Unit Plan – Lesson Plan (Sample 1

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Your Name: Caitlin Hawkins Name of Unit: Heros/Morality
Subject Area:English Grade Level:9th grade Instruction time:50 min

Lesson Summary Description
In this lesson I will be introducing the topic of the “hero” to the class. I will start by asking them to identify someone they view as a hero in their lives and then coming up with a list of characteristics or ideals that makes someone a hero. We will then compile a list of these characteristics as a class and students will use this to develop another list of heroes from stories they know that they think would fit this list of characteristics. We will also discuss the heroes counterpart – the villain – and see if the villain has opposite attributes as the “hero”. Students will apply this list to a hero of their choice in a writing assignment that night.

Standard(s)
 W.9-10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. W.9-10.2.Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

 

Enduring Understandings/Essential Question(s)
What makes someone a “hero” or “heroic”? Can someone be qualified as purely “heroic” or purely “evil”?

Objective(s)
During class (C) students (A) will deconstruct their definition of a “hero” (B) giving one examples of a hero in their life and at least four characteristics they believe make that person a “hero” (D). Students (A) will be able to analyze the class list of “heroic” attributes and develop (B) 5-6 attributes of the “villains” seen in the opposing positions as the “hero” we defined (D).

Lesson Plan

Differentiation
The quick write at the beginning of class will not be graded for writing abilities so ESL and struggling writers won’t need to worry about perfect grammar or vocabulary/spelling so long as they attempt to complete the assignment. This lesson does not require reading skills, but instead deeper thinking skills, which will hopefully make the learning more available to struggling readers. Students who need help with note taking will be able to receive a copy of my printed notes after they attempt to take notes on their own as well. ESL students may struggle to understand some vocabulary mentioned as we define attributes of the hero or villain, for unfamiliar words I will ask the student who suggested to word to give an example and I will proved extra definitions or examples as needed. Students will be able to ask questions at any time.

Resources & Materials
-Paper -Pencils -Large sheets of paper for class notes (can be hung up again) - Markers - Dictionaries for students to look up words -Writing prompt #1 (see last sheet of document)

Student Assessment(s)
I will collect the students two quick writes as well as ask each student to contribute to the class discussion when they feel comfortable doing so. My assessment of their learning will be done through these quick writes, participation, and the writing assignment they will be given for that night.

Instructional strategies/methods
Direct Instruction to begin with as I ask them to complete quick writes. That will in interspersed with partner time and as the class continues it will become more student led and students will be asked to challenge each others thoughts and question the terms suggested. As class continues it should fade into a more indirect instructional method.

Detailed Lesson Steps/Sequence
1. Students will be asked to complete their first quick write: Think of a hero/heroine in your life, write that person down. Why does this person serve as a “hero” to you? (7 min) 2. Students will turn to their partners and share their quick write. (4 min)

Lesson Plan

3. Students will be asked to complete a second quick write: Think of at least 4 characteristics/attributes that qualify that person as a hero in your mind – write them down. (5 min) 4. Students will then share with their partners. (3 min) 5. The class will compile a list of different attributes they believe a hero possesses. Students will be prompted to challenge each others suggestions and ask for examples or definitions to convince their peers that their word belongs on the list. (13 min) 6. A sheet will be placed next to the list of “heroic” attributes and students will be asked to repeat this process listing opposite attributes they think belong to a villain this time. Students will turn to their partners and share their thoughts first. (3 min) 7. The class will come together and compile a list again of their thoughts. (7 min) 8. The class will receive writing prompt #1. I will read through the prompt, give them an example of a topic they could choose to do (a hero that has recently been in the news, Hercules, etc.) and answer any question they have. (8 min)

Lesson Plan

Prompt #1 Characteristics of a Hero/Heroine Write a short essay (1-2 pages) explaining what you think qualifies a person as a hero/heroine. Consider your examples used in your quick write from class and think of other examples from your own life, the news, books, movies, etc. to come up with a list of criteria for determining who is or is not a hero/heroine. Please use specific examples or stories from your life which demonstrate how characters or people you chose to discuss measure up in terms in your criteria. Some questions to think about: What personality traits or skills would be on your list? Do certain actions or behaviors make someone more heroic than someone else? How do you define the term “heroic”? Do heroes/heroines need to possess all of the traits to earn that label? Also consider, what makes someone a victim or villain (or in general, not a hero)? Please make your paper 12-point font, times new roman and double-spaced.

Lesson Plan

Unit Plan – Lesson Plan (Sample 2)
Your Name: Caitlin Hawkins Name of Unit: Heroes/Morality
Subject Area: English Grade Level: 9th grade Instruction time: 50 minutes

Lesson Summary Description
Students will be asked to bring an article either supporting or speaking against infanticide in Inuit communities. Students will then get into groups depending on if they support or condemn infanticide to come up with arguments that will be used in a debate the following day. I will provide them with a basic layout of how a typical debate works. While students work in groups I will circulate around the room to make sure quality arguments are made and all questions can be answered.

Standard(s)
 RI.9-10.8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

Enduring Understandings/Essential Question(s)
While we often think that murder is something that is universally disallowed, this is a situation in which a culture allows for a certain form a murder to happen. Students will learn that even when discussing a topic that is highly frowned upon in our culture, there is still two sides to the argument and an understanding to be reached.

Objective(s)
By the end of the lesson (C) students (A) will be able to pick out facts from provided material to support claims/arguments they form (B) with 75% of their selected facts used effectively in arguments (D). Students (A) will learn to think about different cultures through an understanding, nonjudgmental lens (B) being careful to never speak from a superior point of view (D).

Lesson Plan

Differentiation
Students who struggle with note taking will be given a note sheet to use during the section of the lesson where I discuss the layout of typical debates. Since students are asked to bring in their own research materials students will be able to select something that is on their level of understanding. In classes with high quantities of struggling readers I will front load some of the vocabulary that may be unfamiliar before giving out the readings by fast mapping words for students. As students work in groups, higher-level learners will be able to collaborate with lower performing students to help them understand how to form the arguments. All students will be expected to help the group form their argument, but using a group setting will allow students who are struggling with the concept to ask students in a more comfortable setting as opposed to asking in front of the whole class.

Resources & Materials
- Computers for students who are unable to print out their chosen article/resource at home - White board or projector to display layout of debate - Desks arranged in groups for student work - Paper - Pencils

Student Assessment(s)
Students will do a quick write at the beginning of class giving a quick description of what they have learned about infanticide through their research as well as what side of the debate they want to be on and why. I will check to make sure each student has brought in his or her one article on infanticide to contribute to the debate.

Instructional strategies/methods
Direct instruction as I explain what a debate is and how the layout will work in my class. Indirect instruction as I allow students to work together in groups while I circulate to ask questions, answer questions they have, clarify parts of texts they may need help with, or to keep students on task.

Detailed Lesson Steps/Sequence
1. Students do a quick write: What have you learned about infanticide in relation to Inuit cultures? Which side of the debate did you choose to argue from? Why? (7 minutes) 2. TTYPS – students will turn to their partners and share what they’ve written. (3 min) 3. Short lesson by me on the layout of the debate that we will be following - Intro argument: 5 min each side, time to prepare for rebuttle : 3 min, Rebuttle: 3 min each side. After the debate the two groups who did not participate will vote on who they think won. (13 min) 4. Students will be asked to go to the corner that coincides with the topic they want to debate – corner 1 – pro inuit infanticide, corner 2 – con inuit infanticide, 3- pro general

Lesson Plan

infanticide where it exists, 4 – con all infanticide. Each corner must have at least 2 students. (6 min) 5. Each corner will then meet in groups, share the article/material they brought to class, and begin to formulate their arguments (approx. 21 min or until end of class)

Lesson Plan

Unit Plan – Lesson Plan ( Sample 3)
Your Name: Caitlin Hawkins Name of Unit: Heroes/Morality
Subject Area: English Grade Level: 9th Grade Instruction time: 50 min

Lesson Summary Description
This lesson will be an introduction/work time for students to brainstorm ideas for a paper in which they will be choosing to characters (two heroes, two villains, or one hero and one villain) to compare/contrast using the lists of characteristics made in class earlier in the unit. Using their knowledge of how to see situations from more than one side (the debate and other activities in class have worked towards that goal) they will show how a hero they chose could be seen as a villain or how a villain could be seen as a hero either due to the characters prior life or by comparing them to another similar character. In class we will discuss how to use quotes and how to cite effectively. Students will also be given group time to bounce ideas off of each other.

Standard(s)
   RL.9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. W.9-10.2.Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Enduring Understandings/Essential Question(s)
How do our interpretations of heroes and villains change when compared to other characters Is there ever an absolute definition of a hero or villain? How does morality play into our definitions of the two?

Objective(s)
Students (A) will be able to compare and contrast characters in an informative essay (B) using at least 3 quotes from texts to demonstrate their meanings (D).

Lesson Plan

Students (A) will draw inferences from examples they choose to generate their own definitions of the “hero and the “villain” (B) citing at least two examples (D)

Differentiation
Students will be able to select their own characters for their papers, meaning that students can select characters from texts that they feel comfortable working with. Students with lower literacy proficiency will be able to choose children’s stories if that’s what they feel most comfortable working with while more proficient students will be able to choose more complex characters and texts if they feel able to analyze that. Students will be discussing ideas in groups which means that different levels of learners can get help from their peers – hopefully encouraging them to push their thinking to a new level. While in class, students who are struggling with ideas for their paper or with seeing a situation from different perspectives will be able meet with me to discuss further ideas on how to do that in their paper. The paper will be able to be shortened for struggling writers who feel unable to meet the requirement. ESL students will be able to use the lists of attributes made by the class in previous lessons to help them develop their own list to work with in this paper and should have gained a good grasp of definitions by this time, if they don’t feel comfortable with the terms they are asked to use they can ask their peers or look more into it during the lesson.

Resources & Materials
Paper Pencils Lists of attributes from previous classes Writing prompt for the essay (see last page) Texts with heroes and villains for students to look through for ideas

Student Assessment(s)
The essay they hand in will serve as my main form of assessment for this lesson. Through that essay I will know whether or not the students have met the requirements in the objectives that I set. As I listen to the groups discuss ideas I will be able to get an idea of how comfortable the students feel comparing and contrasting characters as well as drawing inferences from the text. The student’s selection of quotes will help me see how they are doing with the idea of choosing strong textual evidence to support their claims.

Instructional strategies/methods
I will use direct instruction as I introduce the essay and indirect guided instruction as the students break into groups and discuss their ideas with their groups. Students will at that point take over their learning with some facilitation from the teacher. Peer’s will be facilitating each others learning as well as questioning each others ideas and choices for the papers while the teacher oversees them.

Lesson Plan

Detailed Lesson Steps/Sequence
1. Introduction of the essay: read the prompt, discuss ideas and give examples, answer any questions the students have (7 min) 2. Students will be given time to work individually: brainstorm ideas for their paper, think of example characters, look for quotes in texts, think about how they will change a common perception of the hero/villain. (10 min) 3. Quick lesson review on how to quote/cite effectively, show students the OWL page with tips for quoting things. (8 min) 4. Group work time: students will discuss the work they did during their individual work period, groups will question each other and challenge each others work. This is a time for students to bounce ideas off each other and get ideas to deepen their own work. (approx. 25 min or until the end of class)

Essay Prompt Comparing Characters
Now that we have created lists and examined our personal vs. group definitions of the hero and the villain, it is time for you to take that and apply it to two characters of your choice. You may choose any two characters you want (two villains, one hero one villain, or two heroes) from stories we have mentioned in class. If you want to work outside of the texts used in class please get it approved before beginning. In this 3-4 page essay I would like you to consider how the characters you chose compare to the list of attributes/characteristics created in class. How do these characters measure up with our lists? How do they compare to other villains/heroes we’ve learned about? Does comparing them to certain other characters make them appear more or less as their designated role? Is there anything the reader of the original text may not know that would alter their understanding? (ex. after reading Wicked how is your understanding of The Wizard of Oz altered?) Take a stance that is different than societies typical understanding of these characters. Use the critical thinking skills you’ve developed to look at the character from different points of view. Is there anything in their life that could justify the way they act? Does that alter how we should view them as a character? For some villains or heroes it may be hard to find textual evidence of that alternate information, you are free to speculate as you wish but please use at least 3 direct quotations that support your argument and further your reader’s understanding. Please use 12-point font, Times New Roman and double-space your paper.

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