Market Report & Forecast

Colliers International
San Jose/Silicon Valley
2012-2013
TABLE OF CONTENTS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
TRUST HONESTY INTEGRITY RESPECT FAMILY GENEROSITY PROFESSIONALISM
Colliers International - Introduction 1
The Year in Review 2
Observations & Forecasts 4
Silicon Valley Office 8
Silicon Valley Research & Development 12
Silicon Valley Industrial 16
Silicon Valley Warehouse 20
Silicon Valley Retail 24
Silicon Valley Investment 26
Silicon Valley Market Statistics 28
Brokerage Profiles 36
Contri butors
Editor and Chief Contributor:
Jeff Fredericks, SIOR
Managing Partner
Contributing Writers:
Andy Zighelboim & Nate Jones - Investment Services
David Buchholz - Retail Services



Research:
Colliers Research Services Group
Design and Production:
Colliers Graphic Services Group
About the
Newsl et ter
This newsletter represents the ninety-sixth in
a series published by Colliers International.
The information basis for this newsletter
is the Parrish Absorption Tracking System
(PATS) from which the absorption-related
statistics are developed and derived. PATS
maintains monthly statistics within Silicon
Valley for 14 cities, 31 geographical areas
and 4 commercial/industrial building types.
If you desire more data in order to
analyze sub-markets not specified in this
newsletter; please submit your request
through your Colliers International sales
representative at 408 282 3800 or write to
Colliers International at 450 West Santa
Clara Street, San Jose, California 95113.
In addition you may send your e-mail
inquiry to terry.wang@colliers.com. We look
forward to supporting your specific needs.
Initially, the introduction of this year’s Market Report
was going to be about digging under the hood of Silicon
Valley’s commercial real estate market–something we’re
pretty good at here at Colliers. Then, the San Francisco
49ers rallied from an unprecedented seventeen points
down to defeat the top-seeded Atlanta Falcons, earning
a spot in Super Bowl XLVII. Instead of throwing in the
towel, the 49ers dug deep under their own hood into
their individual and collective character and found a
way to win.
It has been quite a start to the new year for
sports-related character studies–the good, the bad,
and the ugly. First, Manti Te’o and the bad choices he
made leading up to the revelation that his deceased
girlfriend was an internet hoax. Next, Lance Armstrong
revealed the depths of his ugly lies, betrayal and
arrogance to millions of people who had looked up
to him as their hero and the best cyclist in the world.
These are people who we thought had character to
match their press clippings.
Such extreme examples provide excellent opportunity
for introspection. How do we measure a good broker
or the character of a good broker? It’s certainly more
than a solid résumé, a killer presentation or even
how many CoStar Power Broker awards are lined-up
on the shelf. Yet, customers make decisions based
on those things every day. Does that knockout pitch
from a self-proclaimed superstar really tell you that
you are hiring the right person for the job, or do you
dig deeper?
In the post-game, 49er interviews, player after player
spoke with conviction about accountability, sacrifice,
hard work, dedication, and team. Success was
achieved by sacrificing personal gain for the sake of
a greater goal. Résumés were irrelevant and talk was
cheap. It’s wasn’t about the me; it was all about the we.
Colliers brokers are the best in the business at
understanding what’s under the hood of our Silicon
Valley commercial real estate market; we have the
résumés. So, when you look to team up with a Colliers
broker, I hope you will dig deep under our hoods at
the selfless culture that really sets our people apart.
That’s where you will not only find the right broker, but
the right teammate. Best wishes for continued success
in 2013!
SILICON VALLEY
FOURTEENTH ANNUAL
COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
TRENDS2013 CONFERENCE
MAJOR SPONSOR
OTHER SPONSORS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
Environmental & Engineering Services
Dig Deep
Jeff Fredericks, SIOR
Managing Partner
1 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
2 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
THE 2012 YEAR IN REVIEW
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
· |ore |||ones ure so|d |n ¦|e quur¦er ¦|un bub|es born |n ¦|e wor|d.
· ln u ¦umu|¦uous yeur, Jerry Yung res|gns ¦rom Yu|oo!'s bourd, ¦|e compuny numes Sco¦¦ ¯|ompson
of PayPal, CEO in January before finally selecting Marissa Meyer from Google in July.
· S&| downgrudes |runce, l¦u|y und Spu|n's cred|¦ ru¦|ngs due ¦o ¦|e econom|c s¦resses we|g||ng down
the Eurozone.
· |odu| ¦u|¦ers |n ¦|e ¦uce o¦ udvunc|ng ¦ec|no|ogy und ¦|e compuny ¦||es ¦or bun|rup¦cy.
· |S Bus|ness |ur|s purc|uses ||||| Amer|cu ||C's 5.33-m||||on-squure-¦oo¦ |or¦|ern Cu||¦orn|u
por¦¦o||o mude up o¦ ¹8 bus|ness pur|s, ¦or 1520 m||||on.
· |uceboo| ¦||es w|u¦ |s expec¦ed ¦o be ¦|e |urges¦ |n|¦|u| pub||c o¦¦er|ng ever ¦o come ou¦ o¦ S|||con
Valley and one of the largest in the nation’s history.
· |rov|ew, u C||nese ¦ec|no|ogy ¦|rm, see|s ¦o |u|¦ ¦|e su|e o¦ App|e's ||uds |n S|ung|u|, c|u|m|ng |¦
owns the iPad trademark in China.
· 0ruc|e buys c|oud so¦¦wure compuny ¯u|eo ¦or 1¹.º b||||on.
· Sun Jose C|¦y Counc|| unun|mous|y upproves meusures ¦o s|us| deve|opmen¦ ¦ees und euse ru|es
in hopes to lure companies and development to the city.
· 0rubb & ||||s ¦||es ¦or bun|rup¦cy und se||s |¦s usse¦s ¦o B0C |ur¦ners lnc.
· ¯|e 0ow c|oses ubove ¦|e ¹3,000 |eve| ¦or ¦|e ¦|rs¦ ¦|me s|nce |uy 2008, |usduq br|e¦|y ||¦s 3,000
for the first time since December 2000.
· C|sco Sys¦ems unnounces ¦|e ucqu|s|¦|on o¦ v|deo so¦¦wure compuny |0S 0roup ¦or
upprox|mu¦e|y 15 b||||on |n |opes ¦o ucce|eru¦e ¦|e de||very o¦ ¦|e compuny's upcom|ng
Videoscape.
· Amuzon.com ugrees ¦o buy ||vu Sys¦ems ¦or 1775 m||||on cus| |n u deu| ¦|u¦ w||| br|ng robo¦|c
technology to help with order fulfillment.
· App|e unnounces |¦ w||| s¦ur¦ puy|ng u d|v|dend ¦o |¦s s¦oc||o|ders. ¯|e quur¦er|y puymen¦ o¦ ubou¦
12.65 u s|ure und wou|d ¦o¦u| more ¦|un 1¹0 b||||on u yeur.
· ¯|e Commerce 0epur¦men¦ pu¦s ¦ur|¦¦s on C||nese-mude so|ur ce||s und pune|s u¦¦er dec|ur|ng
such companies guilty of illegal dumping practices.
· Buy Areu ¦runspor¦u¦|on |euders upprove u deu| w|¦| ¦|e s¦u¦e ¦o sp||¦ ¦|e 1¹.5 b||||on cos¦ ¦o
electrify the Caltrain line that would also serve the statewide bullet trains.
· ¯|e Sun |runc|sco 4ºers breu| ground |n Sun¦u C|uru on ¦|e|r ¹.85-m||||on-squure-¦oo¦ pro¦ess|onu|
football stadium.
· Yu|oo! p|uns ¦o cu¦ 2,000 jobs or ¹4% o¦ |¦s g|obu| wor|¦orce w|||e Sony unnounces u 6% g|obu|
workforce reduction totaling 10,000 jobs.
· Cons¦ruc¦|on on ¦|e S|||con vu||ey BA|¯ ¦o Sun Jose ex¦ens|on beg|ns.
· |uceboo| buys p|o¦o-s|ur|ng upp mu|er lns¦ugrum ¦or 1¹ b||||on |n cus| und s¦oc|.
· 360 |es|dences, u |uxury upur¦men¦ ¦ower |n down¦own Sun Jose, |s so|d ¦or 1¹¹8 m||||on.
Originally developed as for-sale condos, the residences were converted to apartments during the
downturn in the housing market.
· |uceboo| becomes ¦|e second-|urges¦ domes¦|c l|0 w|¦| u 1¹04 b||||on mur|e¦ cup und ¦|e |en|o |ur|
Planning commission approves the social media giant’s proposed expansion.
· 0oog|e-0ruc|e ¦r|u| over ¦|e Andro|d operu¦|ng sys¦em conc|udes w|¦| ¦|e jury ru||ng |n ¦uvor o¦ 0oog|e.
· 0ewey & |eBoeu¦ ||| ¦||es ¦or C|up¦er ¹¹ bun|rup¦cy |n ¦|e b|gges¦ co||upse o¦ u |uw ¦|rm |n U.S.
history amid concerns regarding compensation and the firm’s heavy debt load.
· SA| moves ¦o ¦|e c|oud |n u 14.3-b||||on deu| ¦o buy Ar|bu.
· || unnounces ¦|u¦ 27,000 |uyo¦¦s w||| occur by 20¹4.
· S¦urbuc|s purc|uses Buy Areu ur¦|sun pus¦|er |u Bou|unge ¦or un es¦|mu¦ed 1¹00 m||||on, |n e¦¦or¦s
to expand the coffee giant’s food offerings.
· ¯ub|e¦ wurs |eu¦ up us 0oog|e unve||s |exus 7 on ¦|e |ee|s o¦ ¦|e ||croso¦¦ Sur¦uce debu¦.
· C||nu cu¦s one-yeur |end|ng ru¦e ¦or ¦|e ¦|rs¦ ¦|me s|nce 2008, ¦o s||e|d |¦se|¦ ¦rom ¦|e |uropeun
deb¦ cr|s|s und |¦s own s|ow|ng grow¦|. |eunw|||e, ¦|e U.S. 30-yeur mor¦guge drops ¦o 3.67%.
· ¯|e U.S. Supreme Cour¦ up|o|ds ¦|e |nd|v|duu| |nsurunce mundu¦e o¦ |res|den¦ 0bumu's |eu|¦|
care law.
· |o||ow|ng u deb¦ res¦ruc¦ur|ng deu| w|¦| 0reece ¦o swup 177 b||||on |n deb¦ ¦or new bonds wor¦|
75% |ess, ¦|e ¦ro||u re|euses u ¹30 b||||on euro bu||ou¦ puc|uge.
3 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
THE 2012 YEAR IN REVIEW
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
· ¯|e Cu||¦orn|u Senu¦e upproves 14.7 b||||on |n ¦unds ¦or ¦|e s¦u¦e's ||g|-speed-ru|| p|un.
· ¯wo mon¦|s u¦¦er |uceboo|'s l|0, |u|o A|¦o |e¦wor|s und |uyu| go pub||c.
· ¯|ree Cu||¦orn|u c|¦|es, S¦oc|¦on, Sun Bernurd|no, und |ummo¦| |u|es ¦||e ¦or bun|rup¦cy pro¦ec¦|on.
· 0ermuny's Benc||ser buys |ee¦'s Co¦¦ee ¦or neur|y 1¹ b||||on w|¦| p|uns ¦o ¦u|e |¦ pr|vu¦e.
· 0ne yeur u¦¦er unnounc|ng 6,500 job cu¦s, C|sco reveu|s |¦ w||| |uy o¦¦ ubou¦ ¹,300 more emp|oyees
due to cost cutting and the sluggish economy.
· ¯wo young compun|es prove ¦|e|r wor¦| |n ¦|e ne¦wor|-v|r¦uu||zu¦|on ¦|e|d: v|wure buys ||c|ru ¦or
almost $1.3 billion followed by Oracle announcing its acquisition of Xsigo.
· App|e becomes ¦|e mos¦ vu|uub|e compuny |n ||s¦ory w|¦| u mur|e¦ vu|ue o¦ 1623.5 b||||on, ¦opp|ng
Microsoft’s $620.6 billion valuation during the dot-com boom.
· A ¦ederu| jury uwurds App|e 1¹ b||||on |n dumuges ¦rom r|vu| Sumsung ¦or "w|||¦u||y' copy|ng ¦|e |||one
and iPad.
· Un|¦ed S¦u¦es |os¦u| Serv|ce de¦uu|¦s on u 15.5 b||||on puymen¦ ¦or ¦u¦ure re¦|ree's |eu|¦| bene¦|¦s.
· |o¦oro|u |ob|||¦y, purc|used by 0oog|e |us¦ yeur, unnounces p|uns ¦o cu¦ 4,000 jobs und s|u¦ neur|y
one-third of its offices worldwide.
· ||n|edln expunds ¦o Sunnyvu|e w|¦| ugreemen¦ ¦o occupy u new 556,362 squure-¦oo¦ cumpus u¦
555 |u¦|||du Avenue.
· Amuzon.com beg|ns co||ec¦|ng su|es ¦ux ¦or on||ne purc|uses |n Cu||¦orn|u
· A bun|rup¦cy judge upproves ¦|e su|e o¦ So|yndru's 4¹¹,6¹8-squure-¦oo¦ |remon¦ ¦uc|||¦y ¦o
Seagate Technology for $90.3 million.
· |ederu| |eserve |uunc|es 0|3 |nvo|v|ng ¦|e purc|use o¦ 140 b||||on |n mor¦guge-buc|ed secur|¦|es
each month.
· |||one 5 pre-orders ¦op ¦wo m||||on |n 24 |ours, more ¦|un doub|e ¦|u¦ o¦ |¦s predecessor, ¦|e
|||one 4S und App|e s¦oc| pusses 1700/s|ure.
· 0overnor Brown s|gns b||| u||ow|ng se|¦-dr|v|ng curs on Cu||¦orn|u s¦ree¦s.
· |urr|cune Sundy cr|pp|es ¦|e |us¦ern Un|¦ed S¦u¦es, |||||ng |undreds, c|os|ng e|g|¦ mujor u|rpor¦s,
und cuus|ng un es¦|mu¦ed 150 b||||on |n |osses.
· Sun¦u C|uru so|ur s¦ur¦-up ||uSo|e, munu¦uc¦urer o¦ ¦||n-¦||m p|o¦ovo|¦u|c so|ur pune|s, |s so|d ¦o
Beijing-based Hanergy Holding, the largest non-state-owned provider of renewable power in China.
· ||ec¦r|c-cur bu¦¦ery mu|er A¹23 Sys¦ems, ¦||es ¦or bun|rup¦cy u¦¦er rece|v|ng u 124º-m||||on grun¦
under the 2009 stimulus program in an effort to boost the nation’s green technology efforts.
· 0|sney se¦ ¦o ucqu|re |ucus¦||m ¦or 14.05 b||||on.
· ¯|e Sun |runc|sco 0|un¦s w|n ¦|e wor|d Ser|es, ugu|n.

· Buruc| 0bumu |s re-e|ec¦ed |res|den¦ o¦ ¦|e Un|¦ed S¦u¦es.
· ¯|e c|oud |s on ¦|re us 0ruc|e ucqu|res Sun¦u C|uru-bused lns¦un¦|s u¦ und|sc|osed ¦erms, und C|sco
Systems announces it is buying Meraki for $1.2 billion.
· ¯|e |urozone ¦u||s |n¦o |¦s second recess|on s|nce 200º us 00| dec||nes.
· |or¦guge ru¦es con¦|nue ¦o ¦u|| ¦o u record |ow o¦ 3.34%, mu||ng mor¦guge borrow|ng c|euper ¦|un
one year ago.
· App|e und |¯C unnounce u g|obu| pu¦en¦ se¦¦|emen¦ und ¹0-yeur ||cens|ng ugreemen¦ end|ng ¦|e
patent war between the two companies.
· |r|ce||ne.com ¦o buy |uyu| |n u 1¹.8 b||||on deu|.

· |e¦¦||x s|gns exc|us|ve deu| w|¦| wu|¦ 0|sney S¦ud|os ¦o s¦reum ¦|rs¦-run mov|es, ¦r|gger|ng u ¹5%
increase in share value.
· Br|¦|s| supermur|e¦ g|un¦ ¯esco, operu¦or o¦ ¦|e wes¦ cous¦ supermur|e¦ c|u|n |res| & |usy,
announces it is considering selling all its store and moving out of the U.S. market.
· C|¦|group unnounces ¹¹,000 job cu¦s, umoun¦|ng ¦o 4% o¦ ¦|e wor| ¦orce, br|ng|ng ¦|e compuny's
¦o¦u| |eud coun¦ down ¦o 250,000.
· So|urC|¦y breu|s ¦|e 'so|ur curse' us |¦ gu|ns u|mos¦ 50% |n ¦|e ¦|rs¦ duy o¦ pos¦-l|0 ¦rud|ng.
· ¯w|¦¦er unnounces ¦|u¦ ¦|ere ure more ¦|un 200 m||||on mon¦||y uc¦|ve users.
· ||ss|on wes¦ |roper¦|es se||s |¦s reu| es¦u¦e usse¦s ¦o¦u||ng 7.6 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ ¦or upprox|mu¦e|y
$1.3 billion to Divco West and TPG Real Estate.
4 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
OBSERVATIONS
& FORECAST
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
OBSERVATIONS AND FORECAST
Caution was the story of 2012. Forward progress was
made, but it seemed to come only when the outcome
was certain and the ground was solid. There are many
¦||ngs |n our economy ¦|u¦ prov|de |ope: u recover|ng
real estate sector, companies’ record profits and profit
margins, a cleaner credit market, and even consumer
demand for big-ticket items, like cars, that they
have held off purchasing for the past several years.
Maybe even more promising is that the slow growth
we did experience in 2012 appears to be real and
lasting. Concerning that growth, Ian Shepherdson,
chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, says,
"Underneu¦| u|| ¦|e s|enun|guns |n wus||ng¦on,
¦|ere's u |o¦ o¦ s¦reng¦|en|ng.'
Still, the outlook is more optimistic in Silicon Valley. Being
home to consumers earning the highest wages in the
country, a housing market that has turned the corner
and those companies with record profits, it looks as if
the recovery is faster and stability closer. However, the
past year still left many feeling unsatisfied.
What’s the catch? After the financial collapse brought
on by the housing market and, locally, the burst of the
tech-bubble in the not-too-distant past, businesses
and consumers are looking further into the future
for sustainable growth. Unfortunately, the uncertain
outcome of negotiations in Washington over current
and future fiscal policy, along with the continuing
European debt crisis, is not allowing them to see very
far. According to the Conference Board’s Consumer
Confidence Index, consumers have an increasingly
upbeat outlook on the current business and labor
market conditions, but are becoming more negative
about the overall short-term outlook of the economy.
¯|e economy grew u modes¦ 2.2% |n 20¹2, uccord|ng
to the first estimate by the Bureau of Economic
Anu|ys|s. ¯|e number |sn'¦ ¦ur ¦rom ¦|e ¹.8% grow¦|
|n 20¹¹. 00| grew u surpr|s|ng|y |urge 3.¹% |n
the third quarter of 2012. Even more surprising
|s ¦|e 0.¹% |¦ re¦reu¦ed |n ¦|e ¦our¦| quur¦er. ln
addition to weary businesses and consumers,
the decline in the fourth quarter is attributable
to cuts in federal defense spending. Growth is
growth and it is happily greeted after a recession,
but economists agree that the uncertainty in
Washington is causing the American economy to
grow below potential.
In the midst of uncertain U.S. fiscal stability and the
Eurozone crisis, some clarity has been gained. One
hurdle was the presidential election in November.
Having gotten past that, questions regarding health
care policy cleared up, although questions of its fiscal
sustainability remain. It also ended some uncertainty
businesses and consumers had concerning the
general policy path for the next four years.
The Federal Reserve Board did its part to give direction
to businesses and consumers as well. Throughout the
year, they have tried to clear a path for the country.
In September they committed to their third round
of quantitative easing supporting this recovery. The
$40 billion monthly promise to buy mortgage-backed
securities hopes to drive down long-term interest rates
and improve liquidity in the financial markets. At their
December meeting, they promised to keep the federal
¦unds ru¦e u¦ or neur 0% un¦|| ¦|e unemp|oymen¦
ru¦e ¦u||s ¦o 6.5%. ¯|e dec|s|on ¦o ¦|e ¦|scu| po||cy ¦o
economic markets provides welcome guidance. With a
¦ed ¦unds ru¦e u¦ 0%, |owever, ¦|e |ed |s runn|ng ou¦
of options to spur the economy.
The U.S. national debt stands at $16.4 trillion and
Congress continues to kick the can in solving the
prob|em. "l¦ we ure go|ng ¦o ge¦ ¦|e de¦|c|¦ on u
glide path to balance, then it needs to happen this
yeur.' suys ¦|nunc|u| commen¦u¦or Jo|n |uu|d|n.
2014 is an election year, in which getting anything
o¦ subs¦unce uccomp||s|ed |s doub¦¦u|. 20¹5 |s ¦oo
long to wait. Unwilling to move forward with hiring
and investment, businesses make consumers weary
of spending, which in turn makes businesses even
more uncertain.
Due mostly to the fiscal cliff, the debt crisis in Europe
has mostly faded from the headlines. The European
Central Bank’s pledge to buy as many government
bonds as necessary to stabilize the euro has eased
the pressure on countries like Spain and Italy, but,
as Greece demonstrates, propping up an economy
without a long-term solution creates a protracted
problem.
Silicon Valley Stands Out
OBSERVATIONS AND FORECAST
The California
unemployment rate is
still more than double
the 4.8% reached during
the second half of
2006. Of the 102 major
metropolitan areas in the
United States, six of the
top eight cities furthest
from their pre-recession
unemployment levels are
in California. San Jose
is closer to pre-recession
levels than anywhere else
in the State.
Here at home, our California state government
continues to have debt problems of its own.
Governor Jerry Brown announced in January
2013 a balanced budget for 2013-14, reversing
multiple years of budget deficits. With the
state’s economy turning around and increased
revenue from Proposition 30, along with
spending cuts, the governor expects a surplus
by 2014. At the end of 2012, the half-way point
in California’s fiscal year, revenue was $14.6
billion below estimates. Lower corporate tax
revenue is the main culprit, and leaves many
questioning the optimistic budget proposed by
the Governor.
¯|e nu¦|onu| unemp|oymen¦ ru¦e ¦e|| ¦o 7.º%
¦rom 8.5% dur|ng 20¹2. ¯|e ¹.8 m||||on jobs
gained was almost identical to the gain in 2011.
¯|e economy udded un uveruge o¦ ¹53,000 jobs
per month in 2012. For perspective, 330,000
jobs would need to be added per month
from here on out to reach the pre-recession
unemp|oymen¦ ru¦e by ¦|e end o¦ 20¹5. ¯|e
decline in the unemployment rate during 2012
was due in large part to people giving up
looking for work.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
unemp|oymen¦ |n Cu||¦orn|u s¦ood u¦ º.8% u¦
the end of 2012. There has been a steady
dec||ne s|nce |over|ng be¦ween ¹2.2% und
¹2.4% dur|ng 20¹¹. ¯|e curren¦ unemp|oymen¦
ru¦e |s s¦||| more ¦|un doub|e ¦|e 4.8% reuc|ed
during the second half of 2006. Of the 102
major metropolitan areas in the United States,
six of the top eight cities furthest from their
pre-recession unemployment levels are in
California. San Jose is closer to pre-recession
levels than anywhere else in the State. The
San Jose metropolitan area started 2012 at
8.8% unemp|oymen¦, w|¦| ¦|e Bureuu repor¦|ng
u pre||m|nury ru¦e o¦ 7.6% |n 0ecember 20¹2.
w|||e wuges grew ¹.4% nu¦|onw|de ¦rom
November 2011 to November 2012, Silicon
vu||ey wuges were down ¹.8%. wuges s¦|||
remain higher here than anywhere else in the
country, though. The average weekly wage is
1¹,386.70. ¯|u¦ |s 25.7% ||g|er ¦|un Seu¦¦|e,
the next highest city. San Jose has a median
|ouse|o|d |ncome o¦ 177,000, 50% ||g|er ¦|un
the national level.
Consumer financial health is rebounding as well.
In November, the Federal Reserve reported that
consumer cred|¦ curd deb¦ s¦ood u¦ 1860.5
b||||on, down ¹6.5% ¦rom ¦|e 1¹.03 ¦r||||on
carried by consumers four years ago. Also
measured in the third quarter release by the
|ed, |ouse|o|ds ure spend|ng ¹0.6% o¦ ¦|e|r
after-tax income on servicing debt, a 29-year
low. A long-term fiscal plan by the government
would help consumer confidence and put some
of that money back into the economy.
According to Moody’s, large players in the
reduction of consumer debt are banks–they
are finally processing foreclosures that
were initiated during the past several years,
collectively writing down $1 trillion of mortgage
debt. The good news is that foreclosure activity
continues to drop, in large part due to the
decrease in newly started foreclosures. New
¦orec|osures |n Cu||¦orn|u ure down 38% ¦rom
a year ago.
As noted earlier, housing looks to have turned
the corner as well. According to the Census
Bureau, permits issued for new homes in
December 2012 were at an annualized rate of
º54,000, up 36.º% ¦rom ¦|e prev|ous yeur. ¯|e
National Association of Realtors reports existing
home sales were at a seasonally adjusted
annualized rate of 4.94 million in December, up
º% compured ¦o 20¹¹, und ure u¦ ¦|e|r ||g|es¦
rate since November 2009. The combined
foreclosure and delinquency rate is at its lowest
point in four years. The CoreLogic Home Price
lndex meusured u 7.4% grow¦| |n |ome pr|ces
on a year-over-year basis in November.
As healthy as housing markets are across the
country, they are still better here. San Jose
continues to have the most expensive housing
market in the country and home sales were
up ¹8% |n 0ecember compured ¦o u yeur ugo.
The median single-family home sale price of
168¹,000 wus u 27% |ncreuse ¦rom u yeur ugo,
according to MLSListings’ December data.
Helping the housing market is an improving
credit market. The annual average fixed-rate
mortgage for 2012, says Freddie Mac, was
3.66%, ¦|e |owes¦ |n 65 yeurs. Bun| bu|unce
sheets are starting to strengthen due to the tight
underwriting standards of the past few years,
and lending is becoming more fluid with liquidity
rules easing. With the Fed’s promise to keep
the fed funds rate low in the near future, banks
have little incentive not to lend, and rates are
low enough to make potential homebuyers eager.
5 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
0
12
24
36
60
72
48
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Year-End Available
17.60% 17.64%
13.97%
12.74%
2009 2010 2011 2012
0
5
-5
30
20
10
-10
-15
15
25
Gross Absorption
S
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Net Absorption
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Silicon Valley Availability
All Product Types
Silicon Valley Absorption
All Product Types
OBSERVATIONS AND FORECAST
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
Venture capitalists are being careful with their
money due to the uncertainty in the economy. In a
report issued by PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Tracy
|e¦¦ero¦¦ su|d, "0eneru| econom|c uncer¦u|n¦y
continues to hinder capital investment, and venture
cup|¦u||s¦s ure no d|¦¦eren¦.' ¯|e 126.5 b||||on ¦|ey
|nves¦ed |n 20¹2 wus ¹0% |ess ¦|un ¦|u¦ |n 20¹¹.
The funding for medical devices and bio-tech
sectors were hit, but the natural-gas and shale-oil
industry boom (and likely Solyndra-Gate) caused
clean-tech investment to drop the most, falling
28% |n 20¹2 ¦rom ¦|e prev|ous yeur. ¯|e surpr|se
o¦ ¦|e yeur wus ¦|e so¦¦wure sec¦or. ¯|e ¹0%
increase in funding for that sector marks its
highest level of investment since 2001.
IPO activity fell in 2012 as well, which does not
come as a surprise given the instability in the
markets here and in Europe. IPOs raised $112
billion in 2012, the lowest amount since 2009. 139
companies went public, a fall from the 200-plus
in the previous two years. The Facebook fiasco
certainly made companies more hesitant to move
forward with their offerings. Looking not too far
into the past, Groupon and Zynga are also doing
their share to make companies more cautious to
wade into those IPO waters.
Businesses find themselves in better, if not the
bes¦, ¦|nunc|u| |eu|¦|. Corporu¦e pro¦|¦s were 1¹.75
¦r||||on |n ¦|e ¦||rd quur¦er o¦ 20¹2, up ¹8.6% ¦rom
a year ago. You need not look further than the
Valley to see that companies have a stockpile
of cash to spend, having grown in efficiency
during the recovery. Productivity continues to
rise disproportionately more than labor costs.
Strong profits and low interest rates have
allowed companies to pay off debts.
The Valley is home to the best examples of
the positives the economy is showing. The
housing market is strong again; companies
have jobs to fill and money to use; the service
industry is eager to feel the spillover effect
from falling unemployment in the tech sector.
The growth and improving fundamentals look
like they are here to stay. Once the fog lifts,
forward progress should pick up.
The Commercial Real Estate Market
At first glance, it would be easy to discount 2012
and chalk it up as a below-average year for Silicon
Valley’s commercial real estate market. Indeed,
when compared to 2011, the numbers are down.
There were fewer deals in 2012, not as many big
deals, less square footage leased, and less net
absorption. When compared side-by-side with
figures over the last twenty years, total absorption
of office, R&D, industrial, and warehouse space
outpaced the 2012 totals in seventeen of those
years. While nothing to write home about, a deeper
look under the hood suggests there might at least
be something to text or tweet about.
Total leasing and user-sales activity measured
22.23 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ |n 20¹2, 20.2% |ess ¦|un
¦|e 27.86 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ o¦ gross ubsorp¦|on
tallied in 2011 and just about equal to the activity
measured in 2010. While the momentum gained
in 2011 was not fully sustained, Colliers did
not expect that it would be in our forecast for
20¹2. 0ur prognos|s wus ¦or upwurds o¦ 25.0
million square feet of total gross absorption for
Silicon Valley and with some statistical tweaking
and delayed gratification, you can argue that
25.0 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ |s u more uccuru¦e
representation than the 22.23 million square feet
that went on the books.
The reason? Nearly 3.0 million square feet of
deals have been done in Silicon Valley in buildings
¦|u¦ ure no¦ ye¦ bu||¦, |nc|ud|ng c|ose ¦o 2.5
million square feet of deals inked in 2012. This is
reason number one that a look under the hood is
necessary in order to fully appreciate the year we
just experienced in Silicon Valley. Colliers does
not record absorption in build-to-suits or projects
under construction until they are complete and
occup|ed. Add 2.5-3.0 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ ¦o ¦|e
2012 numbers and not only does Colliers nail its
¦orecus¦ bu¦ ¦|e 25.0 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ o¦ uc¦|v|¦y
then more accurately reflects what was a pretty
good year overall. In the past seven years, the
Valley has experienced only one year with more
uc¦|v|¦y ´20¹¹` und 25.0 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ wou|d
plot 2012 in the upper half of results generated
over the past twenty years.
Another reason to look favorably upon 2012 can
be seen when separating the office and R&D
results from industrial and warehouse. The Silicon
Valley is a technology-fueled market and it has
been seven years since the Valley generated
more than 6.0 million square feet of combined
industrial and warehouse activity. When Silicon
vu||ey wus rou¦|ne|y exceed|ng 25.0 m||||on squure
feet of gross absorption, we were counting on at
least 8.0 million square feet of that coming from
industrial and warehouse absorption. Those days
are gone. Meanwhile, the 16.34 million square feet
of combined office/R&D activity is on par with
results over the last ten years and that is excluding
the 3.0 million square feet of pending absorption.
Consistency is another reason to feel good
about 2012. All years have their ups and
downs but if 2012 can be considered a good
year after looking under the hood, then the
future bodes well thanks to a consistent
¦rend o¦ more ¦|un 5.0 m||||on squure ¦ee¦
of gross absorption per quarter that now
extends to nine consecutive quarters.
Measuring net absorption is tricky business
in the commercial real estate world and
once again, a decent 2012 looks even better
when peering under the net absorption
hood. Colliers measured an occupancy gain
across all product types that totaled 2.40
Nearly 3.0 million square
feet of deals have been
done in Silicon Valley in
buildings that are not yet
built, including close to
2.5 million square feet of
deals inked in 2012. This
is reason number one that
a look under the hood is
necessary in order to fully
appreciate the year we
just experienced in
Silicon Valley.
6 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Office and R&D Absorption as a Percentage of Total
OBSERVATIONS AND FORECAST
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
million square feet in 2012. While shy of the 3.26
million square feet of net absorption posted in 2011,
the figure is significantly greater than any other
year going back to 2006. It is also a figure that is
|und|cupped by u 65º,000-squure-¦oo¦ occupuncy
loss reported in the warehouse sector and nearly 1.0
million square feet attributable to Solyndra’s exodus,
without which, net absorption would be almost 4.0
million square feet.
Total space available and Silicon Valley’s overall
availability rate continue their march downward,
closing in on a healthy overall supply/demand
balance. The 40.02 million square feet of available
space may sound like a lot but it is a far cry from
¦|e 58.48 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ ¦|u¦ wus on ¦|e mur|e¦
just a little more than two years ago. At that time,
¦|e vu||ey's overu|| uvu||ub|||¦y ru¦e s¦ood u¦ ¹8.6%.
¯oduy, |¦ |s ¹2.7% und ¦rend|ng down. ¯|e |us¦ ¦|me
¦|e vu||ey's overu|| uvu||ub|||¦y ru¦e wus |ess ¦|un ¹3%
wus |n ¦|e ¦||rd quur¦er o¦ 2007.
Looking back under the net absorption hood,
Colliers estimates that as mush as two-thirds of the
leasing activity in projects not yet built will result in
occupancy gains. It will not all come in 2013 because
some of these projects will take longer than a year to
build. Still, most of that activity transpired in 2012 and
is reflective of more robust current market conditions
than a casual look at the numbers suggests.
0¦¦|ce gross ubsorp¦|on umoun¦ed ¦o 6.85 m||||on
square feet in 2012, which fell well below the 2011
¦|gure o¦ º.78 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ us we|| us Co|||ers'
forecast for 8.0 million square feet of new deal
activity. The total number of office deals was down
by ¹2.¹% und ¦|e number o¦ deu|s ubove 50,000
squure ¦ee¦ wus down neur|y 50%. S¦|||, ¦|ere were
42.4% more o¦¦|ce deu|s |n 20¹2 ¦|un 20¹0 und
Colliers anticipates that current activity levels should
be sustainable through 2013. With a pre-committed
boost of more than 1.0 million square feet of office
deals that were made in 2012 and will show up on
the absorption rolls in 2013, the numbers should be
solid. Look for 8.0 million square feet of office gross
absorption in 2013, with net absorption scaling to
2.0 million square feet, or more if gross absorption
exceeds expectations.
R&D gross absorption also fell below expectation in
2012, measuring 9.49 million square feet, which was
a bit shy of Colliers’ 11.0-million-square-foot forecast
and the 12.38 million square feet recorded in 2012.
Again, Colliers pegged that 2012 would not match
2011’s totals but underestimated to what degree.
At the year’s midpoint, R&D gross absorption was
|umm|ng u|ong u¦ 5.78 m||||on squure ¦ee¦-we|| on |¦s
way to exceeding forecast. However, the second half
o¦ ¦|e yeur c|ec|ed |n u¦ u d|suppo|n¦|ng 3.7¹ m||||on
square feet of new activity and that has us casting a
conservative eye towards 2013.
When looking at the inventory of available R&D
space, much of it does not meet the needs of today’s
trendy user community. That will become more and
more problematic as the supply of available space
continues to recede, leaving the most obsolete space
left to rummage through. For these reasons, Colliers
|s projec¦|ng 8.5-º.0 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ o¦ |&0 gross
ubsorp¦|on |n 20¹3 und un occupuncy gu|n o¦ ¹.5
million square feet.
The industrial real estate sector managed to dig
itself out of a 900,000-square-foot negative net
absorption hole created by Solyndra, finishing the
year with positive net absorption on the strength of
3.73 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ o¦ new uc¦|v|¦y, s||g|¦|y be|ow
Colliers’ 4.0-million-square-foot forecast. User-sale
activity remained strong in this sector and at least
some portion was driven by the anticipated increase
in the capital gains tax rate. It remains to be seen
how small business will react to changes in the tax
code and health care requirements but those will
certainly be areas of concern for Silicon Valley’s
small business user base. On the other hand, there is
more clarity and with another year of recovery under
our be|¦, we oug|¦ ¦o see u¦ |eus¦ uno¦|er 3.75 m||||on
square feet of industrial gross absorption in 2013 and
u 750,000-squure-¦oo¦ occupuncy gu|n.
Coming off a dismal year in 2011, the warehouse
sector had nowhere to go but up, or so we thought.
Indeed it was a better year for activity and our
2.¹5-m||||on-squure-¦oo¦ ¦orecus¦ wus r|g|¦ on
¦urge¦. 0ur projec¦|on ¦or u 500,000-squure-¦oo¦
occupancy gain missed the mark however, as net
absorption turned negative for the fifth straight year
Building Inventory:
Availability:
Absorption:
Gross
Net
Effective Net
Completed
Construction:
# of Avails. by Size
< 10K SF
10K to 29K SF
30K to 59 K SF
60K to 99K SF
100K SF +
1Q 2011 2Q 2011 3Q 2011 4Q 2011 1Q 2012 2Q 2012 3Q 2012 4Q 2012

315,258,365 315,258,365 315,256,287 314,983,666 315,043,926 315,469,361 314,782,217 314,216,044

52,763,974 50,978,709 46,118,143 44,005,602 42,835,739 42,415,890 41,096,673 40,020,885


6,669,550 8,074,093 7,347,318 5,766,381 5,987,278 5,397,536 5,814,743 5,027,499
(1,024,126) 2,441,500 276,422 1,562,940 (293,292) 1,457,405 1,003,117 232,135
1,150,887 2,815,510 3,330,253 2,353,994 2,361,726 1,005,686 1,830,453 2,510,813


324,658 0 0 0 0 425,435 52,500 417,800


2783 2674 2550 2375 2338 2254 2173 2017
646 651 607 583 612 567 536 494
258 246 223 207 200 202 198 188
161 153 141 134 125 124 117 116
57 57 47 47 39 40 40 42
Silicon Valley All Product
Total Direct Available Total Sublease Available Available Under Construction
0.00%
2.00%
4.00%
6.00%
8.00%
10.00%
12.00%
14.00%
16.00%
1Q11 2Q11 3Q11 4Q11 1Q12 2Q12 3Q12 4Q12
Available Available Total Available Current and
Vacant Occupied Available Current Vacancy Availability Under Pending
Date Direct Direct Sublease Available Rate Rate Construction Availability
4Q 2012 33,367,341 3,058,161 3,595,383 40,020,885 11.36% 12.74% 781,292 40,802,177
3Q 2012 33,746,218 3,527,545 3,822,910 41,096,673 11.38% 13.06% 479,092 41,575,765
2Q 2012 35,371,291 3,488,128 3,556,471 42,415,890 11.86% 13.45% 1,048,187 43,464,077
1Q 2012 36,729,385 2,672,278 3,434,076 42,835,739 12.41% 13.60% 566,031 43,401,770
4Q 2011 36,584,067 3,698,881 3,722,654 44,005,602 12.44% 13.97% 757,652 44,763,254
3Q 2011 38,572,954 3,848,201 3,696,988 46,118,143 13.17% 14.63% 745,167 46,863,310
2Q 2011 41,615,690 4,762,162 4,600,857 50,978,709 14.24% 16.17% 696,847 51,675,556
1Q 2011 43,007,378 4,706,456 5,050,140 52,763,974 14.96% 16.73% 690,335 53,454,309
Availability Breakdown
Silicon Valley All Product
7 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
in this sector. While net absorption has
been positive in every other product
category in each of the last two years,
we continue to be reminded that
Silicon Valley is not a hot distribution
hub or a popular location to warehouse
product. With that in mind, 2013 is
likely to be a repeat of 2012 on the
gross absorption front. Perhaps out
of sheer stubbornness, we are calling
for warehouse gross absorption to
inch up to 2.2 million square feet and
net absorption to return to the black in
20¹3 ¦o ¦|e ¦une o¦ 250,000-500,000
square feet.
Asking rents are increasing all across
Silicon Valley but with completed
deals extending with greater regularity
into lower-rent submarkets, weighted-
average starting rents exhibit a flatter
trend line. That will continue in 2013,
w|¦| us||ng ren¦s |ncreus|ng ¹0% or
more in many submarkets and across
most product categories.
OFFICE
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
OFFICE MARKET
Coming off a record 2011, no one was exactly sure
what to expect from the Silicon Valley office market in
2012. Colliers forecasted that office gross absorption
wou|d be down by roug||y ¹8% |n 20¹2 ¦rom ¦|e
record º.78 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ meusured |n 20¹¹
and our projection was not only met, but surpassed
us o¦¦|ce uc¦|v|¦y ¦e|| by 30%. w|||e 30% muy seem
like a lot, coming off a record year the office sector
more ¦|un |e|d |¦s ground |n 20¹2. ¯|e 6.85 m||||on
square feet of gross absorption was on par with 2010
demund o¦ 6.87 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ und ¦|e ¦en¦| mos¦
in Silicon Valley’s history. Moreover, office demand
picked up in the second half of the year with third and
fourth quarter gross absorption accounting for more
¦|un 58% o¦ ¦|e unnuu| demund.
After 2011 produced Silicon Valley’s first positive net
absorption in five years, the office sector extended its
streak to two years with an occupancy gain totaling
1.18 million square feet. Although this was less than
Colliers’ forecasted 2.0-million-square-foot increase,
any occupancy bump in order of magnitude greater
than 1.0 million square feet is welcome news and
2013 looks to build off of 2012, as a majority of the
occupancy gains came in the second half of the year.
The office sector’s availability rate continued to decline
in 2012. Although the decline was not as pronounced
as 2011’s, the availability rate still dropped more than
200 bus|s po|n¦s ¦o ¹5.5% u¦ ¦|e end o¦ 20¹2 ¦rom
¹7.6% u¦ ¦|e end o¦ 20¹¹. ¯|e º.66 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ o¦
office space available today is 1.22 million square feet
less than the 10.88 million square feet one year ago.
Helping the office market along in 2012 was the
|ower |eve|s o¦ pre-|mproved or "ro||over' spuce ¦|u¦
cume on¦o ¦|e mur|e¦ dur|ng ¦|e yeur. ln 20¹2, 5.67
million square feet of rollover space found its way to
mur|e¦, ¦|e ¦|rs¦ ¦|me s|nce 2007 ¦|u¦ o¦¦|ce ro||over
space has been below the 6.0-million-square-foot
mark. Less space coming back on the market from
users contracting, exiting Silicon Valley or going
out of business, allows greater opportunity for net
absorption even when gross absorption recedes, as it
did in the office sector in 2012.
Another encouraging indicator for the office market
is the pre-leasing activity ascribed to buildings either
currently under construction or part of build-to-suit
agreements. The full impact of these deals is not
seen in the current statistics but will resonate in 2013
and the years following as the buildings associated
with these deals are completed. In the third quarter,
Colliers reported 1.21 million square feet of such
deals, and in the fourth quarter of 2012, Colliers has
¦|ree more ¦u¦ure-ubsorp¦|on ¦runsuc¦|ons ¦o repor¦:
Global Foundries’ agreement to lease 136,000 square
feet at the Irvine Company’s Santa Clara Gateway
project, Apple inking a deal for two buildings totaling
296,000 square feet in Santa Clara that will be built
Office Gratification Delayed
Silicon Valley Availability
Office Product
Silicon Valley Absorption
Office Product
0
3
6
9
12
15
2009 2010 2011 2012
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24.60%
24.68%
17.66%
15.49%
0
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-3
6
2
8
4
10
Gross Absorption
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2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
by Perry Arrillaga, and Samsung Information
Systems entering into a build-to-suit agreement
with TMG Partners and Farallon Capital for
385,000 squure ¦ee¦ |n |oun¦u|n v|ew.
Colliers accurately forecasted that with much of
the premier-location/Class A office space already
leased, lower-rent alternatives would get more
play in 2012. That proved to be the case as
weighted-average starting rents bounced all over
¦|e p|uce on u quur¦er|y bus|s, ¦|n|s||ng up 6.5%
¦rom one yeur eur||er u¦ 12.78 per squure ¦oo¦
full service. Comparing all office deals in 2011 to
all office deals in 2012, weighted-average starting
ren¦s were up on|y 2.2%, demons¦ru¦|ng ¦ur¦|er
that lower-rent submarkets were accounting for a
greater number of deals in the weighting. Asking
rents in the office sector followed a more logical
trend line from quarter to quarter and were up
¹0.¹% |n 20¹2.
Office Hot Spots
The Sunnyvale office market continues to be
the big story, first capturing headlines with a
record-setting 2011 and following that up with
another stellar year. The 1.31 million square
feet of office gross absorption that Sunnyvale
recorded in 2012 was the third best on record
und ¦|u¦ exc|udes 675,000 squure ¦ee¦ o¦ pend|ng
absorption from Juniper Networks and Lab 126
that will not go on the books until their buildings
are completed in 2013. Likewise, 2012 produced
the third-best occupancy gain on record for that
c|¦y, 824,278 squure ¦ee¦.
It is no small feat for the Sunnyvale office market
to string together the first and third-best years on
record, but after 2.3 million square feet of new
office construction added in that city since 2008,
it was only a matter of time. Big deals continue
to be the story in Sunnyvale. Juniper Networks
completed and occupied the first of two 318,000-
square-foot office buildings on Innovation Way,
accounting for Sunnyvale’s biggest absorption bite.
Not far behind, Lab 126 leased 224,492 square feet
on Enterprise Way and Apple signed leases for
¹56,º60 und ¹¹6,586 squure ¦ee¦ respec¦|ve|y on
Mathilda and Mary Avenues.
San Jose experienced a drop-off in leasing and
user-sale activity following two years where office
demand exceeded 2.0 million square feet per year.
Gross absorption in Silicon Valley’s largest city
¦o¦u|ed ¹.57 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ compured ¦o 2.62
million square feet in 2011. Despite the reduced
amount of office activity, San Jose posted a
nominal occupancy gain measuring 14,060 square
feet. Buoyed by the lowest amount of pre-improved
space coming back on the market since 2006, San
Jose's o¦¦|ce uvu||ub|||¦y ru¦e |e|d s¦eudy u¦ ¹º.7% u¦
year end. Notable office deals in San Jose for the
yeur |nc|ude App|e's |euse o¦ 52,040 squure ¦ee¦ on
Stevens Creek Boulevard and Samsung signing on
¦or 46,477 squure ¦ee¦ on |or¦| ||rs¦ S¦ree¦.
The largest beneficiary of the ever-tightening
markets to the north was Santa Clara. The Santa
Clara market generated nearly one-quarter of
Silicon Valley’s total office activity for 2012. At
1.62 million square feet of gross absorption, Santa
C|uru's |eve| o¦ o¦¦|ce uc¦|v|¦y grew by 33.º% over
the 1.21 million square feet produced in 2011.
The increased demand translated to a significant
occupuncy gu|n o¦ 322,677 squure ¦ee¦, ¦|e mos¦
office net absorption for Santa Clara since 2006.
Significantly, the occupancy gains were consistent
throughout the year with positive net absorption
posted in all four quarters. Leading the way, Palo
Alto Networks leased two buildings on Great
America Parkway for a total of 301,163 square feet.
ServiceNow struck another headline-grabbing deal
|n Sun¦u C|uru w|¦| |¦s |euse o¦ ¹48,704 squure ¦ee¦
in three buildings on Jay Street.
Looking Forward
It has been a great three-year ride for Silicon
Valley’s office market. Although the 2012 results
¦e|| s|or¦ o¦ ¦orecus¦, ¦|e 6.85 m||||on squure ¦ee¦
of gross absorption was on par with 2010 results
and well above the returns of 2008-2009. Unlike
the R&D market, which exhibited a big drop-off in
activity in the second half of the year, office results
were strongest in the year’s final two quarters.
0ver 58.0% o¦ ¦|e new deu| uc¦|v|¦y ¦oo| p|uce |n
¦|e second |u|¦ o¦ ¦|e yeur und 86.7% o¦ ¦|e ne¦
absorption was recorded after June.
Office statistics in 2013 will get a boost as users
occupy space they previously leased in buildings
that were under construction or planned. Colliers
estimates that more than 1.0 million square feet of
office absorption will come from this source alone.
OFFICE MARKET
The largest beneficiary of the
ever-tightening markets to the
north was Santa Clara. The
Santa Clara market generated
nearly one-quarter of Silicon
Valley’s total office activity for
2012. At 1.62 million square
feet of gross absorption, Santa
Clara’s level of office activity
grew by 33.9% over the
1.21 million square feet
produced in 2011.
Silicon Valley Office Rent vs. Availability Rate Trends
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
$2.00
$2.25
$2.50
$2.75
$3.00
$3.25
Quarter-End Availability Rate Average Starting Full Service Rental Rates
4Q-09 1Q-10 2Q-10 3Q-10 4Q-11 1Q-11 2Q-11 3Q-11 4Q-11 1Q-12 2Q-12 3Q-12 4Q-12
9 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
OFFICE MARKET
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
Many of the companies
that favor a South Bay
location want it to be
as far north as possible
and close to Caltrain.
The problem is, existing
space meeting that
need is increasingly in
short supply and very
expensive. 2011 was the
year that most of the
existing space fitting the
bill leased and 2012 was
the year that much of the
planned developments
meeting the need were
also leased. Now
developers are scrambling
for additional development
projects in order to cash
in on the trend.
10 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
· Synopsys s|gned u renewu| ¦or 2¹5,824 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 445 und 555 |ury Avenue |n Sunnyvu|e. Jay Paul Company is the landlord.
· Eagle Ridge Partners comp|e¦ed u ¹48,704-squure-¦oo¦ ¦|ree-bu||d|ng |euse u¦ 3250-3570 Juy S¦ree¦ |n Sun¦u C|uru. ServiceNow is the tenant.
· SuccessFactors |eused ¹¹6,035 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ ¹ ¯ower |une |n Sou¦| Sun |runc|sco. Myers Development Company is the landlord.
· Carlye Group comp|e¦ed u 52,040-squure-¦oo¦ |euse u¦ 5300 S¦evens Cree| Bou|evurd |n Sun Jose. Apple is the tenant.
· Menlo Equities comp|e¦ed u 45,50¹-squure-¦oo¦ |euse u¦ 525 A|munor Avenue |n Sunnyvu|e. Fiserv Solutions is the tenant.
· Chegg |eused 45,000 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 3ºº0 |reedom C|rc|e |n Sun¦u C|uru. RREEF is the landlord.
· Namco Bandai Games sub|e¦ 30,652 squure ¦ee¦ o¦ o¦¦|ce spuce u¦ ¹740 ¯ec|no|ogy 0r|ve |n Sun Jose. Nutranix is the sublessee.
· Equity Office completed a 21,924-square-foot lease at 10 Almaden Boulevard in San Jose. MalwareBytes is the tenant.
Selected Colliers Office Transactions
Selected Cities Historical Availability Rate Trends - Office
San Jose Palo Alto Santa Clara Sunnyvale Cupertino
0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24% 28% 0% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24% 28% 0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24% 28% 0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24% 28%
16.74%
16.79%
24.21%
23.76%
19.49%
19.67%
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
26.37%
26.77%
23.28%
18.64%
9.65%
13.24%
16.21%
11.45%
1.84%
3.91%
42.12%
41.70%
17.54%
8.36%
This absorption is all but guaranteed although the
net impact on occupied space will not be known until
we see how much existing space these companies
actually vacate when making their moves.
Somewhat offsetting the teed-up absorption
reflected in projects under construction is the
shortage of speculative Class A product to meet the
needs of other growing users in the Silicon Valley.
The Valley has been a partial bystander to the draw
of a San Francisco address from social media and
mobile technology users. Many of the companies
that favor a South Bay location want it to be as far
north as possible and close to Caltrain. The problem
is, existing space meeting that need is increasingly
in short supply and very expensive. 2011 was the
year that most of the existing space fitting the bill
leased and 2012 was the year that much of the
planned developments meeting the need were
also leased. Now developers are scrambling for
additional development projects in order to cash in
on the trend.
All factors considered, office gross and net
absorption stands poised to generate better results
in 2013. While lack of supply is a concern, 2012
showed us that if a company wants and needs a
unique type of office space, they will find a solution
even if it has not yet been designed. Colliers
anticipates that office gross absorption will increase
to the neighborhood of 8.0 million square feet in
2013 with net absorption in the 2.0-million-square-
foot range. We are anticipating a fairly significant
bite out of the office availability rate attributable to
positive occupancy gains and new projects coming
on||ne ¦|u¦ ure ¹00% |eused upon comp|e¦|on. A||
told, Silicon Valley’s office availability rate could
drop ¦rom ¦oduy's ¹5.5% ru¦e ¦o ¦|e ne|g|bor|ood
o¦ ¹2.5% by yeur-end.
Limited Class A options in the market today are
going to continue to compress weighted-average
start rates overall but asking rents should continue
their slow-but-steady climb in 2013, rising by up to
¹0% und ec||ps|ng ¦|e 13.00-per-squure-¦oo¦ ´¦u||
service) threshold. Average starting rents are also
|||e|y ¦o |ncreuse by ¹0% dur|ng ¦|e yeur.
The Silicon Valley R&D sector moved laterally in 2012,
failing to break the 10-million-square-foot threshold
for gross absorption while still finishing the year with
a respectable 9.49 million square feet of new deals.
In some part, sluggish R&D demand was attributable
to the ongoing shift towards office uses in the Silicon
Valley and the plethora of functionally obsolete R&D
buildings from a bygone era. Regardless of the
circumstances, one thing is for certain–R&D demand
slowed noticeably in the second half of the year and
that gives us pause when looking ahead to 2013.
On the plus side, the R&D sector recorded its second
straight year of positive net absorption, weighing in
u¦ u more-¦|un-respec¦ub|e ¹.73 m||||on squure ¦ee¦,
¹8.0% ||g|er ¦|un 20¹¹. A|¦|oug| ¦|e |&0 occupuncy
gain in 2012 was weighted towards the first half of
the year, all four quarters produced some amount of
positive net absorption, a first since 2006. So while
demand levels in the R&D sector were not stellar, the
resulting positive net absorption demonstrates the
overall stability of the Valley’s R&D user base.
Growing stability is a function of both supply
and demand. On the supply side, the pipeline of
pre-improved R&D space that came on the market in
2012 declined for the third straight year, from 10.92
m||||on squure ¦ee¦ |n 20¹¹ ¦o 7.76 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ |n
20¹2, u drop o¦ 28.º%. ¯||s decreuse |n ro||over spuce
is indicative of the stabilizing space needs of Silicon
Valley companies as they are no longer reacting to
rapidly changing economic circumstances. Although
the economic outlook may remain murky, companies
are now prepped to meet the known challenges that
are in front of them with a plan of action.
With decent demand and a subdued pipeline of
pre-improved space coming to market, the R&D
availability rate continued to decline steadily in 2012,
albeit at a much slower pace than 2011. As was the
case during the prior year, the R&D availability rate
dropped in every quarter of 2012, beginning the year
u¦ ¹5.3% und ¦|n|s||ng u¦ ¹3.7%. w|||e muc| |mproved,
that still translates to 21.48 million square feet of
available R&D space on the market.
Colliers’ forecast for R&D starting rents to increase
¹5% |n 20¹2 wus more r|g|¦ ¦|un wrong bu¦ you need
to look under the hood to see why. The weighted-
average asking rent for R&D space in the final quarter
o¦ 20¹2 wus 1¹.30 per squure ¦oo¦ |||, up ¹3.0%
from the same period the prior year and a good
indicator that rents continued to exhibit the upward
momentum we expected. However, the weighted-
average starting rents for R&D leases closed in the
fourth quarter of 2012 was unchanged from the
weighted-average start rate in the same quarter the
previous year. The discrepancy is owing to the fact
that more deals in lower-rent, Class B properties
and submarkets are increasingly suppressing
weighted-averages.
R&D
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
R&D MARKET
Silicon Valley Availability
R&D Product
0
9
18
36
27
45
S
q
u
a
r
e

F
e
e
t

i
n

M
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
19.20%
19.34%
15.28%
Year-End Available
2009 2010
13.67%
2011 2012
Silicon Valley Absorption
R&D Product
12
14
0
- 4
- 8
4
8
Gross Absorption
S
q
u
a
r
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F
e
e
t

i
n

M
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
Net Absorption
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
R&D Plays Second Fiddle
R&D MARKET
R&D Hot Spots
San Jose, the largest R&D submarket, generated
2.49 million square feet of gross absorption in
20¹2, jus¦ 6.8% |ess ¦|un 20¹¹'s 2.67 m||||on
square feet. Where San Jose really stood out is
with its positive net absorption. For the year, San
Jose’s R&D sector produced an occupancy gain
of just over 1.0 million square feet. While not a
record, the last time San Jose posted R&D net
absorption greater than 1.0 million square feet
was in 2000.
All four quarters of 2012 resulted in occupancy
gains for San Jose, demonstrating that results
were not attributable to just one or two huge
deals. The three largest R&D deals in San Jose
¦or 20¹2 were u|| user su|es: |Sl's purc|use o¦ ¦wo
bu||d|ngs ¦o¦u||ng 220,5º¹ squure ¦ee¦ on ||dder
Park Drive, Synapitcs’ purchase of three buildings
¦o¦u||ng ¹5¹,247 squure ¦ee¦ on |c|uy 0r|ve, und
Zo|| C|rcu|u¦|on's purc|use o¦ u ¹24,500-squure-
foot building on Ringwood Avenue.
Sunnyvale also posted noteworthy results in
2012. Despite R&D gross absorption dropping
¹8.4%, ¦rom 2.¹6 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ |n 20¹¹ ¦o
¹.76 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ |n 20¹2, Sunnyvu|e wus
able to rebound with a healthy occupancy gain
after recording an occupancy loss in 2011. In fact,
20¹2, w|¦| |¦s 434,2º7 squure ¦ee¦ o¦ pos|¦|ve ne¦
absorption, was the best R&D occupancy gain
for Sunnyvale since 2006 and a far cry from the
323,001 square feet of negative net absorption in
2011. Apple was the main driver for Sunnyvale in
20¹2, s|gn|ng n|ne |euses ¦or 488,307 squure ¦ee¦
in various locations. The largest Apple transaction
wus |¦s ¹38,6º8-squure-¦oo¦ sub|euse u¦ º85
Almanor Avenue. Other significant Sunnyvale
transactions include Ruckus Wireless signing a
|euse ¦or º6,4¹5 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 350 Juvu 0r|ve,
and Optimedia Corporation signing a sublease for
55,403 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ ¹3¹0 |o¦¦e¦¦ |ur| 0r|ve.
In the East Bay, Fremont posted a respectable
yeur w|¦| ¹.52 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ o¦ |&0
gross absorption, just under its annual average
of 1.63 million square feet of activity since
2001. Noteworthy R&D deals in Fremont include
0p¦|vue's 5º,736-squure-¦oo¦ |euse u¦ 2800
Bayview Drive and Aver Information taking
54,8º2 squure ¦ee¦ on ||ss|on Cour¦. 0esp|¦e
decent activity, the gains were offset by other
space coming to market and at the end of the day,
Fremont weighed-in with a small R&D occupancy
|oss o¦ 78,06º squure ¦ee¦.
Milpitas boasted renewed R&D life, posting 1.18
million square feet of leasing and user-sale activity
|n 20¹2, u º2.º% |ncreuse ¦rom ¦|e prev|ous yeurs'
610,046 square feet. To top it off, Milpitas finished
w|¦| |&0 pos|¦|ve ne¦ ubsorp¦|on o¦ 467,558
squure ¦ee¦, |¦s ¦|rs¦ occupuncy gu|n s|nce 2007.
The big driver in Milpitas was SanDisk’s user
purc|use o¦ ¦|ve bu||d|ngs ¦o¦u||ng 588,¹¹¹ squure
feet on Technology Drive, McCarthy Boulevard,
and SanDisk Drive.
Looking Forward
With R&D availability rates in the single
digits north of Santa Clara, there is a greater
opportunity for cities like San Jose, Milpitas and
Fremont to capture demand and take a healthy
bite out of their inventories of available space.
It will be a double-edged sword of opportunity
however, as many growing companies seem to
be willing to pay the freight to locate further
north and closer to their employment base and
public transportation hubs. Cities sitting on fat
supplies of increasingly obsolete R&D space are
likely to fare better in 2013 but perhaps not as
well as they might hope.
The magic elixir in the near-term to drive greater
demand to cities with the most available space
would be a broad economic recovery that is
humming on all cylinders. Perhaps this will come
by the tail end of the year but prospects are less
favorable in the near-term. After a strong 2011
fueled by big companies, we hoped that 2012
would be the year that small business would
be ¦|e s¦undou¦. lns¦eud, Co|||ers coun¦ed ¹6.2%
¦ewer deu|s |n 20¹2 overu|| und ¹8.¹% ¦ewer |&0
deals less than 20,000 square feet.
With not much to draw from the numbers to
suggest a demand increase in 2013, we are left
hoping and expecting that Silicon Valley will post
a repeat of 2012’s decent R&D results. Even
that will be difficult if recent trends are to be
All four quarters of 2012
resulted in occupancy
gains for San Jose,
demonstrating that results
were not attributable to
just one or two huge
deals. The three largest
R&D deals in San Jose
for 2012 were all user
sales: LSI ’s purchase of
two buildings totaling
220,591 square feet
on Ridder Park Drive,
Synapitcs’ purchase of
three buildings totaling
151,247 square feet on
McKay Drive, and Zoll
Circulation’s purchase of
a 124,500-square-foot
building on Ringwood
Avenue.
13 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Silicon Valley R&D Rent vs. Availability Rate Trends
0%
3.5%
7.0%
10.5%
14.0%
17.5%
21.0%
24.5%
28.0%
$0.60
$0.80
$1.00
$1.20
$1.40
Quarter-End Availability Rate Average Starting NNN Rental Rates
4Q-09 1Q-10 2Q-10 3Q-10 4Q-10 1Q-11 2Q-11 3Q-11 4Q-12 1Q-12 2Q-12 3Q-12 4Q-12
R&D MARKET
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
A smaller pipeline of
rollover space indicates
that companies are doing
better overall and not
closing their doors or
subleasing space. Barring
any reversal of that trend,
we could see up to 1.5
million square feet of
R&D net absorption in
2013. For that number
to be any higher, gross
absorption will need to
do better than the 8.5-9.0
million square feet that
Colliers is projecting.
¦rus¦ed. |eur|y 6¹.0% o¦ ¦|e |&0 gross ubsorp¦|on
recorded in 2012 happened in the first half of the
yeur und º¹.5% o¦ ¦|e ne¦ ubsorp¦|on wus recorded
in the year’s first six months. Fortunately, we are
not experiencing a large turnover of space from
existing users and that should help keep R&D net
absorption in the black.
Unless recent trends reverse themselves in a hurry,
R&D gross absorption is likely to slip to below 9.0
million square feet in 2013. While this number
looks relatively dismal when compared to historical
trends, readers need to look at it in the context of
the current user base, which is decidedly slanted
towards office users. Net absorption should still
fare well in the R&D sector. 2012 marked the fourth
straight year that less pre-improved space came on
the market for lease than the year before. A smaller
pipeline of rollover space indicates that companies
are doing better overall and not closing their doors
or subleasing space. Barring any reversal of that
¦rend, we cou|d see up ¦o ¹.5 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ o¦
R&D net absorption in 2013. For that number to be
any higher, gross absorption will need to do better
¦|un ¦|e 8.5-º.0 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ ¦|u¦ Co|||ers
is projecting. These results should be sufficient
to lower the R&D availability rate modestly, to the
¹2.5% runge.
Assuming that the economy continues to gain a
stronger foothold, we are likely to see a continuation
of the R&D rent trends that we experienced in
2012. As the recovery spreads and more leases
transact in secondary locations, weighted-average
starting rents may not change much overall even
though rents are rising across most submarkets.
Colliers anticipates that R&D asking rents should
r|se by 5-¹0% dur|ng ¦|e yeur, w|¦| we|g|¦ed-
uveruge s¦ur¦|ng ren¦s up upprox|mu¦e|y 5%.
14 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Selected Cities Historical Availability Rate Trends - R&D
San Jose Santa Clara Sunnyvale Mountain View Fremont
14.49%
13.02%
15.03%
17.57%
0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20%24%28%32% 0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24% 28% 0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24% 30% 0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24% 28% 0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24%
26.59%
26.32%
14.19%
15.14%
23.31%
22.02%
18.42%
15.62%
12.68%
8.84%
14.53%
14.14%
23.56%
24.35%
5.84%
8.30%
26.59% 2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
Selected Colliers R&D Transactions
· InfoBlox |eused ¹26,5º4 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 3¹¹¹ Coronudo 0r|ve |n Sun¦u C|uru. Bixby Land Company is the landlord.
· Zoll Circulation purc|used u ¹24,500-squure-¦oo¦ bu||d|ng u¦ 2000-2002 ||ngwood Avenue |n Sun Jose. Sanmina-SCI Corporation is the seller.
· 8x8 |eused ¹04,657 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 2¹25 0'|e| 0r|ve |n Sun Jose. Cannae Partners is the landlord.
· Rockpoint Group and Presidio Investments comp|e¦ed u º6,4¹5-squure-¦oo¦ |euse u¦ 350 Juvu 0r|ve |n Sunnyvu|e. Ruckus Wireless is the tenant.
· iStar Financial comp|e¦ed u 7º,085-squure-¦oo¦ |euse u¦ ¹873 Burber |une |n |||p|¦us. Creation Technologies is the tenant.
· Soladigm |eused 77,200 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ ¹º5 S. |||p|¦us Bou|evurd |n |||p|¦us. Bryan Family Partnership is the landlord.
· LitePoint Corporation s|gned u renewu| ¦or 55,288 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 573-585 |uude Cour¦. The Irvine Company is the landlord.
· Aver Information |eused 54,48º squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 440 ||ss|on Cour¦ |n |remon¦. Mission Corporate Center is the landlord.
INDUSTRIAL
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
INDUSTRIAL MARKET
The Silicon Valley’s industrial sector finished strong
after an inauspicious start to 2012. Despite a first
quarter where the sector had to contend with a
sizable decrease in activity and the final ramifications
from the Solyndra bankruptcy (900,000+ square
feet of industrial space becoming vacant), the Silicon
Valley’s industrial sector fought its way back to a
worthy year. Granted, the industrial segment of
Silicon Valley’s commercial real estate market now
takes a back seat to the office and R&D segments,
but at least there was someone sitting in that seat
this past year.
After consistently averaging about one million square
feet of gross absorption per quarter in 2011, quarterly
uc¦|v|¦y dropped neur|y 30% |n ¦|e ¦|rs¦ quur¦er o¦
2012 before returning to a more consistent path for
the remainder of the year. When the dust settled,
|ndus¦r|u| gross ubsorp¦|on ¦u|||ed 3.73 m||||on squure
¦ee¦, jus¦ 5.2% |ess ¦|un ¦|e 3.º4 m||||on squure ¦ee¦
reported in 2011. Despite the slow start, the industrial
sector not only rebounded but impressed us with
its consistently-increasing demand each quarter of
the year.
Coming as somewhat of a surprise, the industrial
sector managed to post positive net absorption in
2012 despite nearly one million square feet of vacant
space added in the first quarter. By year-end, the
industrial sector climbed out of that deep hole and
¦|n|s|ed w|¦| ¹4º,4º5 squure ¦ee¦ o¦ pos|¦|ve ne¦
absorption. Weighing heavily in those results was the
fact that not a lot of other space was being vacated.
The amount of pre-improved space added to available
supp|y ¦o¦u|ed jus¦ 3.58 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ ¦or ¦|e
year. With its space shedding complete, Solyndra
news will be of the rear-view-mirror variety as their
remaining abandoned buildings lease or sell, starting
with Seagate’s purchase of the 411,618-square-foot
manufacturing facility that will close in the first
quarter of 2013. As a result, Silicon Valley’s industrial
sector looks poised for a strong start in 2013.
¯|e |ndus¦r|u| uvu||ub|||¦y ru¦e dec||ned ¦rom 8.5% ¦o
7.7% over ¦|e course o¦ 20¹2. l¦ |s ¦|e ¦|rs¦ ¦|me s|nce
the first quarter of 2008 that the industrial availability
ru¦e |us been under 8.0%. ¯o¦u| uvu||ub|e |ndus¦r|u|
spuce now meusures 4.32 m||||on squure ¦ee¦, u º.5%
decline from one year earlier.
A¦¦er r|s|ng neur|y ¹0% over ¦|e ¦|rs¦ |u|¦ o¦ 20¹2,
weighted-average asking rents in the industrial sector
¦|u¦¦ened ou¦ u¦ 10.78 per squure ¦oo¦ ||| over ¦|e
second half of the year. Closed deals started and
finished the year at an average start rate in the low
$0.60-per-square-foot range. In fact, when looking
at all industrial deals in 2011 compared to all deals
in 2012, weighted-average start rents were up only
5% |n 20¹2, ¦rom 10.60 per squure ¦o 10.63 per
square foot NNN.

Industrial Survives Solyndra
Silicon Valley Availability
Industrial Product
Silicon Valley Absorption
Industrial Product
0
2
4
6
8
S
q
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F
e
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i
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M
i
l
l
i
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n
s
11.37%
10.31%
7.70%
8.47%
Year-End Available
2009 2010 2011 2012
0
5
3
2
1
-1
-2
4
S
q
u
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r
e

F
e
e
t

i
n

M
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
Gross Absorption Net Absorption
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Industrial Hot Spots
San Jose proved to be the cornerstone of the
sector’s rebound. The 1.40 million square feet of
industrial gross absorption San Jose produced
in 2012 was decent but not any better than 2011.
But with that same amount of activity, San Jose
generu¦ed 47¹,º6º squure ¦ee¦ o¦ pos|¦|ve ne¦
ubsorp¦|on, neur|y 350,000 squure ¦ee¦ more
than in 2011. The improvement was owing to less
pre-improved space coming to market during the
year and in the end, it was the greatest industrial
occupuncy gu|n ¦or Sun Jose s|nce 2005. ¯|e
availability rate made significant strides, dropping
233 bus|s po|n¦s ¦rom 8.0% u¦ ¦|e end o¦ 20¹¹ ¦o
5.6%. C|u|||ng one up ¦o ¦|e re-emergence o¦
small business, San Jose produced these results
with only two deals greater than 30,000 square
feet–those being Legacy Transportation Services’
¹07,¹¹6-squure-¦oo¦ |euse on Sen¦er |oud, und
versegrove |ov|ng's 5¹,600-squure-¦oo¦ |euse on
Lenfest Road.
Consistency reigned supreme in Santa Clara,
w||c| produced 88º,456 squure ¦ee¦ o¦ |ndus¦r|u|
gross ubsorp¦|on, u ¹0.0% |ncreuse ¦rom 808,625
square feet of demand recorded in 2011. Similar
to San Jose, Santa Clara did more with less,
generating 141,909 square feet of net absorption in
20¹2 compured ¦o ¹8,5¹¹ squure ¦ee¦ |n 20¹¹. ¯|e
two largest industrial deals in Santa Clara were
user sales. One Workplace purchased a 202,000-
square-foot building on De La Cruz Boulevard
and Mass Precision Sheetmetal purchased two
buildings totaling 104,289 square feet on Copper
Road and Ryder Street.
Sunnyvale also contributed to the industrial
market’s renaissance. Lease and user-sale activity
¦o¦u|ed 343,¹46 squure ¦ee¦ ¦or 20¹2, u 57.8%
|ncreuse ¦rom ¦|e prev|ous yeur's 2¹7,3º7 squure
feet of gross absorption. The Sunnyvale industrial
market also made substantial contributions to
net absorption, posting a 240,623-square-foot
occupancy gain. The totals for both gross and net
absorption represent Sunnyvale’s best year since
¹ºº5. ¯runsuc¦|ons ¦|u¦ |e|ped w|¦| Sunnyvu|e's
overall performance include Fortinet’s user
purchase of a 164,099-square-foot building on
Kifer Road and a 40,000-square-foot lease to
Tire Center, also on Kifer.
All these positive results were necessary to
counteract the imposing hurdle that the industrial
market had to contend with in 2012–the added
vacancy created by two former Solyndra facilities
that dominated Fremont’s first quarter occupancy
loss of 918,108 square feet. While the Valley’s
industrial sector was able to overcome the deficit,
|remon¦ ¦|n|s|ed |n ¦|e red w|¦| un 846,552-
square-foot occupancy loss. Building upon the
449,223 square feet of demand generated during
the year, Fremont is poised to move on and grab
more good-news headlines in 2013. Noteworthy
2012 industrial transactions in Fremont include
0uun¦u Compu¦er's ¹02,626-squure-¦oo¦ |euse on
Boscell Road, and Full Source signing a 46,433
square-foot lease on Boyce Road.
Looking Forward
Commercial real estate news on the industrial
side was decidedly upbeat during 2012 and there
is no reason to anticipate anything different for
2013. In fact, the year promises to start out with a
bang when Seagate closes escrow on Solyndra’s
411,618-square-foot manufacturing facility in
Fremont during the year’s first quarter. This will
result in positive net absorption of one of the two
Solyndra facilities totaling 918,108 square feet
that were a part of the negative net absorption
tally in the first quarter of 2012. The fact that
the industrial market was able to finish with
¹50,000 squure ¦ee¦ o¦ pos|¦|ve ne¦ ubsorp¦|on
after starting in such a deep hole is a testament to
the strong momentum from the industrial sector
coming into 2013.
Not all is rosy on the horizon however. It bears
mentioning that the national economy is still
unstable and changes to the tax code are not
going to provide any jump start for small business.
Locally, industrial suppliers to the tech industry,
service providers and the like will need to ride
the coattails of Silicon Valley’s technology sector.
As Silicon Valley continues to gain momentum,
small business should follow suit. Although we
are concerned by the fact that there were fewer
industrial deals done in 2012 than 2011 in smaller
size categories, we are encouraged by the 1.08
million square feet of positive net absorption that
occurred after the first quarter in Silicon Valley’s
industrial sector.
It will be interesting to see what happens
with industrial building sales in 2013. Colliers
INDUSTRIAL MARKET
The year promises to
start out with a bang
when Seagate closes
escrow on Solyndra’s
411,618-square-foot
manufacturing facility
in Fremont during the
year’s first quarter. This
will result in positive
net absorption of one
of the two Solyndra
facilities totaling 918,108
square feet that were a
part of the negative net
absorption tally in the
first quarter of 2012.
¹7 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Silicon Valley Industrial Rent vs. Availability Rate Trends
0%
6%
10%
2%
4%
8%
14%
12%
$0.40
$0
$0.50
$0.70
$0.90
$0.60
$0.80
$1.00
Quarter-End Availability Rate Average Starting NNN Rental Rates
4Q-09 1Q-10 2Q-10 3Q-10 4Q-10 1Q-11 2Q-11 3Q-11 4Q-11 1Q-12 2Q-12 3Q-12 4Q-12
INDUSTRIAL MARKET
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
The new fiscal cliff plan did
not take nearly as big of a
bite out of capital gains tax
as many expected and the
incentive to beat the capital
gains tax rate change that
was unknown coming
into 2013 has passed for
now. Still, we anticipate
that owner-user industrial
building sales will be in
play over the course of the
new year. Escalating rents
and values are motivating
factors for tenants to
buy and owners to sell,
and that should keep
owner-user building sales
on the radar.
18 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Selected Cities Historical Availability Rate Trends - Industrial
Fremont Santa Clara San Jose Mountain View Sunnyvale
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12%
10.59%
9.77%
7.98%
5.64%
0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14%
10.51%
7.51%
5.97%
4.20%
0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14%
6.43%
4.92%
7.04%
16.30%
0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24% 28%
14.77%
15.58%
6.63%
0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14%
8.87%
8.57%
3.89%
4.03%
16.73%
Selected Colliers Industrial Transactions
· One Workplace purc|used u 202,000-squure-¦oo¦ bu||d|ng |ocu¦ed u¦ 2500 0e |u Cruz Bou|evurd |n Sun¦u C|uru ¦rom Graphic Packaging.
· Legacy Transportation |eused ¹07,¹¹6 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 20¹¹ Sen¦er |oud |n Sun Jose. JP DiNapoli Companies is the landlord.
· Mass Precision Sheetmetal purc|used ¦wo bu||d|ngs ¦o¦u||ng ¹04,28º squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 2º60 Copper |oud und 3500 |yder |oud |n Sun¦u C|uru.
Copper Industrials is the seller.
· Omnicell |eused 46,307 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 735 Sycumore 0r|ve |n |||p|¦us. Nearon Enterprises is the landlord.
· Tire Centers leased 40,000 square feet at 680 Kifer Road in Sunnyvale. Home Depot is the landlord.
· Mark Allen Trust comp|e¦ed u 27,770-squure-¦oo¦ |euse u¦ º75 |ubury |oud |n Sun Jose. Legacy Sanitation is the tenant.
· River City Building Supply renewed their 24,000-square-foot lease at 999 Mabury Road in San Jose. Mabruy Road Property is the landlord.
c0-,-,1203!2'-, purc|used u 23,000-squure-¦oo¦ bu||d|ng |ocu¦ed u¦ 270 Cur|bbeun 0r|ve |n Sunnyvu|e ¦rom M3 Global.
observed an upswing in owner-user building
sales momentum over the past three years but
the numbers flattened out in 2012. The new fiscal
cliff plan did not take nearly as big of a bite out
of capital gains tax as many expected and the
incentive to beat the capital gains tax rate change
that was unknown coming into 2013 has passed for
now. Still, we anticipate that owner-user industrial
building sales will be in play over the course of
the new year. Escalating rents and values are
motivating factors for tenants to buy and owners
to sell, and that should keep owner-user building
sales on the radar.
With the Seagate deal getting the ball rolling in 2013,
Colliers anticipates that industrial gross absorption
w||| r|se ubove 3.75 m||||on squure ¦ee¦, w||c| wou|d
be the second highest since 2006 and slightly more
than 2012. Industrial net absorption stands a very
good chance of rising to the highest level since
2006. While a 1.0-million-square-foot occupancy
gu|n |s no¦ ou¦ o¦ ¦|e ques¦|on, 750,000 squure
feet is well within reach and Colliers’ call for 2013.
As with the other product types, the pipeline of
pre-improved space coming to market in the form
of negative net absorption has narrowed and the
resulting positive net absorption should push the
|ndus¦r|u| uvu||ub|||¦y ru¦e be|ow 7.0%.
Industrial rents for new deals were relatively flat
in 2012 and while asking rents increased early in
the year, that trend stalled over the second half
as well. With so much uncertainly in the small
business sector, Colliers does not expect much
dev|u¦|on |n 20¹3-per|ups uno¦|er 5% bump |n
both asking and closed-deal rents over the course
of the year. Beyond that, if industrial availability
ru¦es drop ¦o be|ow 7%, ¦|ere w||| be p|en¦y o¦
momentum heading into 2014 for rents to increase
at an accelerated rate.
WAREHOUSE
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
WAREHOUSE MARKET
The Silicon Valley warehouse sector took one step
forward and two steps back in 2012. Although new
life percolated in the first three quarters of the year,
it disappeared in the fourth quarter at the same time
additional space was being vacated. Moving a step
¦orwurd, uc¦|v|¦y |ncreused 22.5% ¦rom 20¹¹, ¦|n|s||ng
¦|e yeur w|¦| 2.¹5 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ o¦ gross ubsorp¦|on.
Warehouse demand improved consecutively in the first
three quarters of the year, reaching the highest level in
¦wo yeurs dur|ng ¦|e ¦||rd quur¦er u¦ 70¹,0º0 squure
feet. Even with the fourth-quarter collapse, quarterly
gross absorption exceeded Colliers’ forecasted average
o¦ 500,000 squure ¦ee¦ per quur¦er.
Alas, the improved gross absorption results were not
enough to overcome the elevated amount of rollover
space coming to market, especially after fourth-quarter
uc¦|v|¦y s|owed ¦o 334,325 squure ¦ee¦, more ¦|un
50% o¦¦ ¦|e puce se¦ |n ¦|e ¦|rs¦ ¦|ree quur¦ers o¦
the year. During that same quarter, 919,968 square
feet of warehouse space was vacated, resulting in
the highest quarterly loss in warehouse occupancy
since the first quarter of 2009. Although lower than
2008-2010 levels, the 2.81 million square feet of
vacant warehouse space that came to market in 2012
exceeded occupancy gains by a wide margin.
¯|e negu¦|ve ne¦ ubsorp¦|on o¦ 65º,¹04 squure ¦ee¦
marks the fifth consecutive year of increased vacancy
for the warehouse sector. This is the longest stretch
of yearly warehouse occupancy losses since Colliers
started measuring absorption in 1988. The second
quarter posted the only positive gain in occupancy
and that was only the second quarter since 2009 that
warehouse net absorption was in the black.
Avu||ub|e wure|ouse spuce |ncreused º.6% ¦rom 20¹¹
¦o ¦|n|s| ¦|e yeur u¦ 4.56 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ uvu||ub|e.
While this is the highest amount of available space
since the first quarter of 2006, the amount remaining
on the market is less that it could be given the level of
negative net absorption experienced. 2012 saw BART
extending its reach into San Jose, demolishing several
vacant warehouse buildings on Berryessa Road and
Gladding Court. This reduced the warehouse building
buse by 325,5º2 squure ¦ee¦ und w|||e ¦|u¦ creu¦ed un
occupancy loss at the time those users exited, it also
removed 140,882 square feet from available supply
without any corresponding positive net absorption.
The increase in activity did not do much to bring about
a significant change in warehouse rents. Starting rents
meandered in the mid $0.40-per-square-foot range
(NNN), finishing the year at $0.43 per square foot.
Comparing all warehouse transactions in 2012 to 2011,
weighted-average start rents grew from $0.41 per
square foot NNN to $0.43 per square foot. Comparing
deals done in the fourth quarter of 2012 to the same
quarter of 2011, weighted-average start rents were
actually down slightly, at $0.43 per square foot NNN
|n ¦|e ¦our¦| quur¦er o¦ 20¹2 compured ¦o 10.45 per
square foot in the same quarter of 2011.
Warehouse Still Boxed Out
Silicon Valley Availability
Warehouse Product
Silicon Valley Absorption
Warehouse Product
0
1
2
3
4
5
S
q
u
a
r
e

F
e
e
t

i
n

M
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
10.18%
10.75%
11.83%
Year-End Available
2009 2010 2011 2012
9.12%
3
2
1
.5
1.5
-1.5
2.5
0
-1
-.5
Gross Absorption
S
q
u
a
r
e

F
e
e
t

i
n

M
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
Net Absorption
2009 2010 2011 2012 2008
Warehouse Hot Spots
Fremont and San Jose reversed roles from the
previous year. Fremont contributed the largest
increase in warehouse occupancy and San Jose
the largest decrease in 2012. After not posting
u s|ng|e |euse ¦runsuc¦|on ubove 5¹,000 squure
feet in 2011, Fremont landed two new warehouse
deals above 100,000 square feet in the past year.
The first, RK Logistics Group’s 190,080-square-
foot lease on Christy Street in the second quarter,
was the biggest deal done in the warehouse
sector during the year. The second was OnTrac’s
132,900-square-foot lease signed on Boyce Road,
also in the second quarter. All told, Fremont
posted four consecutive quarters of occupancy
gain, reducing that city’s warehouse availability
ru¦e ¦rom ¹5.4% ¦o ¹2.4% und |euv|ng º46,462
square feet of warehouse space still available.
San Jose’s warehouse occupancy loss of
806,75º squure ¦ee¦ wus |¦s greu¦es¦ decreuse |n
occupancy since 2002 and the fifth consecutive
year of negative net absorption for that city.
There is now 1.80 million square feet of available
wure|ouse spuce |n Sun Jose, up ¹6.5% ¦rom
one yeur ugo und ¹0º.5% s|nce 2007. Ac¦|v|¦y
was subdued during the year, with the largest
warehouse deal being Freeland Food’s purchase
o¦ 65,¹73 squure ¦ee¦ on |us ||umus Avenue. 0n
the flip side, San Jose Forest Products vacated
¹35,000 squure ¦ee¦ on Sou¦| 7¦| S¦ree¦ und u
number o¦ o¦|er spuces under 50,000 squure
feet were vacated as well.
Gilroy was the other large contributor to negative
net absorption in the Valley, with 162,830 square
feet on Chestnut Street being vacated in the fourth
quur¦er. Curren¦|y, ¦|ere |s 5¹¹,306 squure ¦ee¦
available in Santa Clara County’s southernmost
warehouse submarket.
On a positive note, there was an increase in
new, 100,000-square-foot-plus deals done in
2012 over 2011. While 2011 only saw one new
deal above that threshold, 2012 offered more. In
addition to RK Logistics and OnTrac in Fremont,
Apple finalized their expansion into 149,010
square feet in Milpitas on Montague Expressway,
and DGA Servicesleased 134,160 square feet on
Mead Avenue in Sunnyvale.
Looking Forward
The one easy thing to forecast in the warehouse
sector is that Silicon Valley is unlikely to break
any new absorption records, at least not on
¦|e ||g| s|de. ln ¹ºº3, ¦|e vu||ey produced 5.24
million square feet of warehouse absorption
and we have not touched 4.0 million square feet
s|nce ¹ºº7 or even 3.0 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ s|nce
2005. w|¦| ¦|e munu¦uc¦ur|ng g|un¦s |urge|y
gone from the Silicon Valley, we see very little
need for warehousing product from large users
themselves. Instead, we will continue to have a few
third party providers who handle the temporary
logistics, distribution, and warehousing needs
for others.
We also do not see many deals from alternative
uses like sports facilities that seem to arise
periodically. Back in the 1990’s, those uses often
gravitated into old cannery buildings and those
are now gone. Rents for the limited inventory
that remains are typically too high for these
alternative uses unless one of the older, obsolete
spaces happens to be on the market. In large
part, those have been razed and replaced by
residential development. When looking at the
largest dozen warehouse deals from 2012, none
can be categorized as an alternative use. Even
the recyclers that seemed to be so hot in recent
years are noticeably absent from the list of the top
warehouse deals of 2012.
What we can expect going forward are deals
similar to those that were closed in 2012. Most of
the larger deals will probably be in Fremont, with
a handful in Milpitas and San Jose. Third-party
logistics companies were responsible for four of
the largest six deals in 2012, so that appears to
be the single hottest warehouse segment going
for Silicon Valley right now. Apple computer is
always a possibility; otherwise most of the larger
warehouse deals will be one-off transactions
here and there from all sorts of corners, ranging
from goods & parts distribution to research &
development uses coming from the tech industry.
When all is said and done, a repeat of 2012
warehouse activity is Colliers’ outlook for 2013.
A|¦|oug| ¦|u¦ wou|d meun roug||y 2.25 m||||on
square feet of gross absorption, activity may
creep a little higher for one simple fact; there is
more warehouse space available now than at any
time since the first quarter of 2006. More choices
WAREHOUSE MARKET
The one easy thing to
forecast in the warehouse
sector is that Silicon Valley
is unlikely to break any
new absorption records, at
least not on the high side.
In 1993, the Valley produced
5.2 million square feet of
warehouse absorption and
we have not touched 4.0
million square feet since
1997 or even 3.0 million
square feet since 2005.
21 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Silicon Valley Warehouse Rent vs. Availability Rate Trends
0%
4%
8%
2%
6%
12%
10%
$0
$.30
$.15
$.45
$.60
$.75
$.90
4Q-09 1Q-10 2Q-10 3Q-10 4Q-10 1Q-11 2Q-11 3Q-11 4Q-11 1Q-12 2Q-12 3Q-12 4Q-12
Quarter-End Availability Rate Average Starting NNN Rental Rates
WAREHOUSE MARKET
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY
MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
The slight bump in
warehouse activity does
not necessarily translate
to a corresponding
occupancy gain but the
five year negative net
absorption trend cannot
continue forever and it
is Colliers’ position that
this trend will finally
reverse itself in 2013.
Even no change in overall
warehouse occupancy
would be a positive after
2012, but we will go out
on a limb and look for
net absorption to be in
the black to the tune of
250,000-500,000
square feet.
22 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Selected Colliers Warehouse Transactions
· RK Logistics Group |eused ¹º0,080 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 4¹707 C|r|s¦y S¦ree¦ |n |remon¦. BIT Investment Eleven is the landlord.
· 3-Way Logistics |eused 75,º63 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 42505 C|r|s¦y S¦ree¦ |n |remon¦. BIT Holdings 67 is the landlord.
· McCollister’s Moving & Storage renewed ¦|e|r 66,8º3-squure-¦oo¦ |euse u¦ 45¹25 lndus¦r|u| 0r|ve |n |remon¦. PS Business Parks is the landlord.
· Actiontec Electronics |eused 53,4¹0 squure ¦ee¦ u¦ 45¹6º lndus¦r|u| 0r|ve |n |remon¦. PS Business Parks is the landlord.
· Leadman Electronics USA purc|used u 50,860-squure-¦oo¦ bu||d|ng u¦ 382 |uure|wood |oud |n Sun¦u C|uru. Johnson Family Trust is the seller.
· Danny Recycling purc|used u 50,000-squure-¦oo¦ bu||d|ng u¦ 2¹5 |eon Avenue |n Sun Jose. Nemo Ganoza is the seller.
· Prologis comp|e¦ed u 25,200-squure-¦oo¦ |euse u¦ 2026 |ur¦|n |n Sun¦u C|uru. D&T Distribution is the tenant.
· Les Pelio completed a 20,240-square-foot lease at 691 Walsh in Santa Clara. Bay Area Diablo Petroleum is the tenant.
Selected Cities Historical Availability Rate Trends - Warehouse
San Jose Milpitas Fremont Santa Clara Gilroy
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
2009
2010
2011
2012
0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24%
8.95%
9.08%
9.44%
11.17%
0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 24%
7.03%
11.65%
15.44%
12.39%
0% 4% 8% 12% 16% 20% 22% 0% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 15%
5.25%
5.25%
7.19%
15.86%
2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14%
11.04%
9.07%
13.06%
5.98%
15.89%
19.25%
13.29%
18.96%
tend to initiate more activity but not necessarily
more net absorption. Of particular note, there
are nine warehouse spaces available in excess
of 100,000 square feet (excluding combo spaces)
versus four at this time last year, so there is a
greater potential for large deals. Given that the
Silicon Valley’s commercial real estate market is
improving overall, more choices could lead to more
activity in this sector, so our forecast calls for
2.5 m||||on squure ¦ee¦ o¦ new wure|ouse uc¦|v|¦y
in 2013.
The slight bump in warehouse activity does not
necessarily translate to a corresponding occupancy
gain but the five year negative net absorption trend
cannot continue forever and it is Colliers’ position
that this trend will finally reverse itself in 2013.
Even no change in overall warehouse occupancy
would be a positive after 2012, but we will go out
on a limb and look for net absorption to be in the
b|uc| ¦o ¦|e ¦une o¦ 250,000-500,000 squure ¦ee¦.
Slow activity and negative net absorption would
suggest flat rent trends in the warehouse sector
and for the most part that is what the numbers
demonstrate. However, there does appear to be
some upward pressure on rents for warehouse
space currently on the market, as demonstrated by
an increase in weighted-average asking rents from
10.46 per squure ¦oo¦ ||| ¦o 10.52 per squure
foot in 2012. With limited options available for
whatever demand does surface in 2013, Colliers
expects that weighted-average start rents will
nudge upward by a few cents per square foot;
while asking rents will remain relatively flat as the
market attempts to catch up with asking prices.
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
RETAIL MARKET
RETAIL
In our 2011-2012 market report, Colliers posed the
ques¦|on, "Are we ¦|ere ye¦?' ¯|e unswer |us¦ yeur
wus u dec|ded "Yes'. ¯|e ques¦|on now |s |ow |ong
will the current growth cycle last and what will the
longer-term impacts be on retail trends in the Silicon
Valley? Colliers Retail Services Group is predicting
that we should see solid rent growth and continued
strong retail demand during 2013 and beyond.
Silicon Valley helped lead the way for the Bay Area
region with sustained employment growth in the
high-tech sector that has had a trickle-down effect
across the broader economy, leading to increased
residential construction and housing demand,
consumer confidence, and retail real estate demand.
The Bay Area has added over 40,000 new jobs since
eur|y 20¹¹ und neur|y 50,000 jobs |uve been udded
|n S|||con vu||ey s|nce 2007, w|¦| u ||g| concen¦ru¦|on
in better paying high-tech jobs.
ICSC (International Council of Shopping Centers)
reported that December chain-store sales increased
by 4.5% yeur over yeur. Comb|ned w|¦| |ovember
resu|¦s, |o||duy 20¹2 su|es were up 3.¹% on pur
with the sales growth experienced in 2011. Despite
the sales increase, there were some losers in the
mix. The final analysis of 2012 national trends will
be clearer come mid-February as we enter earnings
season and retailers start to report official sales
results. Retailers that we expect to report solid sales
gains include those that secured sizeable inventories
o¦ "|o¦' commod|¦|es: ¦oys ´wu|mur¦, ¯oys |' Us`,
home goods–especially small appliances, high-quality
personal care products (Bath & Body Works, Ulta),
und u se|ec¦ group o¦ "¦us¦ cusuu|' res¦uurun¦s |||e
Starbucks and Corner Bakery, that offer high value
and convenience for their customers.
According to industry reports, Silicon Valley retailers
fared on average better than their counterparts
across the country due in large part to strong
employment gains in the region. We expect that the
Bay Area, which has been a target market for most
retailers, will be magnified with ever-greater demand
by retailers to gain a foothold in the region.
In spite of the overall regional and national economic
progress, valuation and vacancy disparity between
submarkets and trade areas remains an issue worth
keeping a watchful eye on. Older centers and those not
|ocu¦ed |n "A' ¦rude ureus ure see|ng d|spropor¦|onu¦e|y
lower rents and higher vacancy. Overall, the average
re¦u|| vucuncy ru¦e |n ¦|e vu||ey decreused ¦rom 6.5% u¦
¦|e end o¦ 20¹¹ ¦o upprox|mu¦e|y 5.0% u¦ yeur-end 20¹2.
The drop in vacancy is the second straight year we have
seen a reported drop in the annual average since 2009.
¯op-¦|er ¦rude ureus und "A' proper¦|es con¦|nued ¦o
outperform secondary and periphery trade areas with
vacancy rates half those of the lower performing areas.
Rental rate disparity is equally unbalanced.
The highest demand continues to be for prime corner
|ocu¦|ons |n ¦rude ureus w|¦| s¦rong ¦undumen¦u|s:
balanced daytime/evening consumer demands, higher
disposable incomes, regional accessibility, convenient
access, abundant parking, and visibility. National tenant
demand has remained robust along with regional chains.
In particular, growth in the food-services fast casual
segment has been unprecedented with numerous new
¦enun¦s en¦er|ng ¦|e mur|e¦: ¯|e |e|¦, Jersey |||e's,
Which Wich, The Counter, Five Guys Burgers & Fries,
The Habit Burger, Philz Coffee, La Boulanger, Boudin
Bakery, Corner Bakery, Panera, Noodles & Company,
Freebirds, Ponchero’s, Buffalo Wild Wings, Dave’s
|umous BB0, und BJ's Brew|ouse umong o¦|ers.
Banks and financial institutions have also had a good
run over the past year and we expect the trend to
continue, albeit at a reduced pace. Entrepreneurial
start-ups and franchise businesses that have been
almost non-existent since the 2008 bubble are slowly
starting to emerge. We credit the reemergence of these
new entrepreneurs to several factors, not the least
of which is a better lending environment, increasing
home valuation (equity), and the nouveau riche who
cashed out their IPO earnings (Linked-In, Zynga,
Facebook). Much of the entrepreneurial expansion
will be privately funded and/or require high equity
positions as commercial lending has yet to hit its
stride. The combination of solid national and regional
tenant demand coupled with growing demand from
private innovative start-ups and franchises bodes
Retail Revival Arrival
RETAIL MARKET
Barring a major meltdown,
we believe retail leasing
activity will remain steady
and that positive absorption
will continue through
2013, which will in turn
spread to the periphery
submarkets. Rental rates in
the tertiary and periphery
markets should see healthy
rental-rate appreciation
in the double-digit range.
Rental rates in primary
markets will grow by a
smaller percentage, as
those rents have already
priced in market gains.
Selected Colliers Retail Transactions
· Safeway sub|e¦ 7¹,040 squure ¦ee¦ o¦ re¦u|| spuce u¦ 375 |. Cup|¦u| Avenue |n Sun Jose. Fallas Paredes is the sublessee.
· Hobby Lobby |eused 77,¹65 squure ¦ee¦ |n ¦|e ¦ormer |ervyn's |ocu¦ed u¦ Coc|rune ||uzu |n |orgun ||||. Inland Western Real Estate Trust is
the landlord.
· Safeway s|gned u 65,000-squure-¦oo¦ bu||d-¦o-su|¦ ugreemen¦ w|¦| ¦|e Sobrato Organization at Homestead Square in Cupertino.
· LA Fitness s|gned u 45,000-squure-¦oo¦ bu||d-¦o-su|¦ ugreemen¦ w|¦| Arcadia Development at Coleman Landings Shopping Center in San Jose.
· TIAA-CREF purc|used C|ur|es¦on ||uzu, u ¹32,5º0-squure-¦oo¦ C|uss A re¦u|| deve|opmen¦, |n |oun¦u|n v|ew ¦rom Dollinger Properties.
25
well for rental growth and declining vacancies in
secondary and tertiary retail centers in the region
in the coming years.
Rental rates that essentially bottomed out in late
2009, have risen to pre-recession levels in many
of the stronger markets and in some instances
are now topping previous highs for the very best
spaces in the best locations. With minor exception,
competition from office/R&D and high-density
residential projects has crowded out most new
retail development. In the few cases where more
traditional retail is being built, rental rates are top
of the market.
Grocery tenants’ appetite for new locations went
unabated in 2012, with Safeway, Sprouts, The
Fresh Market, Grocery Outlet, and Walmart Grocery
adding new stores. Safeway has three stores under
cons¦ruc¦|on |n S|||con vu||ey: ¦wo re|ocu¦|ons |n
Cupertino, Mountain View, and one new store in
San Jose. Walmart opened two stores with one
in the former Home Expo building off Almaden
|xpresswuy und ||g|wuy 85 und u wu|mur¦
Grocery backfilled the former Safeway space
at Westgate Shopping Center. Target remained
a market force with new stores anchoring the
redevelopment of the Crossroads Shopping Center
in Santa Clara and Hunter Properties’ new Village
Oaks project in south San Jose.
LA Fitness opened two new clubs and has a
number of additional sites under contract. The
fitness segment in general has been very robust
with numerous competitors churning the market.
Two of the last few Mervyn’s vacant boxes leased
in 2012 with Hobby Lobby and Fallas Paredas
(Factory 2-U) both making market statements
with their first stores in Santa Clara County.
Looking Ahead
Colliers Retail Services Group is optimistic about
leasing and sales activity remaining robust
through 2013 as a result of the healthy regional
and national economy, and the lessening influence
of European and Middle East uncertainties. The
major threat to continued growth is the federal
government and how they handle the fiscal cliff,
debt ceiling, and runaway entitlement costs.
Barring a major meltdown, we believe retail
leasing activity will remain steady and that positive
absorption will continue through 2013, which will
in turn spread to the periphery submarkets.
Rental rates in the tertiary and periphery markets
should see healthy rental-rate appreciation in
the double-digit range. Rental rates in primary
markets will grow by a smaller percentage, as
those rents have already priced in market gains
in recent years and are topping out against tenant
health ratios (sales/occupancy costs).
Projects of Note
The Village at San Antonio: ±120,000-square-
¦oo¦, m|xed-use projec¦ unc|ored by 65,000-
square-foot Safeway, includes 300+ apartments in
Phase I. The project is currently under construction
with completion this spring.
Village Oaks: ±300,000-square-foot retail center
anchored by Target, Safeway, and Marshalls as
part of a larger master-planned redevelopment of
the Hitachi campus in south San Jose. Target is
set to start construction this spring with opening
scheduled for October.
Main Street Cupertino: ±130,000 square feet
of retail as part of a larger mixed-use project
|nc|ud|ng ¹50-200 room |o¦e|, ¹50,000 squure ¦ee¦
of office, and 160 senior living units. The project is
set to start construction in the spring of 2013.
Almaden Ranch: ±380,000 square feet of
planned retail. Tenants actively pursuing the
projec¦ |nc|ude: |ome 0epo¦, |A ||¦ness und
Dick’s Sporting Goods. Project construction is
scheduled to start in the summer of 2013.
@ First: ±210,000 square feet completed in 2012
with Target anchoring this mixed-use project with
CVS, Chick-fil-A, and Fresh & Easy. The project
was developed by Hunter Properties and sold last
year to American Realty Advisors.

Homestead Square: ±200,000-square-foot
redevelopment of the former PW-anchored center
at Homestead and DeAnza in Cupertino. Safeway
|s under cons¦ruc¦|on on u new 65,000 squure-¦oo¦
store along with Rite Aid and Michaels.
Main Street Santa Clara: ±300,000-square-
foot project formerly anchored by Mervyn’s is
being redeveloped with Target to anchor the new
project along with Walgreens and a future grocery
store. Target is expected to start redevelopment
in the fall of 2013.
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
INVESTMENT MARKET
INVESTMENT Following a bullish 2011 in which investors clamored
for well-located product within the Silicon Valley,
the return of the portfolio sale increased overall
investment activity during 2012. Led by the Mission
West Properties’ portfolio sale to the DivcoWest/TPG
Joint Venture that closed in December, along with
LBA Realty, TA Realty, and Lane Partners/Walton
Street all acquiring significant portfolios during 2012,
deu| vo|ume |n 20¹2 jumped 7¹% over 20¹¹.
Non-portfolio transactions also surged during 2012
as value-add investors stabilized and exited assets
in submarkets such as Palo Alto, Mountain View,
and Sunnyvale, and investors with more appetite
for risk acquired assets in submarkets such as
North San Jose, Downtown San Jose, Milpitas,
and Fremont. 2012 marked the first time in this
cycle that a significant amount of capital entered
these markets. While core markets throughout the
Bay Area experienced strong demand as investors
required lower returns, assets in markets outside of
the classification priced more in-line with the risk
inherent to the transactions.
Buoyed by "reu|' ¦ec|no|ogy dr|vers |nc|ud|ng c|oud
computing, virtualization, social networking, and
mobility, Silicon Valley firms continued to aggressively
hire employees in the Silicon Valley. Now at just under
880,000 employees in the San Jose, Sunnyvale,
Santa Clara MSA, the number of employees in the
Silicon Valley has eclipsed the early 2008 level of
employment by over 20,000 jobs. The aggressive
hiring has led directly to corporate real estate
expansion as firms continue to make calculated
decisions to increase their real estate footprints. As
both private and institutional investors continue to see
strong macro-economic and leasing fundamentals in
the region, capital will continue to flow into Silicon
Valley commercial real estate.
Cap Rates
Driven by core buyers seeking relatively stronger
yields in comparison to other financial instruments and
value-add buyers acquiring assets with short-term
and below-market rental income, the average cap
ru¦es ¦or ¦runsuc¦|ons dur|ng 20¹2 ¦e|| ¦o 6.5%, u mur|
significantly less than the 2010 average cap rate of
8.25%, w||c| re¦|ec¦ed ¦|e uncer¦u|n¦y |n ¦|e mur|e¦
at the time. Looking forward, we anticipate this trend
to stabilize as core buyers continue to seek secure
cash flow and value-add buyers continue to acquire
high-quality assets with short-term leases that can be
marked-to-market in the coming years at lease rates
significantly higher than the current income.
Silicon Valley Buyers in 2011-2012
Firm
Number of
Properties
Acquired
Transaction
Amount
DivcoWest Properties 52 $863M
TA Realty 10 $102M
LBA Realty 10 1¹70|
Google 10 $331M
Irvine Company 7 14º7|
Silicon Valley Sellers in 2011-2012
Firm
Number of
Properties Sold
Transaction
Amount
Mission West
Properties
54 $820M
RREEF 20 137º|
South Bay
Development
10 $143M
GE Capital 9 1¹º5|
Blackstone/EOP 9 1327|
Silicon Valley Shines
2009 2010 2011 2012
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
B
i
l
l
i
o
n
s

o
f

D
o
l
l
a
r
s
0
Deal Volume Since 2009
¯Source: |eu| Cup|¦u| Anu|y¦|cs
INVESTMENT MARKET
Driven by core buyers
seeking relatively stronger
yields in comparison
to other financial
instruments and value-add
buyers acquiring assets
with short-term and
below-market rental
income, the average cap
rates for transactions
during 2012 fell to 6.5%, a
mark significantly less than
the 2010 average cap rate
of 8.25%, which reflected
the uncertainty in the
market at the time. Looking
forward, we anticipate this
trend to stabilize.
Selected Colliers Investment Transactions
27 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Looking Forward
Deal Volume
In 2013, expect another strong year of investment sales volume. Many institutional owners of large portfolios within the Silicon Valley
have plans to continue dispositions locally as appetite for Silicon Valley real estate globally has increased dramatically due to the
macro-economic story and strong balance sheets of the tenant base. Along with additional portfolio dispositions, value-add investors will
also sell more real estate as they fill currently-vacant buildings and sell them to core buyers looking for strong yields backed by credit.
Cap Rates
Cap rates within the Silicon Valley during 2013 will most likely decrease slightly as the capital markets are strengthening by the quarter. As
¦|e S|||con vu||ey proves ¦o be one o¦ ¦|e bes¦ 's¦or|es' |n ¦|e g|obu| mur|e¦p|uce, bo¦| equ|¦y und deb¦ ure uggress|ve|y c|us|ng deu|s |ere,
lowering yield requirements and interest rates. With the Federal Reserve pledging to keep interest rates near all-time lows and lenders
such as banks and life insurance companies looking for relatively safe loans, the Silicon Valley will continue to see the capital markets
strengthen during the year.
Price Per Square Foot
Vacant buildings selling to value-oriented investors will continue, as investors are bullish on the fundamentals of the valley and are
confident that they can execute a business plan in a short period of time. On the core side of the buyer pool, investor yield thresholds
con¦|nue ¦o dec||ne due ¦o ¦|e re|u¦|ve s¦reng¦| o¦ ¦|e S|||con vu||ey. ¯|e re|u¦|ve 'su¦e¦y' o¦ ¦|e Buy Areu comb|ned w|¦| ||s¦or|cu||y-|ow
interest rates will continue to drive cap rates lower for well-located real estate with strong credit on the rent roll.
Non-Core Market Investment Activity
As leasing fundamentals within submarkets such as San Jose, Milpitas, and Fremont continue to strengthen, capital allocated to
value-oriented real estate in the Silicon Valley will flow into such markets. Further, as value-add deals are priced at near peak
price-per-foot records in markets further up the Peninsula, value-add deals in markets such as North San Jose, Milpitas and Fremont will
|oo| |ncreus|ng|y u¦¦ruc¦|ve. ¯|ese usse¦s w||| be more |n ¦uvor us |eus|ng ve|oc|¦y expunds w|||e ¦|e 'pr|ce per pound' ¦or suc| |nves¦men¦s
remains significantly below replacement cost and well below where pricing has occurred historically.
Distressed Asset Sales
A|¦|oug| ¦|ere ure u |urge number o¦ 2007 und 2008-v|n¦uge ¦|ve-yeur |ouns ¦|u¦ |uve e|¦|er been ex¦ended or w||| exp|re |n 20¹3, Co|||ers
does not expect a significant upward trend in foreclosure activity, particularly for assets over $10M. Strong leasing fundamentals and an
|mprov|ng mucroeconom|c p|c¦ure |n ¦|e S|||con vu||ey |us dr|ven vu|uu¦|ons ubove 2007 |eve|s |n mos¦ cuses, u||ow|ng curren¦ borrowers
to avoid potential foreclosure activity. Lenders with large portfolios across the country will continue to focus on assets elsewhere that are
less fundamentally sound than the Silicon Valley.

· Graymark Capital purc|used u 3º,3¹¹-squure-¦oo¦ |&0 bu||d|ng u¦ 674-678 w. |uude Avenue |n Sunnyvu|e. Trumark Commercial is the seller.
· Lane Partners so|d un ¹¹¹,285-squure-¦oo¦ o¦¦|ce/|&0 bu||d|ng |ocu¦ed u¦ 3055 0rc|urd 0r|ve |n Sun Jose. TMG Partners and Alcion
Partners are the buyers.
· DivcoWest sold two office/R&D buildings totaling 126,000 square feet at 3000 and 3030 Orchard Parkway in San Jose. AEW Capital
Management is the buyer
· Rockpoint Group so|d u º6,4¹5-squure-¦oo¦ |&0 bu||d|ng |ocu¦ed u¦ 350 w. Juvu 0r|ve |n Sunnyvu|e. Select Income REIT is the buyer.
· Prologis sold a 62,688-square-foot R&D building located at 3939 North 1st Street in San Jose. W3 Partners is the buyer.
· Papsco Trust so|d u 3¹,657-squure-¦oo¦ |&0 bu||d|ng u¦ 8¹4 Sun A|eso Avenue |n Sunnyvu|e. CapRock Partners is the buyer.
· Simeon Commercial Properties purc|used |und ¦o¦u||ng 5.¹7 ucres |ocu¦ed u¦ ¹0333 |. wo|¦e |oud |n Cuper¦|no ¦rom EastWest Bank.
SILICON VALLEY MARKET STATISTICS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
28 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Silicon Valley Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available º,657,4¹2 ¹5.4º% 2¹,480,732 ¹3.67% 4,323,¹7º 7.70% 4,55º,562 ¹¹.83% 40,020,885 ¹2.74%
New Construction 318,000 99,800 0 0 4¹7,800
Net Absorption 30º,276 108,281 400,221 -585,643 232,¹35
Gross Absorption ¹,784,8¹¹ 1,841,388 ¹,066,º75 334,325 5,027,4ºº
30¹2
Total Available ¹0,386,¹27 ¹6.74% 21,806,482 ¹3.8¹% 4,920,013 8.72% 3,º84,05¹ ¹0.35% 4¹,0º6,673 ¹3.06%
New Construction 52,500 0 0 0 52,500
Net Absorption 7¹3,º52 38,823 274,43º -24,0º7 ¹,003,¹¹7
Gross Absorption 2,192,944 ¹,872,0¹0 1,048,699 70¹,0º0 5,8¹4,743
20¹2
Total Available ¹¹,065,¹¹2 ¹7.85% 22,263,073 ¹4.06% 5,20º,¹05 º.23% 3,878,600 ¹0.02% 42,4¹5,8º0 ¹3.45%
New Construction 306,900 ¹¹8,535 0 0 425,435
Net Absorption -¹¹7,772 882,647 400,º58 2º¹,572 ¹,457,405
Gross Absorption ¹,352,3ºº 2,524,22º 909,198 6¹¹,7¹0 5,3º7,536
¹0¹2
Total Available ¹0,463,65º ¹7.0¹% 22,73¹,773 ¹4.35% 5,633,6¹8 º.º8% 4,006,689 ¹0.35% 42,835,73º ¹3.60%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 275,62¹ 698,146 -926,123 -340,936 -293,292
Gross Absorption ¹,52¹,87º 3,255,047 707,8¹7 502,535 5,º87,278
TOTALS
New Construction 677,400 218,335 0 0 895,735
Net Absorption 1,181,077 1,727,897 149,495 -659,104 2,399,365
Gross Absorption 6,852,033 9,492,674 3,732,689 2,149,660 22,227,056
Campbell Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available 391,818 ¹8.83% ¹73,42¹ ¹3.46% 80,920 ¹2.25% 24,949 ¹5.3º% 67¹,¹08 ¹6.0¹%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 2,472 7,786 -3,076 0 7,¹82
Gross Absorption 53,887 16,669 7,340 0 77,8º6
30¹2
Total Available 37º,37º ¹8.23% ¹º¹,728 ¹4.¹7% 6¹,530 ¹0.33% 24,949 ¹5.3º% 657,586 ¹5.68%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 11,391 4,000 -8,272 0 7,¹¹º
Gross Absorption 60,4º7 4,000 8,163 0 72,660
20¹2
Total Available 368,5ºº ¹7.7¹% ¹8º,58¹ ¹3.3º% 49,830 º.35% 24,949 ¹5.3º% 632,º5º ¹5.¹0%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption ¹7,648 28,376 5,º84 0 52,008
Gross Absorption 69,812 28,376 18,236 0 116,424
¹0¹2
Total Available 367,268 ¹7.65% 204,522 ¹3.7º% 46,230 º.º2% 24,949 ¹5.3º% 642,969 ¹5.34%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 80,º45 6,532 8,724 0 96,201
Gross Absorption 116,804 22,¹70 ¹7,0ºº 0 ¹56,073
SILICON VALLEY MARKET STATISTICS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
29 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Cupertino Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available 60,810 ¹.84% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 60,810 0.º0%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -2,º¹7 0 0 0 -2,º¹7
Gross Absorption 83,72¹ 0 0 0 83,72¹
30¹2
Total Available ¹32,278 4.0¹% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% ¹32,278 ¹.º6%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption ¹4,728 0 0 0 ¹4,728
Gross Absorption 44,301 0 0 0 44,301
20¹2
Total Available 141,312 4.28% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 141,312 2.0º%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 26,º72 0 0 0 26,º72
Gross Absorption 64,808 0 0 0 64,808
¹0¹2
Total Available 120,926 3.66% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 120,926 ¹.7º%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 19,481 0 0 0 19,481
Gross Absorption 63,149 100,491 0 0 163,640
Fremont Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available 341,182 20.7º% 4,56º,65º 24.35% ¹,485,647 ¹6.30% 946,462 ¹2.3º% 7,342,º50 ¹º.76%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 31,244 ¹07,¹67 -804 39,684 ¹77,2º¹
Gross Absorption 56,456 35º,3º2 ¹03,¹25 ¹27,868 646,841
30¹2
Total Available 368,439 22.45% 4,740,2º8 25.26% ¹,528,374 ¹6.77% 864,7¹¹ ¹¹.32% 7,50¹,822 20.¹º%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 44,ºº5 -85,6¹4 ¹7,6º¹ ¹5,247 -7,68¹
Gross Absorption 52,520 26º,¹27 ¹¹8,52¹ ¹37,803 577,º7¹
20¹2
Total Available 408,648 24.º¹% 4,752,8º5 25.33% ¹,477,358 ¹6.2¹% 888,75¹ ¹¹.64% 7,527,652 20.26%
New Construction 0 ¹¹8,535 0 0 ¹¹8,535
Net Absorption -26,87¹ 113,922 ¹45,628 30º,272 54¹,º5¹
Gross Absorption 33,620 5º7,¹32 ¹º8,258 407,¹º2 1,236,202
¹0¹2
Total Available 3º6,752 24.¹8% 4,646,124 24.º¹% 1,634,996 ¹7.º4% 1,239,431 ¹6.23% 7,º¹7,303 2¹.37%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 13,188 -2¹3,544 -¹,00º,067 4,060 -¹,205,363
Gross Absorption 40,780 2º3,568 29,329 ¹23,700 487,377
SILICON VALLEY MARKET STATISTICS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
30 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Gilroy Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available 43,753 22.º5% 143,299 38.35% ¹72,º¹º ¹2.73% 5¹¹,306 ¹5.86% 87¹,277 ¹6.º3%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 0 0 32,098 -210,124 -¹78,026
Gross Absorption 378 0 33,298 0 33,676
30¹2
Total Available 43,753 22.º5% 143,299 38.35% 245,3º7 ¹8.07% 335,302 ¹0.40% 767,75¹ ¹4.º2%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -1,029 0 3,587 0 2,558
Gross Absorption 5,64¹ 0 ¹5,000 0 20,641
20¹2
Total Available 42,724 22.4¹% 143,299 38.35% 248,984 ¹8.34% 301,992 º.37% 736,ººº ¹4.32%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 1,302 0 -640 ¹0,760 11,422
Gross Absorption 1,802 0 27,ºº5 ¹0,760 40,557
¹0¹2
Total Available 44,026 23.¹0% 143,299 38.35% 250,¹07 ¹8.42% 149,922 4.65% 587,354 ¹¹.4¹%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 845 -40,083 -¹,650 -25,58¹ -66,469
Gross Absorption 845 0 6,200 0 7,045
Los Altos Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available ¹35,057 ¹2.86% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% ¹35,057 ¹2.86%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -26,6¹5 0 0 0 -26,6¹5
Gross Absorption ¹7,¹08 0 0 0 ¹7,¹08
30¹2
Total Available ¹5¹,847 ¹4.46% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% ¹5¹,847 ¹4.46%
New Construction 13,484 0 0 0 13,484
Net Absorption 3,808 0 0 0 3,808
Gross Absorption 24,508 0 0 0 24,508
20¹2
Total Available ¹64,075 ¹5.º2% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% ¹64,075 ¹5.º2%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 22,850 0 0 0 22,850
Gross Absorption 36,¹54 0 0 0 36,¹54
¹0¹2
Total Available ¹68,546 ¹6.35% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% ¹68,546 ¹6.35%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -747 0 0 0 -747
Gross Absorption 8,¹¹7 0 0 0 8,¹¹7
SILICON VALLEY MARKET STATISTICS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
31 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Los Gatos Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available º0,º77 º.8º% 37,¹78 8.30% 8,016 2º.60% 0 0.00% ¹36,¹7¹ º.65%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 4,068 1,906 -¹,500 0 4,474
Gross Absorption 2º,635 1,906 0 0 3¹,54¹
30¹2
Total Available 100,392 ¹0.º¹% 4¹,726 º.3¹% 8,016 2º.60% 0 0.00% ¹50,¹34 ¹0.64%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -3,058 ¹0,505 0 0 7,447
Gross Absorption 2¹,724 ¹¹,472 0 0 33,196
20¹2
Total Available ¹03,7¹º ¹¹.28% 52,23¹ ¹¹.65% 6,5¹6 24.06% 0 0.00% 162,466 ¹¹.5¹%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 11,434 2,528 ¹,500 0 ¹5,462
Gross Absorption ¹8,445 2,528 ¹,500 0 22,473
¹0¹2
Total Available º5,ºº3 ¹0.44% 54,75º ¹2.22% 8,016 2º.60% 0 0.00% ¹58,768 ¹¹.25%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -1,918 0 2,200 0 282
Gross Absorption 19,928 0 2,200 0 22,128
Milpitas Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available 2¹5,46º 20.55% 2,¹82,506 ¹6.6º% 227,842 7.74% 882,488 ¹8.º6% 3,508,305 ¹6.¹5%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 47,3¹5 -41,448 46,280 -37,705 14,442
Gross Absorption 4º,254 ¹00,0¹7 63,45¹ 64,822 277,544
30¹2
Total Available 26º,742 25.73% 2,¹64,478 ¹5.70% 309,293 ¹0.5¹% 683,467 ¹4.35% 3,426,980 ¹5.2¹%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -10,242 -31,008 -2º,076 -67,752 -¹38,078
Gross Absorption ¹7,240 424,52¹ 57,ºº5 5¹,5º¹ 55¹,347
20¹2
Total Available 270,358 25.7º% 2,00¹,52¹ ¹4.3º% 301,228 ¹0.23% 438,103 º.20% 3,011,210 ¹3.2º%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -3,º7¹ 9,644 -28,864 0 -23,191
Gross Absorption 22,984 55,850 26,5¹2 0 ¹05,346
¹0¹2
Total Available 27º,324 26.64% 2,048,232 ¹4.62% 233,833 8.22% 460,008 º.66% 3,02¹,3º7 ¹3.33%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 4,813 530,370 78,3º3 26,57¹ 640,¹47
Gross Absorption 6º,¹70 5º6,335 103,489 222,¹º7 991,191
SILICON VALLEY MARKET STATISTICS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
32 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Morgan Hill Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available ¹º3,560 28.2¹% 437,887 ¹6.28% 222,693 ¹¹.83% 0 0.00% 854,¹40 ¹5.¹4%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 349 5,844 -7,¹¹¹ 0 -918
Gross Absorption 2,784 28,576 22,038 0 53,3º8
30¹2
Total Available 194,803 28.3º% 443,73¹ ¹6.50% 2¹7,373 ¹¹.55% 0 0.00% 855,º07 ¹5.¹7%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -55,623 ¹º,052 2,052 0 -34,5¹º
Gross Absorption 0 30,º5º 2,052 0 33,011
20¹2
Total Available 25º,¹80 37.77% 528,766 ¹º.66% 205,¹55 ¹0.º0% 0 0.00% 993,101 ¹7.60%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 4,533 -2,413 35,6º7 0 37,8¹7
Gross Absorption 4,533 2,º74 38,7¹º 0 46,226
¹0¹2
Total Available ¹03,7¹3 ¹º.7¹% 5¹6,3º0 ¹º.20% 280,852 ¹3.75% 0 0.00% º00,º55 ¹5.º7%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 20,841 -2,º74 -23,232 0 -5,365
Gross Absorption 20,841 0 ¹5,670 0 36,5¹¹
Mountain View Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available 22¹,506 5.8º% ¹,¹65,¹44 8.30% ¹05,077 4.03% 26,500 0.00% ¹,5¹8,227 7.44%
New Construction 0 99,800 0 0 99,800
Net Absorption 44,627 -375,º60 -6,º75 0 -338,308
Gross Absorption ¹06,856 270,4¹5 27,34¹ 0 404,612
30¹2
Total Available 321,121 8.54% 700,º56 5.02% 84,452 3.¹2% 26,500 0.00% 1,133,029 5.54%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 18,631 -7º,0¹2 ¹2,7¹5 0 -47,666
Gross Absorption ¹º2,737 37,44¹ 20,005 0 250,¹83
20¹2
Total Available 374,302 º.º6% 707,22º 5.06% ¹35,054 4.ºº% 26,500 0.00% ¹,243,085 6.08%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -44,458 ¹68,543 -6,274 0 ¹¹7,8¹¹
Gross Absorption 109,638 375,003 19,461 0 504,¹02
¹0¹2
Total Available 353,38º º.40% 865,840 6.20% ¹2º,580 4.7º% 26,500 0.00% ¹,375,30º 6.73%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 30,292 22,278 -24,334 0 28,236
Gross Absorption 113,460 ¹77,537 18,616 0 309,613
SILICON VALLEY MARKET STATISTICS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
33 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Palo Alto Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available 818,241 ¹3.24% 2¹7,808 2.¹2% º3,¹27 7.33% 58,374 ¹8.º5% ¹,¹87,550 6.58%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -334,856 7,04º 23,989 0 -303,818
Gross Absorption 141,489 60,657 23,989 0 226,¹35
30¹2
Total Available 831,263 ¹3.45% 26¹,5¹5 2.54% 113,116 8.º¹% 58,374 ¹8.º5% 1,264,268 7.00%
New Construction 39,016 0 0 0 39,016
Net Absorption ¹3¹,¹¹5 -24,441 -13,040 0 93,634
Gross Absorption 266,484 53,¹5º 6,476 0 326,119
20¹2
Total Available 648,27¹ ¹0.55% 246,124 2.3º% ¹06,552 8.3º% 58,374 ¹8.º5% ¹,05º,32¹ 5.88%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 7,º80 31,823 10,081 0 49,884
Gross Absorption 160,830 º6,706 18,000 0 275,536
¹0¹2
Total Available 688,270 ¹¹.2¹% 257,562 2.50% 132,361 ¹0.42% 85,8¹7 27.86% 1,164,010 6.46%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -º6,050 4¹5 32,290 0 -63,345
Gross Absorption 119,293 4¹0,358 52,2º0 0 58¹,º4¹
San Jose Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available 4,743,445 ¹º.67% 7,34º,264 ¹5.62% ¹,270,4º3 5.64% 1,800,223 ¹¹.¹7% ¹5,¹63,425 ¹3.8¹%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 54,334 257,852 ¹58,78¹ -3º7,738 73,22º
Gross Absorption 370,408 535,7¹2 384,¹27 º6,¹º5 1,386,442
30¹2
Total Available 4,883,009 20.25% 7,66º,345 ¹6.30% ¹,443,º7º 6.42% ¹,647,º2º ¹0.2¹% ¹5,644,262 ¹4.25%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption ¹22,37º 94,119 72,724 50,408 339,630
Gross Absorption 5¹4,350 4º3,5º2 284,388 235,80º ¹,528,¹3º
20¹2
Total Available 4,º4º,º35 20.5¹% 7,º6º,2¹5 ¹6.84% 1,496,123 6.63% ¹,63º,052 ¹0.02% ¹6,054,325 ¹4.54%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -70,48¹ 428,680 ¹56,0¹º -5º,860 454,358
Gross Absorption 406,654 649,418 349,810 ¹48,858 ¹,554,740
¹0¹2
Total Available 4,º45,056 20.4º% 8,¹6¹,532 ¹7.24% ¹,676,532 7.43% ¹,578,327 º.64% ¹6,36¹,447 ¹4.82%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -º2,¹72 231,030 84,445 -3ºº,56º -¹76,266
Gross Absorption 280,924 807,86¹ 37º,3º4 48,121 ¹,5¹6,300
SILICON VALLEY MARKET STATISTICS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
34 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
Santa Clara Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available ¹,745,º28 ¹8.64% 3,¹06,005 ¹4.¹4% 444,296 4.20% 205,2¹6 5.º8% 5,50¹,445 ¹2.¹3%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 38,627 -46,788 142,903 20,240 ¹54,º82
Gross Absorption 372,306 ¹55,¹º¹ 334,762 45,440 º07,6ºº
30¹2
Total Available ¹,º08,07º 20.37% 3,¹5¹,45¹ ¹4.34% 652,5¹2 6.03% 238,775 7.3º% 5,º50,8¹7 ¹3.¹¹%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 7¹,¹2º 55,702 -4,439 -22,000 100,392
Gross Absorption 567,º2º ¹54,782 310,143 205,260 1,238,114
20¹2
Total Available 2,0º5,4º3 22.37% 3,099,380 ¹4.¹¹% 67¹,623 6.20% 3º6,835 ¹2.2º% 6,263,331 ¹3.80%
New Construction 306,900 0 0 0 306,900
Net Absorption 86,143 190,366 70,0¹4 12,800 35º,323
Gross Absorption 274,233 34¹,5º8 180,924 12,800 80º,555
¹0¹2
Total Available ¹,840,54º 20.3¹% 3,283,220 ¹4.º4% 6º7,222 6.44% 40º,635 ¹2.68% 6,230,626 ¹3.82%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption ¹26,778 -98,604 -66,56º 46,000 7,605
Gross Absorption 410,211 164,223 63,627 46,000 684,061
Sunnyvale Ofce % Available R&D % Available Industrial % Available Warehouse % Available Total % Available
40¹2
Total Available 648,237 8.36% 2,0º8,56¹ 8.84% 212,149 6.63% 104,044 3.ºº% 3,062,991 8.2¹%
New Construction 318,000 0 0 0 318,000
Net Absorption 443,641 ¹84,873 ¹5,636 0 644,¹50
Gross Absorption 4º3,542 3¹2,853 67,504 0 873,8ºº
30¹2
Total Available 787,606 ¹0.5º% 2,2º7,º55 º.68% 255,º7¹ 8.00% 104,044 3.ºº% 3,445,576 º.32%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption 35º,º35 75,520 220,4º7 0 655,º52
Gross Absorption 419,220 3º2,º57 225,º56 70,627 ¹,¹08,760
20¹2
Total Available ¹,2¹5,856 ¹6.35% 2,572,832 ¹0.84% 5¹0,682 ¹5.º6% 104,044 3.ºº% 4,403,414 ¹¹.º¹%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption -¹52,025 -88,822 11,813 18,600 -210,434
Gross Absorption 142,838 374,644 2º,783 32,100 57º,365
¹0¹2
Total Available ¹,036,035 ¹3.º3% 2,550,2º3 ¹0.75% 543,88º ¹6.88% 32,100 ¹.23% 4,¹62,3¹7 ¹¹.26%
New Construction 0 0 0 0 0
Net Absorption ¹72,727 262,726 -7,323 7,583 435,7¹3
Gross Absorption 252,7º2 682,504 19,903 62,5¹7 ¹,0¹7,7¹6
35 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
BROKERAGE PROFILES
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
SAN JOSE
James R. Abarta
-¹ º25 227 6228
jim.abarta@colliers.com
Diane Armstrong
+1 408 282 3848
diane.armstrong@colliers.com
Matt Arya
-¹ 408 282 3835
matt.arya@colliers.com
Jim Beeger
+1 408 282 3942
jim.beeger@colliers.com
Terry Bell, SIOR
+1 408 282 3923
terry.bell@colliers.com
Howard Berry
+1 408 282 3809
howard.berry@colliers.com
Drew Brown
+1 408 282 3834
drew.brown@colliers.com
Mark Bruening
+1 408 282 3833
mark.bruening@colliers.com
David Buchholz
+1 408 282 3843
david.buchholz@colliers.com
Mike Burke
+1 408 282 4003
mike.burke@colliers.com
Samuel E. Burnett
-¹ 408 º78 ¹º¹6
samuel.burnett@colliers.com
Dion Campisi, SIOR
-¹ 408 282 3875
dion.campisi@colliers.com
Jim Castignani
+1 408 282 3893
jim.castignani@colliers.com
Vince Castagnolo
+1 408 282 3932
vince.castagnolo@colliers.com
John Colyar
+1 408 282 3949
john.colyar@colliers.com
Duffy D’Angelo, SIOR
-¹ 408 282 3º50
duffy.dangelo@colliers.com
Scott Daugherty
+1 408 282 3830
scott.daugherty@colliers.com
Brent Dressen
-¹ 408 282 3º7º
brent.dressen@colliers.com
Tom de Jong
+1 408 282 3829
tom.dejong@colliers.com
Joe Elliott, SIOR
+1 408 282 3922
joe.elliott@colliers.com
David N. Evans
-¹ 408 282 3825
david.evans@colliers.com
Craig L. Fordyce, SIOR, CCIM
+1 408 282 3911
craig.fordyce@colliers.com
Greg Galasso, SIOR
+1 408 282 3816
greg.galasso@colliers.com
Stephen J. Gibson, SIOR
+1 408 282 3890
steve.gibson@colliers.com
Mark Giovanzana
+1 408 282 3861
mark.giovanzana@colliers.com
Nick Goddard
-¹ 408 282 3858
nick.goddard@colliers.com
Jay Gomez
+1 408 282 3989
jay.gomez@colliers.com
Susan Gregory, SIOR
+1 408 282 3940
susan.gregory@colliers.com
Joan S. Haynes
+1 408 282 3920
joan.haynes@colliers.com
Terry Healy
+1 408 282 3826
terry.healy@colliers.com
H. L. (Bing) Heckman
-¹ 408 282 3805
bing.heckman@colliers.com
Jere Hench
+1 408 282 3832
jere.hench@colliers.com
Edward M. Hofer, SIOR
+1 408 282 3819
ed.hofer@colliers.com
Steve Hunt
+1 408 282 3846
steve.hunt@colliers.com
Michael R. Johnson, SIOR
-¹ 408 282 3852
m.johnson@colliers.com
Nate Jones
+1 408 282 3966
nate.jones@colliers.com
James Kaye
+1 408 282 3810
james.kaye@colliers.com
Thomas Kim
-¹ 408 282 3º05
thomas.kim@colliers.com
John Kovaleski
+1 408 282 3844
john.kovaleski@colliers.com
Mark R. Kuiper
-¹ 408 282 3850
mark.kuiper@colliers.com
Carla Lindorff, MBA
+1 408 282 3908
carla.lindorff@colliers.com
John Machado, JD, MBA
+1 408 282 3862
john.machado@colliers.com
Kristen Macken, SIOR
-¹ 408 282 3878
kristen.macken@colliers.com
Brian Mason
-¹ 408 282 3º5º
brian.mason@colliers.com
John McMahon
+1 408 282 3944
john.mcmahon@colliers.com
Paul McManus
+1 408 282 3963
paul.mcmanus@colliers.com
David C. Mein
+1 408 282 3828
david.mein@colliers.com
Marne Michaels
+1 408 282 3838
marne.michaels@colliers.com
Mike Miller
+1 408 282 3842
mike.miller@colliers.com
Shane Minnis, LEED, AP
+1 408 282 3901
shane.minnis@colliers.com
Martin A. Morici, SIOR
+1 408 282 3921
marty.morici@colliers.com
Kevin Moul
-¹ 408 282 3873
kevin.moul@colliers.com
Tom Nelson
+1 408 282 3960
tom.nelson@colliers.com
Jeffry S. Nochimson, SIOR
+1 408 282 3941
jeffry.nochimson@colliers.com
Dharmesh Patel
+1 408 282 3990
dharmesh.patel@colliers.com
M. Steven Prehm
+1 408 282 3936
steve.prehm@colliers.com
0eorge 0u|nn
+1 408 282 3912
george.quinn@colliers.com
Donald H. Reimann, SIOR
+1 408 282 3888
don.reimann@colliers.com
Jeffrey L. Rogers
+1 408 282 3919
jeff.rogers@colliers.com
Michael L. Rosendin, SIOR, CCIM
+1 408 282 3900
michael.rosendin@colliers.com
Ryan Rosendin
+1 408 282 3902
ryan.rosendin@colliers.com
Cynthia Rotwein
-¹ 408 282 3856
cynthia.rotwein@colliers.com
Robert Rowland
+1 408 282 3880
robert.rowland@colliers.com
Katherine Roxborough, LEED, AP
+1 408 282 3939
katherine.roxborough@colliers.com
David R. Sandlin, SIOR
+1 408 282 3988
david.sandlin@colliers.com
David V. Schmidt, SIOR
+1 408 282 3814
david.schmidt@colliers.com
Bob Shepherd
-¹ 408 282 3855
bob.shepherd@colliers.com
John Serex
+1 408 282 3803
john.serex@colliers.com
Ryan Slater
+1 408 282 3812
ryan.slater@colliers.com
Hitoshi Takahashi
+1 408 282 3933
hitoshi.takahashi@colliers.com
Brett Taylor
+1 408 282 3889
brett.taylor@colliers.com
Sean Toomey
+1 408 282 3864
sean.toomey@colliers.com
Kenneth D. Tsukahara
+1 408 282 3934
ken.tsukahara@colliers.com
Chris Twardus
+1 408 282 3836
chris.twardus@colliers.com
Gregg von Thaden
-¹ 408 282 3º¹5
gregg.vonthaden@colliers.com
André R. Walewski
-¹ 408 282 3837
andre.walewski@colliers.com
Mary Wimmer
+1 408 282 3913
mary.wimmer@colliers.com
Mark P. Zamudio, CCIM
+1 408 282 3822
mark.zamudio@colliers.com
Steve Zamudio, CCIM
+1 408 282 3824
steve.zamudio@colliers.com
Romy Zeid
+1 408 282 3818
romy.zeid@colliers.com
Andy Zighelboim
+1 408 282 3906
andy.zighelboim@colliers.com

GILROY
Jeffrey A. Barnes
-¹ 408 842 7000
jeff.barnes@colliers.com
Mark Sanchez
-¹ 408 842 7000
mark.sanchez@colliers.com
Matt van Keulen
-¹ 408 842 7000
matt.vankeulen@colliers.com
REDWOOD CITY
Philip Arnautou, Jr., CPA
-¹ 650 486 22¹3
phillip.arnautou@colliers.com
Gabe Burke
-¹ 650 486 2240
gabe.burke@colliers.com
Mike Cobb
-¹ 650 486 225¹
mike.cobb@colliers.com
JP Custodio
-¹ 650 486 22¹8
jp.custodio@colliers.com
Mike Davis
-¹ 650 486 22¹º
mike.davis@colliers.com
Steve Divney
-¹ 650 638 433¹
steve.divney@colliers.com
Michael Draeger
-¹ 650 486 222¹
michael.draeger@colliers.com
Stephanie Elkins
-¹ 650 486 2272
stephanie.elkins@colliers.com
Dwight Gillberg
-¹ 650 486 22¹7
dwight.gillberg@colliers.com
David Gray, IFMA, R.E.C.
-¹ 650 486 2262
david.gray@colliers.com
Mike Kennedy
-¹ 650 486 22¹6
mike.kennedy@colliers.com
Dan Latini
-¹ 650 486 2277
dan.latini@colliers.com
Wendy Leung, CCIM
-¹ 650 486 2228
wendy.leung@colliers.com
John McLellan
-¹ 650 486 2223
john.mclellan@colliers.com
Douglas Marks, MBA
-¹ 650 486 2222
doug.marks@colliers.com
Malonie Maxwell
-¹ 650 486 2234
malonie.maxwell@colliers.com
Gary Nichols
-¹ 650 486 2250
gw.nichols@colliers.com
Tom Schmidt, CCIM
-¹ 650 486 2226
tom.schmidt@colliers.com
Robert Schwartz
-¹ 650 486 2286
rob.schwartz@colliers.com
Craig Walsh
-¹ 650 486 2230
craig.walsh@colliers.com
Brett Weber
-¹ 650 486 2233
brett.weber@colliers.com
Luke Wilson
-¹ 650 486 22¹2
luke.wilson@colliers.com
Appraisal &
Property Tax Division
Donn H. Byrne, Jr., MAI, MRICS, ASA
-¹ 408 282 3853
donn.byrne@colliers.com
Joel C. Yungen, Associate
-¹ 408 282 3854
joel.yungen@colliers.com
Managing Partner
San Jose/Silicon Valley
Jeff S. Fredericks, SIOR
+1 408 282 3801
jeff.fredericks@colliers.com
Managing Partner
Peninsula
Rick Knauf
-¹ 650 486 2244
rick.knauf@colliers.com
36 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
General Terms
Availability: Vacant or occupied space that is offered for lease,
sublease or sale (to an owner-occupant).
Build-to-Suit: A developable parcel that an owner will improve
to suit the needs of a particular tenant. Construction does not
begin until a tenant has committed to the property.
Building Base: Total square footage developed. Colliers tracks
o¦¦|ce bu||d|ngs ¦rom 3,000 squure ¦ee¦, |&0 ¦rom 5,000
squure ¦ee¦, |ndus¦r|u| bu||d|ngs ¦rom 7,500 squure ¦ee¦, und
warehouse buildings from 10,000 square feet.
CBD: Central Business District, generally the downtown area
of a major city.
Completed Construction: Construction which is completed
during the period.
Direct Space: Space available through a landlord/owner.
Effective Net Absorption: Effective net absorption is a Colliers
measurement of the net change in available space during a
given period of time after adjustments for space taken off the
market. Effective net absorption utilizes the same formula to
measure change of occupancy as net absorption except that it
treats any newly available space, whether available direct or for
sublease, as if it is coming onto the market vacant.
Gross Absorption: The total square footage sold (to owner/
occupants) or leased during a given time period.
Net Absorption: The net change in occupied space during a
given period of time.
PSF: Per square foot.
PSF/MO: Per square foot per month.
SF: Square foot or square feet.
Silicon Valley: Colliers International defines Silicon Valley as
all of Santa Clara County plus Fremont, for the purposes of its
market reports.
Speculative Construction: Construction that will commence
without any prior commitment from a tenant.
Sublease Space: Space available through a sublessor to a
third party.
T.I.s: Tenant Improvements are a dollar amount offered by
the lessor generally for the construction or modification of
the premises.
Total Available: The sum of available direct and available
sublease space.
Vacancy: Percentage of vacant inventory available including
both vacant direct, and vacant sublease space.
Product Classification
Class “A” Office: Modern, steel-framed low, mid or high-rise
structures used exclusively for office tenants.
Class “B” Office: Wood and steel mix framed low to
mid-rise structures and older brick or concrete structures used
predominately for office.
Industrial/Light Industrial: Buildings with drive-in and/or
dock-high truck capabilities, clear heights of less than 20 feet
and parking ratios of 2.0/1,000 or less.
Research and Development (R&D): One to three story
structures with extensive glass, heavy office buildout and
3.5/¹,000 pur||ng ru¦|o. Bu||d|ngs muy |nc|ude ||g|-end
production facilities, laboratory space and grade level truck
doors.
Warehouse/Distribution: Buildings with a minimum 20-foot
clear height, dock-high truck loading and parking ratios of
2.0/1,000 or less.
Rental Terms
CAM: Common area maintenance charge. Generally used in
Industrial Gross and NNN leases where the tenant pays a share
of the costs associated with the maintenance of the common
areas.
Full Service: Rental type generally used in office product
where the landlord’s rental rate contains all costs associated
with occupying the premises inclusive of taxes, insurance,
maintenance, janitorial, and utilities.
Industrial Gross: Rental type generally used in industrial
product where the landlord’s rental rate contains all costs
associated with occupying the premises inclusive of taxes,
insurance, and maintenance.
Rental Rates: All rental rates for office space are calculated on
a Full Service basis unless otherwise noted. All rental rates for
R&D, industrial and warehouse space are calculated on a NNN
basis unless otherwise noted.
Triple Net (NNN): Rental type where the tenant pays rent to
the landlord and additionally assumes all costs regarding the
operation, taxes and maintenance of the premises and building.
UNDERSTANDING ABSORPTION
Colliers uses several measurements to track market conditions and deal flow.
While related, the formulas to arrive at these measurements differ. Using the results
from 2012, here is how Colliers measures change in availability and net absorption.
Change in Availability: ¯||s meusuremen¦ |s s|mp|y ¦|e d|¦¦erence be¦ween ¦|e
amounts of space available at the end of one period to the next. The table below
shows that total available space was reduced by 3.98 million square feet in 2012.
|o¦e ¦|u¦ "c|unge |n uvu||ub|||¦y' |nc|udes udjus¦men¦s ¦or spuce ¦|u¦ |s "¦u|en
o¦¦ ¦|e mur|e¦'. Spuce "¦u|en o¦¦ ¦|e mur|e¦' |s no¦ u ¦uc¦or |n ne¦ ubsorp¦|on
measurements.
¯o¦u| Avu||ub|e end o¦ 20¹¹ 44,005,602
||us: vucun¦ & occup|ed spuce
¦|u¦ cume uvu||ub|e |n 20¹2 ¹4,5¹8,378
||us: |ew S|e|| udded |n 20¹2 8º5,735
2011 Available + Newly Available in 2012 = 5º,4¹º,7¹5
|ess: 20¹2 0ross Absorp¦|on -22,227,056
|ess: 20¹2 Adjus¦men¦s/¯u|en o¦¦ ¦|e |ur|e¦ 2,828,226
¯o¦u| Avu||ub|e end o¦ 20¹2 40,020,885
Net Absorption: |e¦ ubsorp¦|on meusures ¦|e c|unge |n occup|ed spuce ¦rom
one period to the next. In this measurement, it is important to distinguish that
u bu||d|ng muy be "uvu||ub|e', bu¦ no¦ vucun¦ ´o¦¦en ¦|e cuse |n u sub|euse
situation, for example). Therefore, occupancy is not reduced (negative
net absorption) until the space is vacated, and sometimes that does not
|uppen un¦|| ¦|e spuce |s |eused, creu¦|ng u ne¦ ubsorp¦|on "wus|' ¦or
the deal and for that particular period.

vucun¦ spuce ¦|u¦ cume uvu||ub|e 20¹2 -7,276,3º¹
Previously available space
that was vacated in 2012 -¹2,55¹,300
20¹2 ¯o¦u| vucun¦ Added ´occupuncy |oss` -¹º,827,6º¹

2012 Gross Absorption (occupancy gain) 22,227,056
2012 Net Absorption (change in occupancy) 2,3ºº,365
38 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
GENERAL TERMS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
COLLIERS BAY AREA LOCATIONS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
MANTECA
STOCKTON
99
33
120
TRACY
LIVERMORE
PLEASANTON
FREMONT
NEWARK
UNION CITY
HAYWARD
PALO
ALTO
MT.
VIEW
REDWOOD
CITY
SAN
MATEO FOSTER CITY
DUBLIN
SAN RAMON
DANVILLE
WALNUT
CREEK
CONCORD
MARTINEZ
RICHMOND
BERKELY
OAKLAND
SAN LEANDRO
PITTSBURG
ANTIOCH
BRENTWOOD
SAN
JOSE
MILPITAS
SUNNYVALE
SANTA
CLARA
GILROY
SANTA CRUZ
MORGAN HILL
LOS GATOS
FAIRFIELD
NAPA
VALLEJO
BENICIA
AMERICAN
CANYON
VACAVILLE
980
580
680
280
680
680
680
780
580
580
580
580
205
880
80
80
280
280
4
4
12
12
12
29
29
29
4
92
84
84
84
17
85
237
87
24
13
121
110
121
101
101
101
CAMPBELL
101
5
5
1
1
1
37
SAN
FRANCISCO
SAN JOSE/SILICON VALLEY
450 wes¦ Sun¦u C|uru S¦ree¦
Sun Jose, CA º5¹¹3
+1 408 282 3800
GILROY/SOUTH COUNTY
8070 Sun¦u ¯eresu Bou|evurd
Suite 220
0||roy, CA º5020
-¹ 408 842 7000
SAN FRANCISCO PENINSULA
203 Redwood Shores Parkway
Su|¦e ¹25
|edwood C|¦y, CA º4065
-¹ 650 486 2200
SAN FRANCISCO
50 Cu||¦orn|u S¦ree¦
Suite 1900
San Francisco, CA 94111
-¹ 4¹5 788 3¹00
OAKLAND/EAST BAY
1999 Harrison Street
Su|¦e ¹750
Oakland, CA 94612
-¹ 5¹0 º86 6770
PLEASANTON/EAST BAY
5050 |opyurd |oud
Suite 180
||eusun¦on, CA º4588
-¹ º25 463 2300
FAIRFIELD/NORTH BAY
360 Campus Lane, Suite 101
|u|r¦|e|d, CA º4534
-¹ 707 863 0¹88
WALNUT CREEK/EAST BAY
¹850 |¦. 0|ub|o Bou|evurd
Suite 200
wu|nu¦ Cree|, CA º45º6
-¹ º25 27º 0¹20
STOCKTON/CENTRAL VALLEY
3414 Brookside Road
Suite 300
S¦oc|¦on, CA º52¹º
-¹ 20º 475 5¹00
SACRAMENTO
301 University Avenue
Suite 100
Sucrumen¦o, CA º5825
-¹ º¹6 º2º 5ººº
Colliers International is a global leader in real estate services with more than 12,300 professionals operating
ou¦ o¦ 522 o¦¦|ces |n 62 coun¦r|es. Co|||ers prov|des u ¦u|| runge o¦ serv|ces ¦o reu| es¦u¦e users, owners und
|nves¦ors wor|dw|de |nc|ud|ng: g|obu| corporu¦e so|u¦|ons, su|es und |euse bro|eruge, proper¦y und usse¦
management; project management; hotel investment sales and consulting; property valuation and appraisal
services; mortgage banking and insightful research. Colliers has 10 offices in Northern California and Nevada.
40 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
UNITED STATES
Alabama
Birmington
Arizona
Greater Phoenix
Phoenix-Scottsdale
Arkansas
Bentonville
Little Rock
California
Bakersfeld
Carlsbad
Fairfeld
Fresno
Gilroy
Los Angeles County
Island Empire/
Oakland/East Bay
Orange County
Pleasanton
Redwood City/Palo Alto
Roseville
Sacramento
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose/Silicon Valley
Stockton
Walnut Creek
Colorado
Denver
Connecticut
Hartford
New Haven
Stamford
Delaware
Wilmington
District of Columbia
Washington DC
Florida
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Jacksonville
Miami
Orlando
South Florida
Tampa Bay
West Palm Beach
Georgia
Atlanta
Savannah
Hawaii
Honolulu
Idaho
Boise
Nampa
Illinois
Chicago
Rosemont
Indiana
Indianapolis
Kansas
Lawrence
Maryland
Bethesda
Greater Baltimore
Massachusetts
Boston
Michigan
Ann Arbor
Detroit
Grand Rapids
Kalamazoo
West Michigan
Missouri
St. Louis
Kansas City
Nebraska
Lincoln
Omaha
Nevada
Las Vegas
Reno
New Jersey
Mount Laurel
Parsippany
Princeton
New York
Long Island
New York
North Carolina
Charlotte
Durham
Raleigh
Ohio
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbus
Oregon
Portland
Pennsylvania
Allentown
Conshohocken
Harrisburg
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
South Carolina
Charleston
Columbia
Greenville
Tennessee
Memphis
Nashville
Texas
Dallas/Fort Worth
Houston
Sugarland
Virginia
Richmond
Tyson Corner
Washington
Bellevue
Seattle
Wisconsin
Fox Valley
Madison
Milwaukee
CANADA
Alberta
Calgary
Edmonton
Greater Toronto
British Columbia
Kelowna
Vancouver
Victoria
Manitoba
Winnipeg
New Brunswick
Moncton
Nova Scotia
Halifax
Ontario
Greater Toronto
London Ontario
Ottawa
Waterloo
Quebec
Montreal
Saskatchewan
Regina
Saskatoon
LATIN AMERICA
Argentina
Buenos Aires
Brazil
Recite
Rio de Janeiro
Sao Paulo
Chile
Santiago
Columbia
Bogota
Mexico
Cancun
Ciudad De Mexico
Guadalajara
Juarez
Monterrey
Puebla
0uere¦uro
Tijuana
Republic of Panama
Panama City
Peru
Lima
Corporate Solutions
Headquarters
Miami, Florida
EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST
& AFRICA
Albania
Tirana
Austria
Vienna
Belgium
Antwerp
Brussels
Bulgaria
Sofa
Varna
Croatia
Zagreb
Czech Republic
Prague
Denmark
Aalborg
Aarhus
Copenhagen
Odense
Vejle
Estonia
Tallinn
Finland
Finland
France
Paris
Germany
Berlin
Dusseldorf
Frankfurt
Munich
Stuttgart
Greece
Athens
Hungary
Budapest
Ireland
Dublin
Israel
Italy
Milan
Rome
Latvia
Riga
Lithuania
Vilnius
Montenegro
Podgorica
Netherlands
Amsterdam
Eindhoven
Norway
Oslo
Poland
Krakow
Pozanan
Warsaw
Wrocław
Portugal
Lisbon
Romania
Bucharest
Russia
Moscow
St. Petersburg
Saudi Arabia
Riyadh
Serbia
Belgrade
Nis
Slovakia
Bratislava
Spain
Madrid
Sweden
Gothenburg
Malmo
Stockholm
Switzerland
Geneva
Zurich
Turkey
Istanbul
Ukraine
Kyiv
United Arab
Emirates
Abu Dhabi
Bahrain
Dubai
Kuwait
Oman
0u¦ur
United Kingdom
Belfast
Birmingham
Bristol
Edinburgh
Glasgow
Leeds
London City
London West End
Manchester
Plymouth
Uxbridge
Colliers Offices Worldwide
Other Memberships
Mountain View Chamber of Commerce
San Carlos Chamber of Commerce
The Society of Industry Leaders
Redwood City Chamber of Commerce
Sons of Sicily
Association of Legal Administrators, Silicon Valley Chapter
Silicon Valley Capital Club
Asian American Manufacturer’s Association (AAMA)
Argus Seld Storage Sales Network
Individual Memberships
41 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL | JANUARY 2013
COLLIERS OFFICES & INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIPS
COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL
2012 - 2013 SILICON VALLEY | MARKET REPORT & FORECAST
R E G I O N A L O F F I C E S
San Jose/Silicon Valley
450 wes¦ Sun¦u C|uru S¦ree¦
Sun Jose, CA º5¹¹3
+1 408 282 3800
Gilroy/South County
8070 Sun¦u ¯eresu Bou|evurd, Su|¦e 220
0||roy, CA º5020
-¹ 408 842 7000
San Francisco Peninsula
203 |edwood S|ores |ur|wuy, Su|¦e ¹25
|edwood C|¦y, CA º4065
-¹ 650 486 2200
San Francisco
50 Cu||¦orn|u S¦ree¦, Su|¦e ¹º00
San Francisco, CA 94111
-¹ 4¹5 788 3¹00
Oakland/East Bay
¹ººº |urr|son S¦ree¦, Su|¦e ¹750
Oakland, CA 94612
-¹ 5¹0 º86 6770
Pleasanton/East Bay
5050 |opyurd |oud, Su|¦e ¹80
||eusun¦on, CA º4588
-¹ º25 463 2300
Fairfield/North Bay
360 Campus Lane, Suite 101
|u|r¦|e|d, CA º4534
-¹ 707 863 0¹88
Walnut Creek/East Bay
¹850 |¦. 0|ub|o Bou|evurd, Su|¦e 200
wu|nu¦ Cree|, CA º45º6
-¹ º25 27º 0¹20
Stockton/Central Valley
3414 Brookside Road, Suite 300
S¦oc|¦on, CA º52¹º
-¹ 20º 475 5¹00
Sacramento
301 University Avenue
Suite 100
Sucrumen¦o, CA º5825
-¹ º¹6 º2º 5ººº
Colliers International is a global leader in real estate services with more than 12,300 professionals operating out of 522 offices in 62 countries. Colliers provides a full range
of services to real estate users, owners and investors worldwide including: global corporate solutions; sales and lease brokerage; property and asset management; project
management; hotel investment sales and consulting; property valuation and appraisal services; mortgage banking and insightful research. Colliers has 10 offices in Northern
California and Nevada. CA License No. 00490878
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