2013 Executive Budget Proposal 

CSEA Memorandum on O.P.W.D.D. 
Over the past 30 years New York State has been reducing its responsibilities in providing  services for the developmentally disabled and pushing them to private not‐for‐profit providers.     This has created a patchwork of providers in the private not‐for‐profit sector that have little  accountability and public oversight.  A major theme from last year was the hailed creation of a juvenile justice center to strengthen  oversight and accountability in order to prevent and punish those who abuse and neglect  individuals with developmental disabilities.  The further privatization of state operated services  proposed by the 2013‐2014 executive budget will make it that much harder for the justice  center to not only do its job, but it will increase their business as the quality of care will suffer  greatly.      This blatant move to eliminate state operated services for the developmentally disabled not  only jeopardizes the quality of care for our most vulnerable, it removes the state from critical  care choices, administrative prerogatives and oversight of this vital public service. In addition, it  eliminates quality middle class jobs from local communities.    It is a well‐known fact that the quality of care is greatly affected by the consistency of the care.   A regular recognizable caregiver who can establish trust and dependability is critical to a better  quality of care as well as a higher quality of life for the developmentally disabled individual.    Private not‐for‐profit providers pay substandard wages, provide little or no benefits, have  unregulated work environments, and are commonly a “starting point” for other jobs and  opportunities.    The turnover rate for staff at private not‐for‐profit providers in the  developmentally disabled field tops 40%, an unacceptable level when it comes to the care and  quality of life for the developmentally disabled.    Furthermore, the continued assault on the public sector workforce through privatization  schemes has been proven time and time again to be ineffective, costly, and regretful.  Taking  middle class jobs away from experienced, dedicated, and caring state employees and replacing  them with private not‐for‐profit providers who fail to pay their direct care workers a living wage   hurts local economies and the quality of life for all New Yorkers, not just those receiving care.       

     
CSEA Legislative and Political Action Department

 

2013 Executive Budget Proposal 
 

CSEA Talking Points – O.P.W.D.D.  
 

 The State of New York has drastically shifted services for people with  developmental disabilities to the private not –for‐profit community.         The quality of care suffers greatly when a large portion of responsibility for  those with developmental disabilities is privatized.  State employees have  for years cared for these individuals with pride and commitment.    
 

 Not‐for‐profits have over a 40% staff turnover rate which is unacceptable  when it comes to caring for individuals in need of continuity and a stable  and secure environment.     
 

 The loss of middle class jobs in local communities has an added devastating  affect displaced state employees, their families, and their local  communities who suffer when decent paying jobs disappear.   
 

CSEA is opposed to the outright privatization of services currently being provided  by state employees of the Office of People with Developmental Disabilities.   CSEA strongly urges the legislature to reject this policy and force the executive to  cease any and all efforts to close or diminish services currently being provided by  OPWDD.      
Not‐for‐profit employees are paid at a much lower level then state employees for the care of  individuals with developmental disabilities.  This creates excessive turnover rates among staff  which is detrimental to those in need of care.        Current actions by the state are divesting local communities of good paying jobs, hurting both  those in need of quality care and middle class families, mostly in upstate New York.     The continued privatization of state services for those with developmental disabilities fails to  recognize the professional, caring, and stable workforce of the State Office for People with  Developmental Disabilities.  Continuing this practice does a disservice not only to the  consumers but the hardworking state workforce.           
CSEA Legislative and Political Action Department