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EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL FACULTY, LEUVEN

COURSE ASSIGNMENT 5: WORSHIP DESIGN

ADVANCED LITURGY

PROFESSOR: DR. C. Cherry

BY Filip De Cavel

HEVERLEE - LEUVEN, BELGIUM June 2012

1. INTRODUCTION
The following order of service revolves around the meeting of Jesus with two people who could not be further apart from each other than humanly possible in the time and culture of first century Israel: Jairus and the sick woman in Mark 5. He is a man, she is a woman. He is named, she remains anonymous. Jairus is a religious man, she would probably be a religious outcast because of her perpetual uncleanness. We do not know if Jairus was poor, but she was. He is assertive and meets Jesus full frontal while the woman in a very timid way approaches Jesus. There is no resemblance between them and they might have never met in real life if it was not for Jesus. In Jesus they come together because they need Him and His powers. The narrative will serve, apart from being the choice of text to preach from, as a template for our worship, in fact for our lives. We come as a united people, united in brokenness. There brokenness is expressed in them kneeling down for Jesus. The whole narrative expresses emotions of fear, hope, lostness, worship and faith. These are great ingredients for a wonderful liturgy. The narrative as it will be expressed through the liturgy will serve as a mirror to our own lives. In this way we hope to be send away with the same blessing Jesus is offering the once sick — now healed — woman...I mean ‘daughter’.

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2. PART ONE: ESSAY ON FOUR-FOLD ORDER
1.1. The Gathering The Gathering is the corporate answer to a Call to Worship of every individual believer. This individual leaves his or her house to join all the other believers. As such they become an embodied and communal reaction of those who are ‘called out’, the ekklēsia. In other words, at that point of Gathering, the church becomes the church visible by virtue of answering that call, of saying “yes” to God’s invitation.1 Two aspects are worth noting: It is called out of somewhere else and it is being called in to a space, a body. These two elements who should be part of the same coin, emphasises some important truths about the Gathering. First, it is our answer to our Creator’s renewed call of “Adam, where are you?” (Gen. 3:9). We don’t hide as a new people. The Gathering answers to God, “Here we are!”. We are called out of our hiding place to enter His hiding place (Ps. 32:7). The second aspect, the be called in, emphasis, as the Gathering progresses, the dialogue that develops between God and the worshipper.2

1 See also Constance M. Cherry, The Worship Architect : A Blueprint for Designing Culturally Relevant and Biblically Faithful Services (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2010), Kindle Electronic Edition: Chapter 4: Location 861. 2 This development from being called out, to being called in, I would argue, fits the movement from the general to the specific as pointed out by Cherry. See also Ibid., Kindle Electronic Edition, 896.

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it is a recipe prepared with love straight out of ‘grandmother's kitchen’. songs. We do what we normally do: eat and drink. But Scripture is much more then that. God has made it easy for us humans. The difference is here is the one who prepared it by way of the same biological elements as by the way he offers it as an evocation of what Christ has done for us. dependent creatures. in all fairness. We eat and drink what we like: wine and bread. but in being shaped by that Word that enters liturgy through a variations of pathways (creed.1. the reality is also that Scripture and sermon have become vehicles of theology and doctrine. 1. The Response to the Word In celebrating the Lord’s Supper.2. our imagination and our actions. do everyday: we eat and drink bread and wine together. In that symbolic moment of embodied drama we act out a response very similar to what we. exhortation. In a post-Reformational context we might applaud the reading and the listening to God’s Word. We are not so much interested in the commentary of a man or woman. It God’s story that shapes our thinking. To put it mildly unrespectful. or the Table. drama. The moment of the Word in this sense might become reduced to a moment of commentary which.…).3. 4 . The Word The context of the early churches and for that matter for the most part of its existence was one of orality. is nothing wrong with. a culture of speaking Gods word and listening to it.

The Sending As intentional the three previous parts have been prepared and experienced. so often this last part has become synonymous for the one thing that keeps us from discussing the sermon while drinking coffee. so we are send out by Him and called back to the world to take up our responsibilities as His witnesses.1. We might not end with saying “have a nice week” but in the sending there is the element of hope that through us others might have a good week. (555 words) 5 .4. As we have been called out the world and called in to the Gathering.

1977) Scripture reading: Gospel of Mark 5:21-33 Communal reading: A meditation on the Hymn of St. 1992) Response to the Word Hymn: It is not death to die (Bob Kauflin.3. 1985) Time of sharing and testimony Intercessory prayer Sending Scripture reading: Gospel of Mark 5:34-43 Chorus: What Can I Do? (Paul Baloche. 1855) Chorus: Jesus stand among us (Graham Kendrick. 2008) Benediction 6 . Patrick Antiphonal prayer Word Sermon based on the Gospel of Mark 5:21-43 Solo: Where there once was only hurt (Tommy Walker. PART TWO: ORDER OF SERVICE The Gathering Call to Worship from Isaiah 55:1-2 Greeting Chorus: The Feast is Ready to Begin (Graham Kendrick. stand among us (William Pennefather. 1989) Hymnal reading: Jesus. 2006) Silent reflection Spontaneous prayer Chorus: He is exalted (Twila Paris.

…). Proclamation. It is the only time in the Gospels Jesus is expressing a relationship to someone in this manner. Greeting. As the text of the sermon is not transcribed here I will briefly explain its main message as it will give impetus to the order of service. your faith has healed you.g. “You have a twelve year old daughter who is dying. using the word ‘daughter’. In same manner Jairus is encouraged to act likewise. It is a story of faith and hope that finds a climax in Jesus facing the woman and speaking life into her: “Daughter. It is as if Jesus is saying to Jairus. This idea of Jesus healing/raising these daughters will be the framework for this service. but this ‘daughter’ of mine has also been dying for twelve years”. In the following text I will accentuate the specific liturgical elements in bold (e.4. PART THREE: EXPLANATION Introduction The Order of Service is based on a sermon theme this writer has preached (A Tale of Two Daughters) which in turn is based on a text from the Gospel of Mark. 7 . It is the story of Jesus healing Jairus' daughter and a sick woman in Mark 5:21-43. a Call to Worship. NIV). Go in peace and be freed from your suffering” (Mk 5:34.

He offers.” closed with an appropriate festive song of thankfulness which could be introduced as complementary to the invitation from Isaiah. 2001).The Gathering (25’) The Gathering opens with a scriptural Call to Worship based on an invitation from Isaiah 55:1-2 (NIV): It is an invitation to the Thirsty. Location: 903.e.. “In Jesus. the wedding at Cana). Then the leader would go on with a greeting in a more personal form of an invitation and in welcoming manner. from the general to the specific). Kindle Electronic Edition.4 on the introductionary chant of “The Feast is Ready to Begin” (No. he proclaims this welcoming. The leader proclaims with a loud voice: Isaiah 55:1-2.g. It is a very festive and celebratory up-tempo chorus with references to other invitationaltype of biblical feast (e. So feel welcomed and greeted by our Heavenly Host. God has prepared a feast of good things for all who accept his invitation. In terms of narrative flow there are a strong invitational elements (“Come. 4 3 A variation Ibid. In terms of the main theme. the leader can highlight that God is a God of invitation. the invitation is already send out by God and became specific in Jesus (i. Even if religion. 412) in Worship Today: Songs and Hymns for the Whole Church (Spring Harvest. 8 . Come on: the feast is ready!”3 This will be the introduction to the first chorus based partially on Isaiah 55. God….. We come. sickness or mere men stops us from approaching Jesus (as with the sick woman). John 1. we thank Him. all you who are thirsty) combined with a Christological greeting in the paraphrased “In Jesus.

stand among us”. These lyrics serves two purposes. we thank You For Your love. The above spoken hymn is a prelude to the following song. they are creedal confessions of the risen Christ and our communal participation in the risen Christ. Suddenly Jesus stands among them and unites them in their brokenness for there is no other ground apart from their brokenness and His mercy to unite them. Two cultures collide with Jairus as a religious figure versus the sick woman who does not want to be noticed. A time of confession will draw us first to the Gospel reading but only up to the point in the text where the woman trembles with fear (v. fear.In this song there is a responsive and acclamation piece of praise with short statements of praise and thanksgiving by the congregation (i. It is at the same time 9 . “Jesus. As the congregation sings they can join hands at the appropriate time in the song as participatory answer to the reality of the risen Christ that unites us as well. 33). is exactly the emotion that will connect us with a time of confession. This idea of brokenness opens up space for expressing our offerings of failures. Jesus. 1989). Secondly it anticipates the tension arising in the theme texts of the Gospel of Mark where there is clearly fear and division. First. The last word of both the chorusses. The congregation answer to the above hymn with a chorus that starts with the same words. 1977). The congregation sings the chorus: The Feast is Ready to Begin (Graham Kendrick.e. When the chorus has finished the leader speaks the words of a hymn by William Pennefather (1855). The congregation sings the chorus: Jesus stand among us (Graham Kendrick. “Jesus. we thank You. for Your love”).

trembling with fear (our attitude of reverence and awe) and telling the truth (confession). The text will be recited in a more dramatic fashion with the necessary pauses. Patrick. What happens then is simple and profound: We tell Him the truth. it invites us to see ourselves in light of His presence. it will be again the word fear at the near end that will need to caught our attention but we move a step further. The leader says something like: “We come as the woman with fear and trembling. The last word is truth. the reader invites the congregation to answer with a communal reading of the following text out of David Adam’s The Cry of the Deer: Meditations on the Hymn of St. Although it will be the first time the believers will hear the text. It is important to stress that we are not left with the emotion of fear but are moved towards Jesus out of His touch and healing power. came and fell (a gesture of worship).the moment within the Gathering that will set the stage for the Word. 10 . Again the flow of the narrative of the text and the Gathering meet each other here as we prepare for confession. A lector reads Mark 5:21-33 (NIV).” After reading this Scripture and saying the above. For one. Vers 33 is pact with meaning and action that invites the believer to do just the same in this time of confession: knowing (that Jesus healed). The truth is spoken. We open our hearts. But meeting Jesus is an encounter extraordinary. Let us open our hearts by citing the following meditation. in this case not by Jesus but by the women.

The leader invites to a prayer based on Alternative Worship. There is confession of failure linked with the creedal confession of His salvation acts. although based on the need for us to approach Jesus (like Jairus and the sick woman) becomes a journey starting with an invitation to all and leading up to an encounter between Him and me. He invites us to listen with honesty and truth so we might open ourselves to Him. The theme. all who are thirsty!” The difference though with the Isaiah text is that the thirstiness becomes something personal and explained in terms of why we are thirsty (cf. Psalm 42).” 11 . ending with Him offering me water. The leader invites us now to listen to Gods Word as explained by the preacher in the following way: “Let us come to the Fountain of Life. It is an antiphonal prayer that helps to believer to come full circle in this gathering with the opening text of Isaiah 55:1-2: “Come. So here again we move from the general invitation of all people to the concrete and the personal weariness of the thirsty soul. we need to become aware.In the text above there is the same expression of knowing as seen in the life of the sick woman. In this sense the Gathering is also complete enough to stand on its own. kneel and be healed by His word. Before we listen to the Word.

Mark 5:35-43). A singer sing the solo: Where there once was only hurt (Tommy Walker. 1992). It could be suggested to adapt the song — normally brought with a ‘latin’ feel — to a more gospel-based style. The leader’s intention is to create room for ‘feeling’ the gladness of the blessed woman. This song will also bridge the Word with the Alternative Response to the Word.Word The preacher starts a ± 25 minute sermon: A Tale of Two Daughters (Jesus Heals Jairus' Daughter . Lively yet not to rhythmic. 12 . to emphatize with her thankfulness. the leader invites the congregation to listen to a song brought as a solo. At the end of the sermon the leader resumes his or her role. The leader asks the congregation to imagine as if the song is sung by the healed woman. Still part of the Word-part.

We kneel before the Healer. from the woman to us. The leader might suggest a variation by asking those who would like to respond in a prayer. This song offers a mood of silence and reflection. The following hymn is a soft song that moves away from the particular to the general. This song opens our eyes to the reality that we are all His sons and daughters. Jesus ‘daughter’. you call me Your son/daughter”.Response to the Word The leader made a transition from the Gathering — which had the emphasis on the invitation to come and be celebrative and honest in light of His presence — to the Word. on how the cross is the answer to the woman’s predicament and ours. Now the leader asks the congregation to respond before we move on in our text since the narrative has not ended yet. The Word is the story of two ‘daughters’ that invites us to join each other in our mutual brokenness. At this point in the service every part has been led by the leader. 13 . After a time of silence it would fair to expect a responsiveness in the people’s heart they would like to express. It is a meditation on the cross and more importantly. The Leader asks the congregation to be silent for a moment as they continue to read the lyrics on the screen. How should we respond? We responded initially by listening to the joy she might have experienced by listening to the solo. We are invited to offer this song as a prayer in response to the story of the healing of the woman. 2006). The leader opens the floor for spontaneous prayer. open up or end the prayer in the following way: “Lord. The congregation sings the hymn: It is not death to die (Bob Kauflin.

For the leader this an opportunity to move away from the focus on ourselves to the needs of others. If we were to be aligned in spirit with the woman. it is with a purpose: to remain strong in our faith in Him. This might open a time for testimonies and responses to these testimonies. Her life returned through the healing and the blessing. your faith has healed you. The congregation sings the chorus: He is exalted (Twila Paris. The lyrics are a resounding ‘Yes!’.This spontaneous prayer is a highly formational moment since it will internalize the emotions of the story as encountered through the meeting with and healing by Jesus into the hearts of those present. The Leader proceeds: “How did this sick woman experienced His kingship? He said to her. He is Exalted (Twila Paris). The opening mood of the song is rather flowing and has a crescendo towards the middle that exemplifies the movement from a stature of sitting down in quiet prayer to a stature of standing and praising. When all hope seems lost. ““Don’t be afraid.” The congregation is invited to sit in pairs or threes. We might be healed but other might find it difficult to come with the same expectations. just believe (v. “Daughter. 36). The others in the group can prayer for them. 14 . Go in peace and be freed from your suffering v. the leader will invite the musicians to start playing a chorus. the Lord is still there and speaks. The leader might ask the congregation to be sensitive to those who might feel like Jairus. Jairus’s daughter in the meantime died. 34). To end this time. In this more intimate context people are free to express either their story of frustration or unanswered prayers. It is this writers experience that this chorus reinforces the reality of the exalted one to Whom we pray and have prayed. 1985).” Her sending might well be Jairus’s frustration.

Fl: RELEVANT BOOKS. 2002). Give me faith to believe that You are doing more than I see right now. In itself this reading does not invite the congregation to be joyful. thank you for being in control of my destination. He tells them all to be quiet about what happened. A miracle but Jesus returns to the mundane of food. The interesting twist is that the sending is all quiet even secretive. the leader closes this time with an invitation to join the corporate setting. He prays the following: “Dear God.After a 3 till 5 minutes. How could this narrative’s ending still inspire an appropriate ending of this service? 5 21. 15 .”5 Not so much the sending of the woman is the emphasis here but the sending of Jairus. Help me to receive the new name You give me. (Lake Mary. Deeper Walk : A Relevant Devotional Series. rather silent.

in this particular song. 2008). the second verse. 16 . ‘He is risen!’ and so are you!” But before we resolve this tension we can word this tension with a song: What Can I Do? (Paul Baloche). The end. Again we answer. To combine the benediction with the prayerful nature of the story makes this sending as a revisit of our main characters a powerful remembering of where we came from. talks about God’s particular revelation in Christ and His saving grace at the cross. the leader answers with a profound “no!”. after the cross.Sending The leader starts the Sending reading the last part of the narrative: Mark 5:34-43. It questions how we can respond and the song offers the answer. “The empty grave screams it out. The leader asks the congregation to stand. But then. How can the congregation be send out with the appropriate benediction? Since both Jairus and the sick woman came to Jesus with a request — a prayer — it seems befit to end with a benediction focus on prayer. The leader confronts the congregation with this: “What does this mean for us? Shall we be quiet? Shall we who have brought back to live be silent?” It is a rhetorical question at first so the congregation can ponder before answering. It is a responsive song to His revelation. The leader speak out a benediction. “make everything a hallelujah”. His general revelation (especially verse 1). we should not be silent. Ironically. It is a Trinitarian prayer written by Richard Foster. The sending is paradoxically a not-sending. The congregation sings the chorus: What Can I Do? (Paul Baloche.

Why spend money on what is not bread.5. and you will delight in the richest of fare. It is a very festive and celebratory up-tempo chorus with references to other invitationaltype of biblical feast (e. he speaks: “In Jesus..” Then the leader would go on with a greeting in a more personal form of an invitation and in welcoming manner. come. John 1. 6 A variation on the introductionary chant of “The Feast is Ready to Begin” (No. buy and eat! Come. 17 . The Gathering opens with a scriptural Call to Worship based on an invitation from Isaiah 55:1-2 (NIV): It is an invitation to the Thirsty. The leader proclaims with a loud voice: “Come. buy wine and milk without money and without cost. PART FOUR: APPENDIX As it was asked. and you who have no money. and your labor on what does not satisfy? Listen. and eat what is good. To be able to follow the flow. listen to me. 412) in Worship Today: Songs and Hymns for the Whole Church (Spring Harvest. all you who are thirsty. part four consists of all the worship material. come to the waters. God has prepared a feast of good things for all who accept his invitation. Come on: the feast is ready!”6 This will be the introduction to the first chorus based partially on Isaiah 55.g. So feel welcomed and greeted by our Heavenly Host. I have kept the text from part three and integrated this time all the songs and prayers with the appropriate footnotes. the wedding at Cana). 2001).

we thank You. In terms of the main theme.e. God…. Jesus.” closed with an appropriate festive song of thankfulness which could be introduced as complementary to the invitation from Isaiah. We come. we thank Him. 412) in Worship Today: Songs and Hymns for the Whole Church (Spring Harvest. Kindle Electronic Edition. the leader can highlight that God is a God of invitation. the angels sing The feast is ready to begin The gates of heav'n are open wide And Jesus welcomes you inside Sing with thankfulness Songs of pur delight Come and revel in heaven's love and light Take your place at the table of the King The feast is ready to begin The feast is ready to begin Tables are laden with good things O taste the peace and joy He brings He'll fill you up with love divine He'll turn your water into wine 7 Ibid. 8 “The Feast is Ready to Begin” (No. for Your love”).e. Location: 903.In terms of narrative flow there are a strong invitational elements (“Come. Even if religion. we thank You For Your love. “Jesus. all you who are thirsty) combined with a Christological greeting in the paraphrased “In Jesus. 2001). 18 . 1989)8 The trumpets sound. sickness or mere men stops us from approaching Jesus (as with the sick woman).7 In this song there is a responsive and acclamation piece of praise with short statements of praise and thanksgiving by the congregation (i. from the general to the specific). He offers.. the invitation is already send out by God and became specific in Jesus (i. Chorus: The Feast is Ready to Begin (Graham Kendrick.

we thank You. Words: William Pennefather. they are creedal confessions of the risen Christ and our communal participation in the risen Christ. Secondly it anticipates the tension arising in the theme texts of the Gospel of Mark where there is clearly fear and division. we thank You For the good things. we thank You. Suddenly 9 “Jesus. for the good things You give to us. Two cultures collide with Jairus as a religious figure versus the sick woman who does not want to be noticed.cyberhymnal. stand among us In Thy risen power.Jesus. The congregation answer to the above hymn with a chorus that starts with the same words. stand among us”. http://www.org/htm/j/s/ jstandau. Let this time of worship Be a hallowed hour. The above hymn is a prelude to the following song. “Jesus. for Your joy Jesus. Breathe the Holy Spirit Into every heart. Bid the fears and sorrows From each soul depart. First. 19 .htm (accessed June 4. You give to us The hungry heart He satisfies Offers the poor His paradise Now hear all heav'n and earth applaud The amazing goodness of the Lord When the chorus has finished the leader speaks the words of a hymn by William Pennefather (1855):9 Jesus. we thank You For Your love. Jesus. These lyrics serves two purposes. Jesus. 2012). for Your love For Your joy. Stand Among Us”.

As the congregation sings they can join hands at the appropriate time in the song as participatory answer to the reality of the risen Christ that unites us as well. we love You.Jesus stands among them and unites them in their brokenness for there is no other ground apart from their brokenness and His mercy to unite them. Although it will be the first time the believers will hear the text. we love You. 33). fear. The text will be recited in a more dramatic fashion with the necessary pauses. it will be again the word fear at the near end that will need to caught our attention but we move a step further.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy0mW2mmLU8 (accessed June 4. 10 11 http://www. The truth is spoken. so we gather here Join our hearts in unity and take away our fear This idea of brokenness opens up space for expressing our offerings of failures. A time of confession will draw us first to the Gospel reading but only up to the point in the text where the woman trembles with fear (v. in this case not by Jesus but by the women. stand among us At the meeting of our lives Be our sweet agreement At the meeting of our eyes O Jesus. The last word of both the chorusses. 1977):10 Jesus. 20 . The last word is truth. 2012) Here the congregation will hold hands. is exactly the emotion that will connect us with a time of confession. It is at the same time the moment within the Gathering that will set the stage for the Word. so we gather here Join our hearts in unity and take away our fear So to You we're gathering Out of each and every land Christ the love between us At the joining of our hands11 O Jesus. Chorus: Jesus stand among us (Graham Kendrick.

came. ‘Who touched me?’ ” 32 But Jesus kept looking around to see who had done it. trembling with fear (our attitude of reverence and awe) and telling the truth (confession). A large crowd followed and pressed around him. It is important to stress that we are not left with the emotion of fear but are moved towards Jesus out of His touch and healing power.” 24 So Jesus went with him. A lector reads Mark 5:21-33 (NIV). she came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak. came and fell (a gesture of worship). trembling with fear (pause). 28 because she thought. I will be healed. (Pause) 33 Then the woman. a large crowd gathered around him while he was by the lake. 27 When she heard about Jesus. and when he saw Jesus. he fell at his feet. 21 . Please come and put your hands on her so that she will be healed and live. came and fell at his feet and. named Jairus. He turned around in the crowd and asked.Vers 33 is pact with meaning and action that invites the believer to do just the same in this time of confession: knowing (that Jesus healed). knowing what had happened to her. 23 He pleaded earnestly with him.” his disciples answered. 30 At once Jesus realised that power had gone out from him. “If I just touch his clothes. (Pause) 25 And a woman was there who had been subject to bleeding for twelve years. “My little daughter is dying. told him the whole truth. “and yet you can ask. “Who touched my clothes?” 31 “You see the people crowding against you. 21 When Jesus had again crossed over by boat to the other side of the lake.” 29 Immediately her bleeding stopped and she felt in her body that she was freed from her suffering. (Pause) 22 Then one of the synagogue leaders. 26 She had suffered a great deal under the care of many doctors and had spent all she had. Again the flow of the narrative of the text and the Gathering meet each other here as we prepare for confession. yet instead of getting better she grew worse.

Lord. But meeting Jesus is an encounter extraordinary. All that I cannot forgive. All that hurts and pains me. We offer our failures and frustration. walk into areas that seem to be breaking down and we know that You offer Your presence. Let us open our hearts by citing the following meditation. the reader invites the congregation to answer with a communal reading of the following text out of David Adam’s The Cry of the Deer: Meditations on the Hymn of St. Experience that peace. 42. All that I wish to forget. We offer our failures and frustration. All that hurts and pains me. All that I cannot forgive. 22 . His forgiveness and His living presence. We open our hearts. All that hurts and pains me. 1st American ed. walks with you.: Morehouse-Barlow. All that I wish to forget. Lead: ALL: Lead: ALL: ALL: 12 David Adam. (Wilton. Patrick. that He may bring peace.” After reading this Scripture and saying the above. All that I wish to forget. He walks into rooms that we thought locked indeed. What happens then is simple and profound: We tell Him the truth. Let Him walk into your past. He accepts you as you are. resurrection and life. All that I cannot forgive.The leader says something like: “We come as the woman with fear and trembling. 43. it invites us to see ourselves in light of His presence. We offer our failures and frustration. 1987). For one. We know that nothing can separate us from the love of God in Christ. The Cry of the Deer.12 Lead: ALL: Know that He was crucified and lives. Conn.

although based on the need for us to approach Jesus (like Jairus and the sick woman) becomes a journey starting with an invitation to all and leading up to an encounter between Him and me. 133-34. Psalm 42). There is confession of failure linked with the creedal confession of His salvation acts.In the text above there is the same expression of knowing as seen in the life of the sick woman.The leader invites to a prayer based on Alternative Worship. my body longs for you. come to the waters. ALL: Lead: ALL: 13 Jonny Baker. Your whole body longs for water. You are weary. all you who are thirsty. and Jenny Brown. Alternative Worship : Resources from and for the Emerging Church (Grand Rapids: Baker Books. Lead: It’s been a hot day You’ve been out in the heat Had nothing to drink And are thirsty My soul thirsts for You. all who are thirsty!” The difference though with the Isaiah text is that the thirstiness becomes something personal and explained in terms of why we are thirsty (cf. 2004). Before we listen to the Word. in a dry and weary land where there is not water. In this sense the Gathering is also complete enough to stand on its own. Come. 23 . The theme. we need to become aware. ending with Him offering me water. Doug Gay.13 It is an antiphonal prayer that helps to believer to come full circle in this gathering with the opening text of Isaiah 55:1-2: “Come. What does it feel like to be thirsty? Your mouth is dry. So here again we move from the general invitation of all people to the concrete and the personal weariness of the thirsty soul.

” 24 . He invites us to listen with honesty and truth so we might open ourselves to Him.The leader invites us now to listen to Gods Word as explained by the preacher in the following way: “Let us come to the Fountain of Life. kneel and be healed by His word.

This song will also bridge the Word with the Alternative Response to the Word. It could be suggested to adapt the song — normally brought with a ‘latin’ feel — to a more gospel-based style. Lively yet not to rhythmic. 1992):14 Where there once Was only hurt He gave His healing hand Where there once Was only pain He brought comfort Like a friend I feel the sweetness Of His love Piercing my darkness I see the bright And morning sun As it ushers in His joyful gladness You've turned my mourning Into dancing again You've lifted my sorrows And I can't stay silent I must sing 14 “Where there once was only hurt” (No. 2001).Mark 5:35-43). Still part of the Word-part.Word The preacher starts a ± 25 minute sermon: A Tale of Two Daughters (Jesus Heals Jairus' Daughter . 468) in Worship Today: Songs and Hymns for the Whole Church (Spring Harvest. At the end of the sermon the leader resumes his or her role. the leader invites the congregation to listen to a song brought as a solo. Solo: Where there once was only hurt (Tommy Walker. The leader’s intention is to create room for ‘feeling’ the gladness of the blessed woman. to emphatize with her thankfulness. 25 . The leader asks the congregation to imagine as if the song is sung by the healed woman.

For Your joy has come Where there once Was only hurt You gave Your Healing hand Where the once Was only pain You brought comfort Like a friend I feel the sweetness Of Your love Piercing my darkness I see the bright And morning sun As it ushers in Your joyful gladness Your anger lasts For a moment in time But Your favour is here And will on me for All my life time You've turned my mourning Into dancing again You've lifted my sorrows And I can't stay silent I must sing For Your joy has come 26 .

It is a meditation on the cross and more importantly.hymnary. The Word is the story of two ‘daughters’ that invites us to join each other in our mutual brokenness. The original hymnal text was written by the French speaking Swiss revival preacher and writer of hymns. We kneel before the Healer. Hymn: It is not death to die (Bob Kauflin. to leave this weary road And join the saints who dwell on high who’ve found their home with God It is not death to close the eyes long dimmed by tears And wake in joy before your throne delivered from our fears O Jesus. Bethune (1847). The following hymn is a soft song that moves away from the particular to the general.org/text/ it_is_not_death_to_die?text=2&textDefault=editor&tab=about&visited=true and http:// www. 15 This is the updated version by Bob Kauflin (Sovereign Grace Music). It is not death to fling aside this earthly dust And rise with strong and noble wing to live among the just It is not death to hear the key unlock the door That sets us free from temporal years to praise you evermore. King of grace You bore the cross in our place Though we suffer for a time We will reign with you on high And it is not death to die. 2006) 15 It is not death to die. It is adapted from a poem by George Bethune.com/watch?v=Sna3Fp4LZ9g ((accessed June 14. 2012). How should we respond? We responded initially by listening to the joy she might have experienced by listening to the solo. Malan (1787-1864) "Non. from the woman to us. 27 .youtube. Henri A.Response to the Word The leader made a transition from the Gathering — which had the emphasis on the invitation to come and be celebrative and honest in light of His presence — to the Word. translated into English by George W. Now the leader asks the congregation to respond before we move on in our text since the narrative has not ended yet. http://www. ce n'est pas mourir que d'aller vers son Dieu" (1832).C. on how the cross is the answer to the woman’s predicament and ours.

To end this time. After a time of silence it would fair to expect a responsiveness in the people’s heart they would like to express. open up or end the prayer in the following way: “Lord. This song opens our eyes to the reality that we are all His sons and daughters. At this point in the service every part has been led by the leader. The Leader asks the congregation to be silent for a moment as they continue to read the lyrics on the screen. It is this writers experience that this chorus reinforces the reality of the exalted one to Whom we pray and have prayed. The leader might suggest a variation by asking those who would like to respond in a prayer. you call me Your son/daughter”. We are invited to offer this song as a prayer in response to the story of the healing of the woman. The leader opens the floor for spontaneous prayer. The opening mood of the song is rather flowing and has a crescendo towards the middle that exemplifies the movement from a stature of sitting down in quiet prayer to a stature of standing and praising. Jesus ‘daughter’. the leader will invite the musicians to start playing a chorus. 28 . He is Exalted (Twila Paris).O Jesus. The lyrics are a resounding ‘Yes!’. This song offers a mood of silence and reflection. This spontaneous prayer is a highly formational moment since it will internalize the emotions of the story as encountered through the meeting with and healing by Jesus into the hearts of those present. King of grace You bore the cross in our place Though we suffer for a time We will reign with you on high And it is not death to die.

it is with a purpose: to remain strong in our faith in Him. 1985):16 He is exalted the King is exalted on High I will praise You He is exalted forever exalted And I will praise His name He is exalted the King is exalted on High I will praise Him He is exalted forever exalted And I will praise His name He is the Lord Forever His truth shall reign Heaven and Earth Rejoice in His holy name He is exalted the King is exalted on high He is exalted the King is exalted on high The Leader proceeds: “How did this sick woman experienced His kingship? He said to her.” Her sending might well be Jairus’s frustration. We might be healed but other might find it difficult to come with the same expectations. This might open a time for testimonies and responses to these testimonies. 34). ““Don’t be afraid.Chorus: He is exalted (Twila Paris. Her life returned through the healing and the blessing. When all hope seems lost. just believe (v. If we were to be aligned in spirit with the woman. Go in peace and be freed from your suffering v. the Lord is still there and speaks. “Daughter. 29 . For the leader this an opportunity to move away from the focus on ourselves to the needs of others. 2001). 139) in Worship Today: Songs and Hymns for the Whole Church (Spring Harvest. In this more 16 “He is exalted” (No.” The congregation is invited to sit in pairs or threes. 36). Jairus’s daughter in the meantime died. The leader might ask the congregation to be sensitive to those who might feel like Jairus. your faith has healed you.

Fl: RELEVANT BOOKS. A miracle but Jesus returns to the mundane of food. rather silent. Help me to receive the new name You give me.”17 Not so much the sending of the woman is the emphasis here but the sending of Jairus. How could this narrative’s ending still inspire an appropriate ending of this service? 17 21. Deeper Walk : A Relevant Devotional Series. 30 . thank you for being in control of my destination. The others in the group can prayer for them.intimate context people are free to express either their story of frustration or unanswered prayers. In itself this reading does not invite the congregation to be joyful. The interesting twist is that the sending is all quiet even secretive. Give me faith to believe that You are doing more than I see right now. After a 3 till 5 minutes. 2002). He prays the following: “Dear God. the leader closes this time with an invitation to join the corporate setting. (Lake Mary. He tells them all to be quiet about what happened.

His general revelation (especially verse 1). the leader answers with a profound “no!”. “The empty grave screams it out. It questions how we can respond and the song offers the answer. Ironically. Chorus: What Can I Do? (Paul Baloche. Amazing artistry across the evening sky When I feel the mystery of a distant galaxy It awes and humbles me to be loved By a God so high Chorus: What can I do but thank You. I say to you. talks about God’s particular revelation in Christ and His saving grace at the cross. after the cross. 2008): Verse 1: When I see the beauty of a sunset's glory. ‘He is risen!’ and so are you!” But before we resolve this tension we can word this tension with a song: What Can I Do? (Paul Baloche). “Talitha koum!” (which means “Little girl. 31 . At this they were completely astonished. It is a responsive song to His revelation. 42 Immediately the girl stood up and began to walk around (she was twelve years old). Again we answer. in this particular song. we should not be silent. The leader confronts the congregation with this: “What does this mean for us? Shall we be quiet? Shall we who have brought back to live be silent?” It is a rhetorical question at first so the congregation can ponder before answering. “make everything a hallelujah”. But then.Sending The leader starts the Sending reading the last part of the narrative. and told them to give her something to eat. 41 He took her by the hand and said to her. the second verse. get up!”). 43 He gave strict orders not to let anyone know about this. The sending is paradoxically a not-sending. [H]e took the child’s father and mother and the disciples who were with him. and went in where the child was.

hallelujah What can I do but praise You. — Amen.18 18 Richard J. ([San Francisco]: HarperSanFrancisco. in the name of Jesus Christ. 1992). receive the spirit of prayer. by the power of the Holy Spirit. the most precious occupation of your life. bless you and give you joy. Foster. 273-74.What can I do but give my life to You Hallelujah. And may the God of all peace strengthen you. Prayer : Finding the Heart's True Home. To combine the benediction with the prayerful nature of the story makes this sending as a revisit of our main characters a powerful remembering of where we came from. Everyday make everything I do a hallelujah A hallelujah. The leader asks the congregation to stand. 32 . It is a Trinitarian prayer written by Richard Foster. that could not hold You Now You're making all things new by the power Of Your risen life How can the congregation be send out with the appropriate benediction? Since both Jairus and the sick woman came to Jesus with a request — a prayer — it seems befit to end with a benediction focus on prayer. hallelujah Verse 2: When I hear the story of a God of mercy Who shared humanity and suffered by our side Of the cross they nailed You to. 1st ed. May it become. A Benediction May you know.

and also the interaction between all those present. took a lot of time and work. Even now I sense that I have probably missed out on some key features that might have balanced or enriched the service. But to translate the theme of a sermon to music.6. Usually my ministry is of an educational kind. To prepare and give a sermon is something that I have come to enjoy. the content be it theological. to a particular flavour with its roots in the biblical narrative. There is so much to cover. I’m grateful for the opportunity to experience once again the joy of struggling with the preparation of the liturgical context as one of the most blessed moments of the week. The latter is a skill that can not be translated to paper. The flow. musical or pastoral. 33 . It is something one learns by doing it consistently and with passion. looking back. This particular essay has been fruitful in that it stretched my thinking. Still. CONCLUSION To develop a strong and meaningful narrative by means of a Four-Fold order is a daunting task.

7831 words i .: MorehouseBarlow. [San Francisco]: HarperSanFrancisco. Grand Rapids: Baker Books. Prayer: Finding the Heart's True Home. 2002. The Worship Architect: A Blueprint for Designing Culturally Relevant and Biblically Faithful Services. Constance M. MI: Baker Academic. 1st ed. Richard J. 2010. Jonny. 1987. Doug Gay. Deeper Walk : A Relevant Devotional Series. 2004. David. 1992. Wilton. The Cry of the Deer. Baker. Grand Rapids.Bibliography Adam. 1st American ed. Fl: Relevant Books. Lake Mary. Foster. Alternative Worship: Resources from and for the Emerging Church. Conn. Cherry. and Jenny Brown.