the range of tests used to confirm the soundness of systems and components and how to use the range of soundness test equipment. (PC 8.2.8, 8.2.9) (Range 2, 5, 8, 9) the different types of test used for Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems installations including pressure, static pressure, and air tests, and procedures and work sequences for each type of test the hygiene and charging procedures for newly installed, or extensions to existing Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems methods of preventing the unauthorised/inadvertent use of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems installations that are not ready for use, including sealing all open ends on pipework, securing controls on input supply, placing warning notices on controls, advising customers or other trades the importance of advising customers or line managers when testing is about to take place, when testing has been completed, and when the system is ready for use

8.1

8.2 8.3

8.4

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 18

Unit 13 Element 13.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1

Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Carry out Pre-Commissioning Checks and Tests on Systems

the procedures, equipment and legislative requirements for applying soundness tests to systems (PC 13.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 5)

1.1 the industry procedures for applying soundness tests to systems 1.2 the sequences of actions for carrying out soundness tests on systems 1.3 the tests and checks to be carried out before testing of systems 1.4 the equipment required to carry out soundness tests on systems 1.5 requirements of current legislation on soundness testing of systems Unit 13 Commission And Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Commission Systems

Element 13.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1 1.1

the sources of information on the performance of systems or components (PC 13.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3) the sources of information on system or component performance, including job specifications, manufacturers specifications or catalogues, contract specifications for commissioning installations the minimum requirements for system or component compliance with industry requirements when a formal specification is not available

1.2

the procedures for establishing correct system or component performance and checking against the design specification (PC 13.2.3, 13.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the procedures for checking and making adjustments to systems or system component controls to establish correct system performance the procedures for measuring pressure/flow/discharge rates at taps and valves, or at inputs to components

2.1 2.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 19

3 3.1

the routines and sequences for commissioning systems or components (PC 13.2.2) (Range 2, 3, 4) the sequence of actions to be followed when commissioning systems or system components

Unit 13 Element 13.3 Knowledge Outcomes

Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Decommission Systems

1. the importance of confirming the system design, specification, functions and outcomes of suspending the operation of the system (PC 13.3.1, 13.3.3, 13.3.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) 1.1 the importance of interpreting information on the Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage System or component, including information gained from site inspection, to confirm the outcomes of decommissioning the system or component the persons with whom liaison should take place before, during and after the decommissioning process, including customers, other appropriate trades, line manager the industry requirements, standards, and tests and procedures used for decommissioning Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems Service and Maintain Complex Plumbing Systems and Components Establish Service and Maintenance Requirements for Systems and Components

1.2 1.3

Unit 17 Element 17.1 Knowledge Outcomes 2

the maintenance procedures across the range of systems and components (PC 17.1.2, 17.1.5, 17.1.6) (Range 2, 4, 5, 6)

2.1 the activities that make up routine maintenance schedules for Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components 2.2 the industry standards for routine maintenance of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components, including compliance with Codes of Practice, BS Recommendations, Manufacturers specifications. 2.3 the requirements of health and safety legislation for safety in the routine maintenance of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 20

Unit 17 Element 17.2

Service and Maintain Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Carry out the Service and Maintenance of Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes 7. how to use performance specifications for systems and components, and maintenance procedures necessary to restore or maintain the continued performance of systems and components (PC 17.2.1) (Range 1, 2) 7.1 7.2 the Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components that require routine maintenance, including pipe materials, controls, and storage vessels how to interpret the required performance of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems and components using performance specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations the routine maintenance procedures necessary to maintain Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage System component performance Service and Maintain Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components

7.3

Unit 17 Element 17.3 Knowledge Outcomes 1

how to interpret information on system or component performance, including advice from users, visual inspections or checks or diagnosis tests to locate faults (PC 17.3.1) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the types of information sources on Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage System or component performance how to carry out visual inspections of Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components to check their performance against specifications how to obtain information on component performance from customers or system users how to carry out diagnostic tests to determine the causes of faults in Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems components the causes of faults in Unvented Domestic Hot Water Storage Systems including inadequate supply, noise, discharge from warning pipes, leaks in system components, control malfunction, corrosion of system components

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 21

Level 3

Unit 303 - Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems

Pre-requisite to this unit Level 2 Unit 206 Above Ground Discharge Pipework Systems General Range: Ventilated, ventilated stack and single stack systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings Unit 3 Plan Complex Domestic Plumbing Work Activities

Element 3.1 Plan the Work Activities to be Carried Out Knowledge Outcomes 1 the system types and their intended functions - system components and layouts (PC 3.1.1, 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3) the types of systems within the unit range the functions of the different types of systems and factors affecting the choice of systems for particular circumstances the range of components for the systems including systems pipework, fittings, fixings, controls, sanitary appliances the layouts of different systems, including the positioning of components the sources of information on systems within the range

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

the regulations governing system design, installation and operation (PC 3.1.3) (Range 1, 4)

2.1 the range of current legislation governing system design, layout, positioning of components, materials for and types of components 2.2 the requirements of current legislation for systems design, layout, and positioning of components 2.3 the requirements of current legislation for materials and component types 2.4 the requirements of industry for systems installations layouts, component positions

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 22

the main construction features of buildings into which the systems are installed (PC 3.1.4) (Range 5, 3)

3.1 main construction features of buildings into which the systems or components are to be installed, including foundations, floors, walls, roof constructions 3.2 provisions within buildings for the accommodation of systems components, including underfloor/in floor, chases and ducts, roof spaces 3.3 provisions for entry into the building of the service to the systems 3.4 how to inspect buildings to confirm that provisions for the system or component are suitable

the sources of information on the design of specific systems plans and drawings specifications (PC 3.1.1) (Range 1, 4)

4.1 the range of information which provides the details required for a specific system installation, including the specification, plans and drawings, material and component details 4.2 how to access information to find the types of materials and components that are specified for a system 4.3 how to confirm that the materials and components specified for an installation meet the requirements of industry standards, including compliance with current legislation

the installation requirements for systems installation sequences and routine liaison with others in the overall construction programme (including) the customer. (PC 3.1.1, 3.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4)

5.1 typical installation procedures for systems the range and sizes of components positions into which they are to be installed the preparatory work necessary before installation commences 5.2 the persons with whom liaison should take place 5.3 requirements for work by, or attendance by other trades, and how to negotiate this 5.4 measures to protect work in progress from damage by building operations

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 23

how to obtain detail from installation programmes and how to monitor progress against the programme (PC 3.1.5, 3.1.7) (Range 1, 7) the purpose of installation programmes and the information that they contain how to locate within an installation programme the timing of the plumbing system installation how and when to check the system installation is meeting the requirements of the work programme

6.1 6.2 6.3

7 how to negotiate variations to work programmes and the need to obtain written acceptance to major work or material variations (PC 3.1.6, 3.1.8) (Range 6) 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 8 the persons with whom variations to an installation programme should be agreed, for single trade (plumbing) contracts, and multi-trade contracts the importance of ensuring that agreement has been reached and confirmed with all whose activities may be affected by the variation. the purpose of a formal variation order what it is, what it does, who signs it the importance of notifying the line supervisor or manager of the variation, and issue of a variation order the role of a Clerk of Works on larger contracts how to calculate the size of system components including pipework and appliances (PC 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3)

8.1 how to establish the sizes of systems pipework 8.2 how to select systems pipe sizes to comply with the requirements of statutory regulations or recommendations

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 24

Unit 13 Element 13.1 Knowledge Outcomes 2.

Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Carry out Pre-Commissioning Checks and Tests on Systems

the methods of establishing that input services adequately supply all components within the system (PC 13.1.2) (Range 4, 2)

2.1 how to check that input supply to systems components meet the requirements of the system component or system specification 2.2 how to check that water levels within systems components are correctly set 2.3 how to check that discharge connections meet the system component or system specification Unit 13 Element 13.2 Knowledge Outcomes 2. the procedures for establishing correct system or component performance and checking against the design specification (PC 13.2.3, 13.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the procedures for checking and making adjustments to systems or system component controls to establish correct system performance the procedures for performance testing above ground discharge pipework systems Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Commission Systems

2.1 2.2

3.

the routines and sequences for commissioning systems or components (PC 13.2.2) (Range 2, 3, 4)

3.1 the sequence of actions to be followed when commissioning systems or system components

4.

the points in the commissioning process where co-operation and liaison with other trades and customers may be required (PC 13.2.2) (Range 4)

4.1 situations in which the commissioning process may affect the activities of other customers or system users 4.2 the points within the commissioning activities where it might be necessary to liaise with other persons, including customers and other trades

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 25

5.

where to access user information appropriate to different systems and components (PC 13.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3)

5.1 how to identify the range of information that the customer or system user will need to operate the systems or component efficiently 5.2 the importance of ensuring that system or component information is in a format that can be understood by the non-technical person

6. how to complete commissioning documentation confirming the safe commissioning of systems and components (PC 13.2.5) (Range 1) 6.1 situations in which it may be necessary to keep or complete records of commissioning that has been carried out 6.2 the details that might typically be required on a commissioning record

7.

system handover procedures and demonstrating the operation of systems and components to end users (PC 13.2.5) (Range 1)

7.1 the importance of ensuring that handover procedures provide the customer, or other system user which all the necessary information on the operation of the system or component 7.2 the types of information that a customer or other system user will need to ensure that they can operate the system or component correctly 7.3 systems or components for which it might be appropriate to demonstrate the correct operation for a customer or other systems user

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 26

Level 3

Unit 304 - Central Heating Systems Including Boilers and Control Wiring

Pre-requisite to this unit Level 2 Unit 207 Central Heating Systems (Pipework Systems Only) Central heating systems including an overview of boilers fuelled by gas, oil and solid fuel, control systems wiring requirements sealed systems and associated components General Range: Complex systems and components to meet the requirements of systems in dwellings Unit 3 Plan Complex Domestic Plumbing Work Activities

Element 3.1 Plan the Work Activities to be Carried Out Knowledge Outcomes 1 the system types and their intended functions - system components and layouts (PC 3.1.1, 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3)

1.1 the types of systems within the unit range 1.2 the functions of the different types of systems and factors affecting the choice of systems for particular circumstances 1.3 the range of components for the systems including systems pipework, fittings, fixings, controls, storage vessels, boilers 1.4 the layouts of different systems, including the positioning of components 1.5 the sources of information on systems within the range

2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

the regulations governing system design, installation and operation (PC 3.1.3) (Range 1, 4) the range of current legislation governing system design, layout, positioning of components, materials for and types of components the requirements of current legislation for systems design, layout, and positioning of components the requirements of current legislation for materials and component types the requirements of industry for systems installations layouts, component positions

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 27

the sources of information on the design of specific systems plans and drawings specifications (PC 3.1.1) (Range 1, 4) the range of information which provides the details required for a specific system installation, including the specification, plans and drawings, material and component details how to access information to find the types of materials and components that are specified for a system how to confirm that the materials and components specified for an installation meet the requirements of industry standards, including compliance with current legislation

4.1 4.2 4.3

how to calculate the size of system components including pipework and appliances (PC 3.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3)

8.1 how to calculate the sizes of systems pipework 8.2 how to select systems pipe sizes to comply with the requirements of statutory regulations or recommendations 8.3 how to calculate the sizes of storage vessels, expansion vessels, radiators and boilers Unit 8 Element 8.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1 the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 8.1.1, 8.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for Central Heating Systems, Boilers, and Control Wiring, including pipe materials, cables, fittings, controls, storage cisterns, expansion vessels, and incoming services sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for Central Heating Systems, Boilers, and Control Wiring components Install Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

1.1

1.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 28

the input services or supplies required for new systems or components, or for extending systems or adding components to existing systems - how to confirm that input services are adequate (PC 8.1.5) (Range 5) methods of identifying the water and electrical supply requirements of Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring or components methods of confirming that input water or electrical supply or existing supply meet the requirements of the system or components Install Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components

5.1 5.2

Unit 8

Element 8.2 Carry out the Installation of Systems Components Knowledge Outcomes 3 the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 8.2.3, 8.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) layouts of Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring System components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of pipework, cables, controls, storage vessels, boilers, expansion vessels, and insulation sets the positioning and fixing requirements of boiler flues

3.1 3.2 3.3

3.4

the procedures required for connecting to input services or connecting pipework into existing systems (PC 8.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 5, 6) how to connect Central Heating Systems, and Boiler components to input supply using methods that conform to industry requirements, including positioning of control valves, and system drainage provisions how to connect Central Heating Systems, and Boiler components to input electrical supply using methods that conform to industry requirements, including positioning of cables, and controls. how to connect Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring components to existing systems using methods that conform to industry requirements how to connect Central Heating Systems, and Boiler pipework to storage vessels and expansion vessels including warning or relief pipe requirements

4.1

4.2

4.3 4.4

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 29

4.5 4.6 8

the jointing methods and materials approved for use on Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring components the connection requirements for boiler flues the range of tests used to confirm the soundness of systems and components and how to use the range of soundness test equipment (PC 8.2.8, 8.2.9) (Range 2, 5, 8, 9) the different types of test used for Central Heating Systems, Boiler installations including pressure, static pressure, and air tests, and procedures and work sequences for each type of test the different types of test used for Central Heating Systems Boiler installations including electrical resistance, earth continuity, polarity, insulation resistance the tests used for boilers flues, including flue soundness, draught, combustion the hygiene and charging procedures for newly installed, or extensions to existing Central Heating Systems and Boilers. methods of preventing the unauthorised/inadvertent use of Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring installations that are not ready for use, including sealing all open ends on pipework, securing controls on input supply, placing warning notices on controls, advising customers or other trades the importance of advising customers or line managers when testing is about to take place, when testing has been completed, and when the system is ready for use

8.1

8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5

8.6

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 30

Unit 13 Element 13.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1

Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Carry out Pre-Commissioning Checks and Tests on Systems

the procedures, equipment and legislative requirements for applying soundness tests to systems (PC 13.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 5)

1.1 the industry procedures for applying soundness tests to systems 1.2 the sequences of actions for carrying out soundness tests on systems 1.3 the tests and checks to be carried out before testing of systems 1.4 the equipment required to carry out soundness tests on systems 1.5 requirements of current legislation on soundness testing of systems 2 the methods of establishing that input services adequately supply all components within the system (PC 13.1.2) (Range 4, 2)

2.1 how to check that input supply to systems components meet the requirements of the system component or system specification 2.2 how to check that water levels within systems components/ charge pressures are correctly set 2.3 how to check that discharge connections meet the system component or system specification

Unit 13 Element 13.2

Commission and Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems Commission Systems

Knowledge Outcomes 1 the sources of information on the performance of systems or components (PC 13.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3)

1.1 the sources of information on system or component performance, including job specifications, manufacturers specifications or catalogues, contract specifications for commissioning larger installations 1.2 the minimum requirements for system or component compliance with industry requirements when a formal specification is not available

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 31

the procedures for establishing correct system or component performance and checking against the design specification (PC 13.2.3, 13.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5)

2.1 the procedures for checking and making adjustments to systems or system component controls to establish correct system performance 2.2 2.3 the procedures for checking flue performance the procedures for checking control wiring systems performance Commission And Decommission Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems

Unit 13

Element 13.3 Decommission Systems Knowledge Outcomes 1. the importance of confirming the system design, specification, functions and outcomes of suspending the operation of the system (PC 13.3.1, 13.3.3, 13.3.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the importance of interpreting information on the Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring System or component, including information gained from site inspection, to confirm the outcomes of decommissioning the system or component the persons with whom liaison should take place before, during and after the decommissioning process, including customers, other appropriate trades, line manager the industry requirements, standards, and tests and procedures used for decommissioning Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring

1.1

1.2 1.3

the precautions to ensure that de-commissioned systems do not prove a safety hazard measures to prevent systems being brought into operation safety and warning notices (PC 13.3.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the precautionary actions including liaison with customer or other system or building users, sealing of open pipework, labelling of controls, to ensure that decommissioned Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring do not become a hazard the types of warning notices that are appropriate for use on temporarily or permanently decommissioned systems

5.1

5.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 32

Unit 17

Service and Maintain Non Complex Plumbing Systems and Components

Element 17.1 Establish Maintenance Requirements for Systems and Components Knowledge Outcomes 1 the range of information that should be available on the routine and non-routine service and maintenance requirements of systems and components (PC 17.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3) 1.1 the range of information that should be available on Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring components including specifications and schedules, manufacturers information, services and maintenance schedules Unit 17 Element 17.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to use performance specifications for systems and components, and maintenance procedures necessary to restore or maintain the continued performance of systems and components (PC 17.2.1) (Range 1, 2) the Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring components that require routine maintenance, including pipe materials, controls, and storage vessels, expansion vessels, wiring controls how to interpret the required performance of Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring and components using performance specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations the routine maintenance procedures necessary to maintain Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring System component performance Service and Maintain Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Carry out the Service and Maintenance of Systems and Components

1.1

1.2

1.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 33

Unit 17 Element 17.3 Knowledge Outcomes 1

Service and Maintain Complex Domestic Plumbing Systems and Components Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components

how to interpret information on system or component performance, including advice from users, visual inspections or checks or diagnosis tests to locate faults (PC 17.3.1) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the types of information sources on Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring System or component performance how to carry out visual inspections of Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring components to check their performance against specifications how to obtain information on component performance from customers or system users how to carry out diagnostic tests to determine the causes of faults in Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring components the causes of faults in Central Heating Systems, Boiler, and Control Wiring including faults in heating system pipework and components, boiler and components, flues, electrical controls and components

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 34

Level 3

Unit 305 - Gas Supply Systems

General Range: Natural Gas or LPG gas supply systems for domestic purposes - supply pipework Central heating boilers space heaters cookers water heaters Unit 25 Element 25.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1 the system types and their intended functions - system components and layouts (PC 25.1.1, 25.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3) Plan Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems Work Activities Plan the Work Activities to be Carried Out

1.1 the types of systems within the unit range 1.2 the functions of the different types of components and factors affecting the choice of components for particular circumstances 1.3 the layouts of different systems, including the positioning of components 1.4 the sources of information on systems within the range

the regulations governing system design, installation and operation (PC 25.1.3) (Range 1, 4)

2.1 the range of current legislation governing system design, layout, positioning of components, materials for and types of components 2.2 the requirements of current legislation for systems design, layout, and positioning of components 2.3 the requirements of current legislation for materials and component types 2.4 the requirements of industry for systems installations layouts, component positions

3 3.1 3.2

the main construction features of buildings into which the systems are installed. (PC 25.1.4) (Range 5, 3) main construction features of buildings into which the systems or components are to be installed, including foundations, floors, walls, roof constructions provisions within buildings for the accommodation of systems components, including underfloor/in floor, chases and ducts, roof spaces

3.3 how to inspect buildings to confirm that provisions for the system or component are suitable

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 35

the sources of information on the design of specific systems plans and drawings specifications (PC 25.1.1) (Range 1, 4) the range of information which provides the details required for a specific system installation, including the specification, plans and drawings, material and component details

4.1

4.2 how to access information to find the types of materials and components that are specified for a system 4.3 how to confirm that the materials and components specified for an installation meet the requirements of industry standards, including compliance with current legislation

the installation requirements for systems installation sequences and routine liaison with others in the overall construction programme (including) the customer. (PC 25.1.1, 25.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4)

5.1 typical installation procedures for systems the range and sizes of components positions into which they are to be installed the preparatory work necessary before installation commences 5.2 the persons with whom liaison should take place 5.3 requirements for work by, or attendance by other trades, and how to negotiate this 5.4 measures to protect work in progress from damage by building operations

how to obtain detail from installation programmes and how to monitor progress against the programme (PC 25.1.5, 25.1.7) (Range 1, 7) the purpose of installation programmes and the information that they contain how to locate within an installation programme the timing of the plumbing system installation how and when to check the system installation is meeting the requirements of the work programme

6.1 6.2 6.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 36

how to negotiate variations to work programmes and the need to obtain written acceptance to major work or material variations (PC 25.1.6, 25.1.8) (Range 6) the persons with whom variations to an installation programme should be agreed, for single trade (plumbing) contracts, and multi-trade contracts the importance of ensuring that agreement has been reached and confirmed with all whose activities may be affected by the variation. the purpose of a formal variation order what it is, what it does, who signs it the importance of notifying the line supervisor or manager of the variation, and issue of a variation order the role of a Clerk of Works on larger contracts

7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5

how to calculate the size of system components including pipework and appliances (PC 25.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3)

8.1 how to calculate the sizes of systems pipework and flue systems, appliance ventilation requirements 8.2 how to select systems pipe sizes to comply with the requirements of statutory regulations or recommendations 8.3 how to establish the size of component required for a particular circumstance Unit 26 Element 26.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1 the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 26.1.1, 26.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) Install Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

1.1 the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for Domestic Gas Systems, including pipe materials, fittings, controls, component locations and incoming services 1.2 sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for Domestic Gas Systems components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 37

the input services or supplies required for new systems or components, or for extending systems or adding components to existing systems - how to confirm that input services are adequate (PC 26.1.5) (Range 5) methods of identifying the gas supply requirements of Domestic Gas Systems or components methods of confirming that input gas supply or existing supply meet the requirements of the system or components

5.1 5.2

the persons to whom deficiencies in input services should be reported and procedures for isolating input services (PC 26.1.5) (Range 5) the persons to whom deficiencies in input gas supply should be reported, including the customer, co-contractors, or other building users the importance of ensuring that appropriate actions are taken to remedy deficiencies in input gas supply before the connection of the system or component

6.1 6.2

the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures. (PC 26.1.7, 26.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10)

8.1 the range of tools and equipment required for the installation of Domestic Gas Systems and components 8.2 the range of materials and components required for the installation of Domestic Gas Systems, including pipe materials, pipe fittings, controls, fixings. Unit 26 Element 26.2 Install Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components

Knowledge Outcomes 1 1.1 1.2 how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 26.2.2) (Range 2, 3) how to interpret drawings of Domestic Gas Systems installations to establish positions of pipework, fittings, fixings, controls and components. methods of measuring locations into which Domestic Gas Systems pipework and components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of pipework for prefabrication purposes

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 38

the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 26.2.2, 26.2.3, 26.2.4, 26.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) methods of cutting, bending, jointing, and installing all materials used for Domestic Gas Systems installations the industry standards of workmanship for Domestic Gas Systems installations the safety practices appropriate to fabrication and installation work on Domestic Gas Systems how to interpret system design information on the positioning requirements for Domestic Gas Systems components how to interpret information on the fixing requirements of Domestic Gas Systems components

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 26.2.3, 26.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) layouts of Domestic Gas Systems to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of Domestic Gas Systems components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix Domestic Gas Systems components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of pipework, components and flue systems

3.1 3.2 3.3

the procedures required for connecting to input services or connecting pipework into existing systems (PC 26.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 5, 6) how to connect Domestic Gas Systems components to input supply using methods that conform to industry requirements, including positioning of control valves, and system drainage provisions how to connect Domestic Gas Systems components to existing systems pipework and flue systems using methods that conform to industry requirements the jointing methods and materials approved for use on Domestic Gas Systems components

4.1

4.2 4.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 39

the range of tests used to confirm the soundness of systems and components and how to use the range of soundness test equipment (PC 26.2.8, 26.2.9) (Range 2, 5, 8, 9) the different types of test used for Domestic Gas Systems installations including pressure, standing pressure, and air tests, and procedures and work sequences for each type of test purging procedures for newly installed, or extensions to existing Domestic Gas Systems methods of preventing the unauthorised/inadvertent use of Domestic Gas Systems installations that are not ready for use, including sealing all open ends on pipework, securing controls on input supply, placing warning notices on controls, advising customers or other trades the importance of advising customers or line managers when testing is about to take place, when testing has been completed, and when the system is ready for use the procedures for testing flue systems to ensure integrity of the flue system Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems Carry out Pre-Commissioning Checks and Tests on Systems

8.1 8.2 8.3

8.4 8.5

Unit 27 Element 27.1

Knowledge Outcomes 1. the procedures, equipment and legislative requirements for applying soundness tests to systems (PC 27.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 5)

1.1 the industry procedures for applying soundness tests to components and flue systems 1.2 the sequences of actions for carrying out soundness tests on systems 1.3 the tests and checks to be carried out before testing of systems 1.4 the equipment required to carry out soundness tests on systems 1.5 requirements of current legislation on soundness testing of systems

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 40

2.

the methods of establishing that input services adequately supply all components within the system (PC 27.1.2) (Range 4, 2)

2.1 how to check that input supply to systems components meet the requirements of the system component or system specification 2.2 how to check that gas pressures are correctly set

3.

the methods of connecting components to systems (PC 27.1.1)

(Range 2, 3)

3.1 how to check that systems components are correctly connected to systems pipework 3.2 how to check that systems pipework is correctly connected to system supply 3.3 how to check that the appliance is correctly connected to the flue system

4.

the actions to take where pre-commissioning checks or tests reveal system or component defects (PC All) (Range All)

4.1 the actions to take when systems or systems components do not comply with specification 4.2 the persons to be advised when corrective actions to faulty components or systems is ineffective

5. how to complete commissioning documentation confirming the safe commissioning of systems and components (PC 27.1.4) (Range 5) 5.1 situations in which it may be necessary to complete records of pre-commissioning tests and checks 5.2 the details that a record of pre-commissioning tests and checks should contain

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 41

Unit 27 Element 27.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1. 1.1

Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems Commission Systems

the sources of information on the performance of systems or components (PC 27.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3) the sources of information on system or component performance, including job specifications, manufacturers specifications or catalogues, contract specifications for commissioning installations the minimum requirements for system or component compliance with industry requirements when a formal specification is not available

1.2

2.

the procedures for establishing correct system or component performance and checking against the design specification (PC 27.2.3, 27.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5)

2.1 the procedures for checking and making adjustments to systems or system component controls to establish correct system performance 2.2 2.3 the procedures for measuring gas pressure and flow at inputs to components methods of performance testing flue systems

3.

the routines and sequences for commissioning systems or components (PC 27.2.2) (Range 2, 3, 4)

3.1 the sequence of actions to be followed when commissioning systems or system components

4.

the points in the commissioning process where co-operation and liaison with other trades and customers may be required (PC 27.2.2) (Range 4)

4.1 situations in which the commissioning process may affect the activities of other customers or system users 4.2 the points within the commissioning activities where it might be necessary to liaise with other persons, including customers and other trades

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 42

5. 5.1 5.2

where to access user information appropriate to different systems and components (PC 27.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3) how to identify the range of information that the customer or system user will need to operate the systems or component efficiently the importance of ensuring that system or component information is in a format that can be understood by the non-technical person

6.

how to complete commissioning documentation confirming the safe commissioning of systems and components (PC 27.2.5) (Range 1)

6.1 situations in which it may be necessary to keep or complete records of commissioning that has been carried out 6.2 the details that might typically be required on a commissioning record

7.

system handover procedures and demonstrating the operation of systems and components to end users (PC 27.2.5) (Range 1) the importance of ensuring that handover procedures provide the customer, or other system user which all the necessary information on the operation of the system or component

7.1

7.2 the types of information that a customer or other system user will need to ensure that they can operate the system or component correctly 7.3 systems or components for which it might be appropriate to demonstrate the correct operation for a customer or other systems user

8.

the actions to take when components being commissioned do not meet design requirements (PC 27.2.2, 27.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5)

8.1 the actions to take when systems or components do not meet the design specification. 8.2 the persons to be advised on jobs where the plumber is the sole contractor, and where the plumber is sub-contractor to a main contractor

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 43

Unit 27

Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components

Element 27.3 Decommission Systems Knowledge Outcomes 1. the importance of confirming the system design, specification, functions and outcomes of suspending the operation of the system (PC 27.3.1, 27.3.3, 27.3.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the importance of interpreting information on the Domestic Gas Systems or component, including information gained from site inspection, to confirm the outcomes of decommissioning the system or component the persons with whom liaison should take place before, during and after the decommissioning process, including customers, other appropriate trades, line manager the industry requirements, standards, and tests and procedures used for decommissioning Domestic Gas Systems

1.1

1.2 1.3

2. the need to liaise with others whose procedures or routines may be affected by the suspension of the system operation (PC 27.3.1, 27.3.2) (Range 1) 2.1 2.2 how to identify other persons, including customers, and other trades whose work or routines may be affected by the decommissioning procedures liaison with other persons to minimise disruption to their work or routines

3. the potential hazards that could arise from de-commissioning activities and the checks to be carried out before de-commissioning takes place (PC 27.3.4) (Range 4, 2, 3) 3.1 3.2 the potential safety hazards that could arise from the decommissioning of Domestic Gas Systems, including the interruption of supply to other systems the checks to be carried out in advance of system decommissioning to ensure that any potential hazards that could arise, have been removed

4. de-commissioning procedures for temporary and permanent de-commissioning of systems (PC 27.3.3) (Range 2, 3) 4.1 4.2 identify the differences between the tests and procedures for temporary and permanent decommissioning of Domestic Gas Systems the different actions and procedures to be used when a full or part system, or individual component is being decommissioned

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 44

the precautions to ensure that de-commissioned systems do not prove a safety hazard measures to prevent systems being brought into operation safety and warning notices (PC 27.3.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the precautionary actions including liaison with customer or other system or building users, sealing of open pipework, labelling of controls, to ensure that decommissioned Domestic Gas Systems do not become a hazard the types of warning notices that are appropriate for use on temporarily or permanently decommissioned systems

5.1

5.2

7 7.1 7.2

how to complete systems de-commissioning records (PC 27.3.3)

(Range 2, 3, 4)

how to identify situations where it would be appropriate to complete records of the decommissioning of Domestic Gas Systems the types of information that a decommissioning record should contain Service and Maintain Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components Establish Maintenance Requirements for Systems and Components

Unit 28 Element 28.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1

the range of information that should be available on the routine and non-routine service and maintenance requirements of systems and components (PC 28.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3)

1.1 the range of information that should be available on Domestic Gas Systems components including specifications and schedules, manufacturers information, services and maintenance schedules 1.2 the details that may be obtained from the different information sources

the service and maintenance procedures across the range of systems and components (PC 28.1.2, 28.1.5, 28.1.6) (Range 2, 4, 5, 6)

2.1 the activities that make up routine service and maintenance schedules for Domestic Gas Systems components 2.2 the industry standards for routine service and maintenance of Domestic Gas Systems components, including compliance with Codes of Practice, BS Recommendations, Manufacturers specifications. 2.3 the requirements of health and safety legislation for safety in the routine maintenance of Domestic Gas Systems components

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 45

how to plan maintenance procedures to minimise interference with system operation and customer routines (PC 28.1.2, 28.1.3, 28.1.4, 28.1.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5) the other persons, including the customer and co-contractors whose work or routines may be affected by maintenance activities on Domestic Gas Systems components how to plan the maintenance of Domestic Gas Systems components to minimise system downtime the importance of ensuring that all tools, equipment, and materials will be available as required, and the costs of delays

3.1 3.2 3.3

5 5.1

the materials required for routine maintenance (PC 28.1.4)

(Range 4)

the consumable materials required for the maintenance of Domestic Gas Systems components, including replacement parts for controls, gland packings, washers, burner parts etc. the sources of information on the materials required for routine maintenance of Domestic Gas Systems components

5.2

the tools and equipment required for routine maintenance operations (PC 28.1.4) (Range 4)

6.1 the tools and equipment required for maintenance operations, including hand and powered tools 6.2 the access equipment used for routine maintenance operations on Domestic Gas Systems components including stand steps, ladders, and trestle Unit 28 Element 28.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1. how to use performance specifications for systems and components, and maintenance procedures necessary to restore or maintain the continued performance of systems and components (PC 28.2.1) (Range 1, 2) the Domestic Gas Systems components that require routine maintenance, including pipe materials, controls, burners. how to interpret the required performance of Domestic Gas Systems and components using performance specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations the routine maintenance procedures necessary to ensure Domestic Gas Systems component performance Service and Maintain Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components Carry out the Service and Maintenance of Systems and Components

1.1 1.2

1.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 46

8. the maintenance procedures necessary to ensure compliance with industry requirements for routine and non-routine maintenance activities (PC 28.2.1, 28.2.2) (Range 1, 2) 8.1 the industry requirements for routine maintenance of Domestic Gas Systems pipe materials and components, including compliance with specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations how to ensure compliance with the requirements of safety legislation in carrying out routine maintenance of Domestic Gas Systems components

8.2

9. how to complete records and reports of the service and maintenance of systems and components (PC 28.2.3) (Range 3, 2) 9.1 the types of service and maintenance activity for which it will be necessary to complete records of maintenance work 9.2 the information that should be included on a service and maintenance record

10. the action to take when the system or component does not work to full performance specification (PC 28.2.1) (Range 1) 10.1 10.2 10.3 procedures for reporting the continued failure of the Domestic Gas Systems component the persons to whom it would be necessary to report continued failure of a Domestic Gas Systems component circumstances in which it might be necessary to implement emergency or temporary provisions for Domestic Gas Systems supply due to delay in correcting faults

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 47

Unit 28 Element 28.3 Knowledge Outcomes 1

Service And Maintain Domestic Plumbing Gas Systems and Components Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components

how to interpret information on system or component performance, including advice from users, visual inspections or checks or diagnosis tests to locate faults (PC 28.3.1) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the types of information sources on Domestic Gas Systems or component performance how to carry out visual inspections of Domestic Gas Systems components to check their performance against specifications how to obtain information on component performance from customers or system users how to carry out diagnostic tests to determine the causes of faults in Domestic Gas Systems components the causes of faults in Domestic Gas Systems including inadequate gas supply, incorrect combustion, faults in flue systems, faults in electrical components, leaks in system components, control malfunction.

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

the work action and sequences required to rectify faults in systems and components (PC 28.3.1, 28.3.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4)

4.1 work sequences required to rectify faults in Domestic Gas Systems pipework or components, including inadequate gas supply, inadequate gas supply, incorrect combustion, faults in flue systems, faults in electrical components leaks in system components, control malfunction.

the measures to ensure that systems do not present a safety hazard to potential users, or the workforce, when carrying out rectification procedures (PC 28.3.2, 28.3.4) (Range 5, 6, 2, 3) the importance of ensuring that appropriate liaison has taken place before, during, and after maintenance activities the measures to be taken to prevent the unauthorised use of systems or components on which maintenance work is being carried out, including safe isolation of the system component, sealing of any open pipework, labelling of controls.

5.1 5.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 48

7 7.1

how to isolate unsafe systems and components (PC 28.3.4)

(Range 6, 2, 3)

how to interpret information, including that gained by visual inspection, and information given by customers or persons in authority, to determine systems layouts, including the positions of pipework, controls. methods of ensuring that unsafe systems cannot be used, including securing of controls, labelling controls, posting warning notices, informing system users

7.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 49

Level 3

Unit 306- Improvement of Business Products and Services

Pre-requisite to this unit Level 2 Unit 210 Environmental Awareness General Range: Contributing to the improvement of business products and services whilst undertaking installation, commissioning and maintenance activities in dwellings The systems are those within the range of the technical units Unit 23 Contribute to the Improvement of Plumbing Business Products and Services

Element 23.1 Promote the Image of the Business to Others Knowledge Outcomes 1. the importance of correct personal presentation clothing worn and manner (PC 23.1.1) (Range 2) 1.1 importance of clean and tidy personal presentation 1.2 importance of complying with company policy regarding the wearing of uniform where provided 1.3 importance of wearing appropriate types of footwear when working in customers homes

2. the range of actions designed to promote the employing business that are within the candidates day to day routine (PC All) (Range All) 2.1 the range of actions designed to promote the business including good timekeeping on the job, taking appropriate measures to protect customers property, keeping the work area clean and tidy, taking appropriate measures to dispose of waste materials.

3. the types of actions that produce positive and negative responses (PC All) (Range All) 3.1 the importance of being punctual for any appointments to view work 3.2 the importance of observing starting and finishing times 3.3 the importance of ensuring that the work area is kept clean and tidy, and that tools and equipment are tidied away when work has finished for the day 3.4 the importance of controlling waste materials, and using appropriate disposal methods 3.5 the importance of good manners and politeness in dealing with customers

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 50

4. the range of promotional information appropriate to different work situations ensuring that information provided is appropriate to its intended use (PC 23.1.2, 23.1.3) (Range 1, 2) 4.1 4.2 the range of information that is appropriate to small and larger contracts that the range of information requested by others could include requests for reports on job progress, information on the candidates company, information on the operation of systems or components, information on prices of components

4.3 the importance of ensuring that the information provided meets the needs of others

5. the methods of presenting information that are appropriate to the situation or the person requesting the information. (PC 23.1.2, 23.1.3) (Range 1, 2) 5.1 the range of methods of presenting information 5.2 the importance of selecting a method of presenting information that is appropriate to the situation and the person requesting the information Unit 23 Contribute to the Improvement of Plumbing Business Products and Services (Excluding Gas)

Element 23.2 Identify and Recommend Opportunities for Improving Customer Care Knowledge Outcomes 1. the typical formal and informal approaches to ensuring a system of customer service (PC All) (Range All) 1.1 the difference between a formal and informal approach to customer services 1.2 the benefits to the customer and company of a formal customer service procedure

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 51

2. the typical details contained in written statements of customer service policy (PC 23.2.4) (Range 3) 2.1 that the details contained in a customer service policy could include the range of systems or components that are covered by the policy, the servicing schedule, the frequency of service, the costs of service items.

3. the work actions necessary to support the business customer service policy (PC All) (Range 3) 3.1 that the actions to support the service policy could include promoting the policy to customers, or co-contractors 3.2 the importance of ensuring the availability of promotional materials for distribution to customers or co-contractors

4. the checks to be carried out during work activities to ensure customer satisfaction with the service provided, and the measures to be taken where deficiencies in customer service are identified (PC 23.2.3) (Range 1, 2) 4.1 the importance of ensuring that checks for customer satisfaction with the work procedures are carried out at appropriate times, including at the completion of the work.

4.2 the importance of reporting to the line manager or supervisor any details of customer dissatisfaction with servicing procedures, and checking that attention has been given to these. 5. the actions necessary to record and report any deficiencies in the performance of systems or components. (PC 23.1.3) (Range 1) 5.1 5.2 the situations where it would be important to formally record or report and deficiencies in the performance of systems or components the key features of a technical report on system or component performance

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 52

6. the methods of dealing with customer complaints arising from dissatisfaction with work standards or attitude of the workforce. (PC 23.2.3, 23.2.4) (Range 1, 2, 3) 6.1 that the methods of dealing with customer complaints could include establishing the key points of the customers complaint, recording the key facts where appropriate, reporting to the line manager or supervisor, checking that the report has been acted upon. 6.2 the importance of complying with any reporting customers complaint procedures that are laid down by the employer.

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 53

Level 3

Unit 310 - Oil Supply Systems (Northern Ireland Only)

General Range: Oil fired heating systems, supply pipework and oil fired boilers. Unit 6 Element 6.1 Knowledge Outcomes Plan Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems Work Activities Plan the Work Activities to Be Carried Out

1.

the system types and their intended functions - system components and layouts (PC 6.1.1, 6.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3) the types of oil heating systems within the unit range the functions of the different types of components and factors affecting the choice of components for particular circumstances the layouts of different oil heating systems, including the positioning of components the sources of information on oil heating systems within the range

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4

2. 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

the regulations governing system design, installation and operation (PC 6.1.3) (Range 1, 4) the range of current legislation governing oil heating system design, layout, positioning of components, materials for and types of components the requirements of current legislation for oil heating systems design, layout, and positioning of components the requirements of current legislation for materials and component types the requirements of industry for oil heating systems installations layouts, component positions

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 54

3.

the main construction features of buildings into which the systems are installed. (PC 6.1.4) (Range 5, 3) main construction features of buildings into which the oil heating systems or components are to be installed, including foundations, floors, walls, roof constructions provisions within buildings for the accommodation of oil heating systems components, including underfloor/in floor, chases and ducts, roof spaces how to inspect buildings to confirm that provisions for the oil heating system or component are suitable

3.1

3.2 3.3

4.

the sources of information on the design of specific systems plans and drawings specifications (PC 6.1.1) (Range 1, 4) the range of information which provides the details required for a specific oil heating system installation, including the specification, plans and drawings, material and component details how to access information to find the types of materials and components that are specified for a oil heating system how to confirm that the materials and components specified for an installation meet the requirements of industry standards, including compliance with current legislation

4.1

4.2 4.3

5.

the installation requirements for systems installation sequences and routine liaison with others in the overall construction programme (including) the customer. (PC 6.1.1, 6.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) typical installation procedures for oil heating systems the range and sizes of components positions into which they are to be installed the preparatory work necessary before installation commences the persons with whom liaison should take place requirements for work by, or attendance by other trades, and how to negotiate this measures to protect work in progress from damage by building operations

5.1

5.2 5.3 5.4

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 55

6.

how to obtain detail from installation programmes and how to monitor progress against the programme (PC 6.1.5, 6.1.7) (Range 1, 7) the purpose of installation programmes and the information that they contain how to locate within an installation programme the timing of the oil heating system installation how and when to check the oil heating system installation is meeting the requirements of the work programme

6.1 6.2 6.3

7.

how to negotiate variations to work programmes and the need to obtain written acceptance to major work or material variations (PC 6.1.6, 6.1.8) (Range 6) the persons with whom variations to an installation programme should be agreed, for single trade (plumbing) contracts, and multi-trade contracts the importance of ensuring that agreement has been reached and confirmed with all whose activities may be affected by the variation. the purpose of a formal variation order what it is, what it does, who signs it the importance of notifying the line supervisor or manager of the variation, and issue of a variation order the role of a Clerk of Works on larger contracts

7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5

8.

how to calculate the size of system components including pipework and appliances (PC 6.1.2) (Range 1, 2, 3) how to calculate the sizes of oil heating systems pipework and flue systems, appliance ventilation requirements how to select oil heating systems pipe sizes to comply with the requirements of statutory regulations or recommendations how to establish the size of component required for a particular circumstance

8.1 8.2 8.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 56

Unit 11 Element 11.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1.

Install Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems and Components Prepare Work Locations for the Installation of Systems and Components

the sources of information on the preparatory work necessary for the system or component installation (PC 11.1.1, 11.1.9) (Range 1, 9, 10) the sources of legislation governing the layout and positioning of components for oil heating systems, boilers, and control wiring, including pipe materials, cables, fittings, controls, storage cisterns, expansion vessels, and incoming services sources of information on the fixing and installation requirements for oil heating systems, boilers, and control wiring components the input services or supplies required for new systems or components, or for extending systems or adding components to existing systems how to confirm that input services are adequate (PC 11.1.5) (Range 5) methods of identifying the supply requirements of oil heating systems or components methods of confirming that input supply or existing supply meet the requirements of the oil heating system or components the persons to whom deficiencies in input services should be reported and procedures for isolating input services. (PC 11.1.5) (Range 5) the persons to whom deficiencies in input supply should be reported, including the customer, co-contractors, or other building users the importance of ensuring that appropriate actions are taken to remedy deficiencies in input supply before the connection of the oil heating system or component the tools, equipment, materials and components required for the system installation order and supply advice, delivery and checking procedures. (PC 11.1.7, 11.1.9) (Range 7, 9, 10) the range of tools and equipment required for the installation of oil heating systems and components the range of materials and components required for the installation of oil heating systems, including pipe materials, pipe fittings, controls, fixings.

1.1

1.2

5.

5.1 5.2

6.

6.1 6.2

8.

8.1 8.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 57

Unit 11 Element 11.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1.

Install Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems and Components Carry out the Installation of Systems and Components

how to measure and record installation and site details for prefabrication purposes (PC 11.2.2) (Range 2, 3) how to interpret drawings of oil heating system installations to establish positions of pipework, fittings, fixings, controls and components methods of measuring locations into which oil heating system pipework and components are to be installed and recording dimensions, angles, and sizes of pipework for prefabrication purposes

1.1 1.2

2.

the industry practices and work standards for fabricating and installing system components (PC 11.2.2, 11.2.3, 11.2.4, 11.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) methods of cutting, bending, jointing, and installing all materials used for oil heating system installations the industry standards of workmanship for oil heating systems the safety practices appropriate to fabrication and installation work on oil heating systems how to interpret system design information on the positioning requirements for oil heating system components how to interpret information on the fixing requirements of oil heating system components

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 58

3.

the positioning and fixing requirements for system components to conform to the system design and intended functions (PC 11.2.3, 11.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 4) layouts of oil heating systems to conform to legislative requirements and recommendations the positioning of oil heating system components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements how to fix oil heating system components to conform to industry standards and system design requirements, including the fixing of pipework, components and flue systems the procedures required for connecting to input services or connecting pipework into existing systems (PC 11.2.5) (Range 2, 3, 5, 6) how to connect oil heating system components to input supply using methods that conform to industry requirements, including positioning of control valves, and system drainage provisions how to connect oil heating system components to existing systems pipework and flue systems using methods that conform to industry requirements the jointing methods and materials approved for use on oil heating system components

3.1 3.2 3.3

4.

4.1

4.2

4.3

8.

the range of tests used to confirm the soundness of systems and components and how to use the range of soundness test equipment (PC 11.2.8, 11.2.9) (Range 2, 5, 8, 9) the different types of test used for oil heating system installations including pressure, standing pressure, and air tests, and procedures and work sequences for each type of test purging procedures for newly installed, or extensions to existing oil heating systems methods of preventing the unauthorised/inadvertent use of oil heating system installations that are not ready for use, including sealing all open ends on pipework, securing controls on input supply, placing warning notices on controls, advising customers or other trades the importance of advising customers or line managers when testing is about to take place, when testing has been completed, and when the oil heating system is ready for use the procedures for testing oil heating flue systems to ensure integrity of the flue system

8.1

8.2 8.3

8.4

8.5

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 59

Unit 15 Element 15.1 Knowledge Outcomes 1.

Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems Carry out Pre-Commissioning Checks and Tests on Systems

the procedures, equipment and legislative requirements for applying soundness tests to systems (PC 15.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 5) the industry procedures for applying soundness tests to oil heating components and flue systems the sequences of actions for carrying out soundness tests on oil heating systems the tests and checks to be carried out before testing of oil heating systems the equipment required to carry out soundness tests on oil heating systems requirements of current legislation on soundness testing of oil heating systems

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

2.

the methods of establishing that input services adequately supply all components within the system (PC 15.1.2) (Range 4, 2) how to check that input supply to oil heating systems components meet the requirements of the system component or system specification how to check that oil supplies are correctly set

2.1 2.2

3. 3.1 3.2 3.3

the methods of connecting components to systems (PC 15.1.1) (Range 2, 3) how to check that oil heating systems components are correctly connected to systems pipework how to check that oil heating systems pipework is correctly connected to system supply how to check that the appliance is correctly connected to the oil fired boiler flue system

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 60

4.

the actions to take where pre-commissioning checks or tests reveal system or component defects (PC All) (Range All) the actions to take when oil heating systems or systems components do not comply with specification the persons to be advised when corrective actions to faulty oil heating systems or components is ineffective

4.1 4.2

5.

how to complete commissioning documentation confirming the safe commissioning of systems and components (PC 15.1.4) (Range 5) situations in which it may be necessary to complete records of precommissioning tests and checks the details that a record of pre-commissioning tests and checks should contain

5.1 5.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 61

Unit 15 Element 15.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1. 1.1

Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems Commission Systems

the sources of information on the performance of systems or components (PC 15.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3) the sources of information on oil heating system or component performance, including job specifications, manufacturers specifications or catalogues, contract specifications for commissioning installations the minimum requirements for oil heating system or component compliance with industry requirements when a formal specification is not available

1.2

2.

the procedures for establishing correct system or component performance and checking against the design specification (PC 15.2.3, 15.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the procedures for checking and making adjustments to oil heating systems or system component controls to establish correct system performance the procedures for measuring adequate fuel supply at inputs to components methods of performance testing oil fired boiler flue systems

2.1 2.2 2.3

3. 3.1

the routines and sequences for commissioning systems or components (PC 15.2.2) (Range 2, 3, 4) the sequence of actions to be followed when commissioning oil heating systems or system components

4.

the points in the commissioning process where co-operation and liaison with other trades and customers may be required (PC 15.2.2) (Range 4) situations in which the commissioning process may affect the activities of other customers or system users the points within the commissioning activities where it might be necessary to liaise with other persons, including customers and other trades

4.1 4.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 62

5.

where to access user information appropriate to different systems and components (PC 15.2.1) (Range 1, 2, 3) how to identify the range of information that the customer or system user will need to operate the oil heating systems or component efficiently the importance of ensuring that oil heating system or component information is in a format that can be understood by the non-technical person

5.1 5.2

6.

how to complete commissioning documentation confirming the safe commissioning of systems and components (PC 15.2.5) (Range 1) situations in which it may be necessary to keep or complete records of commissioning that has been carried out the details that might typically be required on a commissioning record

6.1 6.2

7.

system handover procedures and demonstrating the operation of systems and components to end users (PC 15.2.5) (Range 1) the importance of ensuring that handover procedures provide the customer, or other system user which all the necessary information on the operation of the oil heating system or component the types of information that a customer or other system user will need to ensure that they can operate the oil heating system or component correctly systems or components for which it might be appropriate to demonstrate the correct operation for a customer or other systems user

7.1

7.2 7.3

8.

the actions to take when components being commissioned do not meet design requirements (PC 15.2.2, 15.2.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the actions to take when oil heating systems or components do not meet the design specification. the persons to be advised on jobs where the plumber is the sole contractor, and where the plumber is sub-contractor to a main contractor

8.1 8.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 63

Unit 15 Element 15.3 Knowledge Outcomes

Commission and Decommission Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems Decommission Systems

1.

the importance of confirming the system design, specification, functions and outcomes of suspending the operation of the system (PC 15.3.1, 15.3.3, 15.3.4) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the importance of interpreting information on the oil heating system or component, including information gained from site inspection, to confirm the outcomes of decommissioning the system or component the persons with whom liaison should take place before, during and after the decommissioning process, including customers, other appropriate trades, line manager the industry requirements, standards, and tests and procedures used for decommissioning oil heating systems

1.1

1.2

1.3

2.

the need to liaise with others whose procedures or routines may be affected by the suspension of the system operation (PC 15.3.1, 15.3.2) (Range 1) how to identify other persons, including customers, and other trades whose work or routines may be affected by the decommissioning procedures liaison with other persons to minimise disruption to their work or routines

2.1 2.2

3.

the potential hazards that could arise from de-commissioning activities and the checks to be carried out before de-commissioning takes place (PC 15.3.4) (Range 4, 2, 3) the potential safety hazards that could arise from the decommissioning of oil heating systems, including the interruption of supply to other systems the checks to be carried out in advance of oil heating system decommissioning to ensure that any potential hazards that could arise, have been removed

3.1 3.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 64

4.

de-commissioning procedures for temporary and permanent decommissioning of systems (PC 15.3.3) (Range 2, 3) identify the differences between the tests and procedures for temporary and permanent decommissioning of oil heating systems the different actions and procedures to be used when a full or part system, or individual component is being decommissioned

4.1 4.2

5.

the precautions to ensure that de-commissioned systems do not prove a safety hazard measures to prevent systems being brought into operation safety and warning notices (PC 15.3.4) (Range 2, 3, 5) the precautionary actions including liaison with customer or other system or building users, sealing of open pipework, labelling of controls, to ensure that decommissioned oil heating systems do not become a hazard the types of warning notices that are appropriate for use on temporarily or permanently decommissioned oil heating systems

5.1

5.2

7. 7.1 7.2

how to complete systems de-commissioning records PC 15.3.3) (Range 2, 3, 4) how to identify situations where it would be appropriate to complete records of the decommissioning of oil heating systems the types of information that a decommissioning record should contain

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 65

Unit 20 Element 20.1 Knowledge Outcomes

Service and Maintain Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems and Components Establish Maintenance Requirements for Systems and Components

1.

the range of information that should be available on the routine and nonroutine service and maintenance requirements of systems and components (PC 20.1.3) (Range 1, 2, 3) the range of information that should be available on oil heating systems components including specifications and schedules, manufacturers information, services and maintenance schedules the details that may be obtained from the different information sources

1.1

1.2

2.

the service and maintenance procedures across the range of systems and components (PC 20.1.2, 20.1.5, 20.1.6) (Range 2, 4, 5, 6) the activities that make up routine service and maintenance schedules for oil heating systems components the industry standards for routine service and maintenance of oil heating systems components, including compliance with Codes of Practice, BS Recommendations, Manufacturers specifications. the requirements of health and safety legislation for safety in the routine maintenance of oil heating systems and components

2.1 2.2

2.3

3.

how to plan maintenance procedures to minimise interference with system operation and customer routines (PC 20.1.2, 20.1.3, 20.1.4, 20.1.5) (Range 2, 3, 4, 5) the other persons, including the customer and co-contractors whose work or routines may be affected by maintenance activities on oil heating systems how to plan the maintenance of oil heating systems components to minimise system downtime the importance of ensuring that all tools, equipment, and materials will be available as required, and the costs of delays

3.1 3.2 3.3

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 66

5. 5.1

the materials required for routine maintenance (PC 20.1.4) (Range 4) the consumable materials required for the maintenance of oil heating systems components, including replacement parts for controls, gland packings, washers, burner parts etc. the sources of information on the materials required for routine maintenance of oil heating systems components

5.2

6. 6.1 6.2

the tools and equipment required for routine maintenance operations (PC 20.1.4) (Range 4) the tools and equipment required for maintenance operations, including hand and powered tools the access equipment used for routine maintenance operations on oil heating systems components including stand steps, ladders, and trestle

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 67

Unit 20 Element 20.2 Knowledge Outcomes 1.

Service and Maintain Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems and Components Carry out the Service and Maintenance of Systems and Components

how to use performance specifications for systems and components, and maintenance procedures necessary to restore or maintain the continued performance of systems and components (PC 20.2.1) (Range 1, 2) oil heating systems components that require routine maintenance, including pipe materials, controls, burners how to interpret the required performance of oil heating systems and components using performance specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations the routine maintenance procedures necessary to ensure oil heating systems component performance

1.1 1.2

1.3

2.

the maintenance procedures necessary to ensure compliance with industry requirements for routine and non-routine maintenance activities (PC 20.2.1, 20.2.2) (Range 1, 2) the industry requirements for routine maintenance of oil heating systems pipe materials and components, including compliance with specifications, manufacturers technical data, codes of practice and BS Recommendations how to ensure compliance with the requirements of safety legislation in carrying out routine maintenance of oil heating systems components

2.1

2.2

3.

how to complete records and reports of the service and maintenance of systems and components (PC 20.2.3) (Range 3, 2) the types of service and maintenance activity for which it will be necessary to complete records of maintenance work the information that should be included on a service and maintenance record

3.1 3.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 68

4.

the action to take when the system or component does not work to full performance specification (PC 20.2.1) (Range 1) procedures for reporting the continued failure of the oil heating systems component the persons to whom it would be necessary to report continued failure of a oil heating systems component circumstances in which it might be necessary to implement emergency or temporary provisions for oil heating systems supply due to delay in correcting faults

4.1 4.2 4.3

Unit 20 Element 20.3 Knowledge Outcomes 1.

Service and Maintain Domestic Plumbing Oil Heating Systems and Components Diagnose the Cause and Rectify Faults in Systems and Components

how to interpret information on system or component performance, including advice from users, visual inspections or checks or diagnosis tests to locate faults (PC 20.3.1) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) the types of information sources on oil heating systems or component performance how to carry out visual inspections of oil heating systems components to check their performance against specifications how to obtain information on component performance from customers or system users how to carry out diagnostic tests to determine the causes of faults in oil heating systems components the causes of faults in oil heating systems including inadequate fuel supply, incorrect combustion, faults in flue systems, faults in electrical components, leaks in system components, control malfunction. the work action and sequences required to rectify faults in systems and components (PC 20.3.1, 20.3.3) (Range 1, 2, 3, 4) work sequences required to rectify faults in oil heating systems pipework or components, including inadequate fuel supply, incorrect combustion, faults in flue systems, faults in electrical components leaks in system components, control malfunction

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

4.

4.1

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 69

5.

the measures to ensure that systems do not present a safety hazard to potential users, or the workforce, when carrying out rectification procedures (PC 20.3.2, 20.3.4) (Range 5, 6, 2, 3) the importance of ensuring that appropriate liaison has taken place before, during, and after maintenance activities the measures to be taken to prevent the unauthorised use of oil heating systems or components on which maintenance work is being carried out, including safe isolation of the system component, sealing of any open pipework, labelling of controls.

5.1 5.2

7. 7.1

how to isolate unsafe systems and components (PC 20.3.4) (Range 6, 2, 3) how to interpret information, including that gained by visual inspection, and information given by customers or persons in authority, to determine oil heating systems layouts, including the positions of pipework, controls. methods of ensuring that unsafe oil heating systems cannot be used, including securing of controls, labelling controls, posting warning notices, informing system users

7.2

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 70

Appendix C

Level 2/3 Certificate in Plumbing Studies


6129

Scheme Standards (Job Knowledge) Additional Unit Employment Rights

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 1

ADDITIONAL UNIT 401 - EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES (REQUIRED FOR APPRENTICESHIP FRAMEWORK COMPLETIONS) To be integrated with the induction process this unit deals with basic rights and responsibilities under key Government legislation. Knowledge outcomes Element 1 1 Statutory Rights and Responsibilities

Knowledge of employer and employee statutory rights and responsibilities and how to source such information

A the aspects of employment covered by the law B the industry specific legislation and regulations relevant to the industry C the legislation that exists to protect the rights and responsibilities of individuals, organisations and the public D the sources and types of information/advice on employment issues Knowledge outcomes Element 2 1 A B C D E F Internal (Company) and External (Industry) Relationship Structures and Procedures

Procedures, documentation, principles and codes of practice that exist within the employing organisation information on employee work documentation grievances at work specific health and safety regulations and codes of practice and the work actions to be taken to comply with these regulations exemptions from the Sex or Race Discrimination Acts which are relevant to the job reporting sickness procedures for obtaining time off work

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 2

Knowledge outcomes Element 3 1 A B Candidate roles within the employing organisation and the industry

Understanding of the individuals role within their organisation and of their company position within the industry as a whole the main sectors and supply chains within their industry the main types of representative bodies relevant to their industry and the employing organisation. types of industry organisations responsibilities to customers

Knowledge outcomes Element 4 1 A B Career Development

Career development opportunities and sources of careers information/advice the main career pathways into which their occupation fits the training and development opportunities provided for them by their organisation and what they need to do to make use of them

Implementation Version 2 - July 2005

Page 3