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Glossary of Terms in Shinsekai Yori (From the New World) Chapter 1 & 2

"Gomadan" (Noun) Homa altar. Literally, "altar of the holy fire (Homa)" in Buddhist terminology. "Shingon/Mantora" (Noun) Mantra Buddhist terminology for words that invoke spiritual transformation. Shingon Buddhism is one of the mainstream schools of Buddhism in Japan. "Tsukuba-san" (Noun) Mount Tsukuba This is a real mountain in southern Ibaraki prefecture that rises above the surrounding landscape. Its shrine is considered to be one of the oldest in the region. "Kamisu" (Noun) Kamisu This is a real city in Ibaraki prefecture. "Sato" (Noun) Hamlet Small settlements, of which Kamisu Town 66 is one. "Shime-nawa" (Noun) Festoon Shinto terminology for sacred straw festoons. "Shide" (Noun) Paper chains Shinto terminology for the paper chains hanging from sacred straw festoons. "Watanabe Mizuho / Sugiura Takashi" The names of Sakis parents. Although legal, there is no custom of having different surnames among spouses in current-day Japan.

Shinsekai Yori (From the New World) Glossary by Aidoru Translations

"Hacchou-jime" (Noun) The Ropes Obscure Shinto terminology. "Hacchou" refers to a certain length, "Shime (Jime)" refers to sacred straw festoons (decorated ropes). "Hacchou-jime" is an obscure terminology for one specific type of the sacred straw festoons used in religious contexts, such as for marking off borders in Shinto shrines or lining the streets during festivals. In-universe, the term is treated in a more symbolic sense, hence the translation. "Bake-nezumi" (Noun) Goblin Rat Literal translation. The former form of the written word is used when Saki's father first mentions the creature, and its mix of Kanji and Katakana follows the rules of regular usage when affixing an adjective to a noun, with and usually being written in that way. The latter form of the written word, used throughout the rest of the book, follows the rules of binomial nomenclature in the Japanese language. "Fuusen-inu" (Noun) Balloon Dog Literal translation. "Akki" (Noun) Demon Buddhist terminology. Literally, "Evil monster (Oni)". "Gouma" (Noun) Deed-devil Buddhist terminology. Shorthand for the concept of bad deeds getting in the way of the path to enlightenment, metaphorically represented by an evil creature. "Shukurei" (Noun) Celebratory spirits Literal translation.

Shinsekai Yori (From the New World) Glossary by Aidoru Translations

"Neko-damashi" (Noun) Faker-cat Literally, "cat deceiver". Originally an obscure Sumo terminology for a rare move usually translated as the "clapper", involving the wrestler clapping loudly to distract the opponent at the start of the match. The former form of the written word is used when Saki's father first mentions the creature, and its mix of Kanji and Katakana follows the rules of regular usage when affixing an adjective to a noun, with and usually being written in that way. The latter form of the written word, used throughout the rest of the book, follows the rules of binomial nomenclature in the Japanese language. "Fujouneko" (Noun) Fell-cat Literally, "Cat of Impurity". This is the term used by adults to refer to the creature that children refer to as "Nekodamashi", or "Faker-cat" (see above). "Juryoku" (Noun) The Force / Force powers "" when read as "majinai" refers to a charm/spell/incantation with magical properties; whereas, when it is read as "noroi", it refers to a curse. On the other hand, "" means "power" or "force". Hence, "" as a word can mean anything from "sorcery" to "evil powers" depending on context. However, we have decided to use "the Force / Force powers" for our translation of this term in this particular book for the following reasons: 1. The powers are implied to be distinct from anything "magical" and not conflicting with the science fiction theme; 2. The powers are a specific physical phenomenon - a 'force' equivalent to the concept of psychokinesis; 3. There is no notion of good or bad inherent in the power or its usage 4. No incantation is required for its use. "Matsukaze-no-sato" (Noun) Pine-wind Hamlet Literal translation.

Shinsekai Yori (From the New World) Glossary by Aidoru Translations

"Chinowa-no-sato" (Noun) Cogon-ring Hamlet Literal translation. Shinto terminology. "" refers to the species Imperata cylindrica, a tall perennial grass commonly known as the cogon grass, among other names. A large ring made from the cogon grass is used during the annual Summer Exorcisms at Shinto shrines, during which people climb through it in order to cleanse themselves of accumulated evils. "Shirasuna-no-sato" (Noun) White-sands Hamlet Literal translation. "Mizuguruma-no-sato" (Noun) Water-wheel Hamlet Literal translation. "Miharashi-no-sato" (Noun) Lookout Hamlet Literal translation. "Kogane-no-sato" (Noun) Golden Hamlet Literal translation. "Kunugibayashi-no-sato" (Noun) Oak-woods Hamlet Literally, "Hamlet of the Woods of the Chestnut Oak". "Tone-gawa" (Noun) Tone river A real river, with its mouth in Kamisu. Its drainage basin covers a large part of the Kanto region.

Shinsekai Yori (From the New World) Glossary by Aidoru Translations

"Ieji" (Noun) "Going Home". The name of a song, it is an adaptation of the second movement of Antonn Dvok's Symphony No. 9 in E Minor "From the New World", with lyrics originally written by William Arms Fisher and very liberally translated into Japanese in the pre-war era. The song is the subject of nostalgia in Japan due to the melody being played over loudspeakers from school buildings at dusk, urging those still staying after school to go home. The lyrics in this translation are not Fisher's version but a translation of the commonly known Japanese version as presented in the novel. "Minoshiro" (Noun) Minoshiro Section 1, Chapter 6 of the book states several possible etymologies, with possible derivations being: a. "mino-shiro-goromo", or "clothes used in place of straw raincoats"; b. "mino" "shiro", or "Straw raincoat" + "White"; c. "mi-no-shiro", or "object said to contain a soul" (from the belief that spirits of the dead dwell within objects); d. "mi-no-shiro", or "shrine of the sea" (since they usually live on land but return to the sea to lay their eggs); e. "mino-shiro", "Mino Castle" (because when they meet an enemy, they raise their tail-end reminiscent of the fish gargoyles that adorned the main keeps of ancient castles, although this theory has become unpopular ever since Nagoya Castle, said to have been famous for its fish gargoyles, was found to have been located in the adjacent region of Owari, not Mino) f. "mino shirou" ( refers to a length three times that of a cloth used to make a kimono, at approximately 108 centimeters), g. "mi-no-shirou", "Shirou the snake" (since the many tentacles that move around look like snakes). It is noted as probably being a direct descendant of a certain species of sea hare (clade Aplysiomorpha).

Shinsekai Yori (From the New World) Glossary by Aidoru Translations

"Minoshiro-modoki" (Noun) Faux-minoshiro Literal translation. See "Minoshiro" on the previous page. "Waki-en" (Noun) Waki-en This is a school, named for a part of the Japanese constitution of 604 AD (the first Constitution of Japan), said to have been authored by Prince Shtoku. The section of the constitution literally means "Harmony is to be valued". Literally translated, this would be "Harmony School". "Yuuai-en" (Noun) Yuuai-en Literally "Friendship School". "Tokuiku-en" (Noun) Tokuiku-en Literally "Moral Education School". "Sanba-garasu" (Noun) Triumvirate crows Although implied to be an in-universe creature, the actual word is an idiomatic expression for a trio of experts or geniuses. "Kayanosuzukuri" (Noun) Thatcher In-universe creature. Literally, "maker of nests using grasses and reeds used as roofing material". "Tsuina" (Noun) The Exorcism A traditional driving-out of evils, done on the last day of winter in the traditional lunar calendar at Shinto shrines. The ritual has been modified in this novel.

Shinsekai Yori (From the New World) Glossary by Aidoru Translations