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Antea Worldwide Palliative Care Conference

Rome, 12-14 November 2008

ABSTRACT FORM

Presenting author DEVELOPMENT OF A CORE CURRICULUM FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS IN PALLIATIVE
CARE – KEY ASPECTS AND PREREQUISITES
Junger Saskia
Email:
Authors (max 6, presenting author included): Junger Saskia
sjuenger@ukaachen.de
Phone
Approved international definitions of palliative care unequivocally postulate psychological
support as essential component. However, it is hardly substantiated what “psychological support”
Mobile phone concretely implies, especially in differentiation to psychosocial support or spiritual support.
Likewise, the role and the tasks of a psychologist in the field of palliative care are not clearly
specified. By now, little has been published which might give orientation on this issue. Only few
palliative care associations give explicit information on the role of psychologists in palliative
Please underline the most care. Psychological associations generally do not deal with this issue, either – if at all, they only
appropriate category for your refer to the topic in the context of “aged care”, “grief”, or “end-of-life care”. In reaction to this,
abstract psychologists in some national palliative care associations have started initiatives to develop an
occupational image, a job description, and outline the basic concerns of their profession in the
• Pain and other symptoms
field of palliative care. Consistently, the following tasks and roles are delineated: (1) clinical
• Palliative care for cancer patients tasks, (2) consultancy, and (3) research.
• Palliative care for non cancer When developing an education programme for psychologists in palliative care, several questions
patients have to be considered: (1) the expectations towards psychologists on the part of the patient, (2) an
• Paediatric palliative care elaborate compendium of psychological concepts and psychotherapeutic methods suitable for
• Palliative care for the elderly
palliative care, (3) the tasks of psychologists in a palliative care team, and (4) the compatibility of
psychologists’ professional socialisation during their basic education with the exigencies of
• The actors of palliative care
palliative care.
• Latest on drugs The following methods are suggested for the preparation of a core curriculum: a needs assessment
• Pain among psychologists regarding the perceived requirements for working in palliative care, a needs
assessment among patients, relatives, and staff regarding the desired support by a psychologist,
• Illness and suffering through and a consensus process on the development of therapeutic concepts and interventions.
media
• Marginalisation and social stigma
at the end of life
• Palliative care advocacy projects

• Prognosis and diagnosis
communication in
different cultures
• Communication between doctor-
patient and patient-
equipe
• Religions and cultures versus
suffering, death and
bereavement
• Public institution in the world:
palliative care policies
and law
• Palliative care: from villages to metropolies

• Space, light and gardens for the terminally ill patient
• End-of-life ethics
• Complementary therapies Session: Workshop on Core curricula
• Education, training and research
• Fund-raising and no-profit Chair of the session: Junger Saskia
• Bereavement support
• Volunteering in palliative care
• Rehabilitation in palliative care
• Core curricula