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Chapter 1

Test A
Date ___________________

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1. Refer to Display 1.4 (Round 1Round 5), reproduced here. The open circles represent salaried workers who were laid off in that round, while the solid dots represent salaried workers who were retained. Which two rounds show the strongest evidence of possible age discrimination against older workers? Explain.

2. Suppose a company lays off workers aged 35, 60, 61, 62, and 65 and retains workers aged 22, 40, 41, 41, and 43. a. Make a dot plot that displays this situation. b. Suppose you use only the information about whether a person is in the protected class (age 40 or older), rather than the exact age. Do you then have evidence for possible age discrimination? Explain. c. Do you have evidence for possible age discrimination if you use actual ages? Explain.

Statistics in Action Instructors Resource Book 2008 Key Curriculum Press

Chapter 1 Test A

Chapter 1

Test A (continued)

3. This table shows the ages and lay off status of 75 workers at a manufacturing plant. Choose the statement that best expresses the conclusion that should be drawn from these data.
Number of Younger Workers Laid Off Retained Total 13 5 18 Number of Older Workers Total 33 24 57 46 29 75

A. There might be discrimination against older workers because more older workers were laid off. B. There might be discrimination against older workers because a larger proportion of older workers was laid off. C. There might be discrimination against younger workers because more younger workers were laid off. D. There might be discrimination against younger workers because a larger proportion of younger workers was laid off. E. There is no evidence of discrimination because both older and younger workers were just as likely to be laid off. 4. In her promotional practices, a queen ant has been accused of discriminating against ants with short antennae. During the preceding year, six workers were up for promotion. Four of them, with antenna lengths (in mm) of 65, 71, 72, and 73, were promoted. Two workers, with antenna lengths of 63 and 68, were bypassed for promotion. a. What is the average antenna length of the workers bypassed for promotion? b. Describe a simulation for finding the distribution of the average antenna length of two workers bypassed for promotion at random. c. Repeat your simulation five times. Display your results in a dot plot. d. This dot plot shows the distribution of average antenna length of the two bypassed workers, for 1050 repetitions. Each dot represents 10 points. Use the dot plot to estimate the probability of getting an average antenna length as small as or smaller than that in part a if workers are selected at random for promotion.

Chapter 1 Test A

Statistics in Action Instructors Resource Book 2008 Key Curriculum Press

Chapter 1

Test A (continued)

e. Is the evidence of antenna length discrimination relatively strong or relatively weak? Justify your conclusion. 5. Dog Day Obedience School has been accused of rejecting dogs with long tails. The most recent data show that out of nine dogs considered for the school, two dogs were rejected. This dot plot shows the distribution of average tail length of rejected dogs for a simulation of 52 runs that modeled a situation in which two of the nine dogs were randomly selected. The average tail length of the two dogs actually rejected was 45 cm. Does this dot plot show strong evidence that Dog Day Obedience School should be asked to explain why it rejected dogs with long tails? Choose the best conclusion.

A. Yes, it is unlikely to get an average tail length this long or longer by chance alone. B. Yes, they must have discriminated because 45 cm is longer than the average tail length. C. No, it is easy to get an average tail length this long or longer by chance alone. D. No, 45 cm isnt that much longer than the average tail length. E. Statistics cant be used to answer this question. 6. Refer to the situation described in Question 4: In the preceding year, six workers were up for promotion. Four of them, with antenna lengths (in mm) of 65, 71, 72, and 73, were promoted. Two workers, with antenna lengths of 63 and 68, were bypassed for promotion. a. List all possible pairs of antenna lengths for workers who might have been bypassed for promotion. b. How many pairs give an average antenna length the same as or less than that of the two workers actually bypassed for promotion? c. If a pair of workers is chosen completely at random, what is the probability of getting an average antenna length as small as or smaller than that in part a if workers are selected at random for promotion? d. Is the evidence of antenna length discrimination relatively strong or relatively weak? Justify your conclusion.

Statistics in Action Instructors Resource Book 2008 Key Curriculum Press

Chapter 1 Test A