medford

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES HANDBOOK 2013-2014

voc tech

“arrive with a d re am

w it h a f u tur ave e e” ..l .

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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Arrive with a dream…Leave with a Future 2012-2014 Medford School Committee
Mayor Michael J. McGlynn, Chairperson John C. Falco, Jr., Vice Chairperson Robert Emmett Skerry, Jr., Secretary Ann Marie Cugno Erin DiBenedetto George A. Scarpelli Paulette Van der Kloot

School Department Administration
Roy E. Belson Beverly G. Nelson Diane J. Caldwell Ann Giombetti Superintendent of Schools Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education Director, Office of Finance and Operations

Vocational Technical High School Administration
William C. Mahoney Jill E. Sawyer Alice Beth Fitzpatrick Jenna Tarabelsi Doreen M. McNeill Principal/Director Assistant Principal/Director Guidance Counselor Career Counselor Special Education, ETL

Program of Studies
2013 - 2014
MEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL MEDFORD VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
MISSION STATEMENT ...................................................................................................................................................... 2  EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING ................................................................................................................ 2 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES.......................................................................................................................................3  PROGRAM SELECTION ..................................................................................................................................................... 3  PROGRAM and SCHEDULE CHANGES ........................................................................................................................... 3  CLASSIFICATIONS OF STUDENTS ................................................................................................................................. 4  REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION ............................................................................................................................ 5  MVTHS - MCAS REMEDIATION PROGRAM ................................................................................................................. 5  ACADEMIC ELIGIBILITY FOR ATHLETICS .................................................................................................................. 6  RANK IN CLASS ................................................................................................................................................................. 6  QUALIFICATIONS FOR COLLEGE ADMISSION ........................................................................................................... 6  POLICY NOTIFICATION and ELIGIBILITY: ................................................................................................................... 7  ADMISSION POLICY .......................................................................................................................................................... 7  CURRICULAR OFFERINGS .................................................................................................................................8  TABLE of ORGANIZATION ............................................................................................................................................... 8  EXPLORATORY PROGRAM - Grade 9 ............................................................................................................................. 8  CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION - All Departments ............................................................................................................ 8  COURSES AND CREDITS BY GRADE ...............................................................................................................9  DUAL ENROLLMENT ...................................................................................................................................................... 10  ON-LINE COURSEWORK ................................................................................................................................................ 10  ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS ............................................................................................................................11  ENGLISH DEPARTMENT ................................................................................................................................................ 11  MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT .................................................................................................................................... 12  SCIENCE DEPARTMENT ................................................................................................................................................. 14  SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT ................................................................................................................................. 15  MCAS ENRICHMENT ....................................................................................................................................................... 16  WELLNESS PROGRAM .................................................................................................................................................... 16  ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS DEPARTMENT ................................................................................................... 17  SPECIAL NEEDS DEPARTMENT ................................................................................................................................... 18  CAREER AND TECHNICAL OFFERINGS ..................................................................................................................... 19 

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MEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL MEDFORD VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL

MISSION STATEMENT At Medford High School, caring educators serve as role models and encourage and assist all students to reach their potential as learners. To fulfill that mission, the school creates a climate in which parents, teachers, administrators and staff not only set high expectations for students, but also offer them considerable motivation and support. Medford High School is a community of lifelong learners who respect diversity and are actively involved in the life of the school, which offers physical safety and emotional security. As a result, graduates of Medford High School become responsible citizens and contributors to their community, their nation, and a global society.
(Approved by Medford School Committee, May 2000)

EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING ACADEMIC • • • • Students will analyze, interpret, evaluate and think logically to solve problems using a variety of resources and strategies. Students will communicate effectively to a variety of audiences. Students will create works using a variety of communication forms. Students will develop skills and knowledge to reach personal and career goals. Students will work cooperatively to achieve objectives. Students will demonstrate self-respect, understanding and appreciation for the diversity and interdependence of all peoples. Students will recognize and fulfill their duties and obligations as students and citizens.

SOCIAL • CIVIC • •

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Program of Studies 2013 - 2014
PROGRAM SELECTION
You are in the process of making career decisions. The importance of thoughtful planning cannot be overemphasized. You are being asked to make decisions that will have far-reaching effects on your future because they pertain to your academic and career/technical preparation and to your graduation. Therefore, these decisions should be carefully made with guidance from parents, your school counselors, and teachers. To assist with your career decisions, this Program of Studies has been compiled. It outlines the programs and briefly describes the courses offered. Please take time to become familiar with the information and the course offerings, and please do not hesitate to see the Guidance staff at Medford Vocational Technical High School for additional information. Parents are asked to complete the Application for Admission and sign the application before the student returns the form to the guidance counselor on March 1. Every attempt will be made to place students in the programs of the first choice. Because of space limitations in some departments, students will be given the opportunity to enroll in their second or third choice. Admission to MVTHS is subject to the terms and conditions outlined in the Medford Vocational Technical High School Admission Policy. The Admission Policy is on file in the Medford Public Schools and the Massachusetts Department of Education.

PROGRAM and SCHEDULE CHANGES
Once the school year begins, the process for changing schedules is much more complicated because it involves evaluating arguments based on extenuating circumstances. Initially, students and parents need to solicit and receive permission from the guidance counselor, Assistant Principal/Director, and the appropriate curriculum director(s). Where extenuating circumstances (as stated below) apply in a specific case and thus justify a schedule change, these individuals identify the allowable exception(s) and submit their decision to the Principal/Director, who will act affirmatively on all properly determined recommendations. Students and parents whose requests are denied will be entitled to a hearing with the Principal/Director. Where practicable, the guidance counselor, Assistant Principal/Director, and appropriate curriculum director will be in attendance at the hearing. In addition, transfers within career and technical education (CTE) majors or from a non-vocational technical high school will not be considered after the 15th of October. Rationale There are several reasons why requests for schedule changes should not be granted after the school year begins. The call for higher standards at the national, state and local levels requires greater accountability. Time and Learning requirements, high-stakes tests and community expectations impact on the course-selection process. Under Time and Learning regulations, every student must carry a full course load to fulfill state requirements. In addition, school officials encourage students to exhibit diligence, responsibility and forethought in selecting courses and in planning for their future. Changes of courses and/or teachers interrupt continuity of instruction. In changing schedules, not only do students encounter new material and different teaching styles and policies, but they also need to make up days, weeks or months of class work, tests and homework, in addition to fulfilling current assignments, thus becoming academically at-risk. Related to continuity of instruction is that, with virtually every course change, the receiving teacher is required to assign to new students equivalent class work, tests and homework and to assess these assignments and to incorporate the grades from the sending teacher. As a result, the demands that
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schedule changes place on teachers either usurp time and energy that they would ordinarily devote to the rest of their students or become additional burdens for the teachers. Schedule changes contradict the integrity of the scheduling process. Each spring, after asking students and parents to complete Course Selection Forms, the curriculum directors and headmaster make staffing recommendations to the Superintendent. Those recommendations are based on the projected number of coursesections needed to schedule the students who request each course. Allowing course changes creates imbalances not only in class and department sizes, but also in total student enrollments among teachers. Exceptions to the Rule Although the rule is that no schedule changes will be allowed after the school year begins, there are exceptions to the rule. The following are illustrations of allowable extenuating circumstances that are considered, under most circumstances, to be exceptions to the rule: • The student’s schedule does not include courses that are requirements for graduation. • The student has selected a course without fulfilling the course pre-requisite. • The student’s schedule includes a course with a teacher who failed that student during a previous school year. • A course-section is added to or deleted from the master schedule. • An obvious mistake has been made, and school personnel have a responsibility to take corrective action. • The student has a documented medical or psychological condition that prevents him or her from continuing with one or more courses. • The student’s family is undergoing a documented crisis that prevents him or her from continuing with one or more courses. • Changes in a special needs student’s Individual Education Plan require changes in the student’s schedule. • A schedule change is needed to accommodate a student with Limited English Proficiency. • Safety considerations require that a student’s schedule be changed.

CLASSIFICATIONS OF STUDENTS
The system of course credits is based on the number of days the course meets during the five-day cycle. Students are to be scheduled for 25 periods of academics each week in grade nine, 20 periods of academics each week in grade ten, and 30 periods of academics, on alternate weeks in grades eleven and twelve. Each freshmen student is scheduled for one (1) period of Exploratory (shop) per day. Sophomore students are scheduled for two (2) periods of shop per day and junior and senior students are scheduled for thirty periods of shop on alternate weeks. Students in grades ten, eleven, and twelve homeroom assignment is determined by program classification. Freshmen students are randomly group into divisions. To be promoted to the next class at Medford VocationalTechnical High School, a student must have secured a minimum number of credits, including appropriate credits in five-credit courses that apply to specific graduation requirements: Sophomore Status: Junior Status: Senior Status: Minimum of 26 credits; Minimum of 54 credits; Minimum of 80 credits.

For example, if a sophomore does not pass English 10 during the 2010 -2011 school year, they must take and pass the course during Summer School. Any student who does not have the minimum number of credits in September of 2011 will not be promoted to the next grade.

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REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
The total number of credits required for eligibility for a Medford High School Diploma is 112. Those 112 credits include, but are not limited to, the following: A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. Four years of English Language Arts Two courses in Physical Education Three years of Mathematics to include Algebra and Geometry Three years of Science to include Intro. To Physics, Biology and Chemistry Three years of Social Studies to include World History I, World History II, U. S. History Three years of Foreign Language for college prep students Two courses in Health/Wellness One course in Fine Arts (beginning with Class of 1999) One course in Computer Literacy Four years of Community Service (60 hours required, 15 per year) Proficient or Advanced grade on the English Language Arts, and Mathematics MCAS tests Passing Grade on the Science MCAS test Take and Pass Take and Pass Take and Pass Take and Pass Take and Pass Take and Pass Take and Pass Take and Pass Take and Pass

MVTHS – Additional requirements for students attending the Vocational School A. B. C. D. E. Fourth year of Mathematics Physical Education (no requirement) Fine Arts (no requirement) Foreign Language (no requirement) Massachusetts Vocational Competency Exam – (when approved) Take and Pass

Honors and Advanced Courses All Medford Vocational Technical High School students should realize their potential as learners and are encouraged to challenge themselves academically. If a student would like to take an Honors course or challenge themselves with courses not offered at MVTHS, school personnel; will advise the student they may pursue the course at Medford High School. During the course-selection process, teachers, curriculum directors and guidance counselors’ recommend certain courses for each student, considering his/her classroom preparation, teacher-assigned grades, course-prerequisites, standardized test scores, and other data. Guidance counselors will honor the student’s request for a course(s) at Medford High School, provided the request is made before the start of the school year and all prerequisites and requirements are met.

MVTHS - MCAS REMEDIATION PROGRAM
Freshmen and Sophomores participate in the academic and vocational courses of study. Junior students will participate in the traditional “week about” academic/vocational course of study. Any junior student who was not successful on the MCAS test administered in April will be directed to an after school remedial program. This program (7th period) will take place four (4) days a week and will provide students with remedial help in English Language Arts and Mathematics. Students will be afforded the opportunity to retake the MCAS Test as directed by the Massachusetts Department of Education during their junior year. Cooperative Education during the last quarter will continue to be an option for those junior students who have been successful on the MCAS test. Senior students who have successfully passed the MCAS test will continue in the traditional “week about” academic/vocational course of study. All senior students who have not achieved success on the MCAS test will participate in their senior academic classes. The week they are scheduled for their vocational major (shop), they will participate in remedial academic offerings in the morning and their vocational major in the afternoon. This

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program will mirror the course of study for sophomores. These students will be eligible to retake the MCAS test as directed by the Massachusetts Department of Education during their senior year. A thirteenth year will be offered to any student who participated in the remedial academic program during their senior year. The Thirteenth Year program will allow students to complete their vocational competencies, meet time requirements, and complete a practical factors test. Also, this program will afford the student the opportunity to complete his/her vocational training. Any student who was not awarded a standard high school diploma, for failure to pass MCAS testing, will receive assistance in their pursuit of a General Education Development (GED) certificate. Future Department of Education regulations may allow students additional opportunities to pass the MCAS test.

ACADEMIC ELIGIBILITY FOR ATHLETICS
In choosing courses for the coming school year, students should consider the school’s academic requirements for athletic eligibility. To be eligible at the start of the 2013-2014 school year, students must have final passing grades from the 2012-2013 school year in the equivalent of four traditional, yearlong, major English courses. To be eligible for the second marking period, students must satisfy the academic standard in the equivalent of four traditional, year-long, major English courses during the first marking period. It is at this point in the year that the academic eligibility is certified only on the previous marking period and not cumulatively. Only fall eligibility remains cumulative. In addition, to be academically eligible for athletics during a specific marking period, students need to be enrolled at that time in the equivalent of four traditional, year-long, major English courses. At Medford High School, any five-credit course is considered to be the equivalent of a traditional, yearlong, major English course. (For special needs students, the equivalent of four traditional, year-long, major English courses is any combination of twenty credits in academic courses that are required by their Individual Education Plans.)

RANK IN CLASS
The standing of each pupil in his or her class is determined annually on the basis of a quality-point-weighted system. Rank-In-Class is one of the criteria that schools and colleges request of high school students seeking admission. The method of tabulating class rank at Medford Vocational-Technical High School is published in the Student Handbook.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR COLLEGE ADMISSION
College admissions officers consider a variety of criteria in screening college applicants: a good scholastic record, entrance examinations, academic rank-in-class, high school certification, and the recommendations of guidance counselors, teachers and administrators. Most colleges require the applicant to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT I Reasoning Test) given by the College Entrance Examination Board; many colleges require three of the SAT II Subject Tests as well. Students should consult college catalogues for specific information concerning admission requirements. INFORMATION REGARDING COLLEGE PREPARATION A basic curriculum is required of all students, with electives allowing for specialization. Since admission to college is becoming increasingly competitive, students must do intensive work throughout their high school preparation. Consequently, unless a student has a record of merit, he may experience difficulty in gaining admission to the college of his or her choice.

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POLICY NOTIFICATION and ELIGIBILITY:
Medford High School and the Vocational-Technical High School admits students and makes available to them its advantages, privileges and courses of study without regard to race, color, sex religion, national origin, sexual orientation or disability. Inquiries regarding the above may be made to the Headmaster or Vocational Principal/Director at 489 Winthrop Street, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (393-2301) or the Director of the Office for Civil Rights, Department of Education, Washington, D.C.

ADMISSION POLICY
Medford Vocational Technical High School will determine the number of openings for grades 9-12. Any eighth, ninth, tenth or eleventh grade student who is a resident of the City of Medford who expects to be promoted to the grade they seek to enter by the local district is eligible to apply for fall admission or admission during the school year subject to the availability of openings at the Medford Vocational technical High School. Medford Vocational Technical High School is a member of the Shore Educational Collaborative, an educational collaborative chartered under Chapter 631 of the Massachusetts General Laws and approved by the Massachusetts Department of Education under Chapter 40, Section 4e. Students from member districts of the Collaborative (includes the school systems of Cambridge, Everett and Somerville) who do not reside within the Medford School District may apply for admission subject to the availability of openings and the absence of established waiting lists in particular vocational areas provided they expect to be promoted to the grade they seek by their local district. Medford students may also apply to another district within the Collaborative. Collaborative students will be evaluated and ranked using the criteria set forth in the Admission Policy. Freshmen students from Collaborative Districts may elect to explore specific vocational areas that are not offered within their District and participate in the freshmen vocational selection process at a Collaborative school and the Medford Vocational Technical High School. M.G. L. c. 74, section 7 states: Residents of towns in the commonwealth not maintaining approved independent distributive occupations, industrial, agricultural, vocational home economics and allied health occupations training schools offering the type of education desired, or children placed in such a town by the commissioner of social services or by the trustees of the Massachusetts training schools, may upon the approval of the commissioner under the direction of the state board, be admitted to a school in another town. In making his decision, the commissioner under the direction of the state board shall take into consideration the opportunities for free vocational training where the applicant resides, the financial status of such place, the age, preparation, aptitude and previous record of the applicant, and other relevant circumstances. Students who wish to complete a Nonresident Application seeking admission to a Chapter 74-approved program in his/her area of interest must submit the Chapter 74 Vocational Technical Nonresident Tuition applications to the Superintendent of Schools in Medford by April 1. In the interest of complying with the April 1 deadline, students completing the Chapter 74 Vocational Technical Nonresident Tuition Application are required to submit the application to their guidance counselor by March 15.

All programs are subject to change with appropriate notification. All programs are subject to the approval of the Medford School Committee and to budgetary considerations.

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MEDFORD VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULAR OFFERINGS
The primary objectives of the program include the following: • To prepare students for post-secondary and/or apprenticeship training. • To aid students in establishing themselves in their chosen occupations. • To develop within students the attitudes, the knowledge and the character necessary for an active, economic, social and civic life. • To influence students to continue their education, since this is a never-ending process. Shops are equipped with the standard machines and tools and specialized equipment found in the various trades. The skills and processes necessary for skilled workers are acquired in the shop jobs under conditions comparable to those found in industry. The Applied Academic (related) program is the planning and research necessary to complete the shop jobs and the preparation by each student of the shop jobs for the following weeks. The student’s total time is allocated to the study of academic and related theory subjects. These include: Applied Academics, English, Social Studies, Algebra, Geometry, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. The Vocational Program operates under state and federal Vocational legislation.

TABLE of ORGANIZATION
Students in Grades 9 and 10 experience both academic classes and shop on a daily basis. This programming enables the freshmen student to participate in the Exploratory Program and the sophomore student to major in a career area and to participate in a traditional high school course of study. Students in Grades 11 and 12 will spend alternate weeks in shop and the academic classroom.

EXPLORATORY PROGRAM - Grade 9
A ninth-grade exploratory program is offered for those students entering the Vocational Program. The program consists of regular Grade 9 academic subjects and experience in at least eight shop and lab areas. Close attention, direction, and guidance are given to each student during this period. At the end of this exploratory period, the Grade 9 students should be more knowledgeable about and decisive in selecting a career program for Grade 10.

CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION - All Departments
Cooperative Education is a school-based and a work-based program. Cooperative Education students continue to receive their academic education in the traditional classroom setting while spending their shop week employed by area business in their vocational field. Students perform work best suited to their qualifications and educational needs while employers evaluate the student progress according to their predetermined standards. Students will receive no less than minimum wage from the employer, with the exception of those industries not covered by the minimum wage law. Students must meet Medford Vocational-Technical prerequisites including a 10-hour OSHA card before entering the program. Cooperative Education gives a senior or fourth quarter junior practical work experience related to their vocational area. It also allows the student to refine his/her skills prior to entering the work force on a full time basis. Cooperative Education develops proficiency in a trade area, helping the student to assure a smoother transition into the career of their choice.

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Medford Vocational-Technical High School Courses and Credits by Grade
COURSE English Algebra 1* Introductory Physics World History I Exploratory (Shop) MCAS Enrichment Community Service GRADE 9 Periods 5 5 5 5 5 5 15 hours GRADE 10 Periods 5 5 5 5 2 10 15 hours GRADE 11 (bi-weekly) Periods 8 8 8 3 3 30 15 hours GRADE 12 (bi-weekly) Periods 8 8 8 3 3 30 15 hours Credits 5 5 5 5 6 5 Total Credits: 31

COURSE English Geometry Biology World History II Applied Academics Shop Community Service

Credits 5 5 5 5 2 8 Total Credits: 30

COURSE English Algebra 2 U.S. History Health Applied Academics Shop Community Service

Credits 5 5 5 2 3 12 Total Credits: 32

COURSE English Algebra 2B Chemistry Health Applied Academics Co-op/Shop Community Service

Credits 5 5 5 2 3 12 Total Credits: 32

* Beginning with the class of 2014, the four year sequence of mathematics is Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 and Topics in Discrete Mathematics. Accommodations will be made to provide students with additional or accelerated coursework as needed.

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DUAL ENROLLMENT
Qualified juniors and seniors are encouraged to take advantage of the Massachusetts Dual Enrollment Program. When funding is available, this program allows students to take college courses free of charge at Bunker Hill Community College. College and/or high school credits are received for all successfully completed courses. Students may also take courses at Tufts University under an agreement between Tufts University and the Medford Public Schools. For further information on Cooperative Education, Dual Enrollment, and Tufts University, students should consult their Guidance and/or Career Counselor Counselors.

ON-LINE COURSEWORK
Virtual High School (VHS) is a collaborative of schools offering online, content-rich, full-semester courses to high school students. VHS includes core, elective, advanced placement (AP) and Pre-AP courses. Students can enroll in VHS courses on an individual tuition basis. Additional information at: http://www.govhs.org Brigham Young University (BYU) Independent Study has helped students, ranging from remedial to accelerated, who want to make up classes, graduate on time, or enhance their curriculum. Students can enroll in BYU on an individual tuition basis. Additional information at: elearn.byu.edu Students interested in participating in an on-line learning experience must consult with their Guidance counselor and the MVTHS administration prior to making application.

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Medford High and Vocational-Technical High School Academic Departments
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
The English Language Arts Department at Medford High School provides continuing opportunities for each student to develop effective writing, reading, communication and grammar skills necessary for postsecondary endeavors. Although the emphasis placed on specific skills varies for each grade and level, the total program provides continuity in the student’s educational program over four years. The English Language Arts curriculum follows specific guidelines that equip students with content knowledge and skills. These include the understanding and development of knowledge and skills leading to students’ ability to: • use informational texts and multimedia to foster strong content knowledge • write persuasive, narrative and descriptive essays • demonstrate inquisition and presentation skills through research projects • think and use language through interactive learning • analyze and synthesize material that fosters a deep understanding and appreciation for texts • comprehend textual understanding of literary heritage, literary movements and cultural perspectives • understand the many uses of literature as seen through social commentary texts • recognize and use all genres of literature • comprehend and critique social media, the arts and text • read and comprehend a variety of complex literary and informational texts • respond both written and orally to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline including strategic use of digital media • develop and use speaking and listening skills to engage in collaborative and productive discussions Every student must take and pass English 9, 10, 11 and 12. A student cannot progress to another English course without first fulfilling the prerequisites for that course; therefore, two regular English courses (e.g., English 10 and English 11) may not be taken simultaneously. In addition, a summer reading requirement exists for all students entering Standard, Honors and Advanced Placement courses in Grades 9 through 12. Titles are assigned by grade and students are assessed in early September. Therefore, completion of required summer reading is critical. English 9: Literary Exploration I This course enhances the ninth grade students’ literary experience by building on their knowledge of literary and informational reading; persuasive, narrative and descriptive writing; and speaking, listening, and grammatical techniques. Throughout the year, students are provided with continued opportunities for developing these skills. The study of literature focuses on analysis of the short story, novel, and poetry. Required reading includes selections from Shakespeare. Standard - 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle - Full Year Honors – 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full year Prerequisite for Honors: Average grade of “A-“ in English 8 English 10: Literary Exploration II Building on the ninth grade literary exploration course, this course concentrates on themes that include love, heroism, and rites of passage. Students study the roots of the English language as well as literature from AngloSaxon epic poetry and Shakespeare’s Middle English to modern-day short fiction. Instruction spans the reading of ancient myths and legends to the modern novel. Through class discussion, literary and informational reading, oral presentations, informal essays, critical essays, and independent research, students explore the major themes that the authors themselves explored. From this exposure, students develop higher critical and analytical reading and thinking skills in order to evaluate data and respond appropriately. In addition, all other
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communication skills are included. Specific titles, including the works of Shakespeare, are designated as required reading. Standard - 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle - Full Year Honors – 5 credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisite for Honors: Passing grade of “B- “in Honors English 9 English 11: American Literature With American literature as the focus of study, this course enables students to develop a deeper knowledge and greater respect for the American heritage including its history, its complexity and its literary contributions. Thematic concepts such as the Puritan conscience, the American search for identity and the American ideal are studied through representative writers including Jonathan Edwards, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Mark Twain, and Ernest Hemingway. Persuasive, analytical and narrative writing in the form of letters, essays and research comprise the principal amount of writing in English 11. Specific titles, including the works of Shakespeare, are designated as required reading. Standard - 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle - Full Year Honors – 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisites for Honors: Average grade of “b-“in Honors English 10 English 12: World Literature This course explores the roots of literary tradition from a world literature perspective. A survey of world literature from the fourteenth through the twentieth centuries affords students the opportunity to challenge the thinking of the great minds of Western Civilization. Discussions are based on textual analysis and related material. The focus for the research paper originates from course readings. Specific titles, including the works of Shakespeare, are designated as required reading. Standard - 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle - Full Year Honors – 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisites for Honors: Average grade of “B-“ in Honors English 11

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT
The Mathematics Department offers a core mathematics program that is rigorous in content, high in expectations and accessible to all students. The curriculum is reflective of the standards articulated by the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics, the Common Core State Standards for mathematics education, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System. Students will achieve standards of practice, content and mathematical literacy through problem solving, reasoning, communication, representation, and making connections. MASSCORE recommends that all students take and pass four years of mathematics for college and career readiness. Beginning with the class of 2015 all students will be required to take and pass four years of mathematics. The recommended course sequence is Algebra 1/Geometry/Algebra 2 followed by a senior elective. Opportunities for accelerated or honors level courses will be made based on recommendations of the program and department directors. Graphing calculators are essential tools for high school mathematics learning. While classroom sets of graphing calculators are available for in class use, students are strongly encouraged to own graphing calculators to enhance understanding, aid in homework, and for use during standardized testing such as MCAS and SAT. Algebra 1 (Grade 9) This course in algebra provides a strong algebraic foundation for all subsequent mathematics courses. Students will develop mature understanding of algebraic concepts and procedures through communication, representation, reasoning, making connections, problem-solving, and technology integration. Focus is on a deep understanding of linear and exponential relationships; interpretation, comparison and contrast of functions to include linear, quadratic and exponential models; extension of the laws of exponents to include square and cube roots; and application of regression techniques to analyze linear models.
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Standard - 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Strongly Recommended: Graphing Calculator Prerequisite: Passing grade 8 mathematics or grade 8 algebra

ESL Algebra 1 (Grades 9 and 10) This course focuses on developing an understanding of the algebra skills listed in the above Algebra 1 course, while allowing for the development of English communication skills. Standard - 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Strongly Recommend: TI-83+ or TI-84+ Graphing Calculator Prerequisite: Recommendation by the Bi-Lingual and Mathematics Departments Geometry (Grade 10) This course extends the study of geometry by emphasizing precision and developing reasoning and proof. Students will demonstrate understanding using geometric models, constructions, algebraic reasoning and trigonometry. The students develop mathematical language as they investigate problems, make and test conjectures, draw conclusions, and describe results. The course focuses on proving congruence and demonstrating similarity through transformations and proportional reasoning; deriving and using equations of conic sections in the coordinate plane; explaining and using volume formulas to solve problems; as well as understanding and applying the rules of probability to make decisions. Standard - 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Strongly Recommended: Graphing Calculator Prerequisite: Passing grade in Algebra 1 Algebra 2 (Grade 11) This course emphasizes the study of functions including linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, and radical functions, their properties, and graphs. The students will understand the relationship between the arithmetic of rational numbers and that of rational expressions; extend their understanding of trigonometric ratios as they graph periodic functions; and identify the appropriate function to model a situation. Students will also use statistical models to interpret data, make inferences and justify conclusions. Standard - 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Strongly Recommended: Graphing Calculator Prerequisite: A passing grade in Geometry Topics in Discrete Mathematics (Grade 12) This course provides students the opportunity to study numerous disjoint topics in the field of Discrete Mathematics. Students will use discrete models to interpret data, make inferences, and solve problems that answer questions to real situations. They will determine “reasonableness” and evaluate mathematical representations of real-world situations. Students will represent and model with vector quantities; use matrices in applications and modeling to analyze situations and make decisions. Topics include graph theory, combinatory, linear programming, arithmetic & geometric growth, statistical modeling, iteration and recursion, voting theory, fair division, symmetry & tessellations, finance, and more. Standard – 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisite: Passing grade in Algebra 2.

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Mathematical Decision Making (Grade 12) This course provides students the opportunity to apply mathematics as they model a range of situations to solve problems involving the use of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry in diverse areas such as statistics and financial mathematics. The course is highly participatory in nature as students learn in a cooperative environment where they engage in discussion and give presentations. Students will extend and learn new content as they attain independent learning and research skills needed post high school. Standard – 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisite: Passing grade in Algebra 2. Strongly Recommended: Graphing Calculator

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
A scientific education is designed to develop in the student an appreciation and intellectual awareness of our biological, physical, technological, and chemical environment. Developing science literacy enables the student to understand science concepts and process skills in making decisions related to scientific issues that affect society. The science curriculum supports students’ interests in different career paths. The expectation is that all students will complete a course in each of the three main domains of science as they pursue their 3-course graduation requirement: physics, biology, and chemistry. This is also the recommendation of national, state, and local science organizations and many colleges and universities. Opportunities for accelerated or honors level courses will be made based on recommendations of the program and department directors. Introductory Physics (Grade 9) The Introductory Physics course helps students recognize the nature and scope of physics and its relationship to other sciences. Students will learn about basic topics such as motion, forces, energy, momentum, heat and heat transfer, waves, electricity, and magnetism. Students will be engaged in scientific inquiry, investigations, and labs so that they develop a conceptual understanding and basic scientific skills. The mathematics prerequisite skills are based on middle school mathematics topics such as data analysis, measurement, scientific notation, ratio and proportion, and algebraic expressions. Standard – 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisite: Passing grade in all previous science courses ESL Science (Grade 9) This course is designed for students with limited English proficiency with an emphasis on English language development and practice. Integrated ideas and concepts from all the science areas will be studied, using earth and space science as the central theme. Concepts dealing with the land, air, oceans, and space will be studied with an emphasis on laboratory skills, critical thinking and problem solving. Standard – 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisite: Passing grade in all previous science course Biology I (Grade 10) This course emphasizes inquiry and lab-based experiences to explore the fundamental principles of living things. Students learn about the diversity of living organisms and their relationship to the environment. They encounter standards in the areas of The Chemistry of Life, Cell Biology, Genetics, Anatomy and Physiology, Evolution and Biodiversity, and Ecology. In classes where dissection is used as an instructional activity, students will be presented with alternatives as described in the district’s Dissection Policy. Standard – 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisite: Passing grade in Introductory Physics
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Chemistry (Grade 12) This course focuses on the interaction of matter through chemical reactions. Properties and states of matter, atomic structures, chemical formulas, bonding, chemical reactions, energy, gas laws, survey of materials, solutions, acids/bases, and organic, nuclear and equilibrium chemistry are some of the topics covered. Laboratory experimentation is a feature of the course. Standard – 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle – Full Yea Prerequisite: Passing grades in Biology and Algebra 2 or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2. Recommended: Scientific or Graphing Calculator

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT
Students need to successfully complete three years of History and Social Studies instruction in order to be eligible for graduation. To comply with the 2003 Massachusetts History and Social Science Framework, all students must take a two-year sequence in world history starting in their freshman year. As juniors, all students are required to take United States History. Seniors have the choice of several courses but must first ensure they have passed all of their requirements. World History I (Grade 9) Students in Grade 9 will study the history and geography of the civilizations and nations that occurred in Europe, Africa, the Americas and Asia from the fall of the Roman Empire to the beginning of the modern era (500 A. D. to 1815). Focus will be placed on the history and geography of great civilizations that were developing concurrently throughout the world during medieval and early modern times. Students will examine the growing economic interaction within and between civilizations, as well as the exchange of ideas, beliefs, technologies, commodities and cultures. Standard - 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Honors – 5 Credits - 5 periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisite for Honors: Average grade of “A-“in United States History I (Grade 8) Requirement for Honors: Summer Reading project due by the first day of school World History II (Grade 10) The course will begin with a study of the evolution and revolutions of European nation states and then continue with a study of European nationalism and imperialism, the emergence of modern China and Japan and the dawn of 20th century, the turmoil that led to WWI, the Russian Revolution, and the Great Depression. Also included will be the rise of fascism, WWII, the Cold War, the Revolution of Rising Expectations, and the changing scientific, economic, social, cultural, and political events that are shaping the 21st century. Current events will also be looked at and incorporated into the course. Students will be able to put historical events in proper perspective and apply concepts and themes from all of the Social Sciences in order to make sense of the world in which they live. To help prepare students for the upcoming United States History MCAS Test, the curriculum for World History II will integrate aspects of United States History into the study of World History. Standard - 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year
Honors – 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Prerequisite for Honors: Average grade of “B” in Honors World History I Requirement for Honors: Summer reading project due by the first day of school

United States History (Grade 11) This course is required for graduation and conforms to the outline provided by the Massachusetts History and Social Science Framework. Students in Grade 11 will study the major turning points in American History in the 20th century. After a brief review of the causes, events and results of the Civil War and Reconstruction, this
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course will examine the rise of Industrial America and the labor movement, Immigration and the shift in population to the cities, along with the changing ethnic composition of America. Also included will be the position of the United States in a changing and hostile world of the 20th century, adjustments brought on by the Great Depression and the New Deal, the Civil Rights struggle and achievements, the VietnamWar and the changing scientific, cultural, economic, and political developments of the late 20th century. Students will have the opportunity to discuss major events and elements of the Cold War. In addition to the treatment of all core knowledge topics, the course will begin with a featured examination of the Constitution, our government system of checks and balances, assorted case studies as well as the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Standard - 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle – Full Year
Honors – 5 Credits – 8 Periods per Cycle – Full Year Perquisite for Honors: Average grade of “B-“ in Honors World History II Requirement for Honors: Summer reading project due by the first day of School

MCAS ENRICHMENT
MCAS Enrichment and Career Education (Grade 9) This course, required of all freshmen, focuses on the improvement of student skills and knowledge of content in the areas of Mathematics, Science and English. Students will focus on test strategies, short answer and open response questions, and multiple choice testing. Teachers will choose topics of vocational interest to provide instruction in computation, problem solving, and basic algebra and geometry. Student’s time will be divided between MCAS enrichment and Career Education. The Careers Class introduces materials that will aid the student in planning toward a future career. These include goals and values, decision-making skills and understanding risk, and employability skills. Also, the student will use Career Cruising to enhance their learning and commence their four-year career plan. Standard 5 Credits – 5 Periods per Cycle – Full Year

WELLNESS PROGRAM
The goal of the Wellness Education Program is to emphasize the mental, emotional and social aspects of living, as well as the physical development aspects necessary for a satisfying and active life. Students gain an understanding of personal fitness levels and personal fitness needs through discussion and practice of fitness components including the following: • Cardio-respiratory strength/endurance • Muscular strength/endurance • Flexibility • Body composition (height, weight, body fat percentage, BMI etc.) Activities include: • Basic anatomy and physiology information • Weight/resistance training • Cardiovascular • Introduction of various exercise options such as yoga, Pilates, kettle bells • Fitness testing Students continue their development of the following 21st century skills and habits by:

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• • • • •

Developing research skills (example: finding exercises/exercise programs to add to their personal program, researching sources for diet/nutrition and anatomy/physiology, becoming self-directed learners (example: practicing skills/exercises with proper form to avoid injury). Using problem solving and developing inquiry (example: which exercises/exercise programs work best for them, how to modify programs, why modification will be effective, when to introduce modification). Improving technology use (example: reliable sources, heart rate monitors, pedometers, computer body management systems, BMI calculator system). Effectively communicating and collaborating (example: informing instructor of any challenges/difficulties in program and accepting/implementing suggestions). Acting with integrity (example: following protocols, rules, respect for equipment). Becoming well-informed, global citizens, practicing leadership skills (example: practicing a healthy lifestyle, being a positive role model).

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS DEPARTMENT
The English Language Learners (ELL) Department provides full-or part-day instruction, counseling, and placement of students who need to learn English to a level which allows them to participate fully in the academic and social life of the school. The department offers a full range of English language courses, as well as sheltered instruction in core academic areas. ELL- Literacy This course is for students who have had limited educational experiences in their country of origin. Students will learn basic literacy skills that apply to English, Social Studies and Science. Classes meet one period a day. Standard – 5 Credits – 6 periods per Cycle – Full Year ELL – Beginners (Grades 9-12) This course is for students who are recently arrived to this country and who have had normal educational experiences in their country of origin. Students will learn English to function in their new environment and acquire some understanding of the cultural differences in play. The class will focus on the social use of English, receptive language, oral communication, beginning reading and writing, and study skills. Classes meet two periods a day. Standard – 10 Credits - 12 Periods per Cycle – Full Year ELL – Intermediate Low (Grades 9-12) This course is for students who are progressing in their knowledge of English but still have difficulties in speaking, understanding, reading and writing. Classes meet two periods a day. Standard – 10 Credits - 12 Periods per Cycle – Full Year ELL – Intermediate High (Grades 9-12) This course is for students who understand most conversations, explanations and lectures given at a native pace, but need further work in grammar, idioms, and vocabulary acquisition. Classes meet two periods a day. Standard – 10 Credits - 12 Periods per Cycle – Full Year ELL - Advanced (Grades 9-12) This course is for students who are near exit level from the program. They may be taking Math, Science and Social Studies courses in the regular curriculum, but will still benefit from added work in English to polish and improve reading and writing skills. This is the final course in the ELL sequence. Classes meet one period a day. Standard – 5 Credits - 6 Periods per Cycle – Full Year

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Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) (Grades 9-12) The purpose of the program is to offer core academic classes in a manner that provides visual and language support for new English learners. The following core academic SEI classes are offered: Algebra I and II, Geometry, Pre-calculus, World History I and II, United States History, Science, MCAS English, and MCAS Math. All classes meet one period each day except English and MCAS Math, which meet twice in a six-day cycle. Standard – 5 Credits – 6 Periods per Cycle – Full Year

SPECIAL NEEDS DEPARTMENT
The Special Needs Department is available to all students that may need assistance. The services provided can include evaluations and/or delivery of direct services. Services can include mainstream monitoring and/or support, modified sections in various departments and/or designated sections in mainstream, adjustment counseling, Adaptive Learning Program, Life Skills program, resource room assignments, combination of above services; or individual service delivery as recommended by base core team. All students regardless of learning challenges have access to the Medford High School’s curriculum. Students with diverse learning styles are evaluated and diagnosed by the Department of Special Needs. Each student’s team recommends any and all accommodations or schedule adjustments. The purpose of these recommendations is to maximize student success. Listed below are the current offerings for Medford High School. CURTIS TUFTS ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL This 502.4i program was created in 1981. The program was created in response to a need to keep vulnerable “At Risk” students in their community. This model program addresses the needs of students that share a number of high risk and acting out characteristics. This comprehensive program is staffed by eight full time SPED certified personnel. The program has the support, supervision and direct services of three agencies, General Psychological Services and Tri-City Inter Agency. The program effectively addresses the social, emotional, and educational needs of the forty students recommended by their sending TEAM. This is done through creative programming, carefully planned activities, individual and group counseling, behavior modification, parental support group, outreach, community involvement, competitive inter-league sports, liaisons with Tufts University and Northeastern University, as well as many ongoing and effective alternative strategies that address student, family and school priorities. HIGH SCHOOL LIFE SKILLS PROGRAM This program has expanded over the past ten years in order to address the needs of the more severe educationally and physically challenged high school aged student. The Life Skills Program is primarily dealing with the more cognitively and physically challenged youth. This program has one full time teacher, three full time instructional aides, behavior specialist, adjustment counselor and career counselor/job coach, OT/PT providing ongoing services. Students have the opportunity to experience a multitude of activities throughout the day. This includes the multifaceted classroom facility as well as various locations within the confines of the High School and Vocational School. Students also travel to various work sites within the community. There is also an extended day as well as a summer component built into the program. HIGH SCHOOL AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOL LEARNING GROUP PROGRAM These programs offer sound and appropriate academics for the group of Learning Disabled students assigned to them. The teachers and instructional aides to meet the IEP Goals and Objectives use various accommodations and teaching strategies. These students are also exposed to various appropriate mainstream opportunities as well as work sites both within the school environment and at various job sites outside of school. The School Adjustment Counselor, Guidance Counselor and Behavior Specialist address behaviors on an ongoing basis. Students in these programs are offered an opportunity to participate in an extended day component along with the Life Skills Program.
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ADAPTIVE LEARNING PROGRAM This program offers the group of students assigned to it both support and academics. In addition, the Guidance Counselor provides counseling services as well as the Adjustment Counselors assigned by the Department for Special Needs. Individual and group counseling is also incorporated into our program. Students attend classes in the mainstream when appropriate or in the classes allocated to the SPED staff within the program. Students earn the same graduation requirements as any other High School students. The ALP program is an effective intervention that offers the least restrictive setting for those students that require more intensified support within the confines of a large school setting. LANGUAGE-BASED LD PROGRAM This program offers a small group of LD students a chance to take contained classes or appropriate mainstream classes throughout Medford High School. The program offers students a safe, supportive classroom environment, along with LD instruction by its full time Special Needs teacher. VOCATIONAL SCHOOL LANGUAGE BASED CLASSROOM This class was created in order to address the needs of students identified as learning disabled in the area of expressive or receptive language. At the same time these students had expressed an interest in attending the Vocational School to experience the Grade 9 exploratory program of studies. The students attend a selfcontained classroom for their major academics and related Vocational topics and travel into various shops in order to experience the Vocational exploration part of the Grade 9 program. Grades 10 through 12 can also be coordinated through this classroom. RESOURCE CLASSES SPED-certified teachers teach specific subjects to those students whom need a more restrictive environment and more individualized instruction. Classes are offered in Mathematics, Social Studies, Science and Language Arts. Reading is taught by our reading specialists and addresses both reading mechanics and comprehension issues.

CAREER AND TECHNICAL OFFERINGS The City of Medford through its School Committee has offered vocational education, now referred to as Career and Technical Education, to its young people since 1930. Throughout this time many changes in program offerings have been made and all programs have been enhanced to meet the expectations of industry in the 21st century. The current Career and Technical offerings are provided to our students because of the high employment levels that are prevalent in the greater Medford and Metro North Region. The program offerings outlined on the following pages are presented in a user-friendly format. We hope they provide you with a better understanding of our curriculum majors. If you have any questions please consult with your guidance counselor or the Medford Vocational Technical High School Guidance Department. “Arrive with a Dream…Leave with a Career”

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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Automotive Collision Repair & Refinishing
The Automotive Collision Repair course is a three-year program that conforms to the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) standards using I-Car curriculum. Adherence to the NATEF curriculum and standards exposes and trains students in the trade through a series of tasks and competencies in the areas of: Painting & Refinishing using current technology and waterborne paints, Non-Structural Analysis & Damage Repair, Plastics & Adhesives, Structural Analysis & Damage Repair, and Mechanical & Electrical Components. In addition, students learn to use the Audatex Estimating Systems. This system is “state of the art” and complies with NATEF standards. Students enrolled in the program are involved in every aspect of a working business. Students interact directly with customers; write estimates, schedule jobs, order parts and complete repairs. The program is self-paced. The program is recognized by the I-Car Training Alliance The Automotive Collision Repair program is Chapter 74 approved and is taught by ASE Certified and NATEF approved instructors. Upon graduation, students are employed as entry-level technicians, automotive refinishers, assistant managers, detailers, glass installers, automotive appraisers, frame technicians, restyling technicians and sales people in the automotive body supply industry.

Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Automotive Collision Repair Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: Universal Technical Institute WyoTech

Companies or employers where Medford Automotive Collision Repair Program graduates are working: Bonnell Ford Whites Auto Body Grava Chrysler Plymouth Citi Auto Body Charles Street Auto Body Mirak Chevrolet Kwik Auto Body Supplies Today’s Auto Body Hogan & Van Joe Champia Auto Body IRA Motors Pasqualli Auto Body A & M Auto Body Sentry Lincoln-Mercury Safety Insurance Colonial Nissan Arlington Auto Body Boyles Body Works Hanson & Tilton

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS PPG Refinish Certification, 3M Certification, Fusor Plastic Repair Certification, ASE Certification, and one year experience towards the Massachusetts Auto Damage Appraiser’s License, S/P2 Pollution and Safety Certificate, Audatex Computer Estimating Certificate, PPG On-Line Certification, OSHA 10 Hour General Safety Card
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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Automotive Technology

The Automotive Technology course is a three-year program that conforms to the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) standards. Adherence to the NATEF curriculum and standards exposes and trains students in the trade through a series of tasks and competencies in the areas of: Brakes, Electrical/Electronic systems, Engine Performance, Suspension and Steering, Heating and Air Conditioning and additional areas. The program provides the participants with a classroom segment and hands-on work. Students work daily on customer vehicles that have been scheduled for repairs. Students interact directly with customers; write service orders, schedule jobs, order parts and complete repairs. The program is self-paced. The Automotive Technology program is a Chapter 74 approved program taught by ASE Certified and NATEF approved instructors. Upon graduation, students are employed as entry-level technicians, mechanics, brake specialists, electronic technicians, as assistant service managers and as sales people in the automotive parts supply business.

Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Automotive Technology Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: Universal Technical Institute New England Institute of Technology

Companies or employers where Medford Automotive Technology Program graduates are working: Ritchie’s Service Grava Chrysler Plymouth MINI of Peabody Sentry Lincoln Mercury Olson Cadillac Honda of Boston Volsar Automotive

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS ASE Certification, Ford Auto Skills Troubleshooting contest, VICA OSHA 10 Hour General Safety Card

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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Carpentry

Students in the Carpentry program receive instruction in both millwork and house building. Students are taught design, layout, and dimensioning of projects. The students work with a variety of building and finishing materials, and become familiar with modern methods and styles of commercial and residential construction. Students employ the use of a variety of hand and power tools throughout their training. Extended activities range from shed construction to house remodeling techniques, remodeling and construction within the school and off-campus. An integral component of the finish carpentry curriculum involves the Cabinetmaking instructors guiding the students in the craft of furniture making, cabinets, and various small projects from solid lumber, plywood and high-pressure laminates. The competency-based curriculum and hands on approach provides students knowledge to compete in this field. The Carpentry program is a Chapter 74 approved program. Upon graduation, students are employable in the following areas: house siding, framing carpenters, apprentice carpenter, lumber and house salespeople, mill worker, house carpenter, carpenter’s helper, finish carpenter, cabinet making, remodeling, rafter and stair layout as well as self-employment.

Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Carpentry Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: New England Institute of Technology Boston Carpenters Apprenticeship & Training Fund Eastern Massachusetts Carpenters Apprenticeship & Training Committee 

Companies or employers where Medford Carpentry Program graduates are working:

Mystic Builders Mass Cabinets B & D Builders Mitchell Construction Sully & Perk

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS Power Activated Tool License, Construction Supervisor License, Home Improvement Contractor License, CertainTeed Roofing Certificate OSHA 10 hour Construction Safety and General Safety Cards

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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Construction Craft Laborers
The construction industry is one of the most diverse and rewarding industries in the world. From a singlefamily home to a railway tunnel under the English Channel, the potential for personal and financial growth is only limited by your willingness to work and learn. A career in construction can provide a standard of living for you and your family, as well as a sense of pride and accomplishment in the projects you help to build. It is beyond the scope of this document to list all of the major types of construction. They have been identified and grouped into the following three categories: Building – construction and reconstruction on residential and commercial buildings. Heavy/highway, and utilities – construction and reconstruction on the following: Major and minor highways Subdivisions Bridges, dams, tunnels, and airfields Underground utilities (telephone and electric) Piping systems (petroleum, water, sewer, natural gas, and collection systems) Environmental – activities associated with the following: Asbestos abatement Decontamination and demolition of nuclear facilities Hazard waste removal Leads abatement Permit-required confined spaces. Construction remains a major growth industry in North America and a source of jobs for new entrants into the work force. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts construction jobs will increase from 7 million to 7.8 million in the years 2008 - 2018. Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Construction Craft Laborers Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: Wentworth Institute New England Laborers Training Academy Bunker Hill Community College Bristol Community College New England Institute of Technology
University of Mass. Amherst, or Lowell

Companies or employers where Medford Construction Craft Laborers Program graduates are working: Barletta Construction Bond Brothers Construction Aggregate Concrete Lee Kennedy Construction
The MBTA

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS Scaffold Builder – User, OSHA 10 Hour General Safety Card, OSHA – 30 hour Construction Outreach, American Welding Society – Vertical Fill-it, American Welding Society – Horizontal Fill-it, American Welding Society – Overhead Fill-it, American Crane Institute Hoisting & Rigging Cert., Microbial Remediation, DOT – Flagging, Masonry Cont. Assoc. of America, Forklift Trainer Cert. Marr Elevator Work Platform Cert.
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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Cosmetology
Although commonly referred to as a hairdresser, a Cosmetologist actually provides a variety of beauty services, which are related to the care of hair, scalp, the skin and nails. Course work includes shampooing, haircutting, hairstyling, permanent waving, color analysis, facials, skin care pedicures, waxing and manicures. All cosmetology students receive the 1,000 hours of instruction required to qualify for the State of Massachusetts licensing examination and employment as a cosmetologist. Personal hygiene, grooming, bacteriology and sanitation practices as well as good human relations are stressed. Anatomy and physiology play an important part in the course. The students are prepared to provide services such as manicure, facials, pedicure, shampoo, scalp and hair treatments, blow styling, hair styling (roller set, pin curl, finger wave) Computerized hairstyling selections, permanent waving, hair coloring, chemical relaxing, massage, facials, waxing, makeup and color analysis. They are also prepared in computerized salon management. The Cosmetology program is a Chapter 74 approved program.
Upon graduation, job opportunities include: hairstylist, manicurist, aesthetician, wig maker, platform artist, shop manager or owner, beauty school owner, demonstrator, beauty supply owner and distributor, desairologist, hair colorist, manufacturer’s representative, research-testing of products, beauty editor, trichologist, hair color and skin and scalp specialist school instructor.

Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Cosmetology Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: Dermal Institute of Technology Elizabeth Grady – Aesthetics
Catherine Hynes - Aesthetics

Companies or employers where Medford Cosmetology Program graduates are working:

Bella Capelli Central Style Dellaria Salon Fabiano Ltd. Salon Hair Cuttery Hair’s Karen  

Leon & Company Nicholas Call Salon & Spa Park West Supercuts Shear Madness Tradewinds Beauty Salon
Vincenzo’s Hair Design

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS Mass. Board of Registration of Cosmetology OSHA 10 Hour General Safety Card

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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Culinary Arts

Culinary Arts students learn the principles and techniques of food preparation, handling, food service and restaurant management. The study of nutrition, sanitary codes, and inventory control are included in the competency-based curriculum. Café Electra, a student-operated public restaurant, provides the students with the opportunity to gain firsthand experience in the areas of safety, food handling, food preparation, institutional cooking, short order cooking, computer skills, and customer service. In addition, culinary arts skills are reinforced through related studies in the classroom. The Culinary Arts program is a Chapter 74 approved program. Upon graduation, job opportunities include: line cook, prep cook, short cook, chef, butcher, baker, host/hostess, pastry chef, caterer, dining room manager, and restaurant manager. Prospective places of employment include: airlines, bakeries, hospitals, hotels, schools and colleges, food store chains, restaurants, hotels, health care facilities, national chains and resorts.

Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Culinary Arts Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: Bunker Hill Community College

Companies or employers where Medford Culinary Arts Program graduates are working:

99 Restaurants Lawrence Memorial Hospital Winchester Hospital Tufts University Pastalenas Restaurant Pizzeria Regina of Medford Harvard Dining Services Tremonte Restaurante Riverside Wraps & Grille

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS ServSafe Certification, Pro-Start Certification and Bar-Code Certification, OSHA 10 Hour General Safety Card

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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Early Childhood Education and Teaching
Students enrolled in the Early Childhood program participate in the “Make Way for Kids” preschool and other day care programs. The children serviced are 2.9 months to 5 years of age. Through hands on experience in the preschool, students learn, develop and perform the skills as an assistance teacher under the guidance of the teacher. Students have the opportunity to create and implement age-appropriate, theme-based curriculum to the children. All students rotate through the age levels in order to experience a variety of ages and stages as well as different teaching styles. The competency-based curriculum includes Child Growth and Development studies and practical experiences Working with Young Children. Upon graduation the students will receive a personal certificate of proficiency with documentation of child contact hours. The certificate can be used to apply for a preschool teaching certificate from the Early Education and Care (EEC). This application is the responsibility of the student and is not guaranteed. A graduate from the program may obtain an entry-level position in a childcare center, a nanny position or a preschool teacher in an Early Childhood program approved by the Early Education and Care office of Massachusetts. Other venues are home daycare provider, school-age care provider, kindergarten aide, day camp counselor or continue to a post-secondary education Early Childhood Education is a Chapter 74 approved program.

Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Early Childhood Education Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: Bunker Hill Community College Roxbury Community College

Companies or employers where Medford Early Childhood Education Program graduates are working: Kinder Care Government Center Day Care Knowledge Beginnings Kid’s Corner Creative Corner Graceworks – After school care Play Academy

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS EEC Teaching Certificate – Preschool (May qualify for Infant-Toddlers also) OSHA 10 Hour General Safety Card

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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Electrical
Through a competency-based curriculum the Electrical program prepares students with the basic skills needed for an advanced-level position in the electrical field. The students gain a thorough knowledge of materials, terminology, and safety skills that are necessary in becoming a licensed electrician, a licensed systems technician, or a telecommunications technician. In addition, students will be introduced to alternative energy sources such as solar power in our new solar power demonstration area. Students will become proficient in a variety of electrical projects in compliance with the National Electric Code, Massachusetts Electrical Code, and NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) Safety Code, and all other codes relegated to the electrical industry. The related classroom curriculum stresses mathematics, science and blueprint reading related to the electrical field. Emphasis is placed on the mastery of fundamentals, concepts and principles as well as the ability to solve practical problems. The Electrical course is a Chapter 74 approved program. Upon graduation students will receive a high school diploma and a vocational certificate. In addition, he or she may be awarded up to 2080 working hours and 225 classroom hours to apply towards the requirements of the State of Massachusetts Electrical Board for the Electrical License Examination. Graduation provides the following career opportunities: electrical apprentice, journeyman electrician, residential electrician, commercial electrician, industrial electrician, Master electrician, electrical contractor, telecommunications technician, systems technician (burglar and fire) or electrical material sales. Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Electrical Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: New England Institute of Technology Gould Construction Institute Companies or employers where Medford Electrical Program graduates are working:

Facilco IBEW Local 103 Interstate Electric Company Nardone Electric All State Electric Company American Alarm Assured Fire Alarm Company Reliance Electric All-Tech Electric Jupiter Electric

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS State of Massachusetts Electrical License OSHA 10 Hour Construction Safety and General Safety Cards
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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Graphic Communications
Graphic Communications prepares students for careers working in digital technology, printing, publishing and social media. Classroom experiences and laboratory time provide students with the knowledge and experience to gain an entry-level position working on the technical side of a printing press or media development center. Digital design and production involves Adobe Creative Suite and video editing applications. Classes are focused on using the software to design graphics layouts, create graphics and images, and manipulate and enhance images. Projects are prepared from concept to production. Students take prepress and production coursework, in which they learn to prepare projects for an offset printing using digital prepress techniques, develop Internet sites, devise electronic page layout and work with digital media sources. Basic business management and entrepreneurial skills for the graphic industry are also taught. Digital Publishing Solution – As part of the Graphic Communications Technology course, students will learn how to produce television programs for television and the web as part of the curriculum called the Digital Video Unit. This is a project-based activity in which students create video media projects using Macintosh computers and digital editing software. Students will design and produce video projects including instructional videos for students in various career-tech programs, public service announcements for vocational school programs, and videotaping/production for events for MHS-TV Channel 15. Graphic Communications is a Chapter 74 approved program. Graduates learn the technical skills behind publishing newspapers, magazines, newsletters and other forms of mass graphic communications. Though job skills and responsibilities will depend on the place of employment, graduates of this graphic communications program may find a job as a: digital prepress operator, digital media developer, press operator, finisher, page layout technician, output technician, typesetter, proofreader, copy center technician, and a print/media salesperson. Graduates work in advertising agencies, newspapers, magazines, printing companies, in-house corporations, the music industry and multimedia production.

Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Graphic Communications Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: Bunker Hill Community College Boston University Center for Digital Imaging Arts

Companies or employers where Medford Graphic Communications Program graduates are working: Universal Wilde Piro Printing Company Sir Speedy Charles River Publishing Digital Publishing Solution Staples Print Centers

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS Printing Industries of America, National Association of Photoshop Professionals, Printing Industries of New England, Ad Club of Boston, OSHA 10 Hour General Safety Card
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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Health Assisting
Combining medical technology and the human touch, the healthcare industry diagnoses, treats and administers care around the clock, responding to the needs of millions of people – from newborns to the elderly. Medford Vocational Technical High School students receive training and learn essential skills for a variety of health related occupations. Students learn about infection control, nutrition, anatomy and physiology. There is also a strong emphasis on communications skills. To further their education and learning experiences, students go on field trips to the Public Health Museum in Tewksbury, the Museum of Science, and Boston Children’s Hospital. Healthcare will generate 3.2 million new wage and salary jobs between 2008 and 2018 as estimated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is more than any other industry. Students considering careers in healthcare should have a strong desire to help others and a strong work ethic. Many healthcare jobs are regulated by state licensure and require higher post-secondary educational programs. Upon graduation, students are prepared for employment as certified nursing assistants in acute and long term care facilities, as well as home care agencies. Students may decide to continue their education in the field of nursing, radiology, respiratory therapy, physical therapy, or other allied health fields.

Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Health Assisting Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: Bunker Hill Community College

Companies or employers where Medford Health Assisting Program graduates are working:

Lawrence Memorial Hospital Courtyard Nursing Care Center Brighton at Medford Greater Medford VNA ABC Home Care Agency Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary Bear Hill Nursing Facility

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS Students become eligible to sit for their Commonwealth of Massachusetts Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Licensure at the end of the junior year. Other certifications earned include: First Aid Certification, Blood Borne Pathogens Certification, CPR – Healthcare Provider C - through the American Heart Association, and OSHA 10 Hour General Safety Card. Students also have the option of studying towards their introductory certificates in Phlebotomy, EKG, Basic Alzheimer’s Care and Basic EMT Training. Students belong to and participate in the Health Occupations Students of America Organization, sponsored by the University of Massachusetts Medical School.
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Medford Vocational Technical High School
Metal Fabrication and Heating Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration
The metal fabricator makes parts from a variety of metals making use of the exacting specifications of blueprints. The sheet metal worker must be a highly skilled technician in order to meet the demands of modern construction. Using computers and a variety of power and hand tools, students learn the skills needed to fabricate and install the latest air handling equipment installed in today’s construction. Students learn the latest TIG, MIG, Flux-Core, Oxy-Acetylene, and Arc welding methods. Also, shearing, fabricating and installing skills needed in residential and commercial building projects are stressed. The Heating Ventilating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration program is incorporated with Metal Fabrication. Beginning with an introduction to basic safety, students study basic refrigeration, the laws of thermodynamics, Manual – J calculations, and soft and silver soldering techniques. The competencybased curriculum allows the students to learn about compressor installation, and repair, evaporator identification and installation, condenser operation and design, and metering device applications. Forced warm air heating and hydronic heating by both gas and oil are included. Sheet Metal is now a licensed trade in Massachusetts. It is a professional license that requires 750 classroom hours to attain a journey man’s license. Medford Voc Tech is one of the only schools in Massachusetts currently authorized to offer students classroom hours that will count towards their license while they are in school. The Metal Fabrication and Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration program is Chapter 74 approved.
As students refine their skills and upon graduation, they may explore opportunities in the following areas: service technician, installation, technician, maintenance technician, HVAC apprentice, 5 year Journeyman, Master HVAC technician, HVAC salesperson, and HVAC engineer, oil burner technician, licensed gas fitter and licensed sheet metal worker.

Medford Vocational Technical High School’s Metal Fabrication and HVAC-R Program includes Articulation Agreements with the following colleges and institutions: Massasoit Community College

Companies or employers where Medford Metal Fabrication and HVAC-R Program graduates are working: Lake Industries Santini Brothers Iron Works Hanlon Sheet Metal and Ventilation Breen & Sullivan Mechanical
Water Air Corporation

LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND AFFILIATIONS C.F.C. certification is offered to senior students OSHA 10 Hour Construction Safety and General Safety Cards

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Medford Vocational Technical High School 489 Winthrop Street, Medford, MA 02155 781.393.2207 www.medfordpublicschools.org/schools/medford-vocational-technical-high-school/

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