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PITUITARY MICROADENOMA enhancement with intermixed regions of increased


• By definition, measures less than 1 cm. 75% of these and decreased signal. There is a central region of
signal void consistent with calcification. There are
lesions cause hormonal abnormalities whereas the
cystic regions within high signal intensity on T1
nonhormonally active lesions become symptomatic weighted suggesting high protein contrast. There
secondary to the size is obstructive hydrocephalus
Craniopharyngiomas
• Clinical symptoms associated with pituitary adenomas
can be visual disturbance and headaches.

• Pituitary adenomas can produce a spectrum of


hormonal abnormalities.

• Prolactin-producing adenomas are the most common,


however, but growth hormone, ACGH, and 4. SCHWANNOMA
gonadotrophic producing adenomas are also possible.
• 8-10% of all intracranial neoplasms
• Usually appears hypointense on T1 weighted images
and has a variable appearance on the T2 weighted • 60-90% of CPA (Cerebello-pontine Angle) masses
images.
• CN VIII and V origin most common,
**Amenorrhea, increased serum
prolactin
• +/- encapsulated
Pituitary Microadenoma
• Presenting age 40-60 with neuralgia, masticator
Typically, does not weakness..
enhance
• Imaging

 Hypo/iso on CT +/- Ca2+

3. CRANIOPHARYNGIOMA  Hypo or iso on T1, hyper T2—most commonly solid


• Present clinically with increased intracranial pressure, but may be cystic, necrotic, hemorrhagic
hypothalamic dysfunction, or chiasmatic compression
DDX FOR CEREBELLOPONTINE ANGLE MASS
symptoms
• Acoustic shwannomas,
• Origin: cranio from pars tuberalis, Rathke’s from pars • Meningiomas
intermedia • Epidermoids
• Arachnoid cysts
• Location: 70% intra and suprasellar, 10% suprasellar • Aneurysms
only, 10% intrasellar only
**68 y.o. with left sided hearing loss
• Age peak: 5-10 and less so at 50-60
Demonstrate a
• Most common suprasellar mass in children (50%) left

• Imaging: 80% Ca2+ in children 40% Ca2+ adults, 90%


cystic, 90% rim enhance, hyper T1/T2 (cholesterol), +/-
optic tract signal abnormality
cerebellopontine angle mass
**11 y.o. M with
worsening
headache

Heterogenous
primarily
cystic Schwannoma
appearing mass within the suprasellar cistern is
noted. These are focal regions of decreased signal
intensity, which may be secondary to calcifications.

Craniopharyngioma
There is extensive,
primarily
peripheral