You are on page 1of 39

 

 
 
CoastNet’s Introductory Online Guide to… 
 
 
 

Coastal Management in
the Mediterranean coasts
of North Africa and the
Middle East
 
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Coastal Management in the Mediterranean


coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Table of contents
1. WHY USE THIS GUIDE
1.A. Introduction (page 3)
1.B. A snapshot of the area (page 3)
1.C. The Mediterranean: bridges to be built (page 4)
 
2. DECIDING WHAT COMES FIRST
2.A. The big coastal issues (page 6)
a. A closer look at the main issues in Morocco (page 8)
b. A closer look at the main issues in Egypt (page 9)

2.B. Response through policy and practice (page 13)


a. A joint response to Mediterranean coastal issues: protocols
and practice (page 13)
b. From international protocols to national structures, policy
and plans: the Case of Morocco (page 14)
c. From international practices to national policy and practice:
the case of the North West coast of Egypt (page 16)
 
3. LOOKING FOR SUPPORT: ORGANISATIONS AND
INSTRUMENTS SUPPORTING ICZM
3.A. International (page 18)
3.B. Transnational (page 23)
3.C. National (page 26)
 
4. LOOKING FOR SUPPORT: INSPIRATION and GOOD
PRACTICES (page 24)
4.A. Good practice resources: general (page 27)
4.B. Good practice resources: by issues (page 28)
4.C. Good practice examples: by countries (page 29 )
4.D. Examples of good practice at national level: ICZM projects in
Morocco (page 30)
 
5. LOOKING FOR SUPPORT: ICZM RESEARCH, CAPACITY
BUILDING and GOVERNANCE (page 32)
5.A. Insight and examples of current trends in Coastal Management
research and capacity building (page 32)
Case Study recommendations for Matruh (North West Coast of
Egypt)
5.B. Insight and examples of current trends in Governance in
Coastal Management (page 35)
Case Study recommendations for Amsa (North Coast of Morocco)

2
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

1. WHY USE THIS GUIDE

1.A.INTRODUCTION L Read more about... 
Regional Situation 
Coastal zones are characterised by a multitude of potentially and  Analysis of the 
Mediterranean:  
actually conflicting uses, typically managed by sectoral bodies with 
http://cmsdata.iucn.org/
overlapping responsibilities and jurisdictions. Consequently, the  downloads/regional_situ
integrated management of coastal zones (ICZM) is both necessary  ation_analysis.pdf 
and difficult, and was recognised, therefore, as a priority area for 
action by the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in 
Johannesburg. 
  L Read more about... 
The importance of the Mediterranean as an international sea, its  2002 World Summit on 
situation between three continents, and the extent of threats to its  Sustainable 
environmental quality from pollution and coastal urbanisation have  Development 
resulted in complex institutional arrangements for international  http://www.un.org/jsum
mit/html/basic_info/basi
support in the coastal regions of North Africa and the Middle East.  cinfo.html 
An added complexity is in the relationship between Arab and   
Western systems and institutions of governance.  WSSD on Coastal 
  management:  
Paragraph 30 in 
For the individual government official or community leader this must 
http://daccessdds.un.org
present a complex picture, one which confuses rather than clarifies  /doc/UNDOC/GEN/N02/
the way forward for sustainable development at a practical level.   636/93/PDF/N0263693.p
  df?OpenElement 
This guide from CoastNet aims to make sense of the international 
framework, highlighting important recent developments, and 
making proposals to further improve cooperation and  L Read more about... 
implementation of integrated coastal management.  Millenium Development 
  Goals update for each 
1.B. A SNAPSHOT OF THE AREA country 
http://www.undp.org/m
In this guide we have focused on Northern Africa and Middle East  dg/tracking_countryrepo
Mediterranean countries, these are addressed in the latest review of  rts2.shtml 
the Plan Bleu (2006)  as the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean 
Countries (from Morocco to Turkey) as opposed to the Northern 
Mediterranean Countries (from Spain to Greece, including Cyprus 
and Malta).  
Within Northern Africa and Middle East we find yet another 
geographical, and to a certain extent, cultural division in two 
recognized regions: Maghreb and Mashriq.  
 
Figure 1: Maghreb and Mashriq 

   
Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Mauritania)   Mashriq (Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Arabian Peninsula, 
etc.) 

3
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

To summarise the social, economic and environmental development 
of these countries we have included the following table (Table 1) . In 
order to develop two representative case studies we selected the 
two nations with the longest coastlines and worst social and 
economical situation: Egypt and Morocco. 
 
Table 1: Comparative table of North Africa and Middle East nations population, coastline and 
social, economic and environmental indicators 
  q Revealing data... 
1 2 3
Country  Population  Length  HDI    GDP   2005  ESI    
France, with a 
(WB, 03)  coastline  ranking  and ranking 
population of 59.4 
(CIA, 03)  2007  
million, has a GDP of 
Libya  5.5 million  1770 km  56  8400 (53)  126  30,100 (2007) and ranks 
Tunisia  9.8 million  1148 km  91  3000 (92)  55  at no. 36 according to 
Algeria  3.2 million  998 km  104  3400 (85)  96  the Environmental 
Egypt  66.4 million  2450 km  112  1500 (115)  115  Sustainability Index 
Sources: as in table 
Morocco  29.6 million  1835 km  126  1900 (110)  105 
Syria  17 million  193 km  108  1700 (113)  117 
Lebanon  4.4 million  225 km  88  4170 (HDR,  129 
2004)   
Sources: World Bank; UNEP; CIA Factbook, 2003; JRC; World Economic Forum 
 
 
1.C. THE MEDITERRANEAN: BRIDGES TO BE
BUILT

The recent history of cooperation in the Mediterranean region began 
after the second world war, first with political and then later trade and 
technical support agreements. Currently, the principle vehicle for 
international cooperation in the Mediterranean is the Euro‐
Mediterranean partnership, or Barcelona process, initiated in 1995 and 
comprising 35 members, 25  EU Member States and 10 Mediterranean 
Partners 4. The objectives of this partnership are to:  L Read more about... 
A sustainable future for 
1. Define a common area of peace and stability,   the Mediterranean:  
www.planbleu.org 
2. Construct a zone of shared prosperity through an economic 
and financial partnership and the establishment of a free 
trade area,  
3. (...) encouraging understanding between civil societies. 

1
HDI measures a country's average achievements in three basic aspects of human development: 
health, knowledge, and a decent standard of living.  
http://hdr.undp.org/en/statistics/faq/question,68,en.html 
2
GDP (Gross domestic product) is an aggregate measure of production. Between brackets is the 
ranking of these nations, being 1 the highest and 146 the lowest GDP) 
http://stats.oecd.org/glossary/detail.asp?ID=1163 
3
The Environmental Sustainability Index (ESI) is a composite index tracking 21 elements of 
environmental sustainability covering natural resource endowments, past and present pollution 
levels, environmental management efforts, contributions to protection of the global commons, and 
 
a society's capacity to improve its environmental performance over time.  Finland is currently 
number 1 and North Korea number  146 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_Sustainability_Index 

4
http://ec.europa.eu/external_relations/euromed/index_en.htm

4
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

The clear differentiation between Northern and Southern 
Mediterranean countries (essentially continental Europe on the one 
hand, and the Middle East and North Africa on the other) is key to the 
understanding of the current economic, demographic and 
environmental situation in these areas. This could be illustrated by an 
example, the aggregate water resources share: whilst France and Turkey 
have 40% of all the resources of the Mediterranean Basin, the whole  L Read more about... 
Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya) have just 2%. 
 
Mediterranean Action Plan,  
“The regional integration model being developed in the North   
has no equivalent in the South and East. Despite several  http://www.unepmap.org/ 
initiatives, the region remains characterized by persistent 
and the activities and 
conflicts and the lack of structured cooperation” Mediterranean 
publications of its Coastal 
Blue Plan 2006.  Centre 
 
However, expectations rose during the last meeting in July 2008 of the  http://www.pap‐
Euro‐Mediterranean partnership where an agreement to create a  thecoastcentre.org/ 
 
“Union for the Mediterranean” was promoted by the French 
government to create stronger mechanisms for intergovernmental 
cooperation on social, economic and environmental policy 
(http://www.europa‐eu‐un.org/articles/en/article_8021_en.htm). 
Whether this new Union will supersede the Euro‐Mediterranean 
Partnership is yet to be determined. 

The Mediterranean Action Plan (MAP) is one of the main mechanisms  L Read more about... 
for taking forward the Barcelona convention. It includes the Plan Bleu 
 
for sustainable development of the Mediterranean Region. MAP is  Is there a new vision for 
organised as a series of Regional Activity Centres, each with  Maghreb economic 
responsibility for a different aspect of MAP.   integation?  
   
Click here for World Bank 
  report

5
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

 
2. DECIDING WHAT COMES FIRST 

2.A. THE BIG COASTAL ISSUES

CoastNet has identified four big issues for coastal areas on the North 
African coast and Mediterranean coast of the Middle East. They are: 
1. Urbanisation 
2. Governance 
3. Solid waste and water‐borne pollution 
4. Defence against coastal flooding and erosion risks. 

These issues have been identified through an analysis by CoastNet of 
the priorities of international organisations in the region, and from 
interviews with regional experts. An issue that became apparent in this 
exercise is the potential for different policy streams to take divergent 
paths, and the importance of making efforts at the International level to 
ensure consistency. This is particularly the case in relation to integrating 
‘environmental’ policy streams with ‘economic and social development’ 
policy streams.  

To many, the first three issues will appear to be generic ones, which are 
important everywhere. However, they are particularly important in 
coastal areas because of the tendency for much higher population 
densities at the coast. The satellite image below both illustrates this 
tendency in the Mediterranean, and also indicates the level of growth 
potential in the African and Middle East countries. It is this latter factor 
which is perhaps of most concern at the International level. How can 
African and Middle Eastern countries also benefit from the resources 
that the Mediterranean and its coastal margin provides, whilst not over‐
stressing the environmental capacity of the system? 

Figure 2:  Satellite image of the Mediterranean at night 

6
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Looking at the four issues identified, they have both positive and  q Revealing data... 
negative aspects, and it is important to understand something of their 
human impact in order to fully appreciate their importance.  In the South and East 
Mediterranean the very 
1. Urbanisation. We only need to look to the northern  high urban growth rates – 
74% of the population 
Mediterranean coast to understand the potential for  before 2025 – cannot be 
urbanisation in North Africa and the Middle East. The concern is  equated with similar 
that rapid and poorly planned urbanisation could have many  economic development 
impacts which would threaten the long‐term wellbeing of the  levels and technical and 
communities that would develop there: pollution affecting  financial capacities of cities 
are limited. 
public health; cultural barriers leading to a widening gap   
between rich and poor; environmental degradation leading to  Source: Mediterranean Blue 
devaluing of tourism; loss of biodiversity and related  Plan 
opportunities for future economic development; poorly 
considered coastal defences leading to loss of beaches and 
threatening infrastructure such as roads and hotels.  q Revealing data... 
2. Governance. The process of decision‐making is central to the  “The central problem 
identified in a study on 
sustainable development of coastal areas. The complexity of the 
governance in Tunisia and 
interactions between humankind and the environment demands  Morocco was that 
systems that enable decisions that are set within a holistic  governments, in 
perspective. The importance of engaging users and other  maintaining under‐
stakeholders in a process of decision‐making is also widely  resourced command and 
control systems, have 
recognised but more difficult to put in to practice. If achieved its  undermined their own 
benefits include the acquisition of local knowledge, and  capacity to deal with 
engendering a sense of ownership of decisions so as to facilitate  complex, dynamic and 
implementation.  diverse sets of governance 
problems ” 

3. Solid waste and water‐borne pollution. The collection and  Source: Caffyn and Jobbins, 
disposal of solid domestic refuse is a huge problem. As products  2003 
are sold with more and more packaging, the volume of waste is 
constantly increasing as the quality of life continues to improve. 
Systems for the collection and disposal of this waste are poor 
throughout much of the region, and public attitudes do not  q Revealing data... 
make it a high priority. The human impacts are in relation to  “Over 80% of landfills in 
public health, but also to environmental degradation. In the  the South and East of the 
terrestrial environment refuse is unsightly and is off‐putting to  Mediterranean are 
tourists, as well as being harmful to wildlife. In addition, refuse is  uncontrolled” 
windblown into the sea or transported by rivers, and injures 
Source: Mediterranean Blue 
marine wildlife, and damages commercial fishing activities (by  Plan 
clogging nets, for example). 

4. Defence against coastal flooding and erosion risks. In part 
this is a consequence of urbanisation, past and present.  q Revealing data... 
However, it is also an issue in low‐lying rural areas at risk from 
flooding from the sea, such as the Nile Delta. The environmental  Tangiers lost 53% of tourist 
impact that is common to both is that coastal protection  night stays after the 
disappearance of beaches 
structures interfere with coastal processes, which can often lead  in the 90’s 
to a greater problem of erosion elsewhere. The human impact is   
that the pressure to defend, and to stop beach erosion for  Source: 
http://cmsdata.iucn.org/do
example, often results in poorly considered decisions that may 
wnloads/regional_situation
cost more to society in the long term because of unforeseen  _analysis.pdf 
impacts. 
7
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

To integrate all these factors is a difficult task. CoastNet believes that 
they must be tackled at three levels: Government should ensure that 
the legal and administrative framework supports a holistic approach; 
Practitioners must make a personal commitment to integration in their 
approach to work; Citizens must also understand the complexities of 
coastal regions, so that they understand and support the most 
appropriate management decisions. 

  q Revealing data... 
Þ Global to local “The World Bank has 
Knowledge of these strategic issues is important, but how can it be  assesed annual costs of 
translated into action at the local level which meets both these wider  Environmental degradation 
at 5% of the GDP in Syria, 
needs and those of the locality?   Algeria and Egypt” 
 
a. A closer look at the main issues in Morocco Source: Mediterranean Blue 
Plan
Morocco has the lowest human development index (HDI) (UN, 2005) in 
the Mediterranean. More than 40% of the population live under the 
poverty line. With a coastline of 1835 km, 540 km belongs to the 
Mediterranean Sea (Dakki, 2004).   q Revealing data... 
 
The main social and environmental issues raised in Morocco coincide  In 2002, 44% of the 
Moroccan rural population 
with those of other MENA (Middle East and North Africa) nations:  did not have access to 
  drinking water.  
1. Urbanisation: high tourism pressure from intense foreign private 
investment and intensive tourism planning  Source: Mediterranean Blue 
Plan
 
2. Governance: few resources allocated to capacity building for civil 
society, which is characterised by poor organisation and weak lobbies.  
 
3. Solid waste and water‐borne pollution: salination of estuaries ( for 
example at the Mediterranean sites of Smir, Martil, Laou, Nekor, 
Moulouya) 
 
4. Defence against coastal flooding and erosion risks, the erosion of 
beaches is an important problem because of the dependence on these 
ecosystems for tourism activities 
 
The impact of these issues is intensified due to high unemployment 
amongst young people and large economic inequalities, especially in 
large cities. The fact that there is no specific legislation to protect the  L Read more about... 
coast and that very few resources are allocated to protect the  The UNEP‐MAP funded 
environment are seen as two of the main impediments to a sustainable  study on ICZM in the 
Moroccan Mediterranean 
management of coastal areas.  Coast (in French)  
 
There have been conservation initiatives stimulated by national and  (Download PAC Maroc‐
international governmental organisations resulting in two coastal  Etude de faisabilité.pdf / 
Protected Areas with the status of National Park,  Al‐Hoceima and Souss  1.26MB)
Masa. There are 12 Sites of Ecological and Biological Value (SIBE’s – not 
yet a legal protection status) on the Mediterranean coast of Morocco. 
 
 

8
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

b. A closer look at the main issues in Egypt


Egypt has the second worse Human Development Index in the 
Mediterranean, ranked at 112 against Morocco’s 126 (on 2005 data).   
 
The 2005 Human Development Report5, issued jointly by the Egyptian 
L Read more about... 
Government and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP),  The role of Egypt’s civil 
proposed a radical vision for the transformation of public service  society in a new social 
delivery.   contract 
“The first change is a radical 
  departure from the standard 
The 2008 EHDR6 highlights the key role to be played by civil society and its  conceptual framework where 
organizations — as catalysts for change — in an emerging new social contract  poverty reduction is equated 
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_contract). See the text box on the right side of  with handouts, and instead, 
the page.  
the adoption of a pro‐poor 
 
growth paradigm as the key to 
The 55 Social Contract (SC) programs suggested in EHDR 2005 were selected to 
unleashing the nation’s 
achieve the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015, but several are 
economic potential. The 
“significantly more ambitious and better tailored” to the specific socio‐economic and 
second innovation is that 
cultural profile of Egyptian society. They are:  democratization and 
  participation at the 
• Poverty ‐ 4 programs. Ministry of Social Solidarity (MOSS)  decentralized level become a 
Preschool, Basic and Vocational Education and Adult Literacy ‐ 24 programs.  major tool for cultural 
Ministry of Education (MOE)  transformation, (…). The third 
• Health Insurance ‐ 2 program. Ministry of Health (MOHP)  is that the state provides for 
• Social Security ‐ 1 program. Ministry of Finance (MOF)  the full protection of every 
• Micro and Small Enterprise ‐ 6 programs. Social Fund for Development (SFD)  citizen regardless of ability or 
• Agriculture,  mechanization, animal husbandry, and Extension Services ‐ 3  occupation, (…). Another 
programs. Ministry of Agriculture (MOA)  [fourth] element of the 
• Water and Sanitation ‐ 10 programs. Ministry of Housing, Utilities and New  paradigm shift is the targeting 
Settlements (MOHUNS)  of quality in every domain, 
• Housing and Area Development ‐ 5 programs. Ministry of Housing, Utilities  with an incentive package for 
and New Settlements (MOHUNS)  service delivery of the highest 
  standard, in both public and 
All these programmes have clear social dimensions and most of them have now been  private sector domains. The 
incorporated in the annual and five–year investment plan of the government and the  last [fifth] thematic tool that 
current expenditure budget. (Source: Egypt Human Development Report 2005:  permeates the vision is 
Choosing Our Future: Towards a New Social Contract)  capacity building for quality 
  service delivery with a 
  significant portion of the extra 
budgetary resources allocated 
  towards training of trainers in 
Economic and social development is naturally of the highest priority of  the civil service, education and 
the EHDR programmes, so as to bring about positive change in relation  private professions. (…).” 
to the well‐being of the people of Egypt. Egypt’s geography places   
significant constraints on its potential to develop. The map overleaf  http://hdr.undp.org/en/report
s/nationalreports/arabstates/
clearly illustrates the restrictions to growth posed by the Desert and the  egypt/name,3335,en.html 
vital importance of the Nile to the country.  
 

5
 Human Development Report: 
http://78.136.31.142/en/reports/nationalreports/arabstates/egypt/name,3335,en.html 
6
 EHDR: http://78.136.31.142/en/reports/nationalreports/arabstates/egypt/name,3450,en.html 
 

9
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Figure 3: Spatial distribution of population, land‐use, and economic activity in Egypt 

Source: DEVELOPMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN EGYPT: FOCUS ON COASTAL RESOURCES AND THE NILE, 
OECD 2004. http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/57/4/33330510.pdf  

The fertile areas of Egypt are overcrowded, and the need to develop 
elsewhere to the Nile is important. The coastal area of the NW Coast has 
been identified. It is a fertile area with sufficient rain and groundwater  L Read more about... 
reserves to support agriculture. The coast provides the potential for  The UNDP mine clearance 
tourism related growth.   project: 
http://www.unddp‐
However, growth has been constrained by a lack of infrastructure,  ic.org/docments/project_doc/
MA_Project_Document.pdf 
particularly transport, and huge areas of unexploded WWII mines (21% 
of the worlds unexploded mines are in Egypt, mostly in this area). The 
map below illustrates their extent. 
A UN sponsored mine clearance programme was agreed in late 2006 and 
is now underway. This programme underpins a large scale Egyptian 
Government development of the North West Coast area. UNDP 
Figure 4: Mine clearance programme map

q Revealing data... 

21% of the world’s 
unexploded mines are in 
Egypt 
Source: http://www.unddp‐
mic.org/docments/project_doc
/MA_Project_Document.pdf 

ƒ Green indicates priority development areas 
ƒ Pink/purple indicates suspected mine infected areas 
ƒ Dotted blue lines show administrative boundaries 
10 
Source: http://www.unddp‐mic.org/docments/project_doc/MA_Project_Document.pdf 
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

supported the Ministry of Planning in developing the plan. The expected 
cost for full implementation of the development plan is approximately 
US$ 10 billion. The plan, if implemented as envisioned, will have a 
considerable impact not only on the North West Coast region, but also 
on the national economy as a whole. The development plan is expected 
to create about 400,000 jobs and about one and a half million people 
are expected to move into the region by the year 2022.   

The big questions for coastal sustainability relate to how the 
development plans for this region are implemented in such a way that 
the coastal resources are not over‐exploited, which could lead to: 
• polluted waters,  
• depleted fish resources,  
• over‐grazing,  
• loss of diversity in agriculture through cash cropping,  
• loss of cultural identity as immigration from the Nile Valley 
swamps the indigenous Bedouin population,  
• destruction of unique habitats for urbanisation and consequent 
loss of valuable biodiversity,  
• ensuring that development takes account of climate change, in 
particular with regard to coastal flood and erosion risk.  

Given this complex range of demands we must ask whether the systems 
of governance, particularly the mechanisms for community involvement 
in decision‐making and procedures for spatial planning, are sufficiently 
sophisticated and robust to cope? 
 
According to the interviews with regional experts as part of this study, 
Governance was cited as the principle issue in relation to coastal 
management in Egypt and the wider region. Poor governance was  L Read more... 
leading to poorly integrated decision‐making such that, for example, 
coastal development was allowed in inappropriate locations, leading to   
North West Coast 
demand for coastal defences, which were planned and implemented 
Development Plan 
without a full understanding or consideration of the environmental  http://www.unddp‐
consequences.  mic.org/Development
  /developmentplan_en
Figure 5: Haphazard and unsightly defences on Alexandria’s beach  .aspx 
 
   
North West Coast 
Development 
Authority 
http://www.housing‐
utility.gov.eg/english/
northcost.asp  
 

11
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

According to the EU analysis of priorities for cooperation with Egypt 
(http://ec.europa.eu/world/enp/pdf/country/enpi_csp_egypt_en.pdf), 
 
“As regards the marine environment and coastal zones, the 1994 
Environment Protection Law assigns the EEAA [Egyptian 
Environmental Affairs Agency] responsibility for initiating and 
coordinating integrated coastal zone management (ICZM). A 
National ICZM Committee has existed since 1994, but is not 
currently active. A National ICZM Plan was initiated in 1996, and 
a plan was adopted for the Egyptian Red Sea Coastal Zone in 
1998.” 

 
 

12
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

2.B Response through policy and practice

a. A joint response to Mediterranean coastal issues:


protocols and practice
These questions, the issues highlighted in the previous section, are being 
adressed through international and national policy and practice.  

The main framework for national policy development in Middle East and 
North African States of the Mediterranean is the Barcelona Convention, 
a set of older and newer protocols (click here) that initially set out to 
control pollution but has gradually widened its objectives to include 
Integrated Coastal Management. The seven protocols complete the 
Mediterranean Action Plan (MAP), the first‐ever Regional Seas 
Programme under the UNEP's umbrella.  

The most recently agreed ICZM protocol (click here) brings a broader 
and more comprehensive focus to respond to coastal and marine issues.  L Read more about... 
In the words of the Mediterranean Action Plan coordinator “It is the first  What is new about the 
time that ICZM is full addressed by a legally‐binding international  ICZM protocol? 
instrument”.   The new legal instrument. 
It adds provisions inter alia 
on the environmental 
However, although most of the countries have ratified the Barcelona  impact analysis, the 
Convention and will most likely be doing the same with the new ICZM  protection and sustainable 
Protocol, it has been recognised, 30 years into the Convention, that  use of coastal areas, 
particular coastal 
there is a problem with awareness and compliance. Enforcing national 
ecosystems, coastal 
legislation to protect coastal areas becomes more difficult at the local  landscapes and islands, 
level. Insufficient resources and conflicts of interest or conflicts of duty  economic activities and 
often being the barriers to implementation.   cultural heritage, 
governance and climate 
change. 
The Coastal Management Centre ‐ Priority Actions Programme Regional   
Activity Centre (PAP/RAC) of UNEP/MAP plays an essential role in  Source: http://www.pap‐
providing methodologies and tools to partners and most importantly  thecoastcentre.org 
implements different approaches to coastal management issues through 
the CAMP projects (Click here for details)  and other initiatives like 
SMAP III (Click here for details) , focused at top level policy making.   

As we have illustrated with the examples of Morocco and the North 
West coast of Egypt, there are a number of other international bodies, 
cooperation organisations and NGOs that promote good practice (FAO, 
World Bank, OECD, IUCN – see section 3) but each either pursuing its 
own coastal management goals, or prioritising other issues such as 
economic development in a way that by‐passes the ICZM process.   

13
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

b. From international protocols to national structures,


policy and plans

Þ Taking as an example the case of Morocco, the government has 
ratified and signed up to a number of international conventions and 
protocols which has given the state a global and integrated vision of 
sustainable development, in theory placing environmental issues in the 
centre of socio‐economic development. However, legislation is 
inappropriate and does not favour collective and shared responsibility 
for natural resource management. Neither is it clear the impact of the 
existing legislation at a local level.

Regarding Morocco’s policy for international cooperation, both  L Read more about... 
multilateral (World Bank, UNEP, EC, WWF, etc.) and bilateral  Integrated Coastal 
cooperation  (France, Spain, Germany, Canada, Japan) work at different  Management in Africa ten 
levels of coastal management (development, research, protection,  years ago (1998) 
http://www.pap‐
waste management, aquaculture development, empowering local 
thecoastcentre.org/pdfs/af
communities, etc) and are expected to work under a coordinated  ricaeng.pdf 
national strategy. 

National environmental policies are planned by the Department for the 
Environment. They focus on restoring degraded areas, guiding economic 
activities that have a negative impact on the environment, an integrated 
and global prevention system and putting into place appropriate 
resources for implementation (financial, legal, etc.).  

Table 2: Structures that are directly involved in Coastal Management in Morocco
Coastal Cell  “Cellule littoral” cross sectoral commission 
Ministry of Interior  Holds the role of integrating sectoral local actions for ICZM 
and local 
government 
Ministry of  The Department of the Environment comprises the 
Territorial  “Cellule Littoral”, created under the framework of the 
Management, Water  MedWetCoast, which is a cross‐cutting Coastal Unit that 
and the Environment  develops a multi sectoral vision of ICZM, aiming to also 
integrate biodiversity issues. 
Government  Has the role of avoiding conflict between actions of 
Secretariat General  different governmental bodies. 
Ministry of Foreign  Follows international activities and funding opportunities. 
Affairs and 
Cooperation 
Ministry of  Is responsible for Ports and Maritime Public Domain 
infrastructures and 
transport 
Department of  The National Fishing Office (ONP) has recently been 
Maritime Fishing  restructured and is responsible for awareness campaigns 
for fishermen, calling biological stops for recovering fishing 
stocks, surveying and controlling fishing zones, capacity 
building of stakeholders and constructing fishing ports and 
facilities. 
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, High Commission of Water, Forests 
and fighting Desertification, Ministry of Industry and Commerce, Ministry of 
Tourism and Ministry of National Education. 

14
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Source: Dakki, 2004 

In the last five years approximately 120 projects enabled the 
implementation of an Action Plan by the Department of the  L Read more about... 
Environment and public and private partners. The UNDP has supported 
The Moroccan Coastal Cell. 
the National Action Plan for the Environment (PANE) which will involve  MedWet funded a 
many international and regional partners and is orientated towards a  technical assistance project 
more participative environmental management.  with experts from Ernst 
&Young, the French 
Conservatoire du Littoral 
One of the most important policies that has been developed by the  and a Moroccan legal 
government for coastal conservation and management was the  expert. After more than 15 
Economic and Social Plan. This plan foresees a global programme to  meetings all sectoral and 
safeguard and ensure an integrated development of the coastal  stakeholders perspectives 
were taken into account to 
environment with the involvement of stakeholders (This includes the 
establish the functions of 
definition of a Coastal management and protection strategy, pilot  this structure and 
projects, improving the institutional framework for coordination  objectives. 
purposes and reinforcing monitoring).   
Source: MedWet News online 

Two institutions were created to implement some of these actions, the 
High Council for Safeguarding and Exploitation of Fisheries (in regional 
councils) and the Surveying Resource for Coastal Water Quality, with 
twelve stations with laboratories and boats along the Mediterranean 
and the Atlantic coasts of Morocco. 

When it comes to national and local institutional structures, as is usually 
the case with coastal management, nearly all are involved, directly or 
indirectly in the issues of coastal management.  

There are two public organisations specialised in marine and coastal 
environment, the Office of Port Development and Exploitation and the 
National Institute for Fishing Resources (INRH), that play an essential 
role in the knowledge and protection of the marine environment . 
Together they have eight centres (regional and specialised in 
aquaculture) as well as the headquarters in Casablanca. 

National and international expertise in environmental issues is brought 
together through a number of inter ministerial consultation institutions 
that provide technical and scientific basis for decision making 
(Environment, Fishing, Climate, Territorial management, Impact 
assessments, Coasts, Biodiversity and Wetlands). 

It is worth highlighting also the Coastal Commission composition, with 
members from the Ministries of Public Works, Interior, Water and 
Forests, Commerce and Industry and Communication. It has an advisory 
role for coastal planning within 5 kilometres from the coastline. 

15
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

c. From international practices to national policy and


practice

Figure 6: Egypt regions and boundaries  Þ In this section we will 
look at how internationally 
initiated or funded projects 
and programmes have 
provided the basis for 
detailed policy development 
in the case of the Egyptian 
North West Coast.  

This area has been the 
subject of a number of 
internationally‐funded 
studies in the last decade. 
Those of particular 
relevance to coastal 
management are illustrated 
in the diagram below: 
Source: Wikimedia Commons, 2008 
 
 
Figure 7: Diagram illustrating the complexity of coastal management studies developed 
for the North West Coast of Egypt 
 
 
  North West Coast 
MedWetCoast 1999‐2004  Development  Plan  
 
http://vinc.s.free.fr/ and  http://www.housing‐
 
http://vinc.s.free.fr/article.p utility.gov.eg/english/northcost
 
hp3?id_article=113    .asp  
 
 
 
Protected Area 
 
Conservation report 
2006, Egyptial EEA 
  Mine Action Programme, 
and UNDP, IUCN  NW Egypt. 2006 to date 
 
http://cmsdata.iucn. http://www.mineaction.
 
org/downloads/pa_e org/projects.asp?c=72 
 
gypt_towards_future
.pdf    
 
 
 
OECD climate change 
Fuka Matruh ICAM project, 
  MAP, 1992 – 1999 
and coast report, 
http://www.pap‐
2004   
thecoastcentre.org/about.ph
http://www.oecd.or
  p?blob_id=31&lang=en#13  
g/dataoecd/57/4/33
 
330510.pdf  
 
 
University Cantabria ICAM 
  Mediterranean Action Plan  Carrying capacity 
project, Marsa Matruh to  white paper, “Coastal zone  assessment for tourism 
Source: CoastNet 
Sallum, ongoing  management in the  1999, MAP   
  Mediterranean) (2001)  http://pap‐
http://www.pap‐ thecoastcentre.org/pdfs/CC
thecoastcentre.org/pdfs/ICAM A%20for%20Tourism%20De
%20in%20Mediterranean%20‐ velopment.pdf  
%20White%20Paper.pdf 16
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Collectively, these reports provide a good information base to support 
the development activity that is already underway and that which the 
mine clearance programme will enable in the future. 
 
However, it is CoastNet experience that coastal management is as 
much about process as about research and planning. There is little 
evidence of ongoing international support behind the implementation of 
the development programme or of individual components of it. The 
concern must be that the development programme fails to adequately 
address the complex environmental issues in this coastal region and 
harm the future prospects for its citizens through unsustainable 
development. 
 
The resettlement of 1.5 million people and the construction of the 
L Read more... 
infrastructure required to support them, which is the objective of the 
joint UNDP and Egyption Government programme, is a huge undertaking  About the complexity of 
by any standards. Can the public sector keep up with the likely pace of  environmental 
legislation in Egypt. A 
investment in urban housing and tourism accommodation, and so  complilation of more 
ensure that this development is appropriate in nature and scale to the  than 200 laws related to 
cultural, spatial and environmental characteristics of the region?  environmental issues 
  http://www.pap‐
medclearinghouse.org/e
CoastNet’s experience is that ad hoc projects do little to build  ng/frames_legislation.as
capacity for good governance in coastal zones. This is because their  p?bok=egypt 
complexity calls for sustained efforts in relation to raising awareness and 
building understanding amongst decision‐makers and stakeholders. Also 
that the pressures for development and change create a high level of 
case work and an expanding civil service, which requires sophisticated 
institutional procedures that take time to develop and to mainstream, 
which also cannot be done through an ad hoc approach.  
 
 
 

17
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

3. LOOKING FOR SUPPORT:


ORGANISATIONS AND INSTRUMENTS
SUPPORTING ICZM
In this section we have listed some of the main national and international 
organisations, indicating their role, main projects and activities and where to 
find further information about them. 

3.A. INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS AND


INSTRUMENTS
The United The Barcelona Convention was the first of the UNEP regional seas 
Nations programmes  to be established. It now has 22 signatories and 
Environment supports an active programme of activity through the 
Mediterranean Action Plan (MAP).  
Programme
(UNEP) and Lhttp://www.unep.org/regionalseas/  
Mediterranea
n Action Plan Lhttp://www.unepmap.org 
(MAP) Although the initial focus of the MAP was on marine pollution 
control, experience confirmed that socio‐economic trends, 
combined with inadequate development planning and 
management are the root of most environmental problems. 
Consequently, the focus of MAP gradually shifted to include 
integrated coastal zone planning and management as the key tool 
through which solutions are being sought.  
 
MAP created for this purpose a Priority Action Plan Regional 
Action Centre for ICZM in Croatia, the Coastal Centre, that 
supports sustainable management and planning and development 
activities by implementing Coastal Area Management Programmes 
(CAMPs). This is carried out by individual problem‐solving projects 
in the most affected coastal areas of the Mediterranean.  
 

UNEP and Since 1990, 13 CAMP projects have been completed in Albania, 


MAP Projects Algeria, Croatia (Kastela Bay), Cyprus, Egypt (Fuka‐Matrouh), Greece 
and activities (Rhodes), Israel, Lebanon, Malta, Slovenia, Syria, Tunisia (Sfax), and 
Turkey (Izmir Bay). Two more are currently being implemented in 
Spain and Morocco.  

 Lhttp://www.pap‐thecoastcentre.org 
Other relevant recent activities of the Coastal Centre are : 
 
1. The new ICZM Protocol  Lhttp://www.pap‐
thecoastcentre.org/razno/PROTOCOL%20ENG%20IN%20FINAL%20F
ORMAT.pdf 

It became obvious, five years after the 1995 Barcelona Convention 
that no real progress would be achieved in the field with new ICAM 
recommendations or guidelines alone, since these would only be 
repetitions of what already exists, close to stagnation or regression, 
highlighting once again the lack of effectiveness and 
implementation of adopted documents. Only specialists are aware 
of these documents and almost everything has already been written 
on these issues. Time has now come to take one further step, 
ensuring more effective application in the field. To this end, the 

18
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

only truly viable approach is the adoption of a legally binding 
regional instrument. After six years of work including a feasibility 
study and a consultation process the protocol is now available for 
ratification until January 2009.  
 
2.The Coastday campaign for coastal awareness:  
Lhttp://www.coastday.org/ 
3. Other non ‐ coastal specific activities financed by the MAP are: 
- the Blue Plan activity centre in France that works on 
prospective scenarios (www.planbleu.org) 
- the Specially Protected Areas Centre in Tunisia that 
provides training and advice for creating and managing 
protected areas and species (www.rac‐spa.org.tu) 
- the Environment Remote Sensing Centre in Italy that 
applies these techniques to obtain and integrate data 
from other sources (www.ctmnet.it) 
- the Cleaner Production centre in Spain that spreads 
concepts and awareness of the benefits of cleaner 
production and pollution prevention (www.cpin.es) 
- the MEDPOL programme that assists in formulating and 
implementing national pollution assessment 
programmes as well as following up each national 
Strategic Action Plan (SAP) for the reduction and 
elimination of land‐based pollution 
Lhttp://195/97.36.231/medpol 
- The Programme for the Protection of Coastal Historic 
Sites , with a special focus on underwater archaeological 
sites including shipwrecks. 
- The Mediterranean Commission on Sustainable 
Development that works as an advisory body and a forum 
for dialogue for a regional sustainable development 
strategy for the Mediterranean 
 

MENA Started its activity in 1997, the MENA Development Forum 
Development (MDF) is dedicated to empowering civil society to participate 
Forum (MDF) in shaping public policy; improving the outreach and 
dialogue on economic and social policy issues in MENA; 
improving the extent and quality of research on economic 
and social policy issues; and creating vibrant networks of 
development actors in the region. The MDF partnership is 
comprised of Middle East and North Africa Region (MENA) 
think tanks, the United Nations Development Programme, 
and the World Bank Institute.  

L http://info.worldbank.org/etools/mdfdb/about.htm 
 

MENA Projects and The MENA Development Forums (1‐5) – see link above, 


activities Communities of Practice Competition, Network of Lawyers 
Reforming NGO Laws, Network of Women Evaluators, 
MENANET, Poverty Analysis Initiative, Youth Initiatives 

19
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

FAO (Food and This organisation focuses efforts on the sectors of Agriculture, 


Agriculture forestry and fishing and aquaculture activities.  
Organisation)
L www.fao.org 

FAO Projects and The resources of most interest for ICZM in the Southern 


activities Mediterranean Countres can be found in: 
- a general fisheries commission for the Mediterranean 
Lwww.fao.org/fi/body/rfb/GFCM/gfcm_home.htm 
- information for the production of aquaculture in the 
Mediterranean L www.faosipam.org 
- Establishment of cooperative networks for fisheries 
management in the Mediterranean 
Lwww.faocopemed.org 
 

UNDP (United Nations Lhttp://www.undp.org/ 


Development
Programme)

UNDP Coastal projects The MEDWETCOAST project concluded in 2006 with 


and activities highly relevant and accessible outputs for ICZM 
They have implemented pilot projects in the following 
countries: Albania, Algeria, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, 
Tunisia, Morocco, Palestine. 
http://vinc.s.free.fr/ (archive web pages) 
http://www.medwet.org/medwetnew/en/index.asp 
 

Global Environment Facility [GEF]  
Lhttp://www.gefweb.org/ 
UNDP supports the development of projects in the 
areas covered by the GEF, and also manages two 
corporate programmes on behalf of the GEF 
partnership. These are the Small Grants Programme 
(which has a portfolio of over 5,000 community‐based 
projects) and the GEF National Consultative Dialogue 
Initiative, which strengthens country ownership and 
involvement in GEF activities through multiple 
stakeholder dialogue. 
Fonds Français Pour l’Environnement Mondial [FFEM]  
Lhttp://www.ffem.net/ 

20
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

WORLD BANK The Secretariat is located at The World Bank and is supported by 


- METAP, the this organisation as well as the European Union, UNDP , 
Mediterranean European Investment Bank, Finnish Ministry of Foreign Affairs 
and Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. METAP 
Environmental
beneficiary countries are Albania, Algeria, Bosnia‐Herzegovina, 
Technical Croatia, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, 
Assistance Turkey & West Bank & Gaza 
Programme
www.worldbank.org 
 

WORLD BANK - As part of the METAP III regional program, the World Bank has 


METAP Coastal entrusted the CITET with supervising the second phase of the pilot 
projects and project for the institutional strengthening of the system for 
activities evaluating impact on the environment in the Mediterranean 
region. 
 

L http://www.metap.org/ 
 
http://www.metap‐solidwaste.org/ 
 
 

IUCN Centre for The IUCN Programme for the Mediterranean has developed a 


Mediterranean situation analysis of the region to maximise the role of IUCN 
Cooperation and partners to best deliver relevant, sustainable and focused 
actions. 
(IUCN-Med)
 

IUCN Coastal Lhttp://www.iucn.org/places/medoffice/en/en_programs.html  


projects and
activities A draft situation analysis of the Mediterranean region can be  
consulted online: 
Lhttp://www.iucn.org/places/medoffice/documentos/situatio
n_analysis_en.pdf 

Lhttp://www.iucn.org/where/europe/mediterranean/index.cf
m?uNewsID=747 
 
 

Other A number of Cooperation agencies provide support for sustainable 
bilateral development in the region such as the Swedish International 
/multilateral Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA, http://www.sida.se/ ), the 
Canadian (CIDA, http://www.acdi‐cida.gc.ca/ ) or the Japanese (JICA, 
cooperation
http://www.jica.go.jp/english/) equivalents to mention a few. 
agencies  

21
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

WWF- This organisation has worked very actively in the Mediterranean 
Mediterra region. A useful online resource is the Mediterranean Directory of 
nean Environmental Organisations 
L http://www.atw‐wwf.org/mdeo/ 
WWF http://www.panda.org/about_wwf/where_we_work/europe/what_we_
Coastal do/mediterranean/index.cfm 
activities

Greenpeace Greenpeace Mediteranean set up its first office in Malta in 1995, 
Med to set up a base for the co‐ordination of Greenpeace activities in 
Albania, Algeria, Tunisia, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, Lebanon, Libya, 
Morocco, Malta, Syria, Turkey and the Palestinian Authority. 
Also now actively campaign from bases in Istanbul, Tel Aviv and 
Beirut as well. 

L http://www.greenpeace.org/mediterranean/ 
Greenpeace Med Defending our Mediterranean campaign  
Coastal projects
and activities

Friends of the http://www.foeeurope.org/mednet/media/index.html 


Earth (FOE)  
MedNet

FOE MedNet 1) the Euro‐med free trade area (emfta) 


Coastal projects
and activities 2) the Horizon 2020 Mediterranean depollution initiative 

3) the Mediterranean Commission for Sustainable Development 
(mcsd) 

4) Sustainble eating habits 

22
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

3.B. TRANSNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS AND


INSTRUMENTS
SMAP Short SMAP constitutes the environmental component of the Euro 
and Medium- Mediterranean Partnership and builds on the Barcelona 
term Priority Declaration, which “recognised the importance of reconciling 
economic development with environmental protection, of 
Environmental
integrating environmental concerns into the relevant aspects of 
Action economic policy and of mitigating any potential negative 
Programme environmental consequences”.    
coordinated by
the European Lhttp://www.smaponline.net/EN/index.php?subdir=sma&pa
Commission ge=sma.php 
 

SMAP Coastal The SMAP programme sets five priorities for national and donor 


projects and interventions, these include Integrated Water Management and 
activities Waste Management, Pollution or threatened species hotspots, 
ICZM and Combating Desertification. 

SMAP ICZM projects are listed under:  

Lhttp://www.smaponline.net/EN/index.php?subdir=smap3&p
age=smap3.php&menu0=1 
 

Other EU funds There are a number of other EU funding tools for the 


available Mediterranean but the access to these from Southern and 
Eastern Mediteranean Countries is quite limited ( Interreg, Life, 
Framework Programmes, etc.)
However, cooperation has been further enhanced since January 
2007 through the current European Neighbourhood and 
Partnership Instrument (ENPI) with a budget of €13 billion until 
the year 2013. 
 

Examples of other The MAMA MedGOOS project developed a thematic network 


EU funded involving all the Mediteranean countries.  
Coastal projects
and activities L www.ifremer.fr/mama/
The Med PAN Interreg IIIC project supports a network of all 
Mediterranean Marine Protected Areas Managers 

L http://www.medpan.org 

CEDARE (The The Center for Environment and Development for the Arab 


Center for Region and Europe ‐ was established in 1992 as an international 
Environment inter‐governmental organisation with diplomatic status . This 
was in response to the convention adopted by the Council of 
and
Arab Ministers Responsible For the Environment (CAMRE) , in 
Development 1991 and upon the initiative of the Arab Republic of Egypt, the 
for the Arab United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Arab 

23
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Region and fund for Economic and Social Development (AFESD). CEDARE 


Europe) lists marine and coastal management, environmental 
economics and assessment, urbanisation, and education and 
communication as areas of special concern.  

L http://www.cedare.int/Main.aspx?code=284 

PERSGA Persga is an intergovernmental organisation, established as one 
(Regional of the UNEP regional seas programmes, dedicated to the 
Organization conservation of the coastal and marine environments in the 
Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Its strategic action plan lists support 
for the
for integrated coastal zone management as one of its eight focal 
Conservation of areas. 
the
Environment of L http://www.persga.org 
the Red Sea and  
Gulf of Aden)
 

The Africa The Africa Partnership Forum (APF) was established in November 


Partnership 2003 in the wake of the Evian Summit as a way of broadening the 
Forum (APF) existing high‐level G8/NEPAD dialogue to encompass Africa's 
major bilateral and multilateral development partners. The APF's 
mission is to strengthen partnership efforts in favour of Africa's 
development. Its members; Africa, G8, OECD and other 
development partners all work together as equals in the forum – 
and ensure synergies and coherence with other international 
fora. 

L http://www.africapartnershipforum.org
 

Examples of APF This study presents the challenges of Climate Change impacts on 


Coastal projects Africa 
and activities
L http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/32/20/40692762.pdf 

Mediterranean L http://www.mio‐ecsde.org 
Information Office for
 
Environment, Culture and
Sustainable Development
(MIO-ESCDE)

24
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

RAED (Arab Network The Arab Network for Environment and Development 


for Environment and “RAED” is an Arab NGO established since November 
Development) – AOYE 1990. RAED was founded to satisfy the actual needs of 
NGOs throughout the Arab Countries and to gather 
(Arab Office for Youth
them under one umbrella.  
and the Environment)
L http://www.aoye.org/ 
  
 

The Mediterranean Medcities is a network of Mediterranean coastal cities 


Cities Network created in Barcelona in November 1991 at the initiative 
of the Mediterranean Technical Assistance Programme 
(METAP)  
The Medcities network is a tool to strengthen the 
environmental and sustainable development 
management capability of local administration, but it is 
also useful in order to identify the domains were a 
common activation could be the most useful mean to 
improve the regional environmental conditions. 

L www.medcities.org 
 

Enironmental Environment and Development Action in the Third 
Development Action – World (ENDA‐TM) is an international non‐profit 
Maghreb (ENDA) organisation based in Dakar, Senegal. Founded in 1972, 
ENDA is an association of autonomous entities co‐
ordinated by an Executive Secretariat. ENDA's 
worldwide representation includes twenty‐four teams 
at the Dakar headquarters each working on 
development and environment themes and twenty‐
one poles in Southern countries: fourteen in Africa. 

L http://www.enda.sn/ 
 

MED – Forum This organisation was created during the III 


(Meiteranean NGO Mediteranean Environmental Forum and its objectives 
Network for Ecology are to represent NGOs in International Fora, 
developing cooperation projects, promoting regional 
and Sustainable
campaigns, activities at a national level and 
Development) organisation of forums, seminars and meetings. 

L http://www.medforum.org/english/index.htm 
 
 

25
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

3.C. EXAMPLES OF NATIONAL GOVERNMENTAL


ORGANISATIONS
Morocco Cellule Littoral (Office for coastal   
issues) from the Ministère de 
l’Aménagement du Territoire, de 
l’Eau et de l’Environnement. 

L http://www.minenv.gov.ma/ 
Water Ressources, Forests and 
Fight Against Desertification 
(HCEFLCD)  

L www.eauxetforets.gov.ma  

Egypt Governmental body responsible for   
environmental policies is the 
“Egyptian Environmental Affairs 
Agency (EEAA)” 

L http://www.eeaa.gov.eg/ 
 

Tunisia Government body responsible for   
environmental policies is the: 
“Agence de protection et 
d'aménagement du littoral” (APAL) 

L http://www.apal.nat.tn/ 
 
Algeria Government body responsible for   
environmental policies is the: 
“Ministère de l’Aménagement du 
Territoire et de l’Environnement et 
du Tourisme” (MATE) 

L http://www.mta.gov.dz/ 
Lybia Government body responsible for   
environmental policies is the 
Environment General Authority 

L
http://www.environment.org.ly/ 

26
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

4.LOOKING FOR SUPPORT: INSPIRATION and


GOOD PRACTICES

4.A. Good practice resources: general

 If you are looking for Coastal Management projects and/or good 
practice we recommend the following general online resources: 
 
THE ENCORA  The Encora network extends across Europe and North Africa, 
CONTACT  the project database contains more than 450 projects. There 
DATABASE are also a persons and an organisations contact database.  
 
Lhttp://www.encora.eu/index.php?option=com_imis&mo
dule=project&Itemid=21 
 
PAP/RAC (MAP)  Mediterranean ICAM project online database, sorted by 
COASTAL PROJECTS  countries 
INVENTORY   
  Lhttp://www.pap‐medclearinghouse.org/eng/page001a.asp 

THE COASTNET  The CoastNet Good Practice Directory of Good Practice 
GOOD PRACTICE  includes more than 60 examples from UK National 
GUIDE  Partnerships.  
 
 
L http://www.coastnet.org.uk 
http://www.coastnet.org.uk/files/Education/Good%20Practice
%20Directory%20Marine%20Education%20Final.pdf 

THE COPRANET  The Coastal Practice Network has collected 173 projects and 
COASTAL PRACTICE  158 case studies. These can be browsed by keywords selecting 
DATABASE  the Extended Search option. 
 
 
Lhttp://www.coastalpractice.net/en/tourismdb/index.htm 

 
 
 

27
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

4.B. Good practice resources: by issues


 
The following practices are not only from North Africa and Middle East 
we have included others that may be useful sources of information: 
1. Urbanisation
Agriculture and urbanisation in the  http://cordis.europa.eu/inco/fp4/projects/ACTIO
Mediterranean Region: enabling  NeqDndSESSIONeq17065200595ndDOCeq89ndTB
policies for sustainable use of soil  LeqEN_PROJ.htm
and water (completed 2003)   

Development of Strategies for  http://www.life‐destinations.org/
Sustainable Tourism in  The enormous risk of environmental degradation 
Mediterranean Nations  in the case of an unsustainable tourism 
development calls for immediate action. 

2. Governance 
Community engagement    http://www.smaponline.net/EN/index.php?subdir=sm
  ap_proj&page=smap_proj.php&pclass=pmenu&menu0
=1&blocco=int_coa_pro.html 
Governance and capacity‐ http://www.smaponline.net/EN/index.php?subdir=sm
building    ap_proj&page=smap_proj.php&pclass=pmenu&menu0
=1&blocco=int_man_pro.html 
 
Local Agenda 21 projects in  http://www.iclei.org/index.php?id=709 
Africa  http://www.agenda21maroc.ma/ 
Greener Governance in the  http://www.iclei.org/documents/Africa/greener_gover
Southern South Africa  nance_in_southern_SADC.pdf 
Development Community  This report contains a series of 15 case studies on 
  communities in South Africa that have and are 
currently working on projects related to greener 
governance. 
Success stories of coastal  http://www.crc.uri.edu/SUCCESS/stories.php 
governance projects in Latin   
America 

3. Solid waste and water-borne pollution  


Regional Solid Waste  http://www.metap‐solidwaste.org/ 
Management project for 
 
countries in Maghreb and 
Mashreq 
R&D PROJECTS IN THE FIELD  http://www.emsa.europa.eu/Docs/opr/eu_marine_rtd
OF MARINE POLLUTION  _projects_overview.pdf 
   
Sustainable agriculture    http://www.mashreq‐maghreb.org/ 
 

4. Defence against coastal flooding and erosion risks. 


Eurosion case studies  http://www.eurosion.org/reports‐online/part4.pdf 
This report presents the main lessons learned from the 
practical level of coastal erosion 
management with a state‐of‐the‐art of coastal erosion 
management solutions in 
Europe, based on the review of 60 case studies. 
http://www.eurosion.org/reports‐online/reports.html 
List of all reports 

Concepts and Science for  http://www.conscience‐eu.net/ 
Coastal Erosion Management   

28
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

4.C. Good practice examples: by nations


 
Syria  CAMP project 
http://www.pap‐thecoastcentre.org/about.php?blob_id=38&lang=en 
 
Tunisia  CAMP project 
http://www.pap‐thecoastcentre.org/about.php?blob_id=39&lang=en 
 
Algeria  CAMP project 
http://www.pap‐thecoastcentre.org/about.php?blob_id=27&lang=en 
SMAP project 
 
http://www.smaponline.net/EN/index.php?subdir=smap_proj&page=sma
p_proj.php&pclass=pmenu&menu0=1&blocco=alg_coa_pro.html
 
Lebanon  CAMP project 
http://www.pap‐thecoastcentre.org/about.php?blob_id=35&lang=en 
 
Egypt  CAMP project 
http://www.pap‐thecoastcentre.org/about.php?blob_id=31&lang=en 
 
South Sinai Regional Development Programme  http://www.eu‐
ssrdp.org/en/homepage 
 
Community projects in South Sinai 
http://www.southsinaifoundation.org/projects.html 
 
Medicinal plants in Egypt http://www.mpcpegypt.com/index.aspx  
 
Bedouin Handicrafts  http://st‐
katherine.net/en/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=
14&Itemid=143 
 
Learning about Marine Conservation:  
http://www.iucn.org/where/europe/mediterranean/index.cfm?uNewsID=
747  
 
 

29
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

4.D. Examples of good practice at national level:


ICZM projects in Morocco 
 
CAMP project  http://www.pap‐
  thecoastcentre.org/about.php?blob_id=63&lang=en 
 
http://www.smaponline.net/EN/index.php?subdir=smap_proj&pag
CAP‐Nador  e=smap_proj.php&pclass=pmenu&menu0=1&blocco=red_con_pro.
(Coastal Action  html
Plan for Nador) 
CAP‐Nador (Coastal Action Plan for Nador) has the aim to stop the 
decline of Nador´s coastal natural wealth and secure the livelihood 
of its population through the establishment of an Integrated 
Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) Plan of Action with full 
stakeholders’ participation. 
In the Tetouan region, one of the main industrial areas of the 
Research and  country, a local consultative forum in 2003 gathered international 
consultative  experts and local organisations to decide for the future of the local 
forum in  river “Oued Martil”. The following internet address links to the 
document that was the result of several intensive days of work 
Tetouan 
(translated from French):  
  http://66.102.9.104/translate_c?hl=en&sl=fr&tl=en&u=http://www
.sdv‐tetouan.ma/sdv‐tetouan/produits/produit2/2.asp 
See also the Coastal Urban Forum in Tetouan, 2003  
http://www.sdv‐tetouan.ma/sdv‐
tetouan/produits/produit2/tetouan_rapport.pdf 
 
This project involved local fishermen in the management of coastal 
National Park  biodiversity, and a participative designation of a sanctuary, as well 
and fishing  as the creation of the Al Hoceima National Park. This project was 
community  implemented through the local leadership of the Azir association 
and received support from various agencies including WWF. 
driving 
http://azir.cfsites.org/ 
sustainable   
change in Al‐
Hoceima  
 
This project supports capacity building and the development of 
Moroccan  tools and methods to underpin preparation for and responses to 
Coastal  climate‐related events in coastal zones. Researchers will be 
Management:  identifying population vulnerability; develop adaptation strategies 
and land use guidelines while optimizing the tradeoffs between 
Building 
different stakeholders; and enhance local capacity for participatory 
capacity to  planning. 
adapt to  This project is led by the International Development Research 
climate change  Centre from Canada (IDRC) with Moncton University, EUCC and the 
through  Ecole Nationale Forestiere d’Ingenieurs. 
Sustainable  www.idrc.ca 
Policies and   
Planning 
 
Environmental awareness project  
UNEP Coast 
http://www.coastday.org/cd_activities.php?lang=en#maroko 
Day  
 
MEDPOL  reports and the creation of national resources to control marine 
water quality 

http://www.chem.unep.ch/gmn/014_map.htm 

30
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Strategic Action  In the Moroccan Mediterranean 
Plan for Marine  http://www.medsp.org/english/index.asp 
Biodiversity 
 

GEF ‐ GLOBAL 
Project for Protected areas management plans and social actions 
ENVIRONMENT  with neighbouring human settlements. 
FUND  
 
 
UNDP  This project had the cooperation of the Ministry of the 
MedWetCoast  Environment and Water and Forests, the Scientific Institute of 
(concluded  Rabat and WWF and the sites involved were proposed to become 
Ramsar sites. 
2006) 
 
  1. Development and implementation of policies for the sustainable 
management of wetlands and coastal areas. 
 
2. Protection and removal of root causes of the loss of biodiversity 
of global significance in key demonstration sites. 
3. Contributing to closing the Mediterranean circle in terms of 
biodiversity protection and sustainable management of wetlands 
and coastal zones through networking and training. 
 
 
Source: http://vinc.s.free.fr/presentation.php3?id_article=452 
GREPOM – 
Group de   Ecotourism and Environmental Education project. A feasibility study 
Recherche pour  to enhance ecotourism value of a SIBE site in Moulouya. Was led by 
la Protection  the national NGO Grepom, Research group for the protection of 
birds in Morocco, supported by French funds and the 
des Oiseaux au 
MedWetCoast 
Maroc (NGO) 
 
MedPAN (EU 
Interreg IIIC)  MedPAN is the network of managers of marine protected areas in 
the Mediterranean.  
This three‐year project (2005 ‐ 2007) was funded by the Interreg 
IIIC South. It brings together 23 partners from 11 countries around 
the shores of the Mediterranean, of which 14 partners are 
European (France Italy, Greece, Malta, Slovenia, Spain) and 9 
partners from non‐European countries (Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, 
Croatia, Turkey). 

http://www.medpan.org/?arbo=accueil 

Départament 
des Pêches  Establishing the bases for a sustainable managementof sensitive 
Maritimes ‐ Mediterranean ecosystems.
MECO  http://www.meco.unifi.it/italianv.htm 

 
 

31
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

5. LOOKING FOR SUPPORT: ICZM


RESEARCH and CAPACITY BUILDING
5.A. Insight on current trends in Coastal
Management research and capacity building
In most cases ICZM programmes concentrate on the development of 
management strategies. They less often address the issue of the 
capacity of individuals or institutions to deliver integrated management. 
The factors that may make capacity an issue are many, and include: 
• People have a poor understanding of the concept 
• Institutional procedures are a barrier to integrated working 
• Access to information is poor 
• ICZM is a low priority and consequently receives few resources. 

We present here two European funded projects that have addressed this 
issue:  
 
a.COREPOINT, in which CoastNet was a partner, developed a specific 
approach which comprised: 
1. Expert couplets: a Research‐Policy partnership approach 
2. COREPOINT training schools 
3. Local solutions for managing coastal information 
4. Assessing progress in integrated management 

“The COREPOINT approach is about building capacity, so that integrated 
management can be more successfully achieved.  This is tackled at the 
institutional level, through expert couplets, local information systems 
and assessing progress in ICZM. At the human level, capacity is built 
through training, and through the expert couplet experience.”  See 
http://crc67.ucc.ie/corepoint/ for more information. 
 
b.ENCORA (www.encora.eu) was established to provide better 
coordination of research and policy making for coastal management, 
and better access to expertise and information. It has developed an 
internet information portal as one tool to help achieve this. It has a 
database of contacts, as a source of guidance and good practice, and a 
’Coastal Wiki’ as an authoritative source of information on coastal 
concepts. The portal also incorporates CoastNet’s ‘CoastWeb’, an online 
document archive (www.coastweb.info ). The ENCORA project also 
considered the issue of training, and recommended the establishment of 
national centres of excellence in training for coastal management. The 
box below shows the wide range of capacity issues that exist. 
 

32
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Institutional and individual capacity issues in coastal management
 
• Lack of sustained capacity and expertise in ICZM within Local 
Authorities. 
• Fragmentation of the training and educational effort. 
• Training efforts not directly linked with management priorities. 
• Poor links between researchers and policy makers. 
• Limited training directed to higher levels of government and decision‐ 
making. 
• Lack or limited mechanisms to transfer courses and experience. 
• Limited use of need assessments as a diagnostic tool. 
• Limited use of evaluation tools to identify the impact of the capacity 
building effort within the working environment. 
• No synergy between different capacity building initiatives. 
• Limited use of communication means to capture attention of the 
general public and the decision makers. 
• Absence of a critical mass of practitioners and policy makers that push 
ICZM towards the centre stage of the economic and environmental 
goals of a country. 
• Limited numbers of ICZM trainers. 
• Lack of awareness/ information on training opportunities, especially for 
people outside governmental spheres or large institutions. 
• Need to convince institutions of the need and benefits regarding the 
training of personnel at all levels. 
 
Source:  Encora theme 10 report , draft (www.encora.eu) 

 
It is clear from this work that capacity building at both Institutional level 
and human level should be an integral part of ICZM strategies.   
 
Case Study: recommendations for Capacity-building in
the North West Coast of Egypt

The North West Egypt coastal region is to be developed to 
accommodate 1.5 million new residents by 2022. The degree and pace 
of construction activity and the complexities involved with development 
on this scale will require significant additional capacity to ensure that 
development meets community needs and that environmental impacts 
are minimised. CoastNet proposes the following programme for 
capacity‐building in NW Egypt: 
 
ƒ Annual conference – to share knowledge and debate strategic issues 
regarding the development programme 
ƒ Thematic workshops – to assist practitioners in gaining a more 
holistic perspective, and to gain a better understanding of issues and 
concepts 
ƒ Newsletter – to share information and news 
ƒ Guides to good practice  
ƒ Assessment of IT provision and skills – to ensure that online 
resources can be used 
ƒ A Certified training programme, combining periodic events with 
distance learning, leading to vocational qualifications – to improve 
the level of expertise amongst practitioners.  

33
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

ƒ Assessment of Institutional systems and procedures – to identify 
possible improvements and efficiencies 
ƒ Exchanges of staff between Institutions in Europe and Egypt ‐ to 
study systems and procedures, and to implement improvements 

34
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

5.B. Insight and examples of current trends in


Governance in Coastal Management
 
As a follow‐up of the Implementation Plan of the Johannesburg WSSD, it 
has been strongly encouraged that countries of the Mediterranean 
region strengthen legal frameworks, nurture democracy, accountability 
and transparency and promote the effective participation of the civil 
society, especially women and youth and the private sector in the 
decision making process. Timely and proper implementation and 
enforcement of decisions taken at all levels concerning sustainable 
development needs to be given due attention. 
 
Organisations like the International Council for Local Environmental 
Initiatives actively promote that the Mediterranean (and other) 
countries adhere to the Principle 10 of Agenda 21 and consider acceding 
to the Aarhus Convention and establishing domestic regimes which 
provide for public access to environmental information, participation in 
decision‐making and access to justice.  
 
The role of both regional (international) and local levels of governance 
and participatory decision making structures should be strengthened in 
the Mediterranean and the role of women needs to be more 
emphasised at all levels as they play an essential role in sustainable 
development. Development programmes should focus on women’s 
issues. Although there are many publications on community 
engagement the following list of the International Association for Public 
Participation of participatory tools is fairly comprehensive and includes 
an assesment of why and when to use each tool. 
L http://www.iap2.org/associations/4748/files/06Dec_Toolbox.pdf 
 
This handbook on Governance and Socioeconomics of Large Marine 
Ecosystems gives a good insight into the issues at a larger scale. The 
book is divided in three main sections: I.From Sectoral to Ecosystem‐
based management, II. From Planning to Implementation: the steps in 
the Governance process, III. A Primer on the challenges and the 
dimensions of LME governance, IV. Sustainable Financing and V. Future 
Directions. 

L http://www.iwlearn.net/abt_iwlearn/pns/learning/lme‐gov‐
handbook.pdf 

To understand some of the key implications of governance systems in 
North Africa (the case studies were from Morocco and Tunisia), the 
MECO project delivered a revealing study “Governance Capacity and 
Stakeholder Interactions in the Development and Management of 
Coastal Tourism”. This study highlighted the following: 

35
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Box x: Main findings of the Governance Capacity Study in Morocco and Tunisia 

Governing instruments: are in the hands of the state administration, 
stakeholders found these take too long to draft and enact, difficult to 
change and that they focus on symptoms rather than on causes of 
problems. These are rarely carried out by those with power to 
influence their character. 

Financial instruments: subsidies, taxes, compensation and credit 
facilities were generally seen as lengthy processes if beneficial and 
some taxes being unfair. For example hoteliers who pay taxes to local 
authorities for waste management that were not delivered because of 
budgetary problems. 

Governmental information sharing: Data conflicts were found both 
amongst state departments and within different hierarchical levels of 
the same agency. Officials at regional and central level lacked data on 
site conditions whilst local officials frequently did not have access to 
strategic planning documents or data explaining the context for 
instructions. Vertical interactions and integration appear strong due 
to clear lines of accountability and command and supervision. 
However, information trickles up and orders flow down, frequently 
without explanation with little space for adaptive management. 

Access to information: Local non‐state stakeholders rarely had images 
regarding state decisions and more often viewed the state as being 
constraining rather than enabling. Local people were generally 
reluctant to request information from officials. NGOs had more 
complete information but complained about the administrative 
culture that does not encourage questioning or disseminating 
available data. 

Consultation: Few officials saw discussing issues with local 
stakeholders as a priority. Most state organisations did not identify a 
need to engage in liaison or outreach to local people. One of the 
obstacles in this case was the lack of established social structures for 
stakeholders to address, few public forums and an absence of social 
readiness for greater participation, largely due to the lack of human, 
social and capital resource at the structural level. 

36
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Case Study: recommendations for improving


Governance in the North Coast of Morocco (Amsa)  
 
CoastNet proposes the following feasibility study  for the empowerment 
of the fishing community of Amsa, in Northern Morocco. 
 
Small coastal fishing communities are amongst the poorer groups in 
Moroccan society. Amsa is a typical example, with low household 
incomes, poor education facilities and attainment, and declining 
access to the natural resources upon which livelihoods depend. In 
coastal areas in particular, there are also huge external pressures, 
which include, in North Morocco: extensive urbanisation, large‐scale 
infrastructures, unsustainable tourism, floods, overfishing, loss of 
sandy coastlines, maritime pollution, etc. 
 
Demographically, the province of Tetouan follows the pattern of the 
Southern coasts of the Mediterranean where most growth is occurring 
(United Nations Mediterranean Action Plan, 2002). Tourists double 
the population during peak periods resulting in an over‐extension of 
facilities that are costly in terms of space, investment and operations. 
Although the problems are most intense in urban coastal areas, rural 
coasts like Amsa are facing a rural exodus of youth while tourists are 
moving in with increasing cultural impacts on their lifestyle. 
 
The coastal population of Morocco passed from 9.4 million coastal 
inhabitants in 1982 to 14.8 in 2000 (ONEM, Moroccan National 
Observatory of the Environment). A recent study from the University 
of Cadiz shows how in the case of the province of Tetouan the 
population has nearly tripled in the last two decades. 
 
Fisheries, aquaculture and tourism all depend directly on the 
environmental quality of the coast. However, there is a strong 
contrast between traditional subsistence activities and the fast and 
large growing tourism activity in the province of Tetouan.  The know‐
how of the people of Amsa coupled with traditional practices for 
exploiting natural resources is part of their distinctive heritage and 
culture. But according to statistics from INRH (the National Fisheries 
Research Institute) commercial fish stocks have suffered great losses 
in the last decade, and their decline is having a strong impact on small 
traditional fishermen's livelihoods. 
 
There is a strong and urgent need to diversify their sources of income 
and take advantage of the opportunities from the tourism 
development sector. However, such developments and tourists desire 
for apartments on the beach should not be at the expense of 
traditional practices and respect for natural and cultural heritage. 
There is a strong need to prepare rural communities for  the changes 
that are already taking place. They need to benefit from this 
development whilst making sure natural resources are not 
deteriorated or overexploited. 
 
 

37
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

Eco‐tourism is seen by many international institutions, such as IUCN 
and UNDP, as a way of capitalizing on natural resources in a way 
which also contributes to their preservation and sustainable 
management. However, putting this concept into practice is difficult, 
against a background of often poor administration and strong 
financial incentives for mass tourism. Consequently there is a need for 
exemplar projects to demonstrate sustainable approaches. In this 
project a community development approach is taken, which aims to 
balance economic growth against the value of traditional lifestyles. 
 
As another way to diversify fisher household's income, aquaculture 
represents a very good opportunity for the area and there are only 
two companies presently in the province of Tetouan, employing 40 
persons. The Head of the National Aquaculture Centre explained to 
CoastNet the reason for this: there is little funding for knowledge 
transfer to communities and therefore most work is contracted by 
large private companies or Bilateral Development Agencies, all 
interested in research rather than in starting up small family 
aquaculture businesses. 
 
Access to water and sanitation systems is a larger problem in Morocco 
than in any other Mediterranean country according to the UN 
Mediterranean Blue Plan. This lack constrains not only improvements 
in health, but also tourism development.  
 
CoastNet has proposed a project that would support disadvantaged 
fishing communities to mitigate and adapt to the existing and 
upcoming impacts of coastal change and risks (decreasing fish stocks, 
tourism pressure, rural exodus or migration, loss of natural and 
cultural heritage) in the North coast of Africa. 
 
Through a process of learning and building local partnerships (with 
two environmental NGOs, a women’s association, schools, local 
government, university and the national fishing research centre),  
fishermen and their wives and families should be supported by:  
 
1. Renovating traditional fishing gear and facilities and 
innovating through sustainable fishing techniques and 
diversifying their source of income by installing and building 
capacity to develop low impact aquaculture 
 
2. Developing marine and coastal ecotourism 
attractions/educational resources to enhance the value of 
natural and cultural heritage 
 
3. Strengthening a network of civil society from Tetouan 
province and Northern Africa that will promote similar good 

38
CoastNet’s Introductory Guide to… 
Coastal Management in the Mediterranean coasts of North Africa and the Middle East

practice in rural coastal communities.  
 

39