www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 163
QUITE A RISE
BUSINESS PAGE 10
SERRA HOLDS
OFF EL CAMINO
SPORTS PAGE 11
‘CRYSIS 3’: CLICHES
MAR GAME’SBEAUTY
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 17
DOW BOUNCES FROM TWO-DAY SLIDE TO
A THREE-DIGIT GAIN
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The county’s former probation
chief probation officer surrendered
himself in court Friday on a
$100,000 arrest warrant but nearly
immediately posted bail to remain
free while awaiting trial on two
charges of felony child pornography
possession.
Stuart James
Forrest, 61,
walked into
court at 11 a.m.
Friday and was
remanded into
custody by the
Sheriff’s Office,
according to
court clerks.
In a prearrangement with the
prosecuting attorney, he pleaded not
guilty and after being booked into
Maguire Correctional Facility and
posting bail was released, said his
defense attorney Jaime Leanos.
Forrest is due back in court April
9.
Forrest is charged with two
counts of possessing images of
minors exposing their genitals or
engaging or simulating sexual con-
duct.
Leanos said he has no details
about the alleged images or con-
tents, having just received discov-
ery, and has quite a bit to evaluate
before commenting on the case or
sitting down with his client to chart
a course of action.
“This is very stressful for him but
he’s doing as well as can be expect-
ed,” Leanos said.
According to search warrant
records, Forrest reportedly told fed-
eral investigators who searched his
county office and home in
Ex-probation chief surrenders on child porn charges
Stuart Forrest pleads not guilty to two counts of possessing images of minors, posts $100K bail
Stuart Forrest
By Jim Kuhnhenn
and Tracie Cone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Widespread
flight delays and shuttered airports,
off-limit seashores and unprotected
parks.
The Obama administration is
painting a dire portrait of the many
ways the public will feel the effects
of automatic federal spending cuts
due to begin March 1.
The grim picture is emerging as
the White House and lawmakers
count down the days until the gov-
ernment is forced to trim $85 billion
in domestic and defense spending
with hardly any leeway to save some
programs from the budget knife.
In detailing
the costs of the
cuts, President
B a r a c k
Obama is
seeking to
raise the pub-
lic’s aware-
ness while
also applying
pressure on
congressional
Republ i cans
who oppose
his blend of
targeted savings and tax increases to
tackle federal deficits.
“I’ve been very clear that these
Administration warns of effects of
automatic federal spending cuts
White House:
Budget cut’s
impact is dire
See page 7
Inside
• Government
downsizes amid
GOP demands for
more cuts
• Obama,
Republicans see no
need to stop the cuts
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — It’s still
February, but California gas prices
are springing forward.
The average price of gasoline in
the region saw one of the largest
one-month leaps since 2000, the
Automobile Club of Southern
California said Friday. Statewide,
the average price of regular gasoline
was $4.22, up 12 cents from last
week.
Gas prices have spiked between
57 and 59 cents over the past 30
days. The region’s largest increase
was 70 cents between May and June
2008.
Auto Club officials said the surge
can’t be attributed to a single factor,
but refineries were expected to
undergo a heavy maintenance
schedule, and large amounts of
money have been plowed into con-
tracts speculating that the price of
gas and oil will go up.
Gas prices spike across state
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
For Tom Mattusch, captain of the
Huli Cat, spotting whales is some-
thing you get a feel for after spend-
ing decades on the sea.
This year, he has already been out
whale watching near Half Moon
Bay a few times and seen gray
whales, which are about 45 feet
long, and the smaller minke whales.
The captain tells fantasy-like sto-
ries of his encounters with whales.
Once a blue whale — the largest
Underwater giants
Whale watchers ride ‘gray whale highway’
SALLY SCHILLING/DAILY JOURNAL
Tom Mattusch, captain of the Huli Cat, runs three-hour gray whale-watching trips through May and Humpback
whale watching in April through November.
See WHALE Page 20
See CUTS, Page 20
See GAS, Page 19
See FORREST, Page 19
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Actor Aziz Ansari is
30.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1863
British explorers John H. Speke and
James A. Grant announced they had
found the source of the Nile River to be
Lake Victoria.
“Never doubt that a small group of
thoughtful,committed citizens can change the
world.Indeed,it is the only thing that ever has.”
— Margaret Mead, American anthropologist (1901-1978)
Actress Patricia
Richardson is 62.
Actress Dakota
Fanning is 19.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Residents watch horses fight in Rongshui Miao autonomous county, Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, China.
Saturday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs in the mid 50s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 40s. North winds 10 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 50s.
North winds 10 to 20 mph...Becoming 5 to
10 mph in the afternoon.
Sunday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 40s. Northwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 50s.
Monday night and Tuesday: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower
40s. Highs in the upper 50s.
Tuesday night and Wednesday: Partly cloudy. Lows in the
lower 40s. Highs in the upper 50s.
Wednesday night through Friday: Mostly clear.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 10 Solid
Gold in first place; No.04 Big Ben in second place;
and No. 08 Gorgeous George in third place.The
race time was clocked at 1:45.56.
(Answers Monday)
TRAWL ORBIT AGENCY PULPIT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He wasn’t sure if he could give all his fortune to charity
upon his death, but he was — WILLING TOTRY
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MEOGA
KOBER
UNSAAE
RIHTEM
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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4 1 1
9 13 24 38 49 30
Mega number
Feb. 22 Mega Millions
6 12 27 34 35
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 0 2 8
Daily Four
0 7 6
Daily three evening
In 1836, the siege of the Alamo began in San Antonio, Texas.
In 1848, the sixth president of the United States, John Quincy
Adams, died in Washington, D.C., at age 80.
In 1861, President-elect Abraham Lincoln arrived secretly in
Washington to take office, following word of a possible assas-
sination plot in Baltimore.
In 1870, Mississippi was readmitted to the Union.
In 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt signed an agreement
with Cuba to lease the area around Guantanamo Bay to the
United States.
In 1927, President Calvin Coolidge signed a bill creating the
Federal Radio Commission, forerunner of the Federal
Communications Commission.
In 1945, during World War II, U.S. Marines on Iwo Jima cap-
tured Mount Suribachi.
In 1954, the first mass inoculation of children against polio
with the Salk vaccine began in Pittsburgh.
In 1965, film comedian Stan Laurel, 74, died in Santa Monica,
Calif.
In 1970, Guyana became a republic within the Commonwealth
of Nations.
In 1981, an attempted coup began in Spain as 200 members of
the Civil Guard invaded Parliament, taking lawmakers hostage.
(However, the attempt collapsed 18 hours later.)
In 1992, the XVI Winter Olympic Games ended in Albertville,
France.
Ten years ago: In West Warwick, R.I., relatives of the victims
of a deadly nightclub fire were allowed to walk up to the
charred rubble to pray and say goodbye. Norah Jones won five
Grammys, including album and record of the year.
Five years ago: Defense Secretary Robert Gates and other
U.S. officials held daylong meetings with Australian leaders in
Canberra.
Actor Peter Fonda is 73. Pro and College Football Hall of
Famer Fred Biletnikoff is 70. Author John Sandford is 69. Singer-
musician Johnny Winter is 69. Country-rock musician Rusty
Young is 67. Rock musician Brad Whitford (Aerosmith) is 61.
Singer Howard Jones is 58. Rock musician Michael Wilton
(Queensryche) is 51. Country singer Dusty Drake is 49. Actress
Kristin Davis is 48. Tennis player Helena Sukova is 48. Actor
Marc Price is 45. Actress Niecy Nash is 43. Rock musician Jeff
Beres (Sister Hazel) is 42. Country singer Steve Holy is 41. Rock
musician Lasse (loss) Johansson (The Cardigans) is 40. Actress
Kelly Macdonald is 37. Actress Emily Blunt is 30.
In 1929, the first year of the Academy
Awards, it took host Douglas Fairbanks
Sr. (1883-1939) only 10 minutes to hand
out the statuettes. There were 12 cate-
gories then. There are 24 categories this
year, which is the 81st broadcast of the
awards show.
***
During the 1930s, the winners of the
Academy Awards were known prior to the
awards ceremony. The winner’s names
were printed in the Los Angeles Times the
day before the event. The tradition of the
sealed envelope was started in 1941,
adding suspense to the event.
***
From 1959 to 1998, the Academy Awards
took place on a Monday. Since 1999, the
Academy Awards ceremony has been on
Sundays.
***
The Academy Awards was first televised
in 1953 and was first broadcast in color in
1966.
***
ABC has televised the Oscars since 1976
and is under contract to air the event
through 2020.
***
There are 5,755 members of the
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
Sciences that vote for the winners of the
Academy Awards.
***
The Kodak Theatre in Hollywood has
been the home of the Academy Awards
since 2001. The theater was custom-built
for the Academy Awards. It has an area for
1,500 members of the press and a
“Winner’s Walk” that leads directly from
stage to the press area.
***
The Kodak Company does not own the
Kodak Theatre. They paid $75 million to
have their company name on the auditori-
um that hosts Oscar night.
***
Bob Hope (1903-2003) hosted the Oscars
18 times, Johnny Carson (1925-2005)
hosted the glamorous event five times,
Billy Crystal (born 1947) hosted eight
times and Jerry Lewis (born 1926) has
hosted the Oscars three times.
***
Do you know what three films are tied for
winning the most Oscars? See answer at
end.
***
Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003) has won
the most Academy Awards for Best
Actress. She won for “Morning Glory” in
1932, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,”
in 1967; “The Lion in Winter,” in 1968;
and “On Golden Pond,” in 1981.
***
Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen (1903-1978)
received the only wooden Academy
Award in history. It was an honorary
Oscar for Bergen’s creation of dummy
Charlie McCarthy. The wooden Oscar,
awarded in 1938, had a moveable mouth.
***
Walt Disney (1901-1966) has won more
Oscars than any other individual person.
He had a total of 64 Oscar nominations,
and won 26 Academy Awards.
***
When an Oscar winner is announced the
presenter does not say “And the winner is
...” That phrase was discontinued in 1989
at the 61st annual Academy Awards.
Oscar presenters say “And the Oscar goes
to ...“
***
Shirley Temple (born 1928) presented a
special Academy Award to Walt Disney
for “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”
in 1938. Disney was presented with one
full-sized Oscar and seven miniature
Oscars.
***
The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award,
presented during the Academy Awards,
recognizes producers with consistent high
quality motion picture production. Irving
Thalberg (1899-1936) became the vice
president of MGM at age 24, and super-
vised the studio’s top productions in its
heyday. Thalberg died of pneumonia at
age 37. The award is a solid bronze sculp-
ture of his head.
***
Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980) never won
an Academy Award for Best Director,
although he was nominated for the award
five times. Hitchcock did receive the
Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in
1967.
***
The first year that all five Best Picture
nominees were in color was 1956.
***
Answer: There are three movies that have
won 11 Oscars each: “Ben-Hur,” 1959;
“Titanic,” 1997; and “Lord of the Rings:
The Return of the King,” 2003.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
8 14 32 35 37 4
Mega number
Feb. 20 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
San Bruno
Reckless driver. A BMW was burning out on
the street at the intersection of Glenview
Drive, Ridgeway Avenue and Skyline
Boulevard before 5:45 p.m. Thursday, Feb.
21.
Suspicious person. A man wearing a dark
blue hoodie was asking for donations and
then he said he was selling magazines on the
700 block of Easton Avenue before 7:22 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 20.
Burglary. Someone reported the windows of
their Chevrolet Camaro were smashed on the
1100 block of El Camino Real before 9:54
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19.
Stolen vehicle. Someone reported their gold
Honda Accura was stolen on the 1000 block
of National Avenue before 3:54 a.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 19.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Suspicious circumstances. A silver Toyota
Camry’s rear left passenger window was bro-
ken on Claremont Avenue before 1:48 a.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 20.
Burglary. Someone reported that four stor-
age units were broken into on Meath Drive
before 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, 19.
Burglary. Someone reported a burglary at El
Faro on El Camino Real before 2:30 a.m.
Monday, Feb. 18.
Police reports
That’s wild
Someone reported having a pack of coy-
otes in his backyard for two to three
weeks around 3 a.m.on the 2700 block of
Oakmont Drive in San Bruno before 5:51
p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 20.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The insane man who killed a vocational
center client in San Carlos must be moved out
of a private psychiatric facility into a state-run
hospital if his care is to be funded by the state
of California, a judge ruled Friday.
San Mateo County Judge Mark Forcum
reversed his previous placement of Vitin Ajani
Cruz, 39, after the state Attorney General’s
Office said the state would not pay unless the
man is treated at Napa State Hospital. If
Forcum had upheld his earlier order, San
Mateo County would have been required to
pay for Cruz’s housing at Crestwood
Behavioral Health Center near Calistoga
which his defense attorney had argued was the
best place for treatment and less expensive for
taxpayers.
“The single issue was money. That’s all that
mattered,” said defense attorney Vince
O’Malley.
O’Malley said Crestwood costs $241 per
day while Napa State Hospital’s rate has sky-
rocketed up to $700 daily.
“Having said that, the state still refused to
pay,” O’Malley said.
San Mateo County District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe called Forcum’s
decision “excellent” and
affirms his office’s original
position of where Cruz
belongs. Prosecutors
argued that the private
facility is not meant as a
permanent placement for
incompetent or insane
patients from the criminal
system.
A status report by Napa is due within 10
business days to determine if bed space is
available for Cruz’s move. O’Malley said
shifting Cruz to Napa also takes up a bed for a
patient who may be more difficult to manage
and better require that type of supervision.
Cruz had been staying at Crestwood the pre-
vious 14 months while deemed incompetent
for trial on murder charges and later while
prosecuted for the 2004 stabbing death of
Alfonso Ruiz.
In October, Cruz pleaded no contest to sec-
ond-degree murder and the use of a knife in
the Oct. 27, 2004 death at Vocational
Rehabilitation Services on Quarry Road in
San Carlos. According to prosecutors, Cruz
mistook Ruiz for another man as they sat next
to each other at the center and suddenly
lunged at him with a knife. Ruiz was stabbed
several times in the upper torso and arm. Cruz
fled but was arrested a few blocks away from
the site. Ruiz died the following afternoon.
Cruz accepted the negotiated plea after
prosecutors agreed he was not guilty by rea-
son of insanity based on doctors’ conclusions.
O’Malley has said Cruz has a deep fear of
being stabbed because he was left with severe
stomach wounds several years before the mur-
der during a bus attack in San Francisco. Cruz
thought Ruiz was somehow associated with
his previous attackers and possibly armed
with a box cutter.
Cruz’s hospitalization was just the latest in
a long string since his arrest in Ruiz’s death.
In 2005, court-appointed doctors found him
unable to aid in his own defense and he went
back and forth between the mental facilities
and county care until he was found competent
in 2012.
Competency is a person’s ability to aid in
his or her own defense while sanity is a per-
son’s mental state at the time of an alleged act.
Schizophrenia medication and other signs
of psychiatric problems were found at Cruz’s
home during a police search after the stab-
bing.
Driver thrown from car,
killed in solo Bayshore crash
A Redwood City woman killed in a fatal
crash Friday morning was ejected from the car
she was driving after it went off the road and
struck a light pole, fence and fire hydrant,
police said.
Alma Cabrera-Villar, 20, was found face
down in the road on the 1700 block of East
Bayshore Road around 2:20 a.m. after police
responded to a crash, according to police. She
was pronounced dead at the scene a short time
later.
Investigators determined that Cabrera-Villar
had been the driver of the vehicle, which was
traveling south when it left the road for an
unknown reason and struck a light pole, police
said. It then continued south, striking a fence
and a fire hydrant before coming to a stop.
No other vehicles appear to have been
involved in the crash, police said. It is unclear
if drugs or alcohol were a factor.
A passenger in the vehicle was treated for
minor injuries.
Judge orders committed killer out of private facility
Vitin Cruz
Local brief
4
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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COUNTY GOVERNMENT
• The Board of Supervisors will
hold a public hearing to consider
adopting new garbage and recyclable
collection rates for the North Fair
Oaks area. The rates, which would be
retroactive to Jan. 1, would mean a
2.6 percent increase for commercial
customers and a 6.1 percent increase for customers receiving
cart services.
The board meets 9 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27 in Board
Chambers, 400 County Government Center, Redwood City.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Carlos Chamber of Commerce will present
Dick Castner, executive director of the U.S. Chamber’s
western regional office, to address what’s after the fiscal cliff
has been averted.
The address, which is open to the public, is 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
Friday, March 1 at the San Carlos Library, community
room, 610 Elm St.
• The Redwood City Council will consider implementing
its Complete Streets plan which focuses on the city’s strate-
gic initiative of transportation by developing projects, engag-
ing neighborhoods in ways to solve traffic issues and pro-
mote pedestrian and bicycle-friendly options.
The City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 25 at City
Hall, 1017 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
James Stephen Miguel
Jim Miguel, 74, of San Carlos, died
peacefully, Feb. 13, 2013 at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood
City, surrounded by
his loving family after
a courageous battle
with cancer.
He is survived by
Dolores, his wife of
42 years; their two
sons Jimmy (Lori),
Tony; three grandchil-
dren Ross (Heather),
Maurice, Alesha; three great-grandchil-
dren Sienna, Rebecca, Mason; brothers
Bob, Mac, Jack (deceased); sister Kay;
sister-in-laws; nephews; nieces, friends
and devoted dog Sparky.
Miguel was born in San Francisco,
April 7, 1938 and attended and graduated
from Balboa High School where he
played baseball and made the All-City
team in 1956. Subsequently, he spent the
next 10 years playing semi-professional
baseball in San Francisco. He was a mem-
ber of the San Francisco Old Timers
Baseball Association and an avid fan of
his favorite team, the San Francisco
Giants. His passion for the sport evolved
into the mentoring of his sons in the phi-
losophy and techniques of the game.
Family and friends are invited to attend
a Memorial Mass on at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 27 at St. Charles Church,
880 Tamarack Ave, San Carlos. To see the
full obituary visit www.crippenflynn.com.
Ben Vitali
Beni Vitali died Feb. 11, 2013 at his
Burlingame home. He was 83.
Beni, son of the late
Lorenza Vitali and
Velina Rosa Tarabini,
spent his early years
in Pedesina, Italy. He
journeyed to America
in 1949 and settled in
the Bay Area where
he met his late wife,
Marie Louise Caule.
Married in 1953, Beni and Marie settled
in Burlingame and raised three daughters.
For 35 years, he and a partner owned and
operated the Peninsula’s well-known
Roma Italian Delicatessen in San Bruno.
Beni genuinely loved spending time
with family. A humble, no nonsense man
with the heart of two, Beni lived simply
and was fully devoted to family.
Beni is survived by daughters Marisa,
Rosemarie and Carla; brother Guido; sis-
ter Dilma; grandsons, Jeremy, Jacob and
Eric; great-grandchildren Cheyenne and
Wyatt; nephews, Roberto, Oliviero and
Jonny; nieces Antoinetta, Daniella and
Liliana and best friend Frances. He is pre-
ceded in death by grandson Justin.
A memorial service will be held 11 a.m.
Saturday, March 2 at Our Lady of Angels
Catholic Church, 1721 Hillside Drive,
Burlingame.
Gloria Ann Dorsa Escobar
Gloria Ann Dorsa Escobar, 73, of
Belmont, died Feb. 17, 2013 in the priva-
cy of her home.
Escobar was born July 25, 1939 in San
Francisco to Sam and Pauline Dorsa.
She is survived by her husband, Ed
Escobar, daughter Lisa Arvin and son
Danny Escobar. She will be deeply missed
by her three granddaughters, Sherri
Kacludis and, Alyssa and Makayla Arvin.
She was preceded in death by her son,
Eddie Escobar.
Arrangements are with Crippen &
Flynn Carlmont Chapel. As per her
request there will be no services and bur-
ial will be private. Sign the guestbook at
www.crippenflynn.com.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200
words or less with a photo one time on the
date of the family’s choosing. To submit
obituaries, email information along with a
jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.
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Obituaries
Dead body found in South City
Police are investigating the death of a
man found lying on the sidewalk of the
700 block of Circle Court in South San
Francisco.
South San Francisco Police responded
to a call just before 6 a.m. Thursday,
Feb. 21, according to a press release
from the South San Francisco Police
Department. Officers found a non-
responsive man, identified as 33-year-
old Juan Carlos Quinonez, lying on the
sidewalk. Paramedics responded and
pronounced Quinonez dead on the
scene.
The South San Francisco Police
Department is currently investigating the
death. Anyone with information is
encouraged to call Detective Chetcuti at
(650) 877-8910.
Local brief
5
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Time, as they say, is money and in
the case of the proposed Transit
Village development in San Carlos
that means more than $175,000
extra to consultants for attending
more public meetings than antici-
pated to give environmental docu-
ments the green light.
On Monday, the City Council will
consider tweaking the professional
services agreement with environ-
mental consulting firm Atkins North
America, Inc. for attending its Jan.
28 hearing on the final environmen-
tal impact report. The recommenda-
tion of $25,000 would include com-
pensation of $1,787.50 for atten-
dance at the January meeting plus
allow a margin in case any other
unforeseen environmental work is
necessary as the project goes on.
Approval also would bring the
total of additional amendments to
the original consulting contract to
$174,499 which covers the requests
for additional information and addi-
tional public hearings since Atkins
was retained in January 2008 to pro-
duce the EIR. The work has includ-
ed responses to hundreds of com-
ments, visual simulations, diagrams
and analysis of shadowing into the
Greater East San Carlos which gen-
erally opposes the development as
proposed.
The cost is passed through the city
to the project developer, Legacy
Partners, which has already agreed
with the budget amendments,
according to the staff recommenda-
tion. In October, the city previously
increased the contract after the
Planning Commission held several
meetings and began anticipating
several more before making its rec-
ommendation to certify the EIR.
The Planning Commission met
four times before unanimously —
although not without concern —
voting to recommend that the City
Council certify the EIR. The City
Council met three times before vot-
ing 3-2 in favor of finding the envi-
ronmental review acceptable.
The proposed development con-
cerns a 10.53-acre strip of land
within the existing Caltrain station
and running parallel to the railroad
corridor. Legacy’s proposal envi-
sions eight four-story buildings with
281 housing units among a mix of
407,298 square feet of residential,
23,797 square feet of office space
and 14,326 square feet of retail
space. The project would also
include 667 parking spaces and a
new SamTrans Transit Center on
4.29 acres.
The San Carlos City Council
meets 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 25 at
City Hall, 600 Elm St., San Carlos.
Transit Village hearings
cost an additional $175K
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Options for allowing dogs off-
leash at Washington Park will be the
topic of a community meeting
Saturday.
The off-leash conversation began
in 2008, when the council voted to
allow dogs on the upper field of
Cuernavaca Park and the eastern
most lawn in Washington Park to
roam free before 7:45 a.m. Since
then, the city tested allowing dogs
off-leash in the evening hours, from
6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. However, mak-
ing that option permanent was voted
down by the council in a split vote
last March. During that meeting,
Parks and Recreation staff was
directed to consider ways to
upgrade the current park as well as
look for opportunities to provide
another.
After studying research and chat-
ting with neighboring cities, a num-
ber of options were put together. On
Saturday, those in the community
will have a chance to learn about
options and give their input on the
possible solutions.
Increasing opportunities to
have dogs off-leash was original-
ly brought up in September 2010
when the council discussed
extending the hours to include
after 6 p.m. but asked the Parks
and Recreation Commission to
gather more public opinion. A
survey from 2011 showed a posi-
tive response for the additional
hours. The commission again rec-
ommended the expansion for a
trial period, which was granted.
The trial period ended Feb. 15,
2012 with no reports of issues or
complaints, according to a report
from the Parks and Recreation
Commission. The police department
issued one citation, one leash law
warning and took two calls about
dogs in the park during the trial but
all calls were outside of the desig-
nated hours. As a result, the com-
mission recommended to perma-
nently allow the extended hours
which the council denied in a 3-2
vote.
The meeting will be held from 10
a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 23 at the
Burlingame Recreation Center, 850
Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame weighs off-leash options
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A San Francisco man was arrested
in San Carlos after he was robbed at
gunpoint of his car and 2 pounds of
marijuana he tried to sell in the
McDonald’s parking lot Wednesday
evening.
Thirty-three-year-old Jia Hang Li
was arrested for possession and
transportation of marijuana for sale
Wednesday evening. Deputies from
the San Mateo County Sheriff’s
Department San Carlos Police
Bureau responded to a call from Li
of a possible armed robbery at 8:40
p.m. Wednesday evening.
Li, who is in custody, told police
he had driven from San Francisco in
order to sell about 2 pounds of mar-
ijuana to a man whom he had never
met, but had spoken with over the
phone. The two men met in the
McDonald’s parking lot, at 180 El
Camino Real.
The potential buyer — described
as a tall, dark skinned man in his 20s
— brandished a black handgun at Li
then demanded his cellphone and
car keys, according to a police
report.
The unknown man stole Li’s vehi-
cle, which contained the drugs.
Deputies found the unoccupied
vehicle parked a few blocks away
but the “buyer” was not found. A
search of the vehicle resulted in
police finding a bag containing 179
grams, less than half a pound, of
weed.
Li was arrested but posted a
$20,000 bond and is due in court
March 26.
Police are still looking for the
man who stole his car. Anyone with
information should contact the San
Mateo County Sheriff’s Detective
Bureau at (650) 599-1536 or the San
Mateo County Sheriff’s Office
Anonymous tip line at (800) 547-
2700.
Dealer duped while dealing dope
Rendering of proposed Transit Village in San Carlos.
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — A Central
Valley lawmaker resigned unexpect-
edly Friday, creating a vacancy that
dropped Democrats below the two-
thirds threshold they need to pass tax
changes or override vetoes. The loss,
however, was expected to be tempo-
rary and not have major impacts on
the majority party’s clout.
State Sen. Michael Rubio, a mod-
erate Democrat from the San
Joaquin Valley town of Shafter,
which is near Bakersfield,
announced that he was stepping
down immediately to take a govern-
ment affairs job with Chevron Corp.
He was in the middle of his first term
in the Senate after being elected with
60 percent of the vote in 2010.
His resignation comes on top of
recent vacancies but Democrats
were already expecting to face diffi-
culties in some of their goals later in
the year, such as cementing a contro-
versial $150 fee on rural residents
whose homes are at risk from wild-
fires.
Senate Dems slip below two-thirds with resignation
6
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Children’s Concerts at Kohl Mansion
ŶŝŶƚĞƌĂĐƟǀĞƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐĨŽƌĂƵĚŝĞŶĐĞƐŽĨĂůůĂŐĞƐ
Music at Kohl Mansion presents
Based in New York City, Classical Jam ŝƐ ŬŶŽǁŶ ĨŽƌ ŝƚƐ ŝŶŶŽǀĂƟǀĞ ĂƉƉƌŽĂĐŚ ƚŽ ŵƵƐŝĐ
ŽĨ ŵĂŶLJ ŐĞŶƌĞƐ ĂŶĚ ĐƵůƚƵƌĞƐ͘ 1ŚĞ ŵƵƐŝĐŝĂŶƐ ĐŽŶŶĞĐƚ ǁŝƚŚ ůŝƐƚĞŶĞƌƐ ŽĨ Ăůů ĂŐĞƐ͕ ƐŚĂƌŝŶŐ
Ă ũŽƵƌŶĞLJ ƚŽ ĚŝīĞƌĞŶƚ ƟŵĞƐ ĂŶĚ ƉůĂĐĞƐ ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚ ƚŚĞ ƵŶŝǀĞƌƐĂů ůĂŶŐƵĂŐĞ ŽĨ ŵƵƐŝĐ͘
MƵƐŝĐ Ăƚ kŽŚů͛Ɛ ĨĂƐƚͲƉĂĐĞĚ ĂŶĚ ůŝǀĞůLJ CŚŝůĚƌĞŶ͛Ɛ CŽŶĐĞƌƚƐ ĞŶŐĂŐĞ ĂƵĚŝĞŶĐĞƐ ŽĨ Ăůů
ĂŐĞƐ͘ 1ŚĞLJ ĂƌĞ ŝĚĞĂů ĨŽƌ ĐůĂƐƐ Žƌ ŐƌŽƵƉ ĮĞůĚ ƚƌŝƉƐ͕ ĨĂŵŝůŝĞƐ͕ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ ŐƌŽƵƉƐ͕
ƐĞŶŝŽƌƐ ĂŶĚ ŚŽŵĞͲƐĐŚŽŽůĞƌƐ͘ CŚŝůĚƌĞŶ͛Ɛ CŽŶĐĞƌƚƐ ĂƌĞ ŽīĞƌĞĚ Ăƚ ƚŚĞ ƐƵďƐŝĚŝnjĞĚ
ƟĐŬĞƚ ƉƌŝĐĞ ŽĨ Ψϲ ƉĞƌ ƉĞƌƐŽŶ͘
lŶĨŽͬƟĐŬĞƚƐ͗ ǁǁǁ͘ŵƵƐŝĐĂƚŬŽŚů͘ŽƌŐ Žƌ ϲϱϬ͘ϳϲϮ͘ϭϭϯϬ ͻ ĞŵĂŝů͗ ĂĚŵŝŶΛŵƵƐŝĐĂƚŬŽŚů͘ŽƌŐ
Monday,
March 11, 2013
1ŚƌĞĞ ϰϱͲŵŝŶƵƚĞ ƐŚŽǁƐ͗
ϵ͗ϭϱ͕ ϭϬ͗Ϯϱ Žƌ ϭϭ͗ϯϱ Ăŵ
Kohl Mansion
ϮϳϱϬ AĚĞůŝŶĞ DƌŝǀĞ
8ƵƌůŝŶŐĂŵĞ
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Nine in 10
California voters say they support
allowing illegal immigrants who
have been in the country for several
years to stay and become citizens if
they have a job, learn English and
pay any back taxes they may owe,
according to a Field Poll released
Friday.
The poll, which comes as
Congress prepares to debate federal
immigration reform, also found that
a majority of voters support allow-
ing residents who are in the U.S.
illegally to get California driver’s
licenses, a reversal from previous
surveys.
Assemblyman Luis Alejo, D-
Salinas, has proposed legislation
this year that would allow the
Department of Motor Vehicles to
issue licenses to any resident who
can show they pay taxes, regardless
of their immigration status. Former
state Sen. Gil Cedillo, a Democrat,
tried for more than a decade to make
such a change, but his efforts either
did not make it through the
Legislature or were vetoed by previ-
ous governors.
The Legislature took a partial step
last year when Gov. Jerry Brown
signed a bill by Cedillo that allows
some young illegal immigrants to
obtain driver’s licenses. Those
immigrants would have to be eligi-
ble for work permits under a new
federal deferred-action policy.
While the poll found voters sup-
port loosening restrictions on some
illegal immigrants, it also found that
two-thirds favor boosting the num-
ber of federal agents patrolling the
border with Mexico.
Poll: State voters back
citizenship for illegals
T
he San Mateo High
School 2013 graduating
class will hold an E-waste
collection fundraiser from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23 at the
school, 506 N. Delaware St., San
Mateo. Accepted devices include:
monitors, televisions, computers,
laptops, cellphones, telcom equip-
ment, wire/cable, PC boards,
scrap metal, computer mice, key-
boards, printers, fax and copy
machines, toner and ink car-
tridges, stereo equipment,
DVD/CD/MP3 players,
microwave ovens, small appli-
ances and more. No fluorescent
lights or alkaline batteries will be
accepted. Proceeds will go toward
a grad night party for the seniors.
***
In January, Jefferson
Elementary School District
teacher Susan Robboy was
selected as one of the recipients of
the Dorothy Boyajian Honored
Teacher Award for 2013. Robboy
was recognized at the 14th
Annual San Mateo County Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
held at the downtown San Mateo
Caltrain Station.
Working at Thomas R.
Pollicita Middle School in Daly
City for the past 20 years, Robboy
teaches seventh grade physical
education and seventh and eighth
grade peer mediation. She also
coaches sixth through eighth
grade volleyball and basketball.
Robboy’s commitment to convey-
ing the teachings of Dr. King
through her peer mediation pro-
gram makes her an excellent
selection for this award. Robboy
values Dr. King’s lessons concern-
ing tolerance, justice, peace,and
taking action for goodness and
right. She aspires to reflect these
ideas in her work with students.
Her dedication to anti-bullying
efforts and emphasis on patience,
problem-solving and peer cooper-
ation are admirable.
Jessica Gutierrez, a current
eighth grade student at Thomas R.
Pollicita Middle School who nom-
inated Robboy, wrote in her nomi-
nation letter, “Ms. Robboy is an
understanding, kind and positive
person […] She always does
everything she possibly can to
help students. Ms. Robboy is an
extraordinary teacher who
deserves to win this award. She is
one of the best teachers that I
have ever had. I learned many
new life skills in her class.”
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by educa-
tion reporter Heather Murtagh. You
can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext.
105 or at
heather@smdailyjournal.com.
STATE/NATION 7
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Six tanks at Hanford
nuclear site in Washington leaking
YAKIMA, Wash. — Six underground tanks that hold a brew
of radioactive and toxic waste at the nation’s most contami-
nated nuclear site are leaking, federal and state officials said
Friday, prompting calls for an investigation from a key sena-
tor.
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said the leaking material poses
no immediate risk to public safety or the environment because
it would take a while — perhaps years — to reach groundwa-
ter.
But the leaking tanks raise new concerns about delays for
emptying them and strike another blow to federal efforts to
clean up south-central Washington’s Hanford Nuclear
Reservation, where successes often are overshadowed by
delays, budget overruns and technological challenges.
Department of Energy spokeswoman Lindsey Geisler said
there was no immediate health risk and said federal officials
would work with Washington state to address the matter.
Regardless, Tom Towslee, a spokesman for Sen. Ron
Wyden, D-Ore., said the senator will be asking the
Government Accountability Office to investigate Hanford’s
tank monitoring and maintenance program.
Microsoft joins list of
companies recently hacked
REDMOND, Wash. — Microsoft has joined the list of
prominent technology companies confirming they have been
hit by a recent computer hacking attack.
In a blog posting Friday, Microsoft said it had found no evi-
dence that any customer data had been heisted.
Microsoft Corp. gave few other details about the break-in,
except to say that was it similar to a hacking attack that online
social networking leader Facebook Inc. disclosed last week.
Facebook had said its investigation had discovered other com-
panies had been hacked, but didn’t identify the other victims.
Like Facebook, Microsoft says it is still investigating how
malicious software was planted on what it said were a small
number of its computers.
Around the nation
By Tom Raum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Republicans and other
fiscal conservatives keep insisting on more
federal austerity and a smaller government.
Without much fanfare or acknowledgement,
they’ve already gotten much of both.
Spending by federal, state and local govern-
ments on payrolls, equipment, buildings,
teachers, emergency workers, defense pro-
grams and other core governmental functions
has been shrinking steadily since the deep
2007-2009 recession and as the anemic recov-
ery continues.
This recent shrinkage has largely been
obscured by an increase in spending on bene-
fit payments to individuals under “entitle-
ment” programs, including Social Security,
Medicare, Medicaid and veterans benefits.
Retiring baby boomers are driving much of
this increase.
Another round of huge cuts — known in
Washington parlance as the “sequester” —
will hit beginning March 1, potentially mean-
ing layoffs for hundreds of thousands of fed-
eral workers unless Congress and President
Barack Obama can strike a deficit-reduction
deal to avert them.
With the deadline only a week off, Obama
and Republicans who control the House are
far apart over how to resolve the deadlock.
While last-minute budget deals are frequent in
Washington, neither side is optimistic of
reaching one this time.
Even as the private sector has been slowly
adding jobs, governments have been shedding
them, holding down overall employment gains
and keeping the jobless rate close to 8 percent,
compared with normal nonrecessionary levels
of 5 to 6 percent that have prevailed since the
1950s.
“It’s a massive drag on the economy. We
lost three-quarter million public-sector jobs in
the recovery,” said economist Heidi Shierholz
of the labor-friendly Economic Policy
Institute. “We’re still losing government jobs,
although the pace has slowed. But we haven’t
turned around yet.”
A larger-than-usual decline in federal
spending, notably on defense programs,
helped push the economy into negative territo-
ry in the final three months of 2012. Economic
growth, meanwhile, has been inching along at
a weak 1-2 percent — not enough to signifi-
cantly further drive down the national unem-
ployment rate, which now stands at 7.9 per-
cent.
Gov’t downsizes amid GOP demands for more cuts
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Unlike in earlier
rounds of budget brinkmanship, President
Barack Obama and congressional
Republicans both seem content to fight out
their latest showdown on the current terrain,
let across-the-board spending cuts take effect
on March 1 and allow them to stay in place
for weeks if not much longer.
This time, there is no market-rattling threat
of a government default to force the two
sides to compromise, no federal shutdown on
the short-term horizon and no year-end dead-
line for preventing a tax increase for every
working American.
The rhetoric is reminiscent, for sure.
“So far at least, the ideas that the
Republicans have proposed ask nothing of
the wealthiest Americans or the biggest cor-
porations,” Obama said this week as he cam-
paigned to pin the blame for any negative
effects on his political opponents. “So the
burden is all on the first responders, or sen-
iors or middle class families,” he said in com-
ments similar in tone to his re-election cam-
paign.
Republicans, standing on political ground
of their own choosing, responded sharply to
the president’s fresh demand for higher taxes.
“Spending is the problem, spending must
be the focus,” said House Speaker John
Boehner of Ohio, while Senate GOP leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky declared,
“There won’t be any easy off-ramps on this
one. The days of 11th hour negotiations are
over.”
A crisis atmosphere could yet develop this
spring, when hundreds of thousands or even
millions of threatened government furloughs
begin to take effect and the spending cuts
Obama, Republicans see
no need to stop the cuts
REUTERS
Barack Obama discusses the automatic budget cuts scheduled to take effect next week.
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California lawmakers
on Friday positioned themselves to tackle
changes to the state’s landmark environmental
regulatory law, which has long been a source
of conflict among business, environmentalists,
labor groups and local governments.
Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg,
a Sacramento Democrat, proposed a bill on
the last day for lawmakers to introduce legis-
lation. Steinberg said his SB731 will make it
easier to build so-called infill projects and
limit “document dumps” aimed at delaying
projects.
“This measure sets the framework to
encourage smart, environ-
mentally sound growth by
streamlining the environ-
mental review process
without compromising the
quality of life Californians
deserve and expect in our
communities,” Steinberg
said in a statement.
Democrats are renewing
their efforts to modernize
the California
Environmental Quality Act after a proposal
failed last year. Gov. Jerry Brown, who sup-
ports CEQA reform, once called streamlining
the law’s many requirements “the Lord’s
work.”
Bill seeking changes to
state environmental law
Darrell
Steinberg
NATION/WORLD 8
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Obama, Japan’s PM signal
solidarity on North Korea
WASHINGTON — Japan’s new prime min-
ister declared Friday he would make his coun-
try a stronger U.S. ally
and joined President
Barack Obama in warning
North Korea that its recent
nuclear provocations
would not be tolerated.
After meeting Obama in
the Oval Office, Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe also
sent a clear message to
China: that while Japan
does not want confrontation with Beijing, it
won’t tolerate challenges to its sovereignty
over islands disputed by the two Asian pow-
ers.
Those regional tensions served as the back-
drop for Friday’s meetings that came just two
months after Abe began his second stint as
Japan’s prime minister following a convincing
election victory.
Egypt opposition warns
elections will add tensions
CAIRO — Egypt’s president called multi-
stage parliamentary elections beginning in
April but a key opposition leader warned
Friday that the vote may only inflame tensions
unless there are serious political talks first.
President Mohammed Morsi set the start of
a staggered, four-stage voting process for
April 27 ending in June. The newly elected
parliament would convene on July 6, a decree
issued late Thursday night said.
Mohamed ElBaradei, who leads the main
opposition National Salvation Front, wrote on
his Twitter account Friday that Morsi’s “deci-
sion to go for parliamentary elections amidst
severe societal polarization and eroding state
authority is a recipe for disaster.”
Egypt has been mired in political turmoil
for the past two years. The current phase
began when Morsi took over as president in
June 2012.
Around the world
Shinzo Abe
By Ben Hubbard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Gunmen from rival Sunni and
Shiite Muslim villages in northern Syria have
freed more than 200 people snatched in tit-for-
tat kidnappings this month, easing tensions
that threatened to touch off more sectarian
violence, activists said Friday.
In Syria’s largest city of Aleppo, three explo-
sions that appeared to be caused by missiles
killed at least 14 people, activists said, adding
that dozens of others were feared to be trapped
under the rubble of damaged buildings.
The wave of abductions in a rural part of
Idlib province highlighted how much the civil
war between the regime of President Bashar
Assad and the hundreds of rebel groups seek-
ing his ouster has enflamed tensions between
Syria’s myriad religious groups.
The Syrian regime, established more than
four decades ago by Assad’s father, Hafez, has
largely stocked the upper ranks of the coun-
try’s security agencies and armed forces with
members of the ruling family’s minority
Alawite sect, an offshoot of Shiite Islam. Most
of the rebels fighting Assad’s forces are poor,
rural members of Syria’s Sunni majority.
Other religious minority communities, like
Christians and Druze, have largely remained
on the sidelines. As the conflict approaches its
third year, its sectarian divide is worsening.
This month, clashes broke out between Sunni
and Shiite villages in the area of Qusair, near
the Lebanese border. Islamic extremists who
have joined the rebels have destroyed
Christian liquor stores, and sometimes refer to
their dead adversaries with derogatory names
insulting their sects.
More than 200 kidnapped Syrian villagers released
By Robert Burns and Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The U.S. and its NATO
allies revealed Friday they may keep as many
as 12,000 troops in Afghanistan after the com-
bat mission ends next year, largely American
forces tasked with hunting down remnants of
al-Qaida and helping Afghan forces with their
own security.
Patience with the 11-year-old war has
grown thin in the U.S. and Europe, yet
Washington and its allies feel they cannot pick
up and leave without risking a repeat of what
happened in Afghanistan after Soviet troops
withdrew in 1989: Attention turned elsewhere,
the Taliban grabbed power and al-Qaida found
refuge.
In disclosing that he and his NATO counter-
parts were discussing a residual force of
between 8,000 and 12,000 troops in
Afghanistan beyond 2014, Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta said most allied defense minis-
ters assured him they are committed to
remaining part of a U.S.-led coalition.
“I feel very confident that we are going to
get a number of nations to make that contribu-
tion for the enduring presence,” Panetta told a
news conference at NATO headquarters in
Brussels at the conclusion of a defense minis-
ters meeting.
The U.S. and its allies have managed to
stick together throughout the war, despite dif-
fering views. The Europeans have seen the
military mission as mainly aimed at promot-
ing stable governance; the Americans have
viewed it as mainly combat. Some allies,
including France, have already pulled out
their combat troops.
Up to 12,000 U.S., allied troops
may remain in Afghanistan
REUTERS
U.S.Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta,left,meets with Afghanistan’s Defense Minister Bismillah
Khan Mohammadi and members of his delegation.
OPINION 9
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
One Bay Area
Editor,
The following is a letter I sent to my
Santa Clara County supervisor regarding
One Bay Area.
Dear (elected official),
On Feb. 8, 2013, a meeting occurred
which was hosted by the Joint Venture
Silicon Valley Network and the Silicon
Valley Community Foundation. The
theme of the meeting was to tout the
advantage of regionalization, merging
the entire Bay Area in to one region.
This is a very dangerous idea for the fol-
lowing reasons:
1. Businesses that remain stagnate
may be replaced by those that accept
change or adjust to become more effi-
cient, but governments get ossification
of bureaucracy. Therefore, as they grow,
they become less efficient, so the sup-
posed claims of efficiencies are false.
The term “typical government opera-
tion” is used to denote an inefficient
loser of a business.
2. Rather than having to lobby 101
cities, regionalization gives much more
power to special interests (teachers
unions, police, firefighters come to
mind). It is easier to control the few than
the many. Pressure may be placed on the
regional representatives who could easi-
ly be coerced into complying with ideas
that are to their benefit but hurt the peo-
ple they supposedly serve.
3. Local city governments and even
county governments become irrelevant
or are done away with completely, thus
giving the residents even less control
over their lives. People lose any chance
of influencing their government. That is
already in jeopardy because of the
power of the feds and the state. Regional
government is not self government, even
if the regional people are elected. Our
country was set up to have most of the
power with the individual and local gov-
ernment because our founders under-
stood what happens when power is con-
solidated. Local is the key.
Regionalization, as proposed in this
conference, is the antithesis of self gov-
ernment, where the power is supposed
to be with ‘The People’ and their local
elected officials. There is no one Bay
Area. All 101 cities and nine counties
have completely different characters.
Vive la difference! Let’s keep it that
way!
Shirlene Witt
Mountain View
Cut for the poor
Editor,
The word of the month in Washington
is “sequestration,” or the automatic $85
billion in spending cuts slated to take
effect on March 1 unless Congress
reaches a deal. What will those cuts
mean in real life for the poor, unem-
ployed, sick and children? The econom-
ic group Macroeconomic Advisers pre-
dicted that the sequester will slow eco-
nomic growth by more than half a per-
centage point and result in the loss of
700,000 jobs.
Critical areas are as follows: 125,000
people will lose Section 8 housing,
which is critical housing support for the
working poor, 100,000 people who are
homeless will not receive the support
that they need without a place to go and
there won’t be 450,000 AIDS tests.
About 500,000 vaccines won’t be manu-
factured, a million people won’t be able
to access community health centers and
unemployment insurance for 4 million
long-term unemployed will be cut by 10
percent. In terms of education, 70,000
kids won’t have access to Head Start;
another 30,000 in terms of child-care
assistance.
The reality is that the U.S. govern-
ment funds its level of activities at the
same level of Mexico. The United States
has the lowest level of taxation of any
developed country in the world. And
what that means is that we are underin-
vesting in infrastructure, we’re underin-
vesting in education and we’re underin-
vesting in the key things that fuel eco-
nomic growth.
Ted Rudow III
Palo Alto
Letters to the editor
— Long Beach Press-Telegram
I
s Meg Whitman wreaking her
vengeance on the voters of
California?
Whitman, now CEO of Hewlett-
Packard, lavished $144 million of her
own money on her failed bid to best
Jerry Brown in the 2010 gubernatorial
race.
On Thursday, state legislators were
told the Department of Motor Vehicles
has halted a $208 million overhaul of
its vehicle registration and driver’s
license technology halfway through the
project because the contractor was
making scant progress.
Among the promises Whitman made
as a candidate was to save taxpayers
money by upgrading state government’s
antiquated computer systems.
But California has already paid near-
ly $50 million to the contractor, HP
Enterprise Services, a subsidiary of
Whitman’s company. In all, DMV has
spent $135 million on the failed project,
but a spokesman said the department
will not pay HP Enterprise Services the
remaining $26 million in its contract.
A state report issued in December
said the contractor had been unable to
complete some tasks. Faulty computer
coding and critical positions left vacant
were cited as contributing to project
delays, the Los Angeles Times reported.
When the DMV project started in
2007, the contractor was called
Electronic Data Systems. That company
was bought by Hewlett-Packard and
renamed HP Enterprise Services.
Whitman took over Hewlett-Packard
in 2011 and is trying to turn the com-
puter giant’s fortunes around. Tongue
was in cheek when we suggested that
the failed DMV project might be her
revenge on state taxpayers.
Actually, California government has
suffered a rash of expensive technology
failures.
Earlier this month, the State
Controller’s Office fired the contractor
responsible for upgrading and modern-
izing the computer network that issues
paychecks to state employees.
The state had spent $254 million
toward that $371 million project, the
Times reported, including more than
$50 million to the contractor, SAP
Public Services. A spokesman said the
Controller’s Office would try to recoup
the money paid to SAP.
State officials said SAP’s program
made errors at more than 100 times the
rate of the outdated payroll system it
was supposed to replace.
SAP took over the project three years
ago after the previous contractor could-
n’t get it done.
Now it appears that the project,
dubbed the 21st Century Project, will
stretch on indefinitely toward the 22nd
century.
SAP also was the contractor for Los
Angeles Unified School District’s cata-
strophic attempt to upgrade its payroll
system in 2007.
The California Technology Agency,
which oversees state computer initia-
tives, had to break the news to the
Legislature on Thursday that a second
wildly expensive project was canceled
with nothing to show for it. For the two
projects, that’s $389 million down the
drain. Carlos Ramos, secretary of the
California Technology Agency, might
want to spend a little time updating his
resume.
You’d think in California, the home
of Silicon Valley, government could
find some contractors capable of
installing big computer systems.
State’s failed $389M computer upgrades
Belmont wants to stop
the sale of your home
By Suzan Getchell-Wallace
D
o you think the city of Belmont has the right to
stop the sale of your private property? If you
don’t go to the City Council meeting on Tuesday,
Feb. 26 at 7:30 p.m. in the Council
Chambers, 1 Twin Pines Lane, they very
well could give themselves that power.
Under the guise of “consumer protec-
tion,” the City Council wants to require
property owners to pay to inspect their
sewer lateral pipes — and if needed,
repair or replace them — before the city
will allow the home sale to close. And if
you have to repair or replace the line, it
will cost thousands of dollars ($7,500 to $25,000) just to
close escrow. The proposal is part of a larger strategy for
the upgrade of the treatment, disposal and control of
wastewater. It sounds like a good idea until you begin
reading the proposal.
It states clearly the city will require private property
owners to replace their sewer laterals when they sell their
home. In layperson’s terms, it’s called a ‘point-of-sale’
mandate. Think you’re in the clear because you don’t plan
on selling your home? If your home and the house next
door are serviced by ‘Y’ lateral they all have to be replaced
— citywide — whether you sell or not.
If you’re wondering how they can do that, then you may
not be aware that years ago, overall responsibility for the
maintenance and repair of the sewer lateral system was
offloaded from the city to its residents.
What does that really mean for the citizens of Belmont?
It means the city has decided to place the burden of fixing
a community-wide problem on the collective backs of peo-
ple selling their home.
And here’s the kicker: Belmont is the only city in San
Mateo County that is not being forced by litigation to
enact this requirement. Aside from the implications to pri-
vate property rights, it puts a city-wide problem on the
shoulders of a small segment of the population. Is that
equitable?
Whether Belmont’s sewer lateral systems are sufficient
is an issue that impacts the entire community. And thus far,
smoke testing of the system has turned up a few major
remediation problems. Ensuring the quality of the sewer
lateral systems throughout Belmont is an important health
and safety issue, so the solution should also be city-wide
in scope.
Further, point-of-sale requirements are highly ineffi-
cient. As of the most recent annual figures (2012), the
property turnover rate in Belmont was 2.3 percent
(throughout the county, the average was 2 percent per
year). Meaning 2.3 percent of the housing stock was sold
every year. Translation: It will take approximately 44
years to address the sewer lateral issue if the city waits
until the point-of-sale to achieve the inspections and/or
repairs.
Another concern for residents is the impact of point-of-
sale mandates on the transaction itself. In our current eco-
nomic climate, there are a number of short sales and real
estate-owned transactions that, for a number of reasons,
require an expedited processing (most commonly to stave
off foreclosure).
These point-of-sale mandates have caused delays or out-
right voiding of a transaction because the last minute costs
are added to already negotiated sale which the lender may
or may not approve. How often has it happened in
Belmont? Isn’t one family that could lose their opportuni-
ty to become a first time home owner enough? Or do we
need a metaphorical road littered with such broken trans-
actions and ultimately foreclosures?
Belmont already has a proposal in place to upgrade of
the treatment, disposal and control of its sewer/wastewater
and related systems without using a point-of-sale mandate.
The City Council should adopt that recommendation to
underscore to its residents that home ownership matters. If
not, what other city service (for which you already pay
property taxes) will become your responsibility?
Suzan Getchell-Wallace, Vice-President and/or Co-owner
of Coldwell Banker-Fahey Properties Inc.
Other voices
Guest
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,000.57 +0.86% 10-Yr Bond 1.97 -0.64%
Nasdaq3,161.82 +0.97% Oil (per barrel) 93.36
S&P 500 1,515.60 +0.88% Gold +0.56%
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on
the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
American International Group Inc., up $1.17 at $38.45
The insurer posted a $4 billion loss at the end of 2012 on costs
from Sandy, but its operating profit topped Wall Street
expectations.
Hewlett-Packard Co., up $2.10 at $19.20
The latest quarter showed some progress at the PC maker,which
has been struggling with a shift toward smartphones and tablets.
Abercrombie & Fitch Co., down $2.19 at $46.86
The teen clothing retailer’s profit rose during the holiday quarter,
but sales trends deteriorated.It plans to close up to 50 U.S.stores.
Rackspace Hosting Inc., down 74 cents at $54.59
The website hosting company is cutting prices for its cloud
bandwidth by one-third and setting tiered prices for other
services.
Nasdaq
Zynga Inc., up 23 cents at $3.19
The online games maker could be closer to offering lucrative
gambling games in the U.S. after a Nevada law legalized online
gambling.
Aruba Networks Inc., up $4.60 at $25.40
The maker of equipment for wireless networks reverted to a
profit and posted higher revenue in its latest quarter as demand
grew.
WebMD Health Corp., up $4.14 at $20.44
The health website predicted another sales decline for this year,
but the drop was not as steep as Wall Street expected.
Charter Communications Inc., up $7.99 at $85.02
New customers and more video and advertising sales helped
the cable TV provider narrow its fourth-quarter loss.
Big movers
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Strong earnings from big U.S. com-
panies pushed the Dow Jones industri-
al average to a rare triple-digit gain
Friday, but the S&P 500 index still
posted its first weekly loss of the year.
Hewlett-Packard had the biggest
gain in the Dow and the Standard &
Poor’s 500 index. It posted fiscal first-
quarter earnings late Thursday that
beat all forecasts, a relief after months
of bad news for the computer maker.
H-P rose $2.10, or 12.3 percent, to
$19.20.
Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. was the S&P
500’s second-best performer, jumping
a day after reporting earnings that beat
analysts’ expectations. It rose $5.95, or
11.1 percent, to $59.81.
American International Group Inc.
rose after its fourth-quarter operating
results exceeded analysts’ forecasts.
The company’s net loss was $4 billion,
mainly because of claims related to
Superstorm Sandy, in the first full
quarter after it finished repaying its
$182 billion government bailout. AIG
rose $1.17, or 3.1 percent, to $38.45.
The Dow closed up 119.95 points, or
0.9 percent, at 14,000.57 — its third-
biggest gain this year. The S&P 500
rose 13.18 points, also 0.9 percent, to
1,515.60. The Nasdaq composite index
rose 30.33, or 1 percent, to 3,161.82.
The S&P 500 and Nasdaq closed
slightly lower for the week, while the
Dow edged higher.
Bill Stone, chief investment strate-
gist with PNC Wealth Management,
said he expects stocks to hold up
despite this week’s volatility.
“You’re going to get bumps and
bruises along the way, but we do
believe things are actually getting bet-
ter, so I think there’s underlying
demand” for stocks, Stone said.
Spooked investors sent stocks plung-
ing Wednesday after minutes from the
Federal Reserve’s latest policy meet-
ing revealed disagreement over how
long to keep buying bonds in an effort
to boost the economy. The slide con-
tinued Thursday. The Dow lost 155
points over those two days.
Many analysts say the Fed’s bond-
buying and resulting low interest rates
have driven this year’s stock rally,
which lifted indexes to their highest
levels since before the 2008 financial
crisis. The Dow is now just 164 points
below its record close of 14,164
reached in October 2007.
U.S. stocks followed European
stocks higher after a survey of German
business optimism rose sharply,
adding to evidence that the country
will avoid a recession. Germany’s eco-
nomic vitality is crucial for the belea-
guered region, offsetting economic
contraction in surrounding countries.
“Germany is really the bedrock,”
Stone said. “If it gives way, then you
have real problems.”
France’s CAC-40 closed up 2.2 per-
cent, Germany’s DAX 1 percent.
Dow bounces from slide to a three-digit gain
REUTERS
Specialist trader Paul Cosentino, left, gives a price just before the opening bell on
the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
By Jennifer Peltz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Help wanted.
Qualifications: Must already have a job.
It’s a frustrating catch for those out of work
in an era of high unemployment: looking for
a job, only to find that some employers don’t
want anyone who doesn’t already have one.
But after four years of above-average job-
lessness in the U.S., efforts to bar such prac-
tices by employers have met with mixed
results.
While New Jersey, Oregon and
Washington, D.C., have passed laws mak-
ing it illegal to discriminate against the
unemployed, New York City’s billionaire-
businessman mayor vetoed on Friday what
would have been the most aggressive such
measure in the country. Similar proposals
have stalled in more than a dozen other
states and Congress.
Advocates for the unemployed say such
hiring practices are unfair, particularly to
those who have been laid off because of the
economic crunch and not through any fault of
their own. Businesses, though, say that the
extent of such practices is exaggerated, hiring
decisions are too complicated to legislate,
and employers could end up defending them-
selves against dubious complaints.
Nationally, more than 1 in 3 unemployed
workers has been looking for at least six
months, according to the federal Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
Janet Falk said that when she applied for a
public-relations job at a New York law firm
two years ago, the recruiter told her she
wouldn’t be considered because she had been
out of work for more than three months. The
recruiter was being paid to find candidates
who were in jobs or just out of them.
“My personal view is that hiring is like
musical chairs, and if only the people who
are already on the dance floor are playing,
then the long-term unemployed can’t get in
the game,” said Falk, who was laid off four
years ago. She now runs her own consulting
business.
An October 2011 search of New York City-
based job listings found more than a dozen
that explicitly required candidates to be
employed, Manhattan Borough President
Scott Stringer’s office said. A broader review
that year by the National Employment Law
Project found 150 ads that were restricted to
or aimed at people currently working.
As for why, experts say employers may
think that unemployed applicants’ skills have
atrophied, that they lost their jobs because of
their own shortcomings, or that they will
jump at any job offer and then leave as soon
as something better comes along.
But “‘don’t apply, don’t even try’ is the
opposite of American values,” New York City
Council Speaker Christine Quinn said when
the measure passed last month. She said
Friday that she expects the City Council will
override Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s veto
within a month.
Bloomberg called the measure a well-
intended but misguided effort that would cre-
ate more lawsuits than jobs.
“Hiring decisions frequently involve the
exercise of independent, subjective judgment
about a prospective employee’s likely future
performance,” he said in a statement.
And unlike other characteristics that
employers are generally banned from consid-
ering, such as an applicant’s race, religion or
gender, “the circumstances surrounding a
person’s unemployment status may, in certain
situations, be relevant to employers when
selecting qualified employees,” he said.
Unemployed complain they need a job to find a job
By Peter Svensson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — A federal judge is blocking
Apple from conducting a shareholder vote on
a package of governance proposals, handing a
victory to a rebel investor who is trying to per-
suade the company to share more of its cash
with its investors.
U.S. District Judge Richard Sullivan in New
York ruled Friday that Apple Inc. was wrong
to bundle four amendments to its corporate
charter into one proposal for a vote at next
Wednesday’s annual meeting. Shareholders
should get to vote on the amendments sepa-
rately, he said. Although the ruling was pre-
liminary, before both sides had a chance to
fully make their case, Sullivan said Apple was
likely to lose. He granted dissident investors a
preliminary injunction against Apple pending
a full trial.
Apple will comply with Sullivan’s order and
withdraw the issue from the agenda of next
week’s meeting, said Steve Dowling, a
spokesman for the Cupertino, Calif., compa-
ny. It had appeared on the shareholder voting
list as proposal No. 2.
“We are disappointed with the court’s rul-
ing,” Dowling said. “Proposal No. 2 is part of
our efforts to further enhance corporate gover-
nance and serve our shareholders’ best inter-
ests.”
Greenlight Capital, a hedge fund run by
Wall Street maverick David Einhorn, sued
Apple over the proposal because it would
remove the board’s ability to issue preferred
stock without shareholder authorization.
Einhorn wants Apple to issue “iPrefs,” pre-
ferred shares with a guaranteed dividend, as a
way of committing the company to sharing its
massive profits with shareholders.
Einhorn has been trying to rally Wall Street
to vote against the Apple proposal as a way of
showing their displeasure with the company’s
capital-allocation policies. Right now, Apple
hands only a small amount of its profits to
shareholders through dividends and stock buy-
backs.
Boeing proposes battery fix for 787s
WASHINGTON — Boeing attempted a
major step Friday toward getting its 787
Dreamliners flying again, proposing a fix for
the plane’s troubled batteries that could allow
the flights to resume as early as April, con-
gressional officials said.
The next question is whether the Federal
Aviation Administration will agree to let the
planes fly even though the root cause of a bat-
tery fire in one plane and a smoking battery in
another is still unknown.
A Boeing team led by CEO Ray Conner
presented the plan to Federal Aviation
Administration head Michael Huerta. The air-
liners, Boeing’s newest and most technologi-
cally advanced, have not been allowed to fly
since mid-January.
The plan — a long-term solution, rather
than a temporary fix — calls for revamping
the aircraft’s two lithium ion batteries to
ensure that any short-circuiting that could lead
to a fire won’t spread from one battery cell to
the others, officials said. That would be
achieved by placing more robust ceramic insu-
lation around each of the battery’s eight cells.
The aim is to contain not only the short-cir-
cuiting, but any thermal runaway, a chemical
reaction that leads to progressively hotter tem-
peratures.
Wireless show expected
to draw crowds to Barcelona
When the top executives of the world’s
wireless industry gather next week in
Barcelona for their annual trade show, cell-
phones will take a back seat to talk of cars,
electric meters and insulin monitors.
That idea of empowering new devices with
wireless connections has been percolating for
years. General Motors cars have had wireless
OnStar connections for more than a decade.
But the push is intensifying now that most
people have cellphones —and the wireless
industry’s future growth depends on it. That
means the GSM Mobile World Congress, the
telecommunications industry’s largest annual
trade show, will be abuzz with discussion of
devices like “smart” meters that report a
home’s usage of electricity, natural gas or
water back to the utility, and to your phone.
“You’ll see more things that are ‘today’
things versus ‘tomorrow’ things at the show,”
said Glenn Lurie, AT&T’s president of
“emerging devices.”
AT&T’s CEO Randall Stephenson will
speak at the show, which runs Monday
through Thursday.
Judge blocks shareholder
vote on Apple proposal
Business briefs
<< Vogelsong gets Spring Training nod, page 13
• Sharks can’t stop Chicago from setting record, page 16
Weekend, Feb. 23-24, 2013
THE GHOST SEES WEAKNESS: ROBERT GUERRERO SAYS ‘MONEY’ HAS FLAWS IN GAME >>> PAGE 12
Serra outlasts El Camino
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Serra’s Henry Caurso drives to the basket for two of his 30 points during a 74-66 win over El Camino in a CCS Open Division playoff game.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
SANTA CLARA — The game of basketball
is all about matchups. If a team can keep an
opponent in front of them and challenge shots
consistently, it has a good chance of winning.
El Camino, the No. 7 in the Central Coast
Section new Open Division, matched up well
with No. 2 Serra for most of the game. But
foul trouble for the Colts, plus a reinvigorated
Padres squad in the second half equaled a
tough 74-66 win for Serra Friday night at
Santa Clara High School.
“In the first half, we were able to keep our
matchups,” said El Camino coach Archie
Junio. “In the second half, with foul problems,
we had to change matchups and it changed the
game a little bit.
“You have to keep your best players on the
floor.”
The Colts biggest concern was wing
Michael Smith, who picked up his third foul
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Every season, the California Interscholastic
Federation and the Central Coast Section
awards selects coaches for their Sports Honor
awards.
And for the 2012-13 winter season, the
Peninsula Athletic League is well represented.
Mills boys’ basketball coach Rick Hanson
and Sequoia girls’ basketball coach Steve
Picchi were two of the four coaches chosen by
the CIF-CCS.
The Central Coast Section Honor Coach
Award is presented to those coaches who their
colleagues believe have made outstanding
contributions to that sport at their school,
within their league, in the community and to
the CCS.
“It’s a very nice award,” Hanson said as he
prepares the Vikings to a Division III show-
down with No. 6 Aptos Saturday afternoon at
St. Ignatius High School in San Francisco. “I
think it means a lot of the players I’ve
See SERRA, Page 16
PAL coaches
take home
CCS honors
See PAL, Page 15
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Gilbert “El Niño” Melendez is all grown up.
And that has nothing to do with age yet
everything to do where the mixed martial arts
champion has finally reached.
For years, Melendez, the Bay Area Native
who now fights out of San Francisco, stayed
true to the hometown MMA promotion that
was Strikeforce, conquering its featherweight
and lightweight divisions since he arrived in
2006, and before then with the World Extreme
Championship in 2002 where he cut his teeth
to an 8-0 record.
But now, 23 fights and 21 victories later,
Melendez steps into the big boy octagon for
his first fight with the Ultimate Fighting
Championship — MMA’s premiere promo-
tion. And the step and stage couldn’t be any
larger considering his first fight involves a
shot at the UFC’s lightweight championship
against Benson Henderson April 20 in
Local MMA
legend ready
for UFC debut
See MMA, Page 15
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Guerrero says Mayweather has flaws
By Greg Becham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Robert Guerrero has been calling out Floyd
Mayweather Jr. since he was an obscure, skin-
ny 135-pounder with no logical chance of get-
ting a fight with boxing’s pound-for-pound
champion.
Guerrero finally landed the bout he craved
this week, and he’s already
got plenty more to say
about his chances.
Guerrero says
Mayweather is declining,
and he intends to exploit
the flaws of the sport’s top
money-maker in their May
4 meeting at the MGM
Grand Garden in Las
Vegas.
“I see a lot of slippage,”
Guerrero said in a phone interview. “I see him
slowing down, as far as his legs not being as
quick as they used to be.”
Bold words are no surprise from Guerrero
(31-1-1, 18 KOs), the talkative former feather-
weight champion from Gilroy, Calif., who has
even more old-school boxing bravado than
Mayweather, whose interest in trash talk has
faded in recent years.
When asked if Mayweather was the best
fighter in boxing, Guerrero was blunt: “In my
eyes, no.”
“There’s just so many fighters out there that
he hasn’t fought, and he was picking and
choosing fights,” Guerrero said. “That’s why
I’m excited that I’m in the position I’m in,
earning the spot where he actually is going to
fight somebody who’s earned it.”
Guerrero betrays no fear of Mayweather,
who hand-picked the challenger for their wel-
terweight title bout in his debut on Showtime.
Guerrero thinks the champion doesn’t realize
what he’s facing, and he also expects
Mayweather to be fighting
rust after a year away from
the ring, including a two-
month stint in jail.
“Definitely, he’s ripe for
the picking,” Guerrero
said. “You know, he’s
been out for a year. ... He
is sharp in the ring. He
puts more pressure on
guys. I think that has to do
with him not being able to
move as good on his legs, where people think,
‘Oh, he’s changed his style.’ But I just think
that when you get older and your legs start to
go, you have to change direction.”
Guerrero realizes he’s the presumptive vic-
tim for the first bout of Mayweather’s lucra-
tive six-fight contract with Showtime over the
next 30 months. Mayweather opened as a
heavy favorite in Las Vegas sports books.
“If people bet on me, they’re going to make
a lot of money, so I suggest they do,” Guerrero
said. “I was put in this position not only to
humble the boxing world, but to humble
Floyd Mayweather. I have a lot of faith that
I’m going to go in there and dominate this
fight.”
Although Mayweather doesn’t talk trash the
way he once did, at least he finally has an
opponent who won’t rely on Mayweather to
do most of the heavy lifting in promotion and
pre-fight interest. Guerrero’s confidence could
play well on Showtime, which plans to show-
case Mayweather and his upcoming oppo-
nents in behind-the-scenes programming.
Outside the ring, he’s best known for his
steadfast support of his wife, Casey, who sur-
vived a prolonged struggle with leukemia
while Guerrero was an up-and-coming fighter.
Any doubts about Guerrero’s ability to fight
at welterweight evaporated when he returned
from a 15-month ring absence following
shoulder surgery last year. Guerrero jumped
up two weight classes to 147 pounds to beat
Selcuk Aydin last July — and in November, he
won a decision over former welterweight
champion Andre Berto in one of last year’s
most exciting fights.
“(Mayweather) is a way smarter fighter than
Berto, than Aydin,” Guerrero said. “Strength-
wise, I feel he’s not as strong as either one of
them. I think Berto is a lot faster, but the one
thing that carries Floyd Mayweather through
is his elegance in the ring. His intelligence,
being able to change angles. That’s what gets
him through the day.”
Robert
Guerrero
Floyd
Mayweather
‘Ghost’ begins big fight preparations,‘I see a lot of slippage’
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Justice Department
joined a lawsuit Friday against disgraced
cyclist Lance Armstrong that alleges the for-
mer seven-time Tour de France champion con-
cealed his use of performance-enhancing
drugs and defrauded his longtime sponsor, the
U.S. Postal Service.
The lawsuit alleges that riders on the postal
service-sponsored team, including Armstrong,
knowingly violated their
postal service agreements
by regularly using banned
substances and methods
to enhance their perform-
ance.
“Lance Armstrong and
his cycling team took
more than $30 million
from the U.S. Postal
Service based on their
contractual promise to
play fair and abide by the rules — including
the rules against doping,” said U.S. Attorney
Ronald Machen, whose office is handling the
case. “The Postal Service has now seen its
sponsorship unfairly associated with what has
been described as ‘the most sophisticated,
professionalized and successful doping pro-
gram that sport has ever seen.”’
In recent weeks, settlement discussions had
been under way between the Justice
Department and Armstrong’s lawyers.
A person familiar with the negotiations said
Friday the two sides are tens of millions of
dollars apart on how much Armstrong should
pay to settle the case.
U.S. joins fraud
lawsuit against
Lance Armstrong
Lance
Armstrong
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Madison
Bumgarner will follow Matt Cain in San
Francisco’s starting rotation, though Giants
manager Bruce Bochy says there will likely
be some shuffling before
the end of spring camp.
“We can still tweak it,”
Bochy said Friday. “I’ll
keep saying that when I
look at all five starters,
they are all so balanced.”
Ryan Vogelsong starts
Saturday’s exhibition
opener against a visiting
split squad of Los Angeles
Angels. Cain will take the
ball Sunday, followed by Bumgarner, Tim
Lincecum and Barry Zito.
Zito will start for the World Series champi-
ons in their regular-season home opener, with
Vogelsong to pitch out of the fifth spot.
“I haven’t really announced that yet,”
Bochy said. “At the end of the year, knock on
wood they all stay healthy, they’ll get the
same amount of starts. It’s not who is No. 1 or
who follows who. Each one of these guys
gives us a chance to win every time they take
the mound. I don’t want them to get caught up
in this.”
Lincecum, the two-time Cy Young Award
winner who made the previous four opening
day starts, is happy with the arrangement and
glad for the opportunity to pitch in the sea-
son’s opening series in Los Angeles.
“I’m definitely excited to get out there again
and throw against them,” Lincecum said.
“That rivalry is so huge and the Dodgers went
out and made themselves better too. I enjoy
throwing at the Los Angeles Dodger blue, and
not necessarily at the name on the back.”
Lincecum is coming off the worst of his six
major league seasons. He was 10-15 with a
5.18 ERA, which “jumped” his career ERA to
3.31.
Despite being taken out of the rotation for
the postseason, Lincecum managed to make
his mark, going 1-1 with a 2.55 ERA in six
appearances, including one start.
Zito won 15 games for the Giants last year,
including six in a row. He also threw his first
shutout in nine years. All of which prompted
Bochy to give him the home opener.
“With the year he had and some of things
he’s been through, I’m sure it would mean a
lot to him,” Bochy said.
San Francisco trades
Conor Gillaspie to White Sox
The San Francisco Giants have traded third
baseman Conor Gillaspie to the Chicago
White Sox for minor league pitcher Jeff
Soptic.
The 25-year-old Gillaspie spent parts of
three seasons with the Giants, hitting .205
with a home run and four RBIs in 29 games
and 44 at-bats.
San Francisco selected Gillaspie with the
37th overall pick in the 2008 amateur draft
from Wichita State. He made his major league
debut that Sept. 9.
Soptic, a 21-year-old right-handed reliever,
was 3-2 with an ERA of 5.40 with Class A
Kannapolis last year. Chicago took him in the
third round of the 2011 amateur draft out of
Johnson County Community College in
Overland Park, Kan.
With the trade of Gillaspie and the impend-
ing departure of Pablo Sandoval to the World
Baseball Classic, Bochy said he will turn to
Joaquin Arias, Brett Pill and minor leaguer
Adam Duvall to fill the position. Pill, an out-
fielder-first baseman, played third for one
inning last year, his only major league experi-
ence. He also played third at Cal State
Fullerton. “Really it’s just a matter of getting
the arm strength back,” Pill said. “And I have
been taking ground balls at third.”
Soptic, whom the Giants acquired in the
trade for Gillaspie, will report to the minor
league camp.
Vogelsong starts Giants’ spring opener, Cain to follow
Ryan
Vogelsong
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PRETORIA, South Africa — Oscar
Pistorius walked out of court Friday — free at
least for now — after a South African magis-
trate released him on bail, capping four days
of often startling testimony that foreshadowed
a dramatic trial in the Valentine’s Day slaying
of his girlfriend.
But as he was driven away, chased by pho-
tographers and cameramen, questions contin-
ued to hound the double-amputee Olympian
about what actually happened the night he
gunned down Reeva Steenkamp inside a
locked bathroom in his home.
Pistorius is charged with premeditated mur-
der, and even Chief Magistrate Desmond Nair
expressed doubts about his story that he mis-
took the 29-year-old model for an intruder and
fired out of fear.
“Why would (Pistorius) venture further into
danger” by going into the bathroom at all,
Nair asked.
Cries of “Yes!” went up from Pistorius’ sup-
porters when Nair announced his decision to a
packed courtroom after a nearly two-hour
explanation of the ruling.
Nair set bail at 1 million rand ($113,000).
Oscar Pistorius gets bail as murder trial looms
SPORTS 14
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 32 20 .615 —
Brooklyn 33 23 .589 1
Boston 29 26 .527 4 1/2
Philadelphia 22 30 .423 10
Toronto 23 33 .411 11
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 38 14 .731 —
Atlanta 30 23 .566 8 1/2
Washington 16 37 .302 22 1/2
Orlando 15 40 .273 24 1/2
Charlotte 13 42 .236 26 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 34 21 .618 —
Chicago 32 23 .582 2
Milwaukee 26 27 .491 7
Detroit 22 35 .386 13
Cleveland 17 37 .315 16 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 44 12 .786 —
Memphis 36 18 .667 7
Houston 31 26 .544 13 1/2
Dallas 25 29 .463 18
New Orleans 19 37 .339 25
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 40 15 .727 —
Denver 34 22 .607 6 1/2
Utah 31 24 .564 9
Portland 25 29 .463 14 1/2
Minnesota 20 32 .385 18 1/2
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 18 .684 —
Golden State 31 23 .574 6 1/2
L.A. Lakers 26 29 .473 12
Sacramento 19 37 .339 19 1/2
Phoenix 18 38 .32120 1/2
Thursday’sGames
Miami 86, Chicago 67
San Antonio 116, L.A. Clippers 90
Friday’sGames
Chicago 105, Charlotte 75
Toronto 100, New York 98
Indiana 114, Detroit 82
Washington 119, Denver 113
Atlanta 122, Sacramento 108
Houston 106, Brooklyn 96
Memphis 88, Orlando 82
Dallas 104, New Orleans 100
Oklahoma City 127, Minnesota 111
Boston 113, Phoenix 88
Portland at L.A. Lakers, late
Saturday’sGames
Denver at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Houston at Washington, 7 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 10 a.m.
Golden State at Minnesota, 12:30 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 3 p.m.
Cleveland at Miami, 3 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York, 4 p.m.
Memphis at Brooklyn, 4 p.m.
San Antonio at Phoenix, 5 p.m.
Boston at Portland, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE NHL GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
New Jersey 17 10 3 4 24 45 40
Pittsburgh 18 12 6 0 24 60 45
N.Y. Rangers 16 8 6 2 18 41 41
Philadelphia 19 8 10 1 17 53 59
N.Y. Islanders 17 7 9 1 15 50 60
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 17 11 4 2 24 49 39
Boston 14 10 2 2 22 41 33
Ottawa 18 10 6 2 22 43 34
Toronto 18 11 7 0 22 51 41
Buffalo 18 6 11 1 13 48 59
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 15 8 6 1 17 44 44
Tampa Bay 16 8 7 1 17 61 51
Winnipeg 16 7 8 1 15 41 50
Florida 17 5 8 4 14 41 61
Washington 16 5 10 1 11 43 54
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 17 14 0 3 31 57 35
Nashville 18 8 5 5 21 39 39
St. Louis 17 9 6 2 20 53 51
Detroit 17 7 7 3 17 45 51
Columbus 17 5 10 2 12 39 53
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 17 10 3 4 24 49 40
Minnesota 16 8 6 2 18 36 39
Colorado 15 7 7 1 15 38 43
Edmonton 16 6 7 3 15 37 44
Calgary 15 5 7 3 13 40 54
PacificDivision
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 15 12 2 1 25 53 39
San Jose 16 8 5 3 19 40 36
Phoenix 16 8 6 2 18 44 41
Dallas 17 8 8 1 17 44 47
Los Angeles 15 7 6 2 16 36 38
NOTE:Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Thursday’sGames
Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, SO
Toronto 3, Buffalo 1
Florida 5, Philadelphia 2
New Jersey 3,Washington 2
Winnipeg 4, Carolina 3
N.Y. Islanders 4, Montreal 3, OT
Boston 4,Tampa Bay 2
Columbus 3, Detroit 2
Vancouver 4, Dallas 3
Minnesota 3, Edmonton 1
Friday’sGames
Florida at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville,5 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
Saturday’sGames
New Jersey at Washington, 9 a.m.
Winnipeg at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 12:30 p.m.
Colorado at Los Angeles, 1 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
San Jose at Dallas, 5 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 7 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
Boston at Florida, noon
Vancouver at Detroit, 2 p.m.
Winnipeg at New Jersey, 2 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 4 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Calgary, 5 p.m.
@Stars
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/23
@Celtics
4:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/1
@Chicago
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/22
@Flames
6:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/6
vs.Predators
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/2
@Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/5
vs.Avalanche
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/26
vs.RedWings
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/28
@Twolves
12:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/24
@Pacers
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/26
@Knicks
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/27
vs.Raptors
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/4
@76ers
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/2
vs. Spurs
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/22
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Agreed to terms RHP
Dylan Axelrod, RHP Simon Castro, RHP Deunte
Heath, RHP Nate Jones, LHP Charlie Leesman, RHP
Jhan Marinez, RHP Nestor Molina, RHP Brian
Omogrosso,LHPJoseQuintana,RHPAddisonReed,
RHPAndreRienzo,LHPSantosRodriguez,LHPChris
Sale, LHP Hector Santiago, LHP Leyson Septimo,
LHPDonnieVeal,CTyler Flowers,CHector Gimenez,
CJoshPhegley,INFBrent Morel,INFAngel Sanchez,
OF Jordan Danks, OF Jared Mitchell, OF Blake
Tekotte and OF Dayan Viciedo on one-year con-
tracts.
SEATTLEMARINERS—Agreed to terms with RHP
Stephen Pryor,RHP Erasmo Ramirez,RHP Tom Wil-
helmsen and C Jesus Montero on one-year
contracts.
National League
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Placed RHP Chris Car-
penter on the 60-day DL.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Traded INF Conor
GillaspietotheChicagoWhiteSoxfor RHPJeff Sop-
tic.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA—Named Greg Taylor senior vice president
for player development.
ATLANTAHAWKS—Traded G Anthony Morrow
to Dallas for G/F Dahntay Jones.
CHARLOTTEHORNETS—Traded F Hakim Warrick
to Orlando for F Josh McRoberts.
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Traded G Charles
Jenkins and cash to Philadelphia for a protected
second-round draft pick.Traded F Jeremy Tyler to
Atlanta for cash and future draft considerations.
HOUSTONROCKETS—Traded F Marcus Morris to
Phoenixfor a2013second-rounddraft pick.Traded
FPatrickPatterson,CColeAldrichandGToneyDou-
glas to Sacramento for C Thomas Robinson, F
Francisco Garcia and F Tyler Honeycutt.
MIAMI HEAT—Traded C Dexter Pittman, a 2013
second-round draft pick and cash considerations
to Memphis for the draft rights to F Ricky Sanchez.
NEWYORKKNICKS—Traded G/F Ronnie Brewer
to Oklahoma City for a 2014 second-round draft
pick and cash.
OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER—Traded G Eric
Maynor to Portland for the rights to F Georgios
Printezis and cash.
ORLANDOMAGIC—Traded G J.J. Redick, C Gus-
tavo Ayon and G Ish Smith to Milwaukee for G
Doron Lamb, G Beno Udrih and F Tobias Harris.
PHOENIXSUNS—Waived F Luke Zeller.
TORONTORAPTORS—TradedCHamedHaddadi
and a 2014 second-round draft pick to Phoenix for
G Sebastian Telfair.
WASHINGTON WIZARDS—Traded G Jordan
Crawford to Boston for C Jason Collins and G Le-
andro Barbosa.
THURSDAY
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
DIVISION I
Sequoia 38, Fremont 36
Carlmont 64, Milpitas 53
DIVISION II
Aragon 68, Pioneer 57
Leland 72,Woodside 38
DIVISION III
Hillsdale 51, Prospect 40
Aptos 63,Terra Nova 41
DIVISION IV
Sacred Heart Prep 67, Greenfield 39
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
DIVISION I
Milpitas 48, Menlo-Atherton 37
DIVISION II
Woodside 55, El Camino 39
Leland 45, South City 34
DIVISION III
Santa Cruz 38, San Mateo 34
Saratoga 75,Terra Nova 56
DIVISION IV
Mercy-SF 49, Half Moon Bay 42
Notre Dame-Belmont 27, Seaside 24
Sacred Heart Prep 79, King City 37
SATURDAY
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
DIVISION I
Sequoia vs. No. 3Santa Teresa at Piedmont Hills
High School, 4:30 p.m.
Carlmont vs. No. 2 San Benito at Piedmont Hills,
2:45 p.m.
DIVISION II
No. 8 Los Altos vs. No. 1 Westmoor at Santa Clara
High School, 1 p.m.
No.6 Aragon vs.No.3 St.Francis at Santa Clara High
School, 6:15 p.m.
DIVISION III
No.6Aptos vs.No.3Millsat St.IgnatiusHighSchool,
1:45 p.m.
No. 7 Monterey vs. No. 2 Burlingame at St. Ignatius
High School, Noon
No. 8 Hillsdale vs. No. 1 St. Ignatius at St. Ignatius
High School, 3:30 p.m.
DIVISION IV
No. 5 SacredHeart Prep vs. No. 4 Half Moon Bay at
Menlo School, 4:30 p.m.
No. 6 Harker at No. 3 Menlo School, 6:15 p.m.
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
DIVISION II
No. 6 Woodside vs. No. 3 Westmont at Oak Grove
High School, 4:30 p.m.
No.10Lelandvs.No.2Westmoor at OakGroveHigh
School, 2:45 p.m.
DIVISION III
No. 5 Valley Christian vs. No. 4 Mills at Christopher
High School, 6:15 p.m.
No. 9 Santa Cruz vs. No. 1 Burlingame at Christo-
pher High School, 4:30 p.m.
DIVISION IV
No. 7 Mercy-SF vs. No. 2 Menlo School at Notre
Dame-Belmont, 4:30 p.m.
No. 5 Sacred Heart Prep vs. No. 4 Gunderson, at
Notre Dame-Belmont, 2:45 p.m.
NO.9NotreDame-Belmont vs.No.1Soquel at Notre
Dame-Belmont, 6:15 p.m.
DIVISION V
No. 5 Immaculate Conception vs. No. 4 Crystal
Springs at Castilleja High School, 2:45 p.m.
BOYS’ SOCCER
DIVISION I
No. 6 Sequoia vs. No. 3 Bellarmine at Pioneer, noon
No. 7 Salinas vs. No. 2 Carlmont at Gunn, noon
DIVISION III
No. 9 Gilroy vs. No. 1 Half Moon Bay at Gilroy, noon
No. 5 Sacred Heart Prep vs. No. 4 San Mateo at
Burlingame, noon
No. 10 Menlo vs. No. 2 Soledad at Gilroy, 10 a.m.
GIRLS’ SOCCER
DIVISION I
No. 7 Menlo-Atherton vs. No. 2 Woodside at
Burlingame, 10 a.m.
No. 5 Mountain View vs. No. 4 Carlmont at Gunn,
noon
DIVISION II
No. 11 Burlingame vs. No. 3 Gilroy at Gilroy, 2 p.m.
DIVISION III
NO.7 Stevenson vs.No.2 Menlo at Valley Christian,
2 p.m.
WRESTLING
CCS championships at Independence High School
CCS WHAT’S ON TAP
Melendez’s backyard — the HP
Pavilion in San Jose.
“It’s an honor,” Melendez said of
the opportunity to hit the ground
running in the UFC. “I feel like it’s
a great sign of respect from the UFC
to me. Whether the fans want to see
it that way or not, it feels that way to
me. It’s definitely a lot of pressure
but I want this, I’ve been waiting for
this my whole life. It also shows I
can carry a main event. I always
come out to fight and I just want to
show it. I take it as a compliment.
I’m grateful and excited.”
The entire MMA world is a buzz
over UFC on FOX 7 mainly
because it’ll answer the question
of Strikeforce’s legitimacy as a
MMA promotion. When
Strikeforce was bought out by the
UFC, Melendez was its light-
weight champion and had success-
fully defended his title four times.
“A lot of people are saying either
‘Gilbert is the best in the world’ and
more than the other half says
‘Gilbert is a complete joke. He’s
never fought any talent. He’s not in
the UFC.’ It’s one-sided,” Melendez
said. “There’s not really a middle
area. I think I represent all the other
fighters in that frame — all the
internationals who have been out-
side the UFC brand.”
Melendez fought through some
nagging injuries as Strikeforce was
folding but he said he’s physically
ready for Henderson and that the
13-week notice was the longest he’s
ever had to train for a fight. And
while the hometown attention lends
itself to various distractions, the
champion says they are a nonfactor
in his preparation.
“It’s something I’ve been through,
it’s something I’ve trained for,”
Melendez said. “I do pressure on
myself. On fight night, it is what it
is. I’m lucky to have a lot of loved
ones who loved me before I was a
fighter. I feel like there is no pres-
sure walking in there. This doesn’t
define me as a person. I do what I
love.”
In Henderson, Melendez faces a
fighter who won multiple “Fighter
of the Year” honors after going 3-0
in 2012, beginning with a victory
over Frankie Edgar to claim the
lightweight title. Henderson hasn’t
lost since 2010, his last fight with
the WEC and is 6-0 as a UFC com-
petitor — all his wins coming via
decision.
That said, Melendez believes his
experience will be a factor come
April.
“As soon as I walk in the cage,
I’m a different man,” Melendez
said. “I’m a different man. I’m
ready. I’m focused. Nothing can
distract me. I just have confidence in
myself — fighting my fight. And I
just really want to keep the pressure
on him. I want to win the fight. I
don’t want to keep it close. I need to
take the title from the champ. I’m
looking to make it a fight, not a
point-sparing match.”
coached over the years have done well and
have gone on and represented Mills well. I
think it reflects that in a lot of ways. I’m very
happy for Mills High School, to be at Mills
for the number of years that I have and to be
recognized.”
Hanson has been the head coach at Mills
since 2003. Prior to that, he was the boys var-
sity coach at Aragon High School for three
years and an assistant basketball coach at
Mills for 10 seasons.
“Rick clearly communicates the importance
of playing to the fullest potential without
relaying a win at all costs mentality,” said
Mills Principal Paul Belzer via CCS press
release. “Rick exemplifies what I think is
most important about high school athletics; a
commitment to excellence through consistent
effort, teamwork and strategy.”
Added Mills athletic director Tim Keller via
the same release: “Rick has a work ethic that
is unquestionable. Not only does he know the
game itself, he demonstrates the ability to
teach the required skills that allow teams to
win. He has displayed the moral character and
commitment necessary to lead any high
school basketball program. Rick is a dedicat-
ed mentor who leads others by setting exam-
ples and assisting other coaches on staff to
make tough decisions. I am always confident
that Rick will produce a team that will have
great sportsmanship as well as show success
on and off the court.”
In his tenure as head coach, Hanson has led
the Vikings to over 155 wins and a .600 win-
ning percentage. Mills is 9-8 under his watch
in the CCS playoffs with a couple of semifinal
appearances. He said that 10 years in, he still
finds multiple sources of inspiration.
“Certainly the kids that I’m currently
coaching,” Hanson said. “But I also think the
basketball alumni at Mills is very important to
me and was very important to coach
Thompson, who was my mentor, not only in
basketball but in many ways, in life. And that
was always impressed up on, that coach
Thompson and even coach Smith before him,
took great care of keeping the alumni on cur-
rent news and if there’s a chance for an alum-
ni that was prominent in a certain field of
work, that we sometimes we try to align them
with a current player, help them out a little bit
and maybe give them some advice they can
look forward to — help them on the journey
through life.”
Mills continues its current basketball jour-
ney this Saturday as the No. 4 seed in
Division III.
“We’ve had some time off,” he said. “I think
it’s been good where we’ve been able to heal
physically. We’ve improved as individuals
and as a team and we’re certainly looking for-
ward to the challenge.”
Picchi has been coaching girls’ varsity bas-
ketball at Sequoia High School since 2006.
Before his tenure with the Cherokees, he
coached at Burlingame and Arroyo high
schools. He was also at Chabot College
(women’s basketball), Notre Dame-Belmont
(varsity softball), the College of Notre Dame-
Belmont (basketball and volleyball) and Santa
Clara University (women’s basketball and
volleyball).
From 1980-1988, Picchi coached at
Burlingame. The Panthers girls’ basketball
program had just been reinstated after several
years. For three consecutive years,
Burlingame played for the Division III CCS
championship and the culmination of the
eight-year run was a Division III state cham-
pionship in 1988. To this date, the 1988 team
remains the only public school team to run the
table and accomplish this feat. That team was
honored this year during Senior Night at
Burlingame. It happened to be the night the
Panthers clinched a share of the PAL South
title.
At the time of nomination, coaches must be
actively coaching and have been coaching
their respective sport for a minimum of five
years at the varsity level.
The other two award winners were Jolene
Fugate of Valley Christian High School (girls’
soccer) and J. Reggie Roberts of Aptos High
School (wrestling).
SPORTS 15
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Continued from page 11
MMA
UFC
Gilbert Melendez,shown here following a win over Josh Thompson,makes
his Ultimate Fighting Championship debut April 20 at the HP Pavilion.
Continued from page 11
PAL
early in the third quarter and his fourth
early in the final quarter. With Smith
having to tone down his aggressiveness,
the Padres took advantage. Especially
Henry Caruso, who was being guarded
by Smith. Caruso scored 11 in the first
half and exploded for 19 in the second
half to finish with 30 points and it was
his play in the post that proved to be the
difference.
“We got a couple of mismatches on
the block and we took advantage,” said
Serra coach Chuck Rapp.
In addition to Caruso, Jacqui Biggins
finished with 23 points — the only two
Padres to score in double figures.
While El Camino faded down the
stretch, everything was going the Colts
way in the opening 16 minutes. Noted
mostly for the play of Smith and point
guard Elijah White, the Colts got more
players involved in the first and second
quarters, having six players in the scor-
ing column as El Camino led Serra 37-
30 at halftime. Smith and White, howev-
er, paced the Colts in the first two quar-
ters, combining for 23 of the Colts’ 37
points.
Smith finished with a team-high 28
points, while White chipped in with 19.
“Give El Camino credit. Those guys
(Smith and White) are hard covers,”
Rapp said. “The first half was way too
easy. [Smith] hit a couple of easy shots,
then he hits the difficult shots.”
Both Rapp and Caruso admitted the
Padres came out of the blocks rather
slowly and they paid the price as they
trailed at halftime.
“We kind of came out flat. We had a
strong second half,” Caruso said. “In the
first half, it was real easy for them to get
into their offense. In the second half, we
didn’t allow that.”
Added Rapp: “Everything felt a little
off. We have to play better. I thought our
first 16 minutes lacked energy. That was
my emphasis at half.”
In the second half, the Padres made a
concerted effort to be more aggressive.
They attacked the basket more consis-
tently and did a better job rebounding
the ball, out-rebounding the Colts 19-10
in the third and fourth quarters.
“If we don’t step it up (in the second
half), we’re going to lose,” Caruso said.
“We just wanted to keep attacking.”
The shots weren’t really falling for
either team, but the Padres aggressive-
ness resulted in constant trips to the free
throw line. Serra had 25 free throws
attempts over the final two quarters, con-
verting 22 of them. It was their free
throw shooting down the stretch that
kept the Colts at bay.
“The second half was a lot better,”
Rapp said. “We had more intensity and
started battling.”
Serra started the third quarter on a 10-
4 run to cut the Colts lead to 41-40 fol-
lowing a Biggins 3-pointers. El Camino
responded with back-to-back 3s from
Smith, sandwiched around a Caruso
bucket, as the Colts pushed their lead
back to five, 47-42. But another 3 from
Biggins and a bucket from Matt Jajeh
tied the game at 47 with 1:23 left in the
third and the teams were tied at 49 going
into the fourth.
Biggins gave Serra a 51-49 early in the
final period, but the Colts responded
with a 5-0 run to take a 54-51 advantage.
It would be their last lead of the night.
Caruso’s basket with 4:20 left tied the
game at 55 and his bucket on the Padres’
next possession put the Padres ahead for
good, 57-55. Serra scored only one bas-
ket the rest of the way, but went 13 for
15 from the line over the final 3:21 of the
game.
“This is the Open Division. There are
no low seeds,” Rapp said. “You only get
one mulligan and this was it.”
Despite the loss, the season is not over
for the Colts. Part of the allure of the
Open Division is the fact first-round los-
ers move into a consolation bracket as
well as advance to the Northern
California tournament. That means the
Colts are assured of at least two more
games this season.
“We get to play again, but we never
want to be happy with a loss,” Junio
said.
Serra will play the winner of No. 6
Piedmont Hills and No. 3 Sacred Heart
Cathedral at a time to be determined
Wednesday. El Camino will face the
Piedmont Hills-SHC loser in a consola-
tion game Tuesday. Both game are at
Independence High School in San Jose.
16
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Sports brief
Vonn ahead of schedule after knee surgery
Lindsey Vonn’s right knee is healing quicker than her feel-
ings over a world championship race she says should have
been called off.
The four-time overall World Cup cham-
pion remains unhappy about how she sus-
tained a season-ending injury — two
shredded ligaments and a broken bone —
at the world championships in
Schladming, Austria. She believes organ-
izers should have postponed the super-G
race on Feb. 5 because of deteriorating
course conditions.
In a conference call Friday, Vonn said
she “did not think it was safe” to race on
the soft snow and that “athletes safety
should come first.”
“I do not think the jury made the right call,” said Vonn, who
underwent surgery to repair the ACL and MCL nearly two
weeks ago. “It was definitely not safe to run with that fog.”
The start of the super-G was delayed by 3 1/2 hours because
of fog hanging over the course. During that time, conditions
dramatically changed, said Vonn, who noted that she inspect-
ed the hill early in the morning.
Soon after her crash, Atle Skaardal, women’s race director
for the International Ski Federation, defended the decision to
go ahead with the event, saying, “I don’t see that any outside
factors played a role in this accident.”
Lindsay Vonn
Sharks’ scoring woes continue
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — The Chicago Blackhawks
set an NHL record for the best start to a sea-
son, beating the San Jose Sharks 2-1 on
Friday night to give them at least one point
in their first 17 games.
Blackhawks rookie Brandon Saad scored
a short-handed goal early in the third period
to snap a 1-all tie. Chicago (14-0-3) won its
fourth straight game to break a mark set by
the 2006-07 Anaheim Ducks, who earned
points in their first 16 games.
The Blackhawks equaled that run
Tuesday with a shootout win over
Vancouver.
Saad closed in on the left wing one-on-
one with San Jose defenseman Brent Burns.
After a quick fake, Saad fired a shot from
the circle that beat San Jose’s Antti Niemi
just under the glove 2:24 into the period.
Viktor Stalberg also scored for league-
leading Chicago, which has captured a total
of 31 of 34 possible points.
Blackhawks goalie Ray Emery made 26
saves to win his fourth straight start and
improve to 7-0. Chicago killed all four San
Jose power plays, all of which occurred in a
span of under 14 minutes late in the second
and early in the third periods.
Patrick Marleau scored for the Sharks,
getting only his second goal in 11 games
after getting nine in San Jose’s first five
games.
Both Emery and Niemi were sharp
throughout most of the game. But a misplay
by Niemi led to Stalberg’s goal at 16:40 of
the second period, and he seemed fooled on
Saad’s score. Niemi stopped 32 shots.
Continued from page 11
SERRA
By Brooke Lefferts
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Many parents claim they’re too busy raising
their kids to stop and read a book about how to
do it better. Bruce Feiler, who has a full plate
as a successful writer and dad of two, decided
to make improving family life his business in
his new book, “The Secrets of Happy
Families.”
The scene at
Feiler’s house, with
his working wife
and now 8-year-old
twin daughters, is
similar to most fam-
ilies: active and
stressful. Feiler’s
goal was to put out
a playbook for
happy families to
make life more effi-
cient, relaxed and
fun.
But instead of seeking advice from tradi-
tional sources, he consulted people at the top
of their game in business, technology, sports
and the military about innovative ideas they
take from the boardroom to the playroom.
The best-selling author is known for tack-
ling tough issues, including family, mortality
and faith, and making them accessible to read-
ers. In this book, he offers useful advice on
everything from weekly allowances to road
trip games to sex talks. But it’s Feiler’s unique
perspective and voice that sets it apart from
other work in both the parenting and happi-
ness genres.
The book is organized and easy to digest.
It’s broken down into sections on the impor-
tance of families adapting to change, commu-
Work and play meet
in the family home
Museum
gotta see ‘um
China’s Terracotta
Warriors at the S.F.
Asian Art Museum
SEE PAGE 19
Black History Month
Celebrate Black History Month with local
African-American authors Claire Mack
(novelist and former San Mateo mayor),
Cozetta Gray Guinn (artist and educator),
Gertrude Dyer Wilks (East Palo Alto
community organizer) and Paula Michelle
Williams (novelist) as they discuss their
books. Light refreshments served. Authors’
books available for purchase and signing. 2
p.m. Sat. San Mateo Public Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. 522-7898. Free.
Taste of Terror
A Taste of Terror: Mini Film Festival. Hosted
by horror author William Pattison (known
as Eric Morse) and the Wolf Pack in
association with Sandwich Spot. Canned
food and donation drive to feed homeless
and elderly citizens. Short films by Richard
Powell, Shawn Buffington and Derek
Young shown. Proceeds go to Samaritan
House. 7 p.m. Sat. Sandwich Spot, 2420
Broadway, Redwood City.
Repair Café
Keep your favorite things working. Bring
your broken household items to the Repair
Café in Palo Alto and work with Repair
Volunteers to fix them. Be a part of the
worldwide movement to repair, not
replace. Small appliances, bicycles, lamps,
clocks, luggage and more. No cost except
parts purchases, if needed. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Sunday. Museum of American Heritage.
351 Homer Ave. Palo Alto. www.repaircafe-
paloalto.org.
Best bets
‘Our Practical Heaven’ falls short of promise
DAVID ALLEN
Freom left, Vera (Joy Carlin), Magz (Lauren Spencer), Willa
(Julia Brothers), Suze (Blythe Foster), Sasha (Anne Darragh)
and Leez (Adrienne Walters) spend an afternoon at the pond
in Aurora Theatre Company’s World Premiere of Anthony
Clarvoe’s Our Practical Heaven.
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Three generations of women celebrate
holidays at the family’s coastal cottage,
watch birds, bicker and look ahead in
Anthony Clarvoe’s “Our Practical
Heaven,” being given its world premiere
by Berkeley’s Aurora Theatre Company.
Clarvoe’s two-act play is the main stage
anchor production of Aurora’s eighth
annual Global Age Project, which fosters
21st century play development.
It features excellent acting thanks to
such Bay Area treasures as Joy Carlin,
who plays Vera, the family’s widowed
matriarch; Anne Darragh, who plays
Sasha, Vera’s daughter; and Julia
Brothers, who plays Willa, whom Sasha
considers an honorary sister.
With them are three young up-and-
comers: Blythe Foster as Suze and
Adrienne Walters as Leez, Sasha’s daugh-
ters; and Lauren Spencer as Magz,
Willa’s daughter.
Perhaps because Sasha is so uptight,
her daughters don’t especially like her.
While sitting next to each other, they
communicate their feelings about her via
text messages, which are projected onto
the back of Mikiko Uesugi’s set.
Willa, who overcame lowly beginnings
to become a successful businesswoman,
is mostly level-headed, but she’s deeply
concerned about Magz, who has an
autoimmune disorder that often leaves
her in severe pain.
Despite the excellent acting and Allen
McKelvey’s direction, the play can feel
vague at times. It needs more background
to help the audience understand why
some of characters are the way they are.
Some details seem sketchy, as do issues
like the threat of global warming.
Still, there are some lovely scenes,
especially the one in which Carlin’s Vera
talks to Leez about the specialized func-
tions of feathers she has collected.
The play went through much work after
being given a reading as part of the 2011
Global Age Project. Some more work is
needed for it to reach its full promise.
“Our Practical Heaven” will continue
at Aurora Theatre Company through
March 3. For tickets and information call
(510) 843-4822 or visit www.aurorathe-
atre.org.
See BOOK, Page 18
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Crysis 3” (Electronic Arts,
for the Xbox 360, PlayStation
3, PC, $59.99) is a gorgeous
game. Its creator, the German
studio Crytek, has lived up to
its promises that it will set a
new benchmark for computer
graphics. On a state-of-the-art
PC, it’s spectacular.
You probably don’t have a
state-of-the-art PC, but that’s
OK. I played “Crysis 3” on
Microsoft’s eight-year-old
Xbox 360, and it still looks
pretty good. If only all that
beauty was in the service of
something more interesting
than another alien bloodbath.
Actually, “Crysis 3” throws
two types of enemies at you:
the alien Ceph and the human
employees of CELL, a corpo-
ration that has built a giant
dome over the ruins of New
York City. As a supersoldier
nicknamed “Prophet,” your
‘Crysis 3’ pretty but predictable
See CRYSIS, Page 18
18
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
EXPIRES: March 28, 2013
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job is to get inside the Liberty Dome and fig-
ure out what CELL is up to.
Prophet is equipped with a “nanosuit,” a
combination of human and alien tech that has
two primary functions, armor and cloaking. If
you’re the kind of player who likes to plunge
right into firefights, you’ll keep turning on the
armor. If you’d rather avoid attracting atten-
tion from the Ceph, you can hit the cloaking
switch for temporary invisibility.
The nanosuit’s other major feature is a visor
that lets you scope out the battlefield before
you rush in, pinpointing enemies as well as
locating ammunition dumps and fresh
weapons. The visor also helps you hack
enemy systems, so you can disarm minefields
or turn turrets against their builders.
Of course, Prophet has the usual assortment
of firearms at hand, from pistols and sniper
rifles to assault weapons and missile launch-
ers. You can also pick up Ceph plasma
weapons, which are somewhat more effective
at obliterating the aliens. The silent-but-dead-
ly Predator bow is a little clunkier, but it does
let you remain cloaked even while you’re
shooting electrified arrows.
All this takes place in a New York City that
will be unrecognizable to anyone who lives
there now. Familiar neighborhoods like
Chinatown and Hell’s Kitchen are flooded or
overgrown with vegetation, and there are only
a few glimpses of landmarks like the
Brooklyn Bridge. Right in the middle of the
whole thing is a hydroelectric dam, which
makes one wonder: Why is this set in New
York?
It’s a shame, too, that the story is so cliched.
I don’t think I’m giving anything away by
revealing that there’s a connection between
CELL and the Ceph, and other plot twists are
so baldly telegraphed that the only surprise is
how long it takes the characters to figure them
out. And it wraps up with a desperately
tedious boss fight that makes some of the best
tools in Prophet’s arsenal useless.
Fortunately, “Crysis 3” comes with a robust
assortment of multiplayer games. There are
the expected variations on deathmatch, cap-
ture-the-flag and king-of-the-hill, but the real
standout is “Hunter.” It’s a clever game of
hide-and-seek in which nanosuit-clad hunters
pursue less powerful CELL guards; any guard
that gets killed joins the hunters. The suspense
is excruciating.
For fans of first-person shooters, the solid
online action may be enough to make “Crysis
3” a worthwhile purchase. If you’re a PC
gamer who wants to show off your new graph-
ics card, it’s probably essential. But if you’re
looking for a fresh approach to video-game
science fiction, you won’t find it here. Two
stars out of four.
Continued from page 17
CRYSIS
nicating and taking time to play. Each chapter
takes on a new family challenge, including
sharing meals, tackling difficult conversa-
tions, creating a more functional and com-
fortable home, and managing extended fami-
ly.
Feiler will win readers from the get-go
when he says the nearly 200 books he read by
child-rearing experts and therapists were
dated and out of touch with the reality of
modern families.
His healthy mix of enthusiasm and skepti-
cism for the solutions he uncovers instills
trust in the reader. In each chapter, Feiler test-
drives the methods he presents on his own
family. Not afraid to admit their failures, his
stories are relatable and infused with humor
and authenticity.
Feiler takes his research duties seriously,
offering many studies, references and view-
points to back up his arguments. The most
compelling groundwork is when he visits
several families and examines their homes,
joins them for meals and even attends a soc-
cer game — all to see theories put into action.
Some of the book’s best advice is simple,
yet routinely neglected by many families.
Feiler says their weekly family meetings —
modeled after sit-downs at many giant com-
panies — became the “single most impactful
idea they introduced since their kids were
born.” His family also created a mission state-
ment to sum up their priorities, goals and
dreams, and posted it in a visible spot at
home.
The chapter heading on sports, titled “Shut
Up and Cheer,” says it all. Examining this
country’s obsession with kids’ sports, Feiler
discusses the importance of parents staying
neutral and supportive, suggesting that con-
trolling, emotional parents can zap all the joy
and life lessons out of sports.
Continued from page 17
BOOK
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
CHINA’S TERRACOTTA WARRIORS
STAND GUARD AT THE ASIAN ART
MUSEUM IN SAN FRANCISCO. 8,000
soldiers in an underground city, guarding an
emperor through eternity. The First Chinese
Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259-210 B.C.), left
a rich legacy with enduring achievements,
including the unification of China under cen-
tralized imperial rule, brilliant military sys-
tems and assembly production, but his driv-
ing purpose was even greater: He sought to
conquer death. In order to achieve immortal-
ity, he built for his tomb a vast underground
city guarded by a life-size terracotta army
including 8,000 warriors, infantrymen and
horses, along with chariots and 10,000
pieces of attendant armor and weaponry. The
First Emperor envisioned a subterranean
domain that would parallel his worldly exis-
tence after his corporeal death. First
unearthed in 1974, the underground burial
complex is a revelation on par with Egypt’s
mummies and elaborate tombs. San
Francisco’s Asian Art Museum now hosts
China’s Terracotta Warriors: The First
Emperor’s Legacy, an exhibition that
includes 10 of these soldiers — the maxi-
mum number permitted outside China in a
single exhibition — along with life-size
horses, large scale chariots and 110 other
recovered items. The soldiers and horses are
displayed without glass barricades, so visi-
tors can see them up close and be amazed.
Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum,
said: “In 1994, the Asian Art Museum, then
located in Golden Gate Park, was among the
first institutions to present the terracotta war-
riors to a U.S. audience. The 2013 exhibition
offers a new generation the rare chance to
view the figures up close. Visitors will also
discover new secrets from the tomb complex,
all lending vivid detail to this fascinating
story of the First Emperor’s reign and his
quest for immortality.”
The entire first floor of the museum is ded-
icated to the exhibit. A multi-media tour may
be rented at the museum or downloaded for
free at www.asianart.org. The museum’s first-
ever iOS app offers visitors a 3-D augmented
reality experience of several of the exhibition
objects.
TAKE A WARRIOR HOME: During the
run of China’s Terracotta Warriors, the muse-
um store offers 5 foot tall terracotta figures
depicting three of the many forms found in
the burial mound. These replicas, works of art
in their own right, are created in Beijing by
the Zhang family of artisans. The clay used by
Mr. Zhang and his family is actually sourced
from the Xi’an region of China and brought to
Beijing. Huge chunks of raw coal are heated
and placed underground to create a drying
room before the kiln—fairly traditional and
very hands-on. For those who would like to
“do it themselves,” the shop has Excavation
Kits. These are great for kids, but also for
adults who want to practice their archeology
skills. Blocks of plaster encase small warriors,
it’s up to you to play archaeologist.
MUSEUM FACTS: The Asian Art
Museum is located at 200 Larkin St., San
Francisco. Museum hours are Tuesday
through Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with
extended evening hours every Thursday until
9 p.m. For information about ticket prices and
exhibition tours call (415) 581-3500 or visit
www.asianart.org. China’s Terracotta
Warriors: The First Emperor’s Legacy runs
through May 27.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjour-
nal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
The Asian Art Museum’s live ‘lost’ Chinese terracotta warrior (foreground) was reunited with
his 10 life-size cohorts at a recent press event for China’s Terracotta Warriors:The First Emperor’s
Legacy.The ‘lost warrior’had been wandering the Bay Area for the past month as the museum
made extensive use of social media to obtain the public’s help in directing him to the museum
in time for the Feb. 22 exhibit opening. One of the 2,112-year-old figures on display is seen
behind him in the museum’s main gallery.The exhibition runs through May 27.
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Reps. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., and Eliot Engel, D-N.Y.
NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
Govs. Deval Patrick, D-Mass., and Bobby Jindal, R-La.
CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
Govs. Martin O'Malley, D-Md., Bob McDonnell, R-Va., Jan
Brewer, R-Ariz., and John Hickenlooper, D-Colo.; Rep.
Tim Murphy, R-Pa.; Sens. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., and Tim
Kaine, D-Va.
CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Patrick Leahy, D-Vt.;
Gov. Daniel Malloy, D-Conn.
‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Govs. Jack Markell, D-Del., and Scott Walker, R-Wis.;
Sens. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., and Tom Coburn, R-Okla.
Sunday news shows
December that he was conducting his
own investigation. Those same records
also indicated that investigators recov-
ered more than 400 pornographic
images from a USB drive and laptop and
that Forrest, when confronted by
Sheriff’s deputies in December, tried to
kill himself on the steps of a San Mateo
church. He was placed on a psychiatric
hold but later released and had been free
from custody until surrendering Friday
morning.
The investigation into Forrest’s
alleged conduct involved several agen-
cies, with the U.S. Postal Service taking
the lead because it may have involved
material sent through the mail.
Although Forrest reportedly had hun-
dreds of illegal images, the law typically
allows a person only to be charged for
each incident of possession rather than
the total number of photographs or
videos. The Feb. 21 complaint filed by
the state Attorney General’s Office,
alleges that Forrest possessed child
pornography once on Dec. 20 and anoth-
er Dec. 21.
Following the search by federal agents
of Forrest’s office at the Youth Services
Center, he was placed on administrative
leave. Ten days later, Forrest resigned by
having a family member deliver paper-
work to the county while reportedly he
was still hospitalized.
Forrest joined the Probation
Department in 1977 and after assign-
ments, including time at the juvenile
hall, moved to adult services. He was
appointed chief in 2009 following the
retirement of former chief Loren
Buddress. The Probation Department
has a $76 million budget, approximately
400 employees and is the lead agency in
implementing state inmate realignment.
The chief is appointed by the San
Mateo County Superior Court.
Although Forrest’s case is being heard
in the local court, the state Attorney
General’s Office is prosecuting and an
outside judge will oversee proceedings.
Meanwhile, San Mateo County is
working with the Attorney General’s
Office to ensure that no images of chil-
dren in the custody or care of San Mateo
County are among the evidence, said
county spokesman Marshall Wilson.
Wilson said officials are also looking
at the criminal complaint and any other
evidence as the case progresses to see if
any further steps are necessary or if any
probation employees may have wit-
nessed any behavior that should have
been reported to authorities.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
FORREST
Californians, however, are used to
seeing a hefty price at the pump and
might be resigned to paying $4 or more
for a gallon of gas.
“We’ve done this before,” said Auto
Club spokeswoman Marie
Montgomery. “It’s definitely not good
for consumers.”
Last year, for instance, Californians
were paying more than $4 a gallon, but
there was a slower rise in prices.
Prices in Southern California now
nearly match the highest cost for a gal-
lon in the nation, which can be found
on Maui. The average price of regular
gasoline in the Los Angeles area was
$4.316 per gallon Friday; the price in
Wailuku, Hawaii, was $4.399.
The price in Los Angeles is 11.3
cents more than last week and 57 cents
higher than last month. In San Diego,
the average price is $4.285, which is an
increase of 10.2 cents from last week
and 58 cents from last month.
In San Francisco, the price is $4.22.
A week ago, it was $4.08. That price
has gone up 56 cents from a month
ago.
Montgomery said she bought gas
Thursday, and even after a discount,
she paid $4.08 per gallon.
“And I should be happy with that?”
she said, laughing. “It’s frustrating.”
Continued from page 1
GAS
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, FEB. 23
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San
Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled
eggs, pancakes, bacon, ham or
sausage and French toast will be
served. There will also be juice, coffee
or tea. $8 for adults and $5 for
children under 10. For more
information call 583-1740.
E-Waste Collection Fundraiser. 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. San Mateo High School,
506 N. Delaware St., San Mateo.
Entrance is on East Poplar Street. No
fluorescent lights or alkaline batteries.
For more information call 520-0501.
Friends of the Millbrae Library’s
Outdoor Bargain Book/Media Sale.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave., Millbrae. All adult books
will be 50 cents and children’s books
will be 25 cents. Vinyl records will also
be for sale. A bag of books will be $5
from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. For more
information call 697-7607.
America’s Sixth Annual Quilt, Craft
and Sewing Festival. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. The San Mateo Events Center,
Fiesta Hall, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San
Mateo. Come enjoy exhibits, ‘Make
and Take’ workshops and free
educational seminars. Free admission.
For more information visit
quiltcraftsew.com.
Rose Garden Work Party. 10 a.m. to
noon. San Mateo Central Park Rose
Garden. Enter at Ninth and Palm
avenues. Help apply Diestel Compost
and mulch to the beds. Bring gloves.
Coffee and snacks will be provided.
RSVP not required. For more
information visit
http://sanmateoarboretum.org.
Filoli’s 2013 Season Opening
Celebration — ‘Daffodil
Daydreams.’ 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Filoli, 86 Cañada Road, Woodside.
Enjoy the Garden’s early spring floral
display with almost a million daffodils
in bloom. Features three days of talks,
demonstrations, activities for children
and families and garden walks with
horticulturalists. Free parking. Free for
current members of Filoli. For non-
members, adults $15, seniors (ages
65 and older) $12, students (ages 5
to 17 or with valid student ID) $5,
children four and under free. Groups
rates available for groups of 12 or
more adults. For more information
call 364-8300 ext. 508.
Lunar Fest and Free Day at History
Museum. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo
County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
Activities for children inside the
museum will include making
traditional red envelopes, writing
lucky symbols in Chinese calligraphy,
making paper lanterns, learning to
use chopsticks, adding with an
abacus and playing folkloric games.
For more information call 299-0104.
Grand Re-Opening of Baskin
Robins. Noon to 4 p.m. 2107
Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City. Ribbon
cutting ceremony at 1 p.m. Come
enjoy face painting, balloon twisting,
live entertainment and free
giveaways. For more information call
780-7305.
African-American Author Program.
2 p.m. San Mateo Public Library, the
Oak Room, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information call
522-7898.
Jeffrey Jones to perform All-
Chopin program. 3 p.m.
Congregational Church of Belmont,
751 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Refreshments will be served, and a
DVD of the performance will be made
and can be ordered at the concert.
Adults $15, seniors $10, students $5.
For more information call 593-4547.
Fourth Annual Hot Rod Bunko
Event. 4 p.m. 975 Industrial Road,
Suite A, San Carlos. There will be
Bunko, dinner, a silent auction and
door prizes. The event will benefit
Redwood City Special Needs. Hosted
by Chuck and Anne Camilleri and
Golden Gate Street. Registration
deadline is Feb. 11. $50. For more
information and to register call 568-
0565.
ATaste of Terror: Mini Film Festival.
7 p.m. Sandwich Spot, 2420
Broadway, Redwood City. Hosted by
horror author William Pattison
(known as Eric Morse) and the Wolf
Pack in association with Sandwich
Spot. This charity event will help feed
homeless and elderly citizens. Short
films by Richard Powell, Shawn
Buffington and Derek Young will be
shown. There will also be a canned
food and donation drive. Proceeds
will go to the Samaritan House.
Limited Seating. For more
information go to
thesandwichspotrwc.com.
Paint the Town Black with
Guinness.7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Behan’s
Irish Pub. 1327 Broadway, Burlingame.
Free. Guinness nationwide is giving
back through a national partnership
with The Leary Firefighters
Foundation to honor, recognize and
support local heroes. At this event a
pint will be raised to toast Deputy Eric
Mertl Family Relief Fund. For more
information contact
hbaeahona@centralcountyfd.org.
The Peatot Purim Party 2013. 8 p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood
City. $20. For more information call
(877) 435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Coastal Repertory Theatre
Presents: Tomfoolery. 8 p.m. 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. Tickets are
$27-$45. This energetic music hall-
style revue features 28 of Tom
Lehrer’s wickedly witty and
sometimes naughty songs that
satirize social ills in a sassy way. The
show runs through March 2. For more
information and to purchase tickets
call 569-3266.
Pear Theatre Presents: The Apple
Never Falls. 8 p.m. Pear Avenue
Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain
View. Tickets are $10-$30. The world
premiere of this play written by Paul
Bracerman will run from Feb. 22 until
March 10, with performances every
Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 8
p.m. and every Sunday at 2 p.m. For
more information and to purchase
tickets call 254-1148.
SUNDAY, FEB. 24
Repair Cafe. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Bring your
broken households items to the
Repair Cafe and work with our Repair
Volunteers to fix them. Keep your
favorite things working and out of
our scarce landfill. Be part of the
worldwide movement to repair, not
replace. No cost except parts
purchase, if needed. For more
information email info@repaircafe-
paloalto.org.
Filoli’s 2013 Season Opening
Celebration — ‘Daffodil
Daydreams.’ 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Filoli, 86 Cañada Road, Woodside.
Enjoy the Garden’s early spring floral
display with almost a million daffodils
in bloom. Features three days of talks,
demonstrations, activities for children
and families and garden walks with
horticulturalists. Free parking. Free for
current members of Filoli. For non-
members, adults $15, seniors (ages
65 and older) $12, students (ages 5
to 17 or with valid student ID) $5,
children four and under free. Groups
rates available for groups of 12 or
more adults. For more information
call 364-8300 ext. 508.
Purim Extravaganza. 11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Wornick Jewish Day School,
800 Foster City Blvd., Foster City.
Chabad of the North Peninsula invites
the community to celebrate the
Jewish festival of Purim featuring a
magic show, bungee run, balloon
sculptor and food. $5 per person or
$15 per family. For more information
contact info@chabadnp.com.
California Rainbow Girls Celebrate
a Statewide Membership Drive. 1
p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Laurel Street Arts,
733 Laurel St., San Carlos. For girls
between the ages of 8 and 20. For
more information go to
www.gocarainbow.org.
Last Sunday Ballroom Tea Dance
with the Bob Guitierrez Band. 1
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. The San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. $5. For more
information call 616-7150.
Coastal Repertory Theatre
Presents: Tomfoolery. 2 p.m. 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. Tickets are
$27-$45. This energetic music hall-
style revue features 28 of Tom
Lehrer’s wickedly witty and
sometimes naughty songs that
satirize social ills in a sassy way. The
show runs through March 2. For more
information and to purchase tickets
call 569-3266.
Pear Theatre Presents: The Apple
Never Falls. 2 p.m. Pear Avenue
Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain
View. Tickets are $10-$30. The world
premiere of this play written by Paul
Bracerman will run from Feb. 22 until
March 10, with performances every
Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 8
p.m. and every Sunday at 2 p.m. For
more information and to purchase
tickets call 254-1148.
The Crestmont Conservatory of
Music Student Recital. 2 p.m. The
Crestmont Conservatory of Music,
2575 Flores St., San Mateo. The recital
will feature piano and cello
performances by students of
Crestmont Conservatory of Music. Free.
For more information call 574-4633.
Cowboys and Overtures. 3 p.m. First
Congregational Church of Palo Alto,
1985 Louis Road, Palo Alto.The Oxford
Street Brass concertize their way
through the American West. While
playing cowboy music from guys
such as Copland, the popular quintet
are ambushed by Overtures from
Rossini, Glinka and Von Suppe. Be
prepared for musical glimpse of the
past as they ride off into the sunset.
General admission $15. Students and
seniors $10. For more information call
856-6662.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
mammal on the planet at up to 98 feet
long — was swimming right at his boat.
As it went by, Mattusch looked down at
a blowhole that could easily fit a five-
gallon bucket, he said.
“It was just utterly amazing,” he said.
On another visit by a pilot whale, he
found himself looking into a softball-
sized eye.
“You could see all the bloodshot veins
and everything,” he said. “This is real
nature, not TV nature.”
Mattusch, who has been boating out of
Pillar Point Harbor since 1990, says the
ocean can provide some clues as to
where the underwater giants may be.
Where the salmon are, the whales, which
eat the same food, are often close by.
Birds will hover over a whale that is
about to breach the surface with a
mouthful of seafood.
Aboard the Huli Cat, which can carry
about 34 people, Mattusch used to carry
tattered folders of pictures showing the
different shapes of the ‘spouts’ each
whale makes. The silhouette of the spout
is one way he identifies the type of
whale from afar, as whale watching
boats are supposed to stay at least 100
yards from the animals.
With knowledge of how often each
whale must come up for air, Mattusch
can also determine how many whales he
is seeing. If he sees several spouts close
together, he can tell his passengers that
they are seeing not one, but a group
whales swimming next to each other.
Watching a mother-calf combination
is entertaining because the calf will “act
like a spastic teenager” alongside its
graceful mother, said Mattusch.
Gray whale migration
This time of year, gray whales are
migrating between the polar waters of
Alaska and the warm lagoons in Baja
California. This movement creates a
spectacle for eager whale watchers boat-
ing out of Half Moon Bay.
“We are on the gray whale highway,”
said Izzy Szczepaniak, a marine biolo-
gist who leads whale-watching tours for
the Bay Area-based Oceanic Society.
According to Szczepaniak, February
marks the end of the gray whale popula-
tion’s southward migration to Baja —
where breeding and birthing occur —
and also the beginnings of the migration
back to the northern feeding grounds.
“We have the opportunity to see them
going both directions,” he said.
Right now, it is not unusual to see a
couple moms and a couple calves
together, he said.
Seeing whales — a gamble
Without high-tech equipment aboard
the Salty Lady, which can hold up to 48
people, figuring out where the whales
are is often dependent upon if any other
boaters have spotted whales that day.
On a recent outing, Szczepaniak’s
group was not able catch a glimpse of a
whale. On the other hand, another group
did see a whale two days later, he said.
With or without whale sightings, the
sea provides plenty of activity, including
sea otters, sea lions, harbor porpoises
and seals.
“This is a rich area,” he said. “We can
see 35 species of marine mammals
between Point Reyes and Monterey
Bay.”
Gray whale activity in the area ends
around May, which is just when blue and
humpback whales begin to make appear-
ances.
“We are really fortunate because
where we live we can see whales all year
round,” he said.
Determining the age of a gray whale
— which has brush-like baleen instead
of teeth — can be difficult. Some scien-
tists are able to look at the layers of ear-
wax and count them like rings on a tree,
one layer per year, said Szczepaniak.
Gray whales have about the same
lifespan as humans, he said.
Continued from page 1
WHALES
Catch a boat out of Half Moon Bay:
Huli Cat
Three-hour gray whale-watching trips
through May
Humpback whale watching April
through November
For more information and
reservations visit hulicat.com, or call
(650) 726-2926.
Oceanic Society’s Salty Lady
Three-hour gray whale-watching trips
through May
Farallon Islands whale watching May
through November
For updates on recent whale sightings
and reservations visit
oceanicsociety.org, or call (415) 256-
9941.
Queen of Hearts
Gray or humpback whale watching
For information and reservations visit
fishingboat.com, or call (510) 581-
2628.
Riptide Charters
Three-hour or full day tours
For information and reservations visit
riptide.net, or call (650) 728-8433
If you go
kinds of arbitrary, automatic cuts would
have an adverse impact on families, on
teachers, on parents who are reliant on
Head Start programs, on our military
readiness, on mental health services, on
medical research,” Obama said Friday.
“This is not a smart way for us to reduce
the deficit.”
Just in case those consequences didn’t
capture the public’s attention, the White
House also had Transportation Secretary
Ray LaHood spell out the impact on
travelers, a frequent-flier nightmare of
90-minute airport waits, limited flights
and closed regional airports.
LaHood said the cuts would require
slicing more than $600 million from the
Federal Aviation Administration, result-
ing in furloughs of one day per pay peri-
od for a majority of the agency’s 47,000
employees.
“Once airlines see the potential impact
of these furloughs, we expect that they
will change their schedules and cancel
flights,” LaHood said.
Moreover, he said, the Transportation
Department is looking “to likely close”
air traffic control towers at 100 airports
that have fewer than 150,000 flight oper-
ations per year.
“We’re talking about places like Boca
Raton, Fla.; Joplin, Mo.; Hilton Head,
S.C.; and San Marcos, Texas,” he said.
All in all, nearly two-thirds of the air-
ports are concentrated in three states —
California, Florida and Texas.
In a statement, Airlines for America,
an industry group, said the organization,
the FAA and airline carriers would be
meeting soon to plan for potential cut-
backs. “Air transportation is a key driver
of our economy, and should not be used
as a political football,” the statement
said.
Paul Rinaldi, the president of the
National Air Traffic Controllers
Association, said the reductions will not
just inconvenience passengers, it will
also affect local economies and result in
more lost jobs. “The fact that they will
not just be furloughing critical FAA per-
sonnel but closing air traffic control tow-
ers means the system will be even more
compromised than anticipated,” he
added.
Throughout the administration,
agency heads have been depicting an
onerous after-effect to the cuts. The fed-
eral government is required to spell out
the consequences to federal workers, but
the details are also designed to warn
lawmakers that the cuts could have a
fearsome result: angry constituents.
Some of the warnings:
— Defense Secretary Leon Panetta
last week said that automatic cuts,
known in Washington budget language
as a sequester, would harm the readiness
of U.S. fighting forces and he said the
“vast majority” of the Defense
Department’s 800,000 civilian workers
would have to lose one day of work per
week, or 20 percent of their pay, for up
to 22 weeks, probably starting in late
April.
Continued from page 1
CUTS
COMICS/GAMES
2-23-13
friDAY’s PUZZLE sOLVED
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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12 Valhalla host
13 Chew on
14 Famous Khan
15 Bread spread
16 Wooed
18 Interior designs
20 Jobs for actors
21 Nerve network
22 Kenya’s loc.
23 Baker’s need
26 Speck of dust
30 Andy Capp’s wife
33 Conduit
34 Lake swimmer
35 Charged particles
37 Boulevard
39 Bridal notice word
40 The two of them
41 Heart chambers
43 Stomach muscles
45 Aspirin unit
48 Troll’s kin
51 Term papers
53 Made public
56 Enticement
57 Wow
58 Soft drink
59 Great Lake
60 Geog. feature
61 Mia -- of soccer
62 Fire
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1 Fireplace fuel
2 Slacker
3 Brother’s daughter
4 Stuck up
5 Execs
6 Yoko --
7 Hasty escape
8 Tower over
9 Salt’s formula
10 Type of arch
11 Rolls of money
17 Benchmarks
19 Bulrush
22 Rose oil
24 Mystiques
25 Glasgow citizen
27 Buy
28 -- kwon do
29 Compass pt.
30 Stretch the truth
31 London lav
32 Toronto’s prov.
36 Disgrace
38 Ice cream servings
42 Supermarket lanes
44 Vacation spot
46 Writer -- Ingalls Wilder
47 Song part
48 Lab weight
49 Ex-Speaker Gingrich
50 Bakery fxture
51 Party tray cheese
52 Try to locate
54 Mauna --
55 Shade tree
DiLBErT® CrOsswOrD PUZZLE
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sATUrDAY, fEBrUArY 23, 2013
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you have a bad
attitude, unplanned developments could become
overwhelming. Try to roll with the punches and hope
for the best.
AriEs (March 21-April 19) -- There is a strong
chance that you could run into one of your least
favorite people at a social gathering. If you allow
your dislike to surface, the event is likely to lose its
luster.
TAUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- A disagreement
between you and your mate could turn into
something serious if neither one of you shows a
willingness to compromise. Be the one who offers
the olive branch.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- Criticism of someone’s
work will not necessarily help enhance his or her
performance. To encourage this person, your
comments must be constructive and positive.
CAnCEr (June 21-July 22) -- If you haven’t been too
good about managing your money lately, you won’t
have the funds you need to do or buy that something
you want. Plan better for the future.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Any restrictions to which
you might be subjected are not likely to be the
fault of others, but will be a product of your own
mismanagement. Be careful where you point the
fnger of blame.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you’re too self-
involved, your efforts aren’t likely to bring you much
satisfaction today. This malady can easily be cured,
however, by putting the needs of others ahead of
your own.
LiBrA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Allowing friends to
pressure you into spending more money than
necessary could cause you to resent them instead of
yourself. You must be the one who has the willpower
to abstain.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Because you’re likely
to do everything the hard way, you may not be able
to achieve all of your objectives. Try to use your time
wisely.
sAGiTTAriUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Guard against
a tendency to anticipate negative outcomes. If you
think you might fail, you’ll make sure to fnd a way to
prove yourself right.
CAPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Do not allow
yourself to get into a situation that would put you
in a bad fnancial position with another. Don’t start
borrowing from friends if you’ll have trouble paying
them back.
AQUAriUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Be careful, because
your colleagues could have a stronger infuence over
your doings than you’d like. Their aims might not be
in harmony with yours.

COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Weekend• Feb. 23-24, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
PLUMBING -
GUARANTEED INTERVIEW
We need ENTRY LEVEL and SKILLED employees!!!
No experience? Looking for a career? Have you considered the plumbing industry?
Get paid while you train!!!!!
Already a Skilled Plumber or Drain Tech? We’re looking for you, too! We’re more
than just a rooter company.
• Uniforms, Tools, and Vehicle provided
• Top Techs can earn 60K to 80K per year
• Paid time off
• Excellent Benefits
Apply in person at Rescue Rooter:
825 Mahler Rd, Burlingame
or at www.rescuerooter.com/about/careers.aspx
EEO
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CHILDCARE/HOUSEKEEPER LIVE-IN
position (private room, bath, TV) female
only, English speaking, good salary, San
Mateo, (650)678-6737
FULL CHARGE BOOKKEEPER
Established Accounting Firm
with multiple clients,
3-5 Yrs Experience – Quickbooks, Excel
Resumes to:
Karen@tri-starfinancial.com
FAX 650-692-4201
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
150 Seeking Employment
AFFORDABLE ALTERATIONS
by Gloria, (650)281-5387
SEEKING YOUR PERSONAL HOUSE-
KEEPER? Weekly, Bi & Monthly, Per-
form Excellent work down the Peninsula.
Call Marilyn (650)638-1627
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 518808
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Piia E. Thomas, MD
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Piia E. Thomas, MD filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Lauren Jane Fetterman
Proposed name: Lauren Jane Thomas
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 28,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 02/05/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/31/2012
(Published, 02/09/13, 02/16/13,
02/23/13, 03/02/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254326
The following person is doing business
as: Divya Holistic Skin Care, 15 43rd
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Virgina
Heather McKay, 3726 Passadena Dr,
San Mateo, CA 94403. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Virgina Heather McKay /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/09/13, 02/16/13, 02/23/13, 03/02/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 519416
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ramon Avila Montejano
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Ramon Avila Montejano filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Ramon Avila Montejano,
aka Ramon M. Avila, aka Ramon Monte-
jano Avila
Proposed name: Ramon Avila
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 21,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 02/05/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/31/2012
(Published, 02/09/13, 02/16/13, 2/23/13,
03/02/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254348
The following person is doing business
as: McGraws Bar and Grill, 864 El Cami-
no Real, BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Joan
McGraw and Edward McGraw, 651 Port
Dr. Apt. 208, San Mateo, 94404 The
business is conducted by a Married Cou-
ple. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Edward McGraw /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/09/13, 02/16/13, 02/23/13, 03/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254021
The following person is doing business
as: Furry Feet Pooch Pampering, 1597
Roberta Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maria Maldonado, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Maria Maldonado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/02/13, 02/09/13, 02/19/13, 02/23/13).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIV-
EN that on Monday, March
4, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. (or
later) in the Millbrae City
Council Chamber, 621
Magnolia Ave., Millbrae,
CA, the Millbrae Planning
Commission will conduct a
public hearing on the fol-
lowing applications:
1. HOUSING ELEMENT:
CONSIDERATION of a
recommendation to the
City Council on a General
Plan Amendment to up-
date the Housing Element
portion of the Millbrae
General Plan. (Public
Hearing) City Contact: Da-
vid Petrovich (650) 259-
2341
At the time of the hearing,
all interested persons are
invited to appear and be
heard. Forfurther informa-
tion or to review the appli-
cation and exhibits, please
contact the Millbrae Com-
munity Development De-
partment 621 Magnolia
Avenue, Millbrae at (650)
259-2341; or contact the
project planner as indicat-
ed above.
If anyone wishes to appeal
any final action taken,
he/she may do so by con-
tacting the City Clerk at
(650)259-2333, to obtain
the appropriate form and
pay the corresponding fee.
A completed form must be
submitted before the end
of the appeal period stated
at the conclusion of the
hearing.
2/23/13
CNS-2449214#
SAN MATEO DAILY
JOURNAL
23 Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254342
The following person is doing business
as: Yuri Yuryev, 1140 Continentals Way,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Yuri Yur-
yev, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Yuri Yuryev /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/09/13, 02/16/13, 02/23/13, 03/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254398
The following person is doing business
as: ANB Bookeeping Services, 392 Bar-
bara Ln., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Anne Navarro Baronia, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Anne Navarro Baronia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/09/13, 02/16/13, 02/23/13, 03/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254467
The following person is doing business
as: Schrammaphonic Entertainment
Services, 667 Montezuma Dr., PACIF-
ICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Erik Schramm,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Erik Schramm /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/16/13, 02/23/13, 03/02/13, 03/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254125
The following person is doing business
as: ADD3R.com, 404 Dondee Way, PA-
CIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Lloyd Pollock,
same address and Theron Pogue, 3436
Hoppa Cir. #19, Dorrington, CA 95223.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Lloyd Pollock /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/16/13, 02/23/13, 03/02/13, 03/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254435
The following person is doing business
as: Joeyrae, 854 Laurel St., SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Joeyrae, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Allie Board /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/16/13, 02/23/13, 03/02/13, 03/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254216
The following person is doing business
as: Together Editing Press, 570 El Cami-
no Real #150-365, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94063 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Together Editing & De-
sign, CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Leslie Peters /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/16/13, 02/23/13, 03/02/13, 03/09/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254479
The following person is doing business
as: Anne Daiva Photography, 2019 Arbor
Ave., BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Anne
Kayser, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Anne Kayser/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/16/13, 02/23/13, 03/02/13, 03/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254308
The following person is doing business
as: Palo Alto York Rite Bodies, 1019
Lakeview way, EMERALD HILLS, CA
94062 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Palo Alto Commandery #47
Knights Templar, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Patrick G. Bailey /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/4/2013. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/23/13, 03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254192
The following person is doing business
as: Delights By Lisa, 25 W. 25th Ave.,
#6, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Eliza-
beth Chan, 233 Mansfield, South San
Francisco, CA 94080. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/11/2007 .
/s/ Elizabeth Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/23/13, 03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV 515576
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): ED C. DELOSREYES
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): THUN-
DERBOLT HOLDINGS LTD., LLC.,
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
203 Public Notices
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Baker Sanders, Barshay, Grossman,
Fass, Muhlstock & Neuwirth, LLC
By: Michael W. Reich, Esq., Of Counsel,
268525
(877) 741-7370
100 Garden City Plaza, Suite 500
GARDEN CITY, NY 11530
Date: (Fecha) Jul. 24, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk
R. Krill, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
February 9, 16, 23, March 2, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., (650)270-8113
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., (650)270-8113
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
MICROWAVE OVEN - Sharp, 1.5 cubic
feet, 1100 watts, one year old, SOLD!
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER - DeLonghi, 1500
watts, oil filled, almost new, $30.,
(650)315-5902
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
T.V. 19" Color3000, RCA, w/remote
SOLD!
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
298 Collectibles
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99
(650)365-3987
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80’s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
BRASS TROPHY Cup, Mounted on wal-
nut base. $35 (650)341-8342
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all SOLD!
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, SOLD!
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
DELL 17” Flat screen monitor, used 1
year $40, (650)290-1960
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
CHILDREN’S VHS Disney movies, (4),
all $30., (650)518-0813
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
300 Toys
HOBBY TABLE for Slot cars, Race cars,
or Trains 10' by 4'. SOLD!
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. SOLD!
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
VINTAGE HAND Carved mallard duck
beautiful in a decoy $55., (650)341-8342
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PANASONIC CAMCORDER- VHSC
Rarely used $60 obo, (650)341-1728
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers SOLD!
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
24
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Infect
6 Downs
10 Derisive
exclamation
13 Should have said
14 Score in a rare
way
17 “I totally had you
going!”
18 Drum, say
19 Luxury garb
21 Johnny Friendly
portrayer in “On
the Waterfront”
22 It hasn’t released
a U.S. model
since 1987
24 Edible pods
25 Make two cuts in,
maybe
27 Literary
monogram
28 Said three times,
a story shortener
29 Benefit
32 “Head and Shell”
artist
35 Former name of
the bonobo
39 Nationality suffix
40 Night time
41 Anise-flavored
apéritif
42 Some PD officers
43 Low-cost carrier
owned by
Southwest
46 Inflexibility
49 Irish omen of
death
51 Hunks
53 Eponymous
astronomer
56 Foreman’s
dramatic phrase
58 Place for a crown
59 Common
reimbursement
requirement
60 Fights
61 Korean War pres.
62 Old draft category
63 Game with a disk
operating
system?
DOWN
1 Rascals
2 Flat formation
3 Structure
damaged in a
1989 earthquake
4 Guy giving you a
pointer?
5 Fruit-ripening gas
6 Key for backups?
7 Eniwetok, for one
8 Holding
9 Quench
10 Word in many
oaths
11 Lab subject
12 “Scarborough
Fair” quartet
15 Home to
California’s
Torrey Pines Golf
Course
16 Some country folk
20 Fluid holder
23 Many a Mormon
25 Use keys
26 Beams
27 Tear
30 Skybox guest
31 Mideast capital
once called
Philadelphia
32 Fair color?
33 Iran’s Shah
Mohammad __
Pahlavi
34 McJob holder
36 Element no. 39
37 French “these”
38 Student’s
purchase
42 Night sound?
44 Nationality
suffix
45 Compass points
46 Spread with
hands
47 Fan faves
48 Insinuated
49 Under
50 2005 World
Series player
(his team’s only
appearance, and
they lost)
52 Smooth out
lumps, in a way
54 __ fee
55 While opening
57 Vocalist Sumac
By Barry C. Silk
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
02/23/13
02/23/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
lead crystal, with 24 carot guilding, model
# B8640, beautiful, $50., (650)315-5902
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE - pedastal, 42” round,
4 chairs & a leaf, $250., SOLD!
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM Cabinet (Like New),
$150 (650)593-9162
DRESSER - Medium brown, 50” x 39”,
two swinging doors plus 6 deep drawers,
$65., (650)571-5790
DRESSER 6 Drawers $20
(650)341-2397
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 6’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
304 Furniture
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $30.obo, (650)571-5790
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVESEAT - 60” length, reupholstered
appoximately 4 yrs. ago in pink & white
toile, $75., SOLD!
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, SOLD!
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 12x36”, SOLD!
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
307 Jewelry & Clothing
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SHOPSMITH, FOUR power tools and
one roll away unit $85 (650)438-4737
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
DRAFTING TABLE - 60” x 40” tilt top,
with 3 full sets of professional ruling
arms, great deal, $50. all, (650)315-5902
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CEILING FAN - 42”, color of blades
chalk, in perfect condition, $40.,
(650)349-9261
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30
(650)290-1960
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10.,SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOME WINDOW air conditioner $75.00
(650)438-4737
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JACK LALANE juicer - never used,
$20., SOLD!
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., SOLD!
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PET MATE Vari dog kennel large brand
new $99 firm 28" high 24" wide & 36"
length SOLD!
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SET OF MIRRORS (2) - 33” x 50”, no
border, plain mirrors, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VARIETY OF Christmas lights 10 sets, 2
12" reef frames, 2 1/2 dozen pine cones
all for $40 SOLD!
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
FOUND!
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WICKER DOG Bed excellent condition
34" long 26"wide and 10" deep $25
(650)341-2181
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WOOL YARN - 12 skeins, Stahlwolle,
Serenade, mauve, all $30., (650)518-
0813
X BOX with case - 4 games, all $60.,
(650)518-0813
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
25 Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BABY CLOTHES boys winter jackets
and clothes, 1 box, $20. Gina
SOLD!
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
Reversible. Outside: weatherproof tan
color. Inside: Navy plush. Zipper clo-
sure, elastic cuffs. $15 (650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WINTER coat - knee length,
size 14, rust color, $25., (650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor label.
Excellent condition. $18.00
(650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
SOLD!
MENS CLASSIC BOMBER JACKET -
Genuine cow leather, SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2011 SCATTANTE CFR SPORT ROAD-
BIKE - Carbon, Shimano hardware,
$1400 new, now $700., SOLD!
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$50.(650)368-0748.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
HEAVY PUNCHING bag stand - made
out of steel, retail $200., used, $50.,
SOLD!
KR SKATES arm and knee pads, in box,
$15 (650)515-2605
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
319 Firewood
FIREWOOD ALL KINDS- from 4” by 4”
inches to 1” by 8”. All 12” to 24” in length.
Over 1 cord. $50, (650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
Burlingame
132 Bancroft Rd.
Sunday,
Feb. 24th
8 am - Noon
322 Garage Sales
BUSINESS
MOVING SALE
Cleaning out office & showroom-
misc. cabinets, bookcases, glass
shelves, hardware, turned posts,
sample doors, L-shaped desk,
credenza, conference table,
computer desk, metal lateral file
drawer cabinet, keyboard pullout
tray, countertops segments,
wood paneling & moulding.
All priced to go- some items
will be free!
Sat., Feb 23 (9-3)&
Sun., Feb 24 (10-1)
1181 Chess Dr.,
Ste. B, Foster City
(unit faces Hwy 92)
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
DOCTOR’S OFFICE SCALE - by
Health-O-Meter, great condition, SOLD!
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMESELLERS
Find out what homes
down the street
sold for!
Free computerized list
w/pics of area home
sales and current
listing.
SanMateoHomePrices.com
Free recorded message
1-800-231-0064
ID# 1041
JM Son &Associates Lic.# 00981193
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
REDWOOD CITY - 1 bedroom, $1250.
per month, $800. deposit, RENTED!
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1993 HONDA Civic, sun roof, electric
windows, immaculate in and out, low mi-
lage, $3,400 obo, (650)368-6674
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
620 Automobiles
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVY ‘03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$18500. obo, (650)465-6056
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
‘95 HARLEY DAVIDSON very clean
bike, asking $3000, (650)291-5156
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
FORD F150 front grill - fits 2002 and
other years. $20 SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Building/Remodeling
DRAFTING SERVICES
for
Remodels, Additions,
and
New Construction
(650)343-4340
Cabinetry Cleaning
Cleaning
HOUSE CLEANING
Homes, apartments,
condos, offices.
Call
Clean Superstar
(650)576-7794
Concrete Construction
(650) 580-2566
Tacktookconstruction
@yahoo.com
26
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)280-9240
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
Housecleaning
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
FULL
HOME REPAIR
SERVICE
Painting - Interior/Exterior
Plumbing, Electrical, Flooring,
Decks, Fence, Tile, Pressure
Wash, Crown Moulding, Doors,
Windows, Roofing, and More!
Juan (650)274-8387
Henry, (650)520-4739
FREE ESTIMATES
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
FREE DUMPING
Bricks, Blocks
&Trees
(650)873-8025
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 208-9437
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE
HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
27 Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
COMING SOON!
AMAZING MASSAGE
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
Opening in March!
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND
OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
Massage Therapy
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Weekend • Feb. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
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Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
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t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY‡BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 2/28/13
WEBUY
$â0 $â0
OFF
Established 1979

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