chora may be posed.

Possibly, the central complex of the fortress was used as a barracks for the small contingent of troops Controlling nearby roads and territory during the Mithridatic period.

Larisa Vodolazhskaya (Archeological Museum - 'Tanais' Reserve, Rostov-on-Don)
larisavodol@yahoo.com

ANALYSING THE MEASUREMENTS OF ROMAN NARROW-NECKED LIGHT-CLAY D-TYPE AMPHORAE OF THE 3 CENTURY AD FROM TANAIS
RD

Statistical analysis of Volumetrie and linear parameters and geometric modelling were applied to narrow-necked light-clay D-type amphorae of the 3 Century AD from Tanais.
r

The volumes of 362 well-preserved amphorae within the ränge of 2.3-5.5 litres have been analysed in search of a Standard volume. Most numerous are those falling into the intervals of 3.1-3.3 litres and 3.4-3.6 litres. Linear parameters were investigated by taking a random sample of 59 amphorae with volume of 2.6-3.9 litres. Two Standards have been revealed as a result of research - 'Greek' and 'Roman'. The volume of 3.2 litres (an interval of 3.1-3.3) corresponds to the Roman and 3.6 litres (an interval 3.5-3.7) to the Greek. The maximum diameter of the Roman Standard body is equal to 10 Roman inches or 2.5 Roman palms (= 18.5cm), and the average depth to 5 Roman palms plus half A Roman inch (nimbus thickness). The Greek Standard body equals 10 Greek inches or 2.5 Greek palms (=19.3 cm), and the average depth 5 Greek palms plus half a Greek inch (a nimbus thickness). The diameter of the throat is equal to 2 big Greek inches - 2 spans (5.12 cm) - and double that at the base of the throat; and the throat height is also equal to 4 big Greek inches (10.26 cm). However, the throat and Shoulders (height) of the Roman Standard were designed like the Greek. It means that the Roman Standard amphora is a hybrid. Most likely, this is connected with the earlier origin of the Greek Standard and its influence on the Roman.

Mikhail F. Vysokii (Institute of General History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow)
vysoki@mail.ru

THE ARGONAUTICA OF APOLLONIUS RHODIUS AND MAGNA GRAECIA
The füllest version of the Argonaut myth is that given by Apollonius Rhodius, who, as one of the heads of the library at Alexandria had access to many works on mythological history from different parts of the world including the Greek West. The central point of the voyage of the Argonauts was their passage through the Straits of Messina, and Apollonius gives us a mythological map of Sicily and southem Italy. The images of Scylla, Charybdis and the Planctai, reflect real geographical objects: the rock on which Scylla lived is a strategically important small peninsula Skyllaion (modern Scilla), Controlling the entrance to the straits; it is possible to see Charybdis today at Capo del Faro (ancient Pelorus), where, in the narrows, the waters of the Tyrrhenian and the Ionian seas meet, alternately ebbs and flow, and form strong currents and whirlpools. The Planctai are to be identified with Capo Kainys (southem Italy) and Capo Peloro (Sicily), forming an entry to the straits that corresponds to geographical description given by Apollonius.

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