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Presentation # 14 Drama arose from religious ceremonies, as opposed to comedy and tragedys evolvement from themes in ceremonies such

as fertility, life, death. Thespis of Sixth Century B.C. Attica was th first composer and soloist in tragedy. Aeschylus added a second actor to allow conflict and dialogue. Sophocles and Euripides added a third. Medieval drama largely evolved from the rites commemorating birth and the resurrection of Christ. During the Renaissance, we can see the beginning of drama as we know it: a picture of human life revealed in successive changes or events and told in dialogue and action for the entertainment and instruction of an audience. Presentation # 15 During the mid-Sixteenth Century, England was host to one of the greatest eras of world drama. It was during the Elizabethan/Jacobean Age that Shakespeare wrote his 38 plays. According to the modern definition, any play (such as Becketts Waiting for Godot) may be considered a drama. Presentation # 16 Glossary of Drama Terms Allegory A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning. Allegory often takes the form of a story in which the characters represent moral qualities. Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles Aside Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, which are not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play. Presentation # 17 Catastrophe The action at the end of a tragedy that initiates the denouement or falling action of a play. Catharsis The purging of the feelings of pity and fear that, according to Aristotle, occur in the audience of tragic drama. The audience experiences catharsis at the end of the play, following the catastrophe. Character An imaginary person that inhabits a literary work. Literary characters may be major or minor, static (unchanging) or dynamic (capable of change). Presentation # 18 Characterization The means by which writers present and reveal character. Although techniques of characterization are complex, writers typically reveal characters through their speech, dress, manner, and actions. Chorus A group of characters in Greek tragedy (and in later forms of drama), who comment on the action of a play without participation in it. Climax The turning point of the action in the plot of a play or story. The climax represents the point of greatest tension in the work. Presentation # 19

Comedy A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the better. In comedy, things work out happily in the end. Comic drama may be either romantic--characterized by a tone of tolerance and geniality--or satiric. Satiric works offer a darker vision of human nature, one that ridicules human folly. Complication An intensification of the conflict in a story or play. Complication builds up, accumulates, and develops the primary or central conflict in a literary work. Conflict A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. The conflict may occur within a character as well as between characters. Presentation # 20 Connotation The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. Poets, especially, tend to use words rich in connotation. Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" includes intensely connotative language. Dialogue The conversation of characters in a literary work. In fiction, dialogue is typically enclosed within quotation marks. In plays, characters' speech is preceded by their names. Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A work's diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values. Presentation # 21 Fable A brief story with an explicit moral provided by the author. Fables typically include animals as characters. Their most famous practitioner in the west is the ancient Greek writer Aesop, whose "The Dog and the Shadow" and "The Wolf and the Mastiff" are included in this book. Flashback An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident that occurred prior to the main time frame of a work's action. Writers use flashbacks to complicate the sense of chronology in the plot of their works and to convey the richness of the experience of human time. Presentation # 22 Foreshadowing Hints of what is to come in the action of a play or a story. Gesture The physical movement of a character during a play. Gesture is used to reveal character, and may include facial expressions as well as movements of other parts of an actor's body. Monologue A speech by a single character without another character's response. See Dramatic monologue and Soliloquy. Narrator The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author. Presentation # 23 Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often playful and even respectful in its playful imitation. Pathos A quality of a play's action that stimulates the audience to feel pity for a character. Pathos is always an aspect of tragedy, and may be present in comedy as well.

Props Articles or objects that appear on stage during a play. Protagonist The main character of a drama. Presentation # 24 Recognition The point at which a character understands his or her situation as it really is. Reversal The point at which the action of the plot turns in an unexpected direction for the protagonist. Rising action A set of conflicts and crises that constitute the part of a play's or story's plot leading up to the climax. Setting The time and place of a literary work that establish its context. Presentation # 25 Similarities and Differences Live drama is an ancient art form with thousands of years of recorded history and ongoing cultural vitality. Cinema is a much newer art form, with a history dating back only to approximately 1895 but having a mass appealthat has pushed live theater into a secondary position inall but a handful of urban locations. Presentation # 14 Drama arose from religious ceremonies, as opposed to comedy and tragedys evolvement from themes in ceremonies such as fertility, life, death. Thespis of Sixth Century B.C. Attica was th first composer and soloist in tragedy. Aeschylus added a second actor to allow conflict and dialogue. Sophocles and Euripides added a third. Medieval drama largely evolved from the rites commemorating birth and the resurrection of Christ. During the Renaissance, we can see the beginning of drama as we know it: a picture of human life revealed in successive changes or events and told in dialogue and action for the entertainment and instruction of an audience. Presentation # 15 During the mid-Sixteenth Century, England was host to one of the greatest eras of world drama. It was during the Elizabethan/Jacobean Age that Shakespeare wrote his 38 plays. According to the modern definition, any play (such as Becketts Waiting for Godot) may be considered a drama. Presentation # 16 Glossary of Drama Terms Allegory A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning. Allegory often takes the form of a story in which the characters represent moral qualities. Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles Aside Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, which are not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play.

Presentation # 17 Catastrophe The action at the end of a tragedy that initiates the denouement or falling action of a play. Catharsis The purging of the feelings of pity and fear that, according to Aristotle, occur in the audience of tragic drama. The audience experiences catharsis at the end of the play, following the catastrophe. Character An imaginary person that inhabits a literary work. Literary characters may be major or minor, static (unchanging) or dynamic (capable of change). Presentation # 18 Characterization The means by which writers present and reveal character. Although techniques of characterization are complex, writers typically reveal characters through their speech, dress, manner, and actions. Chorus A group of characters in Greek tragedy (and in later forms of drama), who comment on the action of a play without participation in it. Climax The turning point of the action in the plot of a play or story. The climax represents the point of greatest tension in the work. Presentation # 19 Comedy A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the better. In comedy, things work out happily in the end. Comic drama may be either romantic--characterized by a tone of tolerance and geniality--or satiric. Satiric works offer a darker vision of human nature, one that ridicules human folly. Complication An intensification of the conflict in a story or play. Complication builds up, accumulates, and develops the primary or central conflict in a literary work. Conflict A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. The conflict may occur within a character as well as between characters. Presentation # 20 Connotation The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. Poets, especially, tend to use words rich in connotation. Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" includes intensely connotative language. Dialogue The conversation of characters in a literary work. In fiction, dialogue is typically enclosed within quotation marks. In plays, characters' speech is preceded by their names. Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A work's diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values. Presentation # 21 Fable A brief story with an explicit moral provided by the author. Fables typically include animals as characters. Their most famous practitioner in the west is the ancient Greek writer Aesop, whose "The Dog and the Shadow" and "The Wolf and the Mastiff" are included in this book.

Flashback An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident that occurred prior to the main time frame of a work's action. Writers use flashbacks to complicate the sense of chronology in the plot of their works and to convey the richness of the experience of human time. Presentation # 22 Foreshadowing Hints of what is to come in the action of a play or a story. Gesture The physical movement of a character during a play. Gesture is used to reveal character, and may include facial expressions as well as movements of other parts of an actor's body. Monologue A speech by a single character without another character's response. See Dramatic monologue and Soliloquy. Narrator The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author. Presentation # 23 Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often playful and even respectful in its playful imitation. Pathos A quality of a play's action that stimulates the audience to feel pity for a character. Pathos is always an aspect of tragedy, and may be present in comedy as well. Props Articles or objects that appear on stage during a play. Protagonist The main character of a drama. Presentation # 24 Recognition The point at which a character understands his or her situation as it really is. Reversal The point at which the action of the plot turns in an unexpected direction for the protagonist. Rising action A set of conflicts and crises that constitute the part of a play's or story's plot leading up to the climax. Setting The time and place of a literary work that establish its context. Presentation # 25 Similarities and Differences Live drama is an ancient art form with thousands of years of recorded history and ongoing cultural vitality. Cinema is a much newer art form, with a history dating back only to approximately 1895 but having a mass appealthat has pushed live theater into a secondary position inall but a handful of urban locations. Presentation # 14

Drama arose from religious ceremonies, as opposed to comedy and tragedys evolvement from themes in ceremonies such as fertility, life, death. Thespis of Sixth Century B.C. Attica was th first composer and soloist in tragedy. Aeschylus added a second actor to allow conflict and dialogue. Sophocles and Euripides added a third. Medieval drama largely evolved from the rites commemorating birth and the resurrection of Christ. During the Renaissance, we can see the beginning of drama as we know it: a picture of human life revealed in successive changes or events and told in dialogue and action for the entertainment and instruction of an audience. Presentation # 15 During the mid-Sixteenth Century, England was host to one of the greatest eras of world drama. It was during the Elizabethan/Jacobean Age that Shakespeare wrote his 38 plays. According to the modern definition, any play (such as Becketts Waiting for Godot) may be considered a drama. Presentation # 16 Glossary of Drama Terms Allegory A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning. Allegory often takes the form of a story in which the characters represent moral qualities. Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles Aside Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, which are not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play. Presentation # 17 Catastrophe The action at the end of a tragedy that initiates the denouement or falling action of a play. Catharsis The purging of the feelings of pity and fear that, according to Aristotle, occur in the audience of tragic drama. The audience experiences catharsis at the end of the play, following the catastrophe. Character An imaginary person that inhabits a literary work. Literary characters may be major or minor, static (unchanging) or dynamic (capable of change). Presentation # 18 Characterization The means by which writers present and reveal character. Although techniques of characterization are complex, writers typically reveal characters through their speech, dress, manner, and actions. Chorus A group of characters in Greek tragedy (and in later forms of drama), who comment on the action of a play without participation in it. Climax The turning point of the action in the plot of a play or story. The climax represents the point of greatest tension in the work. Presentation # 19 Comedy A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the better. In comedy, things work out happily in the end. Comic drama may be either romantic--characterized by a tone of tolerance and geniality--or satiric. Satiric works offer a darker vision of human nature, one that ridicules human folly.

Complication An intensification of the conflict in a story or play. Complication builds up, accumulates, and develops the primary or central conflict in a literary work. Conflict A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. The conflict may occur within a character as well as between characters. Presentation # 20 Connotation The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. Poets, especially, tend to use words rich in connotation. Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" includes intensely connotative language. Dialogue The conversation of characters in a literary work. In fiction, dialogue is typically enclosed within quotation marks. In plays, characters' speech is preceded by their names. Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A work's diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values. Presentation # 21 Fable A brief story with an explicit moral provided by the author. Fables typically include animals as characters. Their most famous practitioner in the west is the ancient Greek writer Aesop, whose "The Dog and the Shadow" and "The Wolf and the Mastiff" are included in this book. Flashback An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident that occurred prior to the main time frame of a work's action. Writers use flashbacks to complicate the sense of chronology in the plot of their works and to convey the richness of the experience of human time. Presentation # 22 Foreshadowing Hints of what is to come in the action of a play or a story. Gesture The physical movement of a character during a play. Gesture is used to reveal character, and may include facial expressions as well as movements of other parts of an actor's body. Monologue A speech by a single character without another character's response. See Dramatic monologue and Soliloquy. Narrator The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author. Presentation # 23 Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often playful and even respectful in its playful imitation. Pathos A quality of a play's action that stimulates the audience to feel pity for a character. Pathos is always an aspect of tragedy, and may be present in comedy as well. Props Articles or objects that appear on stage during a play. Protagonist The main character of a drama.

Presentation # 24 Recognition The point at which a character understands his or her situation as it really is. Reversal The point at which the action of the plot turns in an unexpected direction for the protagonist. Rising action A set of conflicts and crises that constitute the part of a play's or story's plot leading up to the climax. Setting The time and place of a literary work that establish its context. Presentation # 25 Similarities and Differences Live drama is an ancient art form with thousands of years of recorded history and ongoing cultural vitality. Cinema is a much newer art form, with a history dating back only to approximately 1895 but having a mass appealthat has pushed live theater into a secondary position inall but a handful of urban locations. Presentation # 14 Drama arose from religious ceremonies, as opposed to comedy and tragedys evolvement from themes in ceremonies such as fertility, life, death. Thespis of Sixth Century B.C. Attica was th first composer and soloist in tragedy. Aeschylus added a second actor to allow conflict and dialogue. Sophocles and Euripides added a third. Medieval drama largely evolved from the rites commemorating birth and the resurrection of Christ. During the Renaissance, we can see the beginning of drama as we know it: a picture of human life revealed in successive changes or events and told in dialogue and action for the entertainment and instruction of an audience. Presentation # 15 During the mid-Sixteenth Century, England was host to one of the greatest eras of world drama. It was during the Elizabethan/Jacobean Age that Shakespeare wrote his 38 plays. According to the modern definition, any play (such as Becketts Waiting for Godot) may be considered a drama. Presentation # 16 Glossary of Drama Terms Allegory A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning. Allegory often takes the form of a story in which the characters represent moral qualities. Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles Aside Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, which are not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play. Presentation # 17 Catastrophe The action at the end of a tragedy that initiates the denouement or falling action of a play.

Catharsis The purging of the feelings of pity and fear that, according to Aristotle, occur in the audience of tragic drama. The audience experiences catharsis at the end of the play, following the catastrophe. Character An imaginary person that inhabits a literary work. Literary characters may be major or minor, static (unchanging) or dynamic (capable of change). Presentation # 18 Characterization The means by which writers present and reveal character. Although techniques of characterization are complex, writers typically reveal characters through their speech, dress, manner, and actions. Chorus A group of characters in Greek tragedy (and in later forms of drama), who comment on the action of a play without participation in it. Climax The turning point of the action in the plot of a play or story. The climax represents the point of greatest tension in the work. Presentation # 19 Comedy A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the better. In comedy, things work out happily in the end. Comic drama may be either romantic--characterized by a tone of tolerance and geniality--or satiric. Satiric works offer a darker vision of human nature, one that ridicules human folly. Complication An intensification of the conflict in a story or play. Complication builds up, accumulates, and develops the primary or central conflict in a literary work. Conflict A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. The conflict may occur within a character as well as between characters. Presentation # 20 Connotation The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. Poets, especially, tend to use words rich in connotation. Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" includes intensely connotative language. Dialogue The conversation of characters in a literary work. In fiction, dialogue is typically enclosed within quotation marks. In plays, characters' speech is preceded by their names. Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A work's diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values. Presentation # 21 Fable A brief story with an explicit moral provided by the author. Fables typically include animals as characters. Their most famous practitioner in the west is the ancient Greek writer Aesop, whose "The Dog and the Shadow" and "The Wolf and the Mastiff" are included in this book. Flashback An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident that occurred prior to the main time frame of a work's action. Writers use flashbacks to complicate the sense of chronology in the plot of their works and to convey the richness of the experience of human time.

Presentation # 22 Foreshadowing Hints of what is to come in the action of a play or a story. Gesture The physical movement of a character during a play. Gesture is used to reveal character, and may include facial expressions as well as movements of other parts of an actor's body. Monologue A speech by a single character without another character's response. See Dramatic monologue and Soliloquy. Narrator The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author. Presentation # 23 Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often playful and even respectful in its playful imitation. Pathos A quality of a play's action that stimulates the audience to feel pity for a character. Pathos is always an aspect of tragedy, and may be present in comedy as well. Props Articles or objects that appear on stage during a play. Protagonist The main character of a drama. Presentation # 24 Recognition The point at which a character understands his or her situation as it really is. Reversal The point at which the action of the plot turns in an unexpected direction for the protagonist. Rising action A set of conflicts and crises that constitute the part of a play's or story's plot leading up to the climax. Setting The time and place of a literary work that establish its context. Presentation # 25 Similarities and Differences Live drama is an ancient art form with thousands of years of recorded history and ongoing cultural vitality. Cinema is a much newer art form, with a history dating back only to approximately 1895 but having a mass appealthat has pushed live theater into a secondary position inall but a handful of urban locations. Presentation # 14 Drama arose from religious ceremonies, as opposed to comedy and tragedys evolvement from themes in ceremonies such as fertility, life, death. Thespis of Sixth Century B.C. Attica was th first composer and soloist in tragedy. Aeschylus added a second actor to allow conflict and dialogue. Sophocles and Euripides added a third. Medieval drama largely evolved from the rites commemorating birth and the resurrection of Christ. During the Renaissance, we can see the beginning of drama as we know it: a picture of human life revealed in successive changes or events and told in dialogue and action for the entertainment and instruction of an audience.

Presentation # 15 During the mid-Sixteenth Century, England was host to one of the greatest eras of world drama. It was during the Elizabethan/Jacobean Age that Shakespeare wrote his 38 plays. According to the modern definition, any play (such as Becketts Waiting for Godot) may be considered a drama. Presentation # 16 Glossary of Drama Terms Allegory A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning. Allegory often takes the form of a story in which the characters represent moral qualities. Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles Aside Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, which are not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play. Presentation # 17 Catastrophe The action at the end of a tragedy that initiates the denouement or falling action of a play. Catharsis The purging of the feelings of pity and fear that, according to Aristotle, occur in the audience of tragic drama. The audience experiences catharsis at the end of the play, following the catastrophe. Character An imaginary person that inhabits a literary work. Literary characters may be major or minor, static (unchanging) or dynamic (capable of change). Presentation # 18 Characterization The means by which writers present and reveal character. Although techniques of characterization are complex, writers typically reveal characters through their speech, dress, manner, and actions. Chorus A group of characters in Greek tragedy (and in later forms of drama), who comment on the action of a play without participation in it. Climax The turning point of the action in the plot of a play or story. The climax represents the point of greatest tension in the work. Presentation # 19 Comedy A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the better. In comedy, things work out happily in the end. Comic drama may be either romantic--characterized by a tone of tolerance and geniality--or satiric. Satiric works offer a darker vision of human nature, one that ridicules human folly. Complication An intensification of the conflict in a story or play. Complication builds up, accumulates, and develops the primary or central conflict in a literary work. Conflict A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. The conflict may occur within a character as well as between characters.

Presentation # 20 Connotation The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. Poets, especially, tend to use words rich in connotation. Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" includes intensely connotative language. Dialogue The conversation of characters in a literary work. In fiction, dialogue is typically enclosed within quotation marks. In plays, characters' speech is preceded by their names. Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A work's diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values. Presentation # 21 Fable A brief story with an explicit moral provided by the author. Fables typically include animals as characters. Their most famous practitioner in the west is the ancient Greek writer Aesop, whose "The Dog and the Shadow" and "The Wolf and the Mastiff" are included in this book. Flashback An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident that occurred prior to the main time frame of a work's action. Writers use flashbacks to complicate the sense of chronology in the plot of their works and to convey the richness of the experience of human time. Presentation # 22 Foreshadowing Hints of what is to come in the action of a play or a story. Gesture The physical movement of a character during a play. Gesture is used to reveal character, and may include facial expressions as well as movements of other parts of an actor's body. Monologue A speech by a single character without another character's response. See Dramatic monologue and Soliloquy. Narrator The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author. Presentation # 23 Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often playful and even respectful in its playful imitation. Pathos A quality of a play's action that stimulates the audience to feel pity for a character. Pathos is always an aspect of tragedy, and may be present in comedy as well. Props Articles or objects that appear on stage during a play. Protagonist The main character of a drama. Presentation # 24 Recognition The point at which a character understands his or her situation as it really is. Reversal The point at which the action of the plot turns in an unexpected direction for the protagonist.

Rising action A set of conflicts and crises that constitute the part of a play's or story's plot leading up to the climax. Setting The time and place of a literary work that establish its context. Presentation # 25 Similarities and Differences Live drama is an ancient art form with thousands of years of recorded history and ongoing cultural vitality. Cinema is a much newer art form, with a history dating back only to approximately 1895 but having a mass appealthat has pushed live theater into a secondary position inall but a handful of urban locations. Presentation # 14 Drama arose from religious ceremonies, as opposed to comedy and tragedys evolvement from themes in ceremonies such as fertility, life, death. Thespis of Sixth Century B.C. Attica was th first composer and soloist in tragedy. Aeschylus added a second actor to allow conflict and dialogue. Sophocles and Euripides added a third. Medieval drama largely evolved from the rites commemorating birth and the resurrection of Christ. During the Renaissance, we can see the beginning of drama as we know it: a picture of human life revealed in successive changes or events and told in dialogue and action for the entertainment and instruction of an audience. Presentation # 15 During the mid-Sixteenth Century, England was host to one of the greatest eras of world drama. It was during the Elizabethan/Jacobean Age that Shakespeare wrote his 38 plays. According to the modern definition, any play (such as Becketts Waiting for Godot) may be considered a drama. Presentation # 16 Glossary of Drama Terms Allegory A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning. Allegory often takes the form of a story in which the characters represent moral qualities. Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles Aside Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, which are not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play. Presentation # 17 Catastrophe The action at the end of a tragedy that initiates the denouement or falling action of a play. Catharsis The purging of the feelings of pity and fear that, according to Aristotle, occur in the audience of tragic drama. The audience experiences catharsis at the end of the play, following the catastrophe. Character An imaginary person that inhabits a literary work. Literary characters may be major or minor, static (unchanging) or dynamic (capable of change).

Presentation # 18 Characterization The means by which writers present and reveal character. Although techniques of characterization are complex, writers typically reveal characters through their speech, dress, manner, and actions. Chorus A group of characters in Greek tragedy (and in later forms of drama), who comment on the action of a play without participation in it. Climax The turning point of the action in the plot of a play or story. The climax represents the point of greatest tension in the work. Presentation # 19 Comedy A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the better. In comedy, things work out happily in the end. Comic drama may be either romantic--characterized by a tone of tolerance and geniality--or satiric. Satiric works offer a darker vision of human nature, one that ridicules human folly. Complication An intensification of the conflict in a story or play. Complication builds up, accumulates, and develops the primary or central conflict in a literary work. Conflict A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. The conflict may occur within a character as well as between characters. Presentation # 20 Connotation The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. Poets, especially, tend to use words rich in connotation. Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" includes intensely connotative language. Dialogue The conversation of characters in a literary work. In fiction, dialogue is typically enclosed within quotation marks. In plays, characters' speech is preceded by their names. Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A work's diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values. Presentation # 21 Fable A brief story with an explicit moral provided by the author. Fables typically include animals as characters. Their most famous practitioner in the west is the ancient Greek writer Aesop, whose "The Dog and the Shadow" and "The Wolf and the Mastiff" are included in this book. Flashback An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident that occurred prior to the main time frame of a work's action. Writers use flashbacks to complicate the sense of chronology in the plot of their works and to convey the richness of the experience of human time. Presentation # 22 Foreshadowing Hints of what is to come in the action of a play or a story. Gesture The physical movement of a character during a play. Gesture is used to reveal character, and may include facial expressions as well as movements of other parts of an actor's body.

Monologue A speech by a single character without another character's response. See Dramatic monologue and Soliloquy. Narrator The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author. Presentation # 23 Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often playful and even respectful in its playful imitation. Pathos A quality of a play's action that stimulates the audience to feel pity for a character. Pathos is always an aspect of tragedy, and may be present in comedy as well. Props Articles or objects that appear on stage during a play. Protagonist The main character of a drama. Presentation # 24 Recognition The point at which a character understands his or her situation as it really is. Reversal The point at which the action of the plot turns in an unexpected direction for the protagonist. Rising action A set of conflicts and crises that constitute the part of a play's or story's plot leading up to the climax. Setting The time and place of a literary work that establish its context. Presentation # 25 Similarities and Differences Live drama is an ancient art form with thousands of years of recorded history and ongoing cultural vitality. Cinema is a much newer art form, with a history dating back only to approximately 1895 but having a mass appealthat has pushed live theater into a secondary position inall but a handful of urban locations. Presentation # 14 Drama arose from religious ceremonies, as opposed to comedy and tragedys evolvement from themes in ceremonies such as fertility, life, death. Thespis of Sixth Century B.C. Attica was th first composer and soloist in tragedy. Aeschylus added a second actor to allow conflict and dialogue. Sophocles and Euripides added a third. Medieval drama largely evolved from the rites commemorating birth and the resurrection of Christ. During the Renaissance, we can see the beginning of drama as we know it: a picture of human life revealed in successive changes or events and told in dialogue and action for the entertainment and instruction of an audience. Presentation # 15 During the mid-Sixteenth Century, England was host to one of the greatest eras of world drama. It was during the Elizabethan/Jacobean Age that Shakespeare wrote his 38 plays. According to the modern definition, any play (such as Becketts Waiting for Godot) may be considered a drama.

Presentation # 16 Glossary of Drama Terms Allegory A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning. Allegory often takes the form of a story in which the characters represent moral qualities. Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles Aside Words spoken by an actor directly to the audience, which are not "heard" by the other characters on stage during a play. Presentation # 17 Catastrophe The action at the end of a tragedy that initiates the denouement or falling action of a play. Catharsis The purging of the feelings of pity and fear that, according to Aristotle, occur in the audience of tragic drama. The audience experiences catharsis at the end of the play, following the catastrophe. Character An imaginary person that inhabits a literary work. Literary characters may be major or minor, static (unchanging) or dynamic (capable of change). Presentation # 18 Characterization The means by which writers present and reveal character. Although techniques of characterization are complex, writers typically reveal characters through their speech, dress, manner, and actions. Chorus A group of characters in Greek tragedy (and in later forms of drama), who comment on the action of a play without participation in it. Climax The turning point of the action in the plot of a play or story. The climax represents the point of greatest tension in the work. Presentation # 19 Comedy A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the better. In comedy, things work out happily in the end. Comic drama may be either romantic--characterized by a tone of tolerance and geniality--or satiric. Satiric works offer a darker vision of human nature, one that ridicules human folly. Complication An intensification of the conflict in a story or play. Complication builds up, accumulates, and develops the primary or central conflict in a literary work. Conflict A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. The conflict may occur within a character as well as between characters. Presentation # 20 Connotation The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. Poets, especially, tend to use words rich in connotation. Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" includes intensely connotative language.

Dialogue The conversation of characters in a literary work. In fiction, dialogue is typically enclosed within quotation marks. In plays, characters' speech is preceded by their names. Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A work's diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values. Presentation # 21 Fable A brief story with an explicit moral provided by the author. Fables typically include animals as characters. Their most famous practitioner in the west is the ancient Greek writer Aesop, whose "The Dog and the Shadow" and "The Wolf and the Mastiff" are included in this book. Flashback An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident that occurred prior to the main time frame of a work's action. Writers use flashbacks to complicate the sense of chronology in the plot of their works and to convey the richness of the experience of human time. Presentation # 22 Foreshadowing Hints of what is to come in the action of a play or a story. Gesture The physical movement of a character during a play. Gesture is used to reveal character, and may include facial expressions as well as movements of other parts of an actor's body. Monologue A speech by a single character without another character's response. See Dramatic monologue and Soliloquy. Narrator The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author. Presentation # 23 Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often playful and even respectful in its playful imitation. Pathos A quality of a play's action that stimulates the audience to feel pity for a character. Pathos is always an aspect of tragedy, and may be present in comedy as well. Props Articles or objects that appear on stage during a play. Protagonist The main character of a drama. Presentation # 24 Recognition The point at which a character understands his or her situation as it really is. Reversal The point at which the action of the plot turns in an unexpected direction for the protagonist. Rising action A set of conflicts and crises that constitute the part of a play's or story's plot leading up to the climax. Setting The time and place of a literary work that establish its context. Presentation # 25

Similarities and Differences Live drama is an ancient art form with thousands of years of recorded history and ongoing cultural vitality. Cinema is a much newer art form, with a history dating back only to approximately 1895 but having a mass appealthat has pushed live theater into a secondary position inall but a handful of urban locations.