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U.S.

REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE UNIFORM REGULATIONS OFFICERS , WARRANT OFFICERS AND ENLISTED MEN 1908

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE UNIFORM FOR COMMISSIONED OFFICERS, WARRANT OFFICERS, AND ENLISTED MEN OF THE REVENUE-CUTTER SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES TREASURY DEPARTMENT, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, Washington, November 10, 1908.
The following regulations shall govern the uniforms for commissioned officers, warrant officers, and enlisted men of the Revenue-Cutter Service, and shall be strictly complied with. They shall be effective January 1, 1909, and all officers and men on the active list shall be fully provided with the uniform herein prescribed not later than March 31, 1909. George B. Costelyou, Secretary.

table of contents

chapter 1. 2. 3. 4. general regulations descriptions warrant officers enlisted men 5. 12. 30. 35.

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GENERAL REGULATIONS 1. All persons belonging to the Revenue Cutter Service shall conform strictly to such regulations for uniforms as are published by the department. Every person belonging to the service is strictly forbidden to wear any uniform other than that to which his grade entitles him. No decoration received from a foreign government shall be worn. 2. (a) Medals and badges awarded to officers by the Government shall be worn with full dress and dress, and may be worn with evening dress (A), on the left breast, the tops of the ribbons forming a horizontal line between the second and third buttons of the frock coat and in a similar position on the evening dress coat. Such medals and badges will precede all badges of military societies (from wearer’s right to left) and shall be worn in place in the order of occurrence of the occasions which they respectively commemorate (from the wearer’s right to left). (b) A section of the ribbons of medals and badges awarded to officers by the Government, 5/16 inch long and of the full width of the ribbon, may be worn with the evening dress coat upon occasions when medals and badges are not to be worn, and may be worn with the blue service coat upon occasions of ceremony such as parades with enlisted men on shore; to be worn in a horizontal line in the position prescribed for medals and badges; the ribbon either to be sewn on or to be pinned on, provided no part of the metal bar or pin be visible. (c) The distinctive badges adopted by military societies of men who served in the armies and navies of the United States In the war of the Revolution, the war of 1812, the Mexican war, the war of the rebellion, and the Spanish-American war, respectively, may be worn on all occasions of ceremony by officers and enlisted men who are members of said organizations. 3. (a) Officers are forbidden to wear any part of their uniform, except the overcoat (without shoulder marks) and the boat cloak, with civilian clothes. (b) Officers on winter cruising duty (December 1 to April 1) and those serving on board vessels cruising in Bering Sea and Alaskan waters, will be permitted to wear, in the discretion of the commanding officer, when such vessels are underway, or at anchor in unfrequented places, blue woolen sweaters or blue flannel shirts under uniform service coats and fur overcoats instead of the service overcoats. A woolen or fur cap may be worn by officers under like circumstances. 4. Immediately after a vessel is put into commission and before proceeding on a cruise the commanding officer shall ascertain and report to the department whether any officer under his command is unprovided with a complete outfit of uniforms and equipments as prescribed.

COMMISSIONED OFFICERS

5. (a) The commanding officer shall prescribe daily the uniform for the officers and men under his command. (b) In orders prescribing the uniform to be worn by the commissioned officers the designations : (1) Full Dress, (2) Dress, (3) Service Dress, (4) Evening Dress (A) (5) Evening Dress (B) shall be used. (c) In designating the uniform to be worn due consideration should be given to the weather, the temperature, etc., in order that the health of the command may be preserved. Except on special occasions, the uniform for the day shall be service dress. (d) In the order fixing the uniform of the day, trousers of the same color shall be prescribed for the officers and enlisted men if practicable. This rule is not to apply to men in working clothes, 6. (a) Officers serving on Revenue Cutter service courts, or as witnesses or as prosecutors before the same, shall wear the dress uniform. On boards, and when undergoing examination for promotion, officers shall wear service dress. The president or senior member of the court may prescribe service dress with side arms in hot weather. (b) An officer on trial by a revenue cutter service court shall wear the uniform prescribed for the members of the court, except side arms. (c) Officers may dispense with the wearing of uniforms when on duty at the department or on other shore duty, except as mentioned in the preceding paragraphs of this article or as provided in the following article; but they shall at all times be provided with the complete outfit of uniforms prescribed. 7. (a) Officers on duty on board ship or at the depot of the Revenue Cutter Service shall at all times, except as provided in paragraph 8, and as herein mentioned, wear the uniform of their respective grades. (b) During the performance of such special duties as inspecting holds and overhauling machinery officers may wear overalls. (c) Swords and, in port, white gloves shall always be worn at quarters and at drills, except at “emergency drills”, when officers will be armed with a revolver, the sword being omitted. Officers reporting for duty in obedience to orders shall report to the commanding officer in service dress with side arms. 8. The uniform for Sunday muster shall be dress in port, except on the first Sunday in each month, when full dress shall be worn. Service dress, with side arms, shall be worn for Sunday muster at sea. 9. In domestic ports commanding officers will permit officers to wear civilian clothes when temporarily away from their vessels, except on occasions of official ceremony or when it may be necessary for the interests of the service to wear uniforms. Discretion must be exercised, however, in granting this privilege in foreign ports.

10. On all occasions of ceremony, when a commanding officer may deem it necessary to order the attendance of the officers under his command, he shall prescribe the uniform to be worn; he shall also prescribe the uniform on all social occasions when officers attend in a body in an official capacity. 11. The service dress shall be worn on boarding duty. 12. The uniform to be worn by the officer of the deck shall be prescribed each day by the commanding officer. 13. Officers attached to vessels of the third class, and those serving on launches, shall wear the service dress at all times while on duty on board their vessels. When occasion requires they shall wear side arms. 14. None other than white gloves shall be worn with uniform, except during inclement weather and at sea. 15. In official mourning, officers shall wear a 3-inch crepe band around the left arm above the elbow, and crepe on the sword hilt. 16. Uniform coats, except the evening dress coat, must at all times be worn completely buttoned. 17. (a) In cold weather overcoats shall be worn, when directed by the commanding officer, over any of the uniforms. When overcoats are worn, shoulder knots shall be dispensed with. (b) In foul weather, except under special circumstances, officers shall be permitted to wear rain clothes. 18. (a) Officers on the retired list may wear the uniform prescribed for officers of corresponding grade on the active list under the same restrictions as are provided in these regulations for officers on the active list. (b) An officer suspended from duty, and not on a ship or station, is prohibited from wearing any part of his uniform, except the overcoat (without shoulder marks) and the boat cloak; if on a ship or station he shall not wear side arms. 19. Officers on duty with service dress with leggings. enlisted men on shore shall wear

20. The sword belt shall be worn outside the frock coat, inside the overcoat and service coat, and underneath the evening dress waistcoat. 21. The sword shall be worn hooked up, guard to the rear, slings outside; with the overcoat it shall be worn outside, the long sling of the belt passing through the rear slit, and the short sling through the side slit of the overcoat. The sword knot shall always be worn with the sword.

22. If officers carry the revolver, the sword belt is worn outside the service coat or overcoat, the cartridge box in front and to the right of the belt buckle. The revolver is worn slightly in rear of the right hip. The canteen is carried on the right side in rear of the revolver, with its rear sling under the sword belt. The haversack is worn in rear of the left hip, with both slings under the sword belt. 23. White gloves shall always be worn with the sword except at sea. COMPOSITION OF UNIFORMS OF OFFICERS AND OCCASIONS ON WHICH THEY ARE TO BE WORN Frock coat. Shoulder knots FULL DRESS. Full dress trousers. Sword and full dress belt Medals and badges Full dress cap White gloves

Full dress shall be worn on state occasions at home and abroad; when receiving or calling officially upon the President of the United States, or the president, sovereign, or member of the royal family of any country; at ceremonies and entertainments when it is desirable to do special honor to the occasion; at general muster on the first Sunday of the month, except at sea or in inclement or hot weather; when receiving an ex-President of the United States, the Vice-President, or the Secretary of the Treasury. DRESS Frock coat Plain blue or white trousers Full dress cap Shoulder knots Sword and black leather belt White gloves Medals and badges Dress shall be worn upon the reception of an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury; a member of the President’s Cabinet other than the Secretary of the Treasury; the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States; a governor-general of islands or groups of islands occupied by the United States, the ship being within the islands of which he is governor-general; a governor of one of the States or Territories of the United States, or an island under the control of the United States, the ship being within the waters of the State, Territory, or island of which he is governor; the President of the Senate; the Speaker of the House of Representatives; committee of Congress; a diplomatic representative of the United States of or above the rank of charge d’affaires, the vessel being within the waters of the nation to which he is accredited; a military or naval officer of or above the rank of brigadier general. When making the first visit in port to commanding officers and on occasions of duty and ceremony on shore where such uniform would be appropriate. In hot weather, where offense would not thereby be given, white service dress may be substituted.

By officers serving on revenue cutter service courts, or as witnesses or as prosecutors before the same. The president or senior member of the court may prescribe service dress with side arms in hot weather. An officer on trial by a revenue-cutter service court shall wear the uniform prescribed for the members of the court, except side arms. At Sunday muster, except on the first Sunday of the month or at sea or in inclement or hot weather. Upon other occasions when prescribed by the commanding officer. SERVICE DRESS Blue or white service coat. Plain blue or white trousers. Blue or white service cap. Sword and black leather belt and white gloves, when prescribed. The white service coat shall not be worn with blue trousers. The white cap shall be worn with white trousers and may be worn with blue trousers. White shoes shall be worn with white trousers except when on duty with enlisted men under arms on shore, when black shoes shall be worn. Service dress shall be worn at all times not otherwise provided for. EVENING DRESS (A) Evening dress coat. Evening dress waistcoat, blue (white may be prescribed). Full dress trousers. Full dress cap. Shoulder knots. Sword and full dress belt Black tie. White gloves. EVENING DRESS (B) Evening dress coat. Evening dress waistcoat, blue (white may be prescribed). Plain blue trousers. Blue service cap. Black tie. Evening dress will be worn on occasions of ceremony in the evening to which officers are invited in their official capacity, such as public balls, dinners, and evening receptions. On occasions when such uniform would be appropriate evening dress (B) may be prescribed without swords or belts, in which case blue service caps shall be worn instead of full dress caps. The belt shall not be worn without the sword.

9. ‌

DESCRIPTION OF GARMENTS AND EQUIPMENTS. FROCK COAT For all commissioned officers, the frock coat shall be of dark navy-blue cloth, faced with the same, and lined with black silk serge; double-breasted, made to button to the neck, with two rows of large-size revenue-cutter service buttons on the breast, 9 in each row, the rows spaced 7 to 9 inches apart from eye to eye at top, and 3 to 5 inches at bottom; skirts to be full, beginning at the hip bone and descending four-fifths of the distance thence to the knee, with two large-size service buttons at the waist behind and one near the bottom of each fold; cuffs to be closed, without buttons; to be fitted with shoulder attachments for shoulder knots. Officers whose frock coats now have the rows of buttons spaced from 4½ to 5 inches apart at top and 2½ inches at bottom, in accordance with previous regulations, may make the change in regard to the spacing of the rows of buttons at their own convenience, but all new frock coats must conform strictly in all respects to these regulations. Standing collar, to be joined to body of coat close to neck, so that the collar shall be upright and fit the neck closely at bottom and top; to be 1 ½ to 2 inches high, corners in front to be square and hooked at the bottom and top; the collar to be covered, around the top and down the front, with gold lace, two vellums, upper edge of lace to extend to 1/8 inch from top of collar and to be brought down parallel to front edge of collar, and distant 1/8 inch there from, to where collar joins coat. The gold lace on collar will be 1/2 inch wide for officers with the rank of third lieutenant and 1 inch wide for officers above the rank of third lieutenant. Sleeve marks shall be as follows: Captain Commandant- Four stripes of gold lace, 1/2 inch wide, spaced 1/4 inch apart, lower stripe to be placed 2 inches above the edge of the cuff. Senior Captains and Engineer-in-Chief - Three stripes of gold lace, ½ inch wide, spaced 1/4 inch apart, lower stripe to be placed 2 inches above the edge of cuff. Captains and Captains of Engineers - Three stripes of gold lace, lower stripe to be ½ inch wide, placed 2 inches above the edge of the cuff; the second stripe to be ¼ inch wide, spaced ¼ inch above the lower stripe; the third stripe to be ½ inch wide, spaced ¼ inch above the second stripe. First Lieutenants, First Lieutenants of Engineers, and Constructors-Two stripes of gold lace ½ inch wide, spaced ¼ inch apart, lower stripe to be placed 2 inches above the edge of the cuff. Second Lieutenants and Second Lieutenants of Engineers- Two stripes of gold lace, lower stripe to be ½ inch wide, placed 2 inches above the edge of the cuff; the second stripe to be ¼ inch wide, spaced ½ inch above the lower stripe. Third Lieutenants and Third Lieutenants of Engineers - One stripe of gold lace, ½ inch wide, placed 2 inches above the edge of the cuff. In addition for all line officers - A gold embroidered shield, 1 inch in length, shall be set midway between the seams, ½ inch above the upper stripe of lace. No shield for Engineers.

SERVICE COAT, BLUE For all commissioned officers the service coat shall be of dark navy-blue cloth or serge, shaped to the figure, and to descend to top of inseam of trousers; a slit over each hip, extending on the right side 5 inches from the bottom of the coat, and on the left side as high as the position of the lower edge of the sword belt; single-breasted, with a “fly” front fitted with plain, fiat, black, gutta percha buttons, and to have a standing collar. The collar, edges of the coat, side seams of the back from the shoulder to the lower edge of the skirt, and edges of the hip slits to 5 inches from bottom of coat shall be trimmed with lustrous black mohair braid 1¼ inches wide, laid on flat, beside which, at a distance of 1/8 inch, with an overhand turn 3/8 Inch in diameter at each change of direction, a narrow black silk braid 1/8 inch wide shall be placed. Sleeve marks shall be the same as on frock coat. 12.

Collar devices shall be embroidered in high relief upon each side of the collar of the service coat. Each shall be 1 inch in height, with dimensions proportionate, and shall be placed, the rank device vertically, and the corps device horizontally with reference to the upper edge of the collar. The rank device shall be placed 3/4 inch from the front edge of the collar. The corps device shall be placed 3/4 inch in rear of the rear edge of the rank device. The foul anchor shall be placed with the shank parallel to the upper edge of the collar, crown to the front. Devices representing a leaf shall be placed with the axis parallel to the upper edge of the collar, stem to the front. When two bars are worn, the distance between them shall be the width of one bar. 13.

Collar devices shall be as follows: Captain Commandant—A silver embroidered spread eagle, 2 inches between the tips of the wings, having in the right talon an olive branch and in the left a bundle of arrows; an escutcheon on the breast as represented in the “Arms of the United States;” and a gold-embroidered foul anchor 1¼ inches long, with a 5/8 inch shield embroidered in silver on the shank and perpendicular to the crown of the anchor.

Senior Captains — A silver oak leaf; corps device same as for captain commandant. Captains — A gold oak leaf; corps device same as for captain commandant.

First lieutenants — Two gold bars, each ¼ inch wide; corps device same as for captain commandant.

Second lieutenants—One gold bar ¼ inch wide; corps device same as for captain commandant.

Third lieutenants commandant.

Corps

device

only,

same

as

for

captain

Engineer Officers — Same rank devices as are prescribed for line officers with whom they rank, with a corps device consisting of a gold-embroidered foul anchor 1¼ inches long, with four oak leaves embroidered in silver on the shank. Arranged in a stylized cross shape to resemble a propeller

Constructors—Same rank device as prescribed for first lieutenants; corps device, a branch of oak leaves in silver crossing a gold-embroidered foul anchor at an angle of 45 degrees, stem toward the stock of the anchor, in proportion.

Commander ( E ) Quincy B. Newman U.S.C.G. note Engineers collar device 17.

Possibly First Lieutenant Ellsworth P. Bertholf First Captain Commandant of the Coast Guard 1915 18.

SERVICE DRESS WHITE For all commissioned officers the white service coat shall be made of white linen or cotton duck, or similar material, and trimmed with white linen or cotton braid 1 ¼ inches wide. It shall be similar in cut and fit to the blue service coat, but without collar devices or sleeve marks. The white service coat shall be fitted on the shoulders for shoulder marks which shall always be worn with this coat EVENING DRESS COAT AND WAISTCOAT Coat — For all commissioned officers a body coat of dark navyblue cloth, faced with the same, and lined with black silk serge; double-breasted, cut to the figure, and to have a rolling collar; three large-size revenue-cutter service buttons on each breast, two at the waist behind and one near the bottom of each fold; cuffs closed and without buttons; sleeve marks same as on frock coat Waistcoat, blue — A waistcoat of dark navy-blue cloth, singlebreasted, rolling collar, cut to open low in front, with four small-size revenue-cutter service buttons. Waistcoat, white — To be the same as blue waistcoat, but made of white linen duck or similar material.

19.

OVERCOAT. For all commissioned officers the overcoat shall be an Ulster of dark navy-blue cloth (smooth-faced), lined with dark-blue or black material, the bottom of the skirt to be from 9 to 12 inches from the ground, double-breasted, made to button to the neck, with rolling collar of the same material as the coat and broad enough when turned up to protect the ears. Seven plain, flat, black buttons, 1¼ inches in diameter, on each front, the lower buttons to be placed as low as the knee, the others to be equally spaced up to the throat. An outside pocket in each breast, the openings to be up and down, and the lower part of the openings to be level with the elbow; an up-and-down slit over the left hip long enough to allow the short sling of the sword belt to pass through it and the sword to be hooked up (about 4 inches) ; slit to be strengthened on inside by suitable material. Overcoats shall be made full in the back and fitted with two straps let into the side seams in the back above the hips; the right strap shall have two small buttons of the overcoat pattern, about 2 inches apart, and the left strap two corresponding buttonholes the same distance apart. The rear slit of the overcoat shall extend not more than 25 inches nor less than 20 inches from the bottom of the garment and with the right flap on the outside. Sleeve marks, to indicate rank only, to consist of stripes of lustrous black braid, of the same number, width, and disposition as the gold lace stripes on sleeves of frock coat. The shoulder marks shall be worn on the overcoat at all times, except that they shall be omitted when the overcoat is worn with civilian dress. CLOAK The cloak shall be cut three-fourths of a circle, of a length to reach 2 inches below the ends of the fingers when the arms are hanging naturally by the side, and made of material and lining prescribed for overcoats; rolling collar of the same material from 3½ to 4½ inches wide; cloak to be fastened at the neck with a hook and eye and to have one frog laid on.

20.

FULL DRESS CAP For all commissioned officers, to be of dark navy-blue cloth, with three cloth welts 1/8 inch in diameter; to have a depth of 3½ Inches in front and 3 3/8 inches in back, measuring from the base of the cap; the top to be slightly oval, having a width of about 8¼ inches and length of about 9 inches for the cap size 7 1/8, with difference of 1/8 inch greater or less width and length of top for each size above or below size named; the sides to be made in four pieces, stiffened with hair-cloth and wire around crown. Between the two lower welts will be a band of gold lace 1½ inches wide, of the same character and appearance as the gold lace prescribed for full dress belt. The bottom welt will be about 1/8 inch from the base of the cap. Four black metal eyelets, two on each side, shall be placed above the band in the quarters for ventilation. A small-size revenuecutter service button shall be placed on each side beyond the ends of the visor, the eye of the button immediately above the lower welt. The chin strap will be a sliding strap of gold-wire lace ½ inch wide, backed with black leather, fastened under the buttons; strap to be drawn between the buttons, resting on the upper edge of the visor. The visor to be of black patent leather covered with dark-blue cloth, and to be of green color underneath; edge of visor to be bound; to slope down at an angle of 45 degrees from the horizontal; depth at center to be about 1 3/4 inches. Captain Commandant only: the welt around crown shall be gold braid instead of cloth. Captain Commandant — There shall be embroidered in gold on the visor, and near the front edge, oak leaves and acorns, as per pattern.

21.

Senior Captains and Captains — There shall be embroidered in gold on the visor, and near the front edge, a strip of oak leaves and acorns, as per pattern.

Engineer in Chief and Captains of Engineers — There shall be embroidered on the visor, around the front edge and close to the leather binding, a gold band ½ inch wide.

22.

The cap device for all commissioned officers shall be embroidered in high relief on the front of the cap and so placed that the tips of the eagle wings shall be 1/8 inch below the top welt of the cap. Device to consist of a gold-embroidered spread eagle, with extended wings, showing separated feathers, tips of wings 2 3/4 inches apart and on a line ¼ inch higher than head of eagle; on the breast of the eagle a shield embroidered in silver, 3/4 inch in height; the talons of the eagle to grasp the shank of a silver-embroidered foul anchor, 1 7/8 inches long; from top of head of eagle to center of shank of anchor 1 3/8 inches; all as per pattern.

New RCS Style

Old RCS Style

BLUE SERVICE CAP For all commissioned officers to be of dark navy-blue cloth, the diameter at the top to be ½ inch greater than at the base, the quarters not less than 1¼ nor more than 1½ inches high, and of the same height in front and at the back. The seam around the top shall be made without a welt and neatly stitched on each side. The band shall be 1½ inches high, with a welt 1/8 inch in diameter at the top and bottom. The bottom welt shall be 1/8 inch from the base of the cap. A band of lustrous black mohair braid, similar to that used for the trimmings of the blue service coat, shall be worn between upper and lower welts. The visor shall be of black patent leather and of green color underneath; edge of visor to be bound; to slope down at an angle of 45 degrees from the horizontal; depth at center to be about 1¾ inches. The sweat lining shall be of morocco. Four black metal eyelets, two on each side, shall be placed above the band in the quarters for ventilation. A small-size revenue-cutter service button shall be placed on each side beyond the ends of the visor, the eye of the button immediately above the lower welt. The cap device and chin strap shall be as prescribed for the full dress cap, the device being placed with the tips of the eagle wings about ¼ inch below crown seam. 23.

Captain Commandant — The top of the visor shall be covered with dark blue cloth on which shall be embroidered in gold, near the front edge, oak leaves and acorns, as per pattern.

Senior Captains and Captains — The top of the visor shall be covered with dark blue cloth on which shall be embroidered in gold, near the front edge, a strip of oak leaves and acorns, as per pattern.

24.

Engineer in Chief and Captains of Engineers — The top of the visor shall be covered with dark blue cloth on which shall be embroidered, around the front edge and close to the leather binding, a gold band ½ inch wide.

WHITE SERVICE CAP For all commissioned officers, the white service cap shall be a skeleton cap, with device, black mohair band, chin strap, visor and visor ornaments, the same as on the blue service cap, but the top and quarters of the cap made of white linen duck or similar material. FULL DRESS TROUSERS For all commissioned officers, to be of dark navy-blue cloth with a stripe of gold lace, two vellums, covering the outside seam of each leg, the lace to be of the following width: For officers with the rank of third lieutenant, ½ inch; for officers above the rank of third lieutenant, 1 inch. TROUSERS For all commissioned officers, to be of dark navy-blue cloth, or of white linen or cotton duck, or similar material; all seams to be plain. Dark navy-blue serge trousers may be worn with blue service coat made of serge. 25.

SHOULDER KNOTS For all commissioned officers, to be made of three strands of gold-wire cord 3/16 inch in diameter; to consist of a twisted strap of three loops terminating in an oval-shaped pad; to be about 5 3/4 inches long; the pad and two lower loops to be backed with plain gold-wire lace (no vellums); the knot to be slightly stiffened with a flexible backing, which will be covered with dark blue cloth. The corps and rank devices prescribed for the collar of the blue service coat, of reduced size, shall be embroidered on the gold lace in the center of the pad, the rank device toward the front, and for fastening to the coat the knot is to be provided with a strap about 1 inch wide of same material as the back covering, sewed about 3/4 inch from lower end, passing through cloth loops on coat, and secured at upper loop by small revenue-cutter service screw button; all as per pattern. SHOULDER MARKS For all commissioned officers, to be made of dark blue cloth lined with black silk, worked over an interlining of hair cloth or similar stiffening material. To be 5 to 5¼ inches long, 2 inches wide at lower end, curved inward to a point 3/4 inch from upper end, the form terminating with a triangular peak extending 3/4 inch beyond the curved sides. The corps device and insignia of rank prescribed for collar of blue service coat shall be embroidered on the field, and for fastening to the coat the mark is to be provided with a strap 1 inch wide of same material as the lining, sewed about 3/4 inch from lower end and secured at upper end by small revenue-cutter service screw button placed In center about ¼ inch below the point, all as per pattern.

First Lieutenant

First Lieutenant

26.

SWORD The sword for all commissioned officers shall be a cut-and-thrust blade, not less than 26 nor more than 32 inches long, half-basket hilt, grip white, scabbard of black leather with gilt mountings; blade etched with design as per pattern including the letters “U.S.R.C.S.” in a scroll on one side and, space for officer’s name on the other. SWORD KNOT For all commissioned officers, a strip of ½ inch gold lace 24 inches long, doubled and bearing a gold slide, the ends of the strap inserted in a tassel of 12 gold bullions 1 3/4 inches long, inclosing 5 blue bullions, and with basket-work head. FULL DRESS BELT The gold lace on full-dress belt for all officers shall be 1 ½ inches wide; to be sewed on dark-blue cloth or black morocco leather, backing to show 1/8 of an inch on each side of lace. The slinging shall be of 3/4-inch lace sewed on dark-blue cloth or black morocco leather, backing to show 1/16 inch on each side of lace. Captain Commandant, Senior Captains, and Captains, and officers of corresponding ranks — To be of plain gold lace, woven with four vellums, according to pattern. The slinging shall be of plain gold lace ¾ inch wide, woven with four vellums, according to pattern. Lieutenants and officers of corresponding ranks To be of gold lace, woven with four stripes of dark-blue silk 1/8 inch wide, according to pattern. The slinging shall be of gold lace 3/4 Inch wide, woven with four stripes of dark-blue silk 1/16 inch wide, according to pattern. BELT PLATE To be of gilt and to measure 2 3/4 inches in length and 2 inches in width. The design on the center of the plate shall be a crouching eagle perched upon the shank of an anchor lying horizontally, and encircling this design there shall be a studlink chain cable shackled to the ring of the anchor. The outer rim shall be 3/8 inch wide and be composed of oak leaves in relief, all according to pattern. BLACK LEATHER BELT For all commissioned officers the belt shall be of plain black grained or morocco leather, not less than 1 5/8 nor more than 2 inches wide, with sling straps of same, 3/4 inch wide, and with a hook to suspend the sword, all as per pattern. The belt plate shall be the same as for full dress belt.

27.

BUTTONS Buttons shall be gilt, convex, and of three sizes in exterior diameter. The large size to be 1 inch, the medium button to be ¾ inch, and small button to be ½ inch in diameter. The device shall be in bold relief and conform to pattern. The outer rim to be plain and smooth burnished, with an inner rim of rope design; in the center a perpendicular foul anchor with wooden stock, the crown and flukes resting between a laurel and oak wreath, thirteen leaves on each side, and perched upon the anchor stock, claw on each side, an eagle rising. LEGGINGS To be of the pattern supplied enlisted men in the service. SHIRTS Only plain-bosomed white shirts shall be permitted with the evening dress coat. With any coat no part of a shirt not white shall be permitted to show. COLLARS AND CUFFS Plain white standing collars and plain white cuffs shall be worn with all uniforms, except in such weather or under such circumstances as the com-manding officer may permit their omission with service dress. BLACK TIE To be of black silk or satin, not more than 36 nor less than 32 inches long, and not more than 1¼ inches nor less than ¾ inch wide, to be tied in a double bowknot GLOVES None other than white gloves shall be worn with uniform, except during inclement weather and at sea. Gloves shall be of white lisle thread. In cold weather white leather or heavy white cotton or woolen gloves may be worn. White kid gloves with white stitching may be worn with evening dress or with the frock coat. SOCKS Plain black socks shall be worn with black low shoes, and plain black or plain white socks with white low shoes. SHOES Shoes, high or low, shall be of black calfskin or patent leather, or of white canvas or buckskin. White shoes shall only be worn with white trousers. RAIN CLOTHES Rain clothes of commissioned officers shall be of black material.

28.

WARRANT OFFICERS 1. Warrant officers shall wear the prescribed uniforms at all times on board ship, and also when ashore on duty. They may wear civilian dress when on liberty or leave of absence in domestic ports. 2. The regulations relative to the wearing of uniforms for commissioned officers shall govern in the case of warrant officers whenever applicable. 3. Warrant officers to whom medals or badges have been awarded by the Government shall wear them with blue dress uniform. 4. Warrant officers serving with men under arms shall wear the service revolver belt with revolver. 5. A man rated by the commanding officer as an acting warrant officer will not be required to obtain the uniform of a warrant officer until he receives an appointment from the department, but may continue to wear the uniform of his old ratings 6. A man enlisted as an acting warrant officer will be required to obtain and wear the uniform of a warrant officer. The uniform prescribed for warrant officers shall be designated as dress or undress. BLUE DRESS Blue cloth coat Blue cloth trousers. Blue cap. White shirt. White collar and cuffs. White gloves shall be worn whenever commissioned officers are in full dress or dress uniform. WHITE White White White White White DRESS coat trousers. cap. shirt collar and cuffs.

BLUE UNDRESS Blue coat, of cloth, flannel, or serge. Blue trousers, of cloth, flannel, or serge. Blue cap. White shirt and collar, or blue flannel shirt Clothing that has been some time in service may be worn. WHITE UNDRESS Same as white dress, but clothing that has been some time in service may be worn, and cuffs may be omitted. The white coat shall not be worn with blue trousers. The white cap shall be worn with white trousers and may be worn with blue trousers. White shoes shall be worn with white trousers, except when on duty with enlisted men under arms, on shore, or when on account of the nature of the work on hand the commanding officer permits black shoes to be worn. 29.

BLUE COAT To be a sack coat of dark navy-blue cloth lined with black silk serge, shaped to the figure and to descend to top of inseam of trousers; a slit over each hip extending 5 inches from the bottom of the coat; single breasted with a fly front fitted with plain, flat, black gutta-percha buttons, and to have a standing collar. The collar edges of the coat, and edges of the hip slits shall be trimmed with lustrous black mohair braid, 1¼ inches wide, laid on flat. On each sleeve to be one stripe of flat, black mohair braid, 1 inch wide, placed 2½ inches above edge of cuff. For undress the coat may be of blue flannel or serge.

30.

COLLAR DEVICES Collar devices shall be embroidered in high relief upon each side of the collar of the blue coat. Each shall be 1 inch in height with dimensions proportionate. Collar devices shall be as follows: Master’s Mate - Two foul anchors, embroidered in gold crossed on centers of shanks, placed upon the crossing of the two anchors, a shield embroidered in silver . Boatswain - Two foul anchors crossed on center of shanks, embroidered in gold. Gunner - A flaming spherical shell, embroidered in gold, the flame vertical, above the shell. Carpenter - A chevron, point down, embroidered in gold. Machinist - A three bladed propeller wheel embroidered in gold.

WHITE COAT To be made of white linen or cotton duck, or similar material and trimmed with white linen or cotton braid 1¼ inches wide on the collar and around edges of coat and edges of hip slits. It shall be similar in cut and fit to the blue coat but without collar devices. TROUSERS To be of dark navy-blue cloth, or of white linen or cotton duck, or similar material, all seams to be plain. Trousers of dark navy-blue flannel or serge may be worn with flannel or serge coat respectively.

31.

BLUE CAP To be of dark navy-blue cloth of the same style, and dimensions as the blue service cap for commissioned officers, but the chin strap shall be ¼ inch in width. The cap device to consist of two foul anchors, each 1½ inches long, crossed on centers of shanks, embroidered in gold; placed upon the crossing of the two anchors, a shield, 3/4 inch in height, embroidered in silver.

WHITE CAP To be of same material, style and dimensions as prescribed for commissioned officers, with chin strap ¼ inch in width, and cap device as prescribed for warrant officers. OVERCOAT. To be of heavy, dark navy-blue cloth, lined with dark-blue or black material. The bottom of the skirt to reach to the knees, double-breasted, made to button to the neck, with rolling collar of same material as coat, and broad enough when turned up to protect the ears. Five large-size, plain, black gutta-percha buttons on each front, the lower buttons to be placed on a line a little below the openings of the horizontal pockets, the others to be equally spaced up to the throat An outside pocket in each breast, the openings to be vertical, the middle to be about level with the elbow. A horizontal pocket, with flap cover, to be placed in each front below the line of the waist. Overcoat to be worn completely buttoned.

32.

LEGGINGS - To be of the pattern supplied enlisted men in the service. SHIRTS With any coat no part of a shirt not white shall be permitted to show. COLLARS AND CUFFS Plain white standing collars and plain white cuffs. GLOVES None other than white gloves shall be worn by warrant officers with uniform except during Inclement weather and at sea. Gloves shall be of white lisle thread. In cold weather heavy white cotton or woolen gloves may be worn. SOCKS Plain black socks shall be worn with black low shoes, and plain black or plain white socks with white low shoes. SHOES Shoes, high or low, shall be of black calfskin or of white canvas or buckskin. White shoes shall only be worn with white trousers. RAIN CLOTHES A coat of black material extending below southwester or rubber hat, rubber boots. the knees. Black

33.

ENLISTED MEN
1. The uniforms prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury shall be worn at all times by the enlisted men of the Revenue Cutter Service, except that enlisted men may, in the discretion of the commanding officer, be permitted to wear civilian dress when on liberty or leave of absence on shore In domestic ports, but they shall be required to leave the ship and return thereto in uniform. 2. Enlisted persons shall not be permitted to keep on board ship any clothing other than uniform. 3. The particular dress for the day shall be fixed by the commanding officer, with due regard to the duty to be performed and the state of the weather. 4. The commanding officer may order working dress to be worn by the entire crew, or by individuals performing any work for which the working dress is suitable. 5. At sea, except on special occasions, undress or working dress shall be the uniform of the day. 6. In cool weather the white working dress may be worn over a suit of blue. 7. Rain clothes and rubber boots shall be worn by all men belonging to the deck watch or boats’ crews when exposed to inclement weather. 8. The watch cap may be worn at sea. It may also be worn in port on ordinary occasions during cold weather, and when refitting or coaling ship, by permission of the commanding officer. 9. Clothes made by the men themselves must conform strictly in material, pattern, and make-up to those prescribed by the regulations for uniforms. 10. Stewards, cooks, and boys shall wear white coats or jackets when at work in officers’ quarters. Stewards and cooks at work in the galley shall wear cooks’ white caps. 11. All clothes shall be fitted with neat eyelets for stops. 12. Each article of clothing must be legibly marked with the owner’s name. 13. Warrant officers and petty officers of the first class may, in warm weather, when on duty below decks, take off the coat and waistcoat 14. Boats’ crews must be neatly dressed in the uniform of the day. 15. Shoes neatly blacked shall always be worn with dress and undress except that, when the decks are wet, or in hot weather, shoes may be dispensed with on board ship. Shoes shall always be worn by the crews of running boats. 16. Knife lanyards shall be plain and of a uniform pattern. 17. Leggings shall be worn with any form of dress when under arms for in-fantry drill or for duty with a landing party. 18. Overcoats may be worn in cold weather with any of the prescribed uniforms. 19. No transfer or exchange of clothing shall be made by enlisted persons without the authority of the executive officer. 20. The hair and beard shall be kept neatly trimmed. 35. 21. White headgear shall be worn when white is prescribed for any other portion of the uniform. 22. Underclothing shall always be worn.

23. The haversack is to be worn In rear of the left hip and the canteen in rear of right hip, with cartridge belt over both haversack slings and the rear sling of the canteen. 24. Enlisted men to whom medals or badges have been awarded by the Government shall wear them with dress uniform upon occasions of ceremony. 25. A copy of these regulations shall be placed in charge of the master at arms and shall be accessible to the men at all proper times. The uniform prescribed for enlisted men shall be designated as dress (blue or white), undress (blue or white), and working dress (blue or white). Dress shall be worn on all occasions of ceremony, when going ashore on liberty, and when the commanding officer may order it; undress shall be worn on ordinary occasions; working dress shall be worn by details of men, or by individuals engaged in work for which such dress may be necessary. MASTER AT ARMS, ELECTRICIAN, SHIP’S WRITER, WHEELMAN, STEWARDS, AND COOKS. Blue dress—Blue cloth coat, blue cloth trousers (or white trousers), blue or white cap, blue waistcoat, white shirt, white collar and cuffs, and black cravat. White dress—White coat, white trousers, white cap, white shirt, white collar, and black cravat. Blue undress—Blue coat and trousers of cloth, flannel, or serge, or white trousers, blue or white cap, white shirt and collar or blue flannel shirt, black cravat. Clothing that has been some time in service may be worn. White undress—Same as white dress, but clothing that has been some time in service may be worn. Blue working dress—Same as blue undress. The blue working dress prescribed for other enlisted men may be drawn and worn in the discretion of the commanding officer during such work as may require it. White working dress—Same as white undress. The white working dress prescribed for other enlisted men may be drawn and worn in the discretion of the commanding officer during such work as may require it.

35.

FOR ALL OTHER ENLISTED MEN. Blue dress — Blue overshirt, blue cloth trousers, blue cap (or white hat), neckerchief, knife lanyard. White dress—Clean white undress jumper, white hat, neckerchief, knife lanyard. clean white trousers,

Blue undress—Blue overshirt, blue cloth or flannel trousers, blue cap, white hat or watch cap, neckerchief. Clothing that has been some time in service may be worn. White undress—Same as white dress, without knife lanyard, but clothing that has been some time in service may be worn. Blue working dress—Blue overshirt or blue working jumper, blue cloth or flannel trousers, blue cap, white hat or watch cap. Neckerchief and knife lanyard will not be worn. White working neckerchief. dress—Same as white undress, but without

The commanding officer will require each enlisted man under his command to be provided with a complete outfit of uniform clothing as set forth in the following list, making only such exceptions as are noted below, Each newly enlisted man will be required to draw his outfit by degrees, as the amount necessary for payment for his clothing becomes due him, but he shall not be compelled to expend more than 75 per cent of his pay each month in obtaining his original outfit. Nothing in these regulations is to be construed to mean that a man shall not own more uniform clothing than the outfit requires, provided he desires to do so. On southern stations where overcoats are seldom if ever worn, the overcoat may be omitted and the outfit of blue clothing and heavy underwear may be reduced in the discretion of the commanding officer. The commanding officer is also authorized on any station to use him discretion in regard to requiring the purchase of rain clothes and rubber boots, the necessity for these articles depending upon the climate and the duties of the individual man. The following articles of uniform clothing for Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, Wheelman, Stewards, and Cooks will not be asked for on clothing requisition, but will be purchased by the men as needed. They must conform strictly in material and pattern to these regulations:

36.

BLUE COAT AND WAISTCOAT. Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, and Wheelman Coat to be of dark navy blue cloth, double breasted sack pattern, rolling collar, front and back of skirt to descend to top of inseam of trousers, lined with dark blue flannel or black Italian cloth; one pocket inside right breast; outside, a pocket in the left breast and one in each front near the bottom; five medium size gilt revenue cutter service buttons on each breast, equally spaced; coat to be worn with four lower buttons buttoned. For undress, a flannel or serge coat of similar make may be worn. Waistcoat to be of same material as the coat, single breasted, without collar, cut high in front, with 6 small size gilt revenue cutter service buttons, the upper button to be not more than 4 inches below the collar button in the neck band of the shirt.

Stewards and Cooks — Coat to be of dark navy blue cloth, single breasted sack pattern, rolling collar, lined with dark blue flannel or black Italian cloth; four medium size, plain, black rubber buttons on front; a pocket in the left breast and one in each front near the bottom; front and back skirt to descend to top of inseam of trousers; coat to be worn buttoned. For undress the coat may be of flannel or serge. Waistcoat to be as prescribed for master at arms, except buttons, which shall be plain black gutta percha buttons. 37.

38.

WHITE COAT Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, Wheelman, Stewards, and Cooks — To be of bleached cotton drill of 6½ to 7 ounces, of pattern heretofore described for blue coats of the several ratings, but without lining, and pockets to be overlaid without flaps; the buttons to be medium-size gilt revenue-cutter service buttons for master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, and wheelman, and plain white buttons for stewards and cooks, held by rings in eyelets.

BLUE TROUSERS Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, Wheelman, Stewards, and Cooks — To be of dark navy-blue cloth, all seams to be plain. For undress, trousers may be of flannel or serge if worn with flannel or serge coat respectively. WHITE TROUSERS Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, Wheelman, Stewards, and Cooks — To be of bleached cotton drill, of 6 ½ to 7 ounces, cut and made up similar to blue cloth trousers. OVERCOAT Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, Wheelman, To be of heavy, dark navy-blue cloth, lined with dark-blue flannel, the bottom of the skirt to reach the knees; doublebreasted, made to button to the neck, with rolling collar, of same material as coat, and broad enough when turned up to protect the ears. Five large-size, plain, black gutta-percha buttons on each front, the lower buttons to be placed on a line a little below the openings of the horizontal pockets, the others to be equally spaced up to the throat. An outside pocket In each breast, the openings to be up and down, the middle of the openings to be about level with the elbow; a horizontal pocket, with flap cover, shall be placed in each front below the line of the waist Overcoat to be worn completely buttoned. Stewards and Cooks —furnished on clothing requisition. Same as for other enlisted men. 39.

BLUE CAP Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, Wheelman, To be of dark navy-blue cloth; band of lustrous black mohair; visor of black patent leather, bound with same, green underneath; chin strap of black patent leather, ½ inch wide, with two leather slides, fastened at sides with two small size revenue cutter service gilt buttons; two eyelet ventilating holes in each side of the quarters. The device shall be of metal, 1½ inches in height, consisting of a silver shield upon a vertical gilt foul anchor. Note - chain did not appear on the anchor until approximately 1941

Stewards and Cooks — Same as for master at arms, without cap device, except that the chin strap shall be fastened to cap with two small black buttons. WHITE CAP Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, Wheelman, Stewards, and Cooks — To be a skeleton cap similar in all respects to blue cap but made of 6½ to 7 ounce bleached drill.

40.

WHITE SHIRT, COLLAR AND CUFFS For master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards and cooks—Plain white linen or cotton shirts of ordinary pattern. Plain white collars and cuffs. CRAVAT Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, Wheelman, Stewards, and Cooks — Of black ribbed silk, not more than 36 nor less than 32 inches long and not more than 1 1/8 inches nor less than 7/8 inch wide, of uniform width, to be tied in a double bowknot RATING BADGES (Will be furnished on clothing requisition.) The rating badge shall be worn by all petty officers. It shall be worn by all petty officers of the starboard watch on the right sleeve, midway between the shoulder and elbow; by all petty officers of the port watch, on the left sleeve. It shall be worn on the blue coat and white coat of the master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, and wheelman, and on the overshirt and on the undress jumper (white) of all other petty officers. The badge as made up will cover a field 3¼ inches broad and will consist of a spread eagle, body 1 1/8 inches high from top of head to claws and 2 inches between tips of wings, resting on a bar above a specialty mark and a chevron. Masters at Arms, Electricians, Electricians First Class, Ship’s Writers, and Wheelmen will wear a chevron of three stripes ¼ inch apart with an arch of one stripe forming the arc of a circle between the ends of the upper stripe of the chevron, the outside radius of the circle being 1 7/8 inches; the specialty mark to be in the center of the field under the arch; the eagle to rest on the center of the top of the arch. The stripes will each be 3/8 inch wide, of gold lace on the blue coat and of blue cloth on the white coat. The eagle will be embroidered in gold on the blue coat and in blue on the white coat. Specialty marks for: Master at Arms, Electrician, Ship’s Writer, Wheelman Master at arms — A shield embroidered in silver on the blue coat and in blue on the white coat, to be worn vertical with the apex down. Electrician and Electrician First Class — A representation of forked lightning embroidered in silver on the blue coat and in blue on the white coat. Ship’s Writer — Two crossed quill pens embroidered in silver on the blue coat and in blue on the white coat. Wheelman — A steering wheel with eight spokes, embroidered in silver on the blue coat and in blue on the white coat

41.

For all other petty officers the eagle and specialty marks shall be embroidered in white on blue clothing and in blue on white clothing. For blue and white clothing the stripes of the chevron shall be of white cloth 1/4 inch wide, edged with scarlet cloth 1/8 inch wide. Note : Would have been US Navy rating badges with the white stripe sewn over the red stripe. The Navy didn’t change to blue chevrons on white until 1913 Signal Quartermaster and First Oiler shall wear three stripes in the chevron; all other petty officers shall wear two stripes. The specialty mark will be in the center of the field in the angle of the upper stripe, the eagle to be 1½ inches above the angle and just above the specialty mark. Specialty marks: Signal Quartermaster—Two crossed wig-wag signal flags. Assistant master at arms—A shield. Quartermaster—A steering wheel with eight spokes. First and Second Oilers—A three-bladed propeller. Coxswain—A vertical foul anchor with an arrow crossing the center of the shank of the anchor at right angles, arrow head to the front. Water Tender—A handwheel.

42.

43.

U.S. REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE 1908 RATING BADGES

Master at arms - first class

wheelman - first class 44.

U.S. REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE - 1908 RATING BADGES

ships writer - first class

electrician & electrician first class 45.

U.S. REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE - 1908 RATING BADGES

SIGNAL QUARTERMASTER

FIRST OILER

ASSISTANT MASTER AT ARMS 46. U.S. REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE - 1908 RATING BADGES

QUARTERMASTER

COXSWAIN

SECOND OILER 47. U.S. REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE - 1908 RATING BADGES

WATER TENDER ACTING PETTY OFFICERS A man rated by the commanding officer as an acting petty officer will wear the badge of that rating. A man enlisted as an acting electrician, ship’s writer, or wheelman, will be required to obtain and wear the uniform of that rating. A man who is rated by the commanding officer as an acting master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, or wheelman, will not be required to obtain the uniform of that rating until he receives a permanent rating as such from the department. He may continue to wear the uniform of his old rating, but with the rating badge of his acting rate. When the rating badge of a master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, or wheelman is worn on the overshirt, the eagle and the specialty mark shall be white, and the chevrons shall be white, edged with red, as prescribed for other petty officers; and the chevrons on undress jumper shall be white, edged with red.

48. SERVICE STRIPES To indicate service all enlisted men who have served faithfully for three consecutive years in the Revenue Cutter Service, shall

wear, as a mark of distinction, on the left sleeve on blue and white coats, and on overshirts, a diagonal half chevron 8 inches long; to be stitched on the sleeve diagonally across the outside of the forearm at an angle of 45 degrees; on coats, the lower end of the stripe to be 3 inches above the lower end of sleeve, and on overshirts to be 2 inches above the upper edge of the cuff; to be made of white cloth ¼ inch wide, edged with scarlet cloth 1/8 inch wide. An additional service stripe shall be added for each period as above prescribed, to be placed ¼ inch above other stripe.

WATCH MARKS To be worn on the overshirt and undress jumper by all enlisted men except petty officers. To consist of a strip of braid 3/8 inch wide, white on overshirts and blue on undress jumpers, placed on the shoulder seam of the sleeve and extending entirely around the arm. For firemen and coal heavers the braid to be red on both blue and white clothes and of the same width and disposition as above. Men of the starboard watch will wear the mark on the right sleeve; those of the port watch on the left sleeve. DISTINGUISHING MARK FOR BUGLER To be worn by a bugler on the other arm than that on which the watch mark is worn and half way between the shoulder and elbow. A device, worked in red silk on blue clothing and in blue silk on white clothing, representing a bugle with the mouthpiece uppermost, 2 inches in height, and With two small tassels. This device shall be worn on the overshirt and the undress jumper (white).

49. The following articles of uniform outfit for enlisted men will be supplied on clothing requisitions. Under an existing arrangement with the Navy Department these articles are obtained from that

department and are the same as worn by enlisted men of the navy. Commanding officers will see that rating badges, service stripes, and stripes on cuffs of overshirts are placed on articles issued to ships strictly in accordance with the requirements for enlisted men of the Revenue Cutter Service as prescribed in these regulations. Articles made by the men or purchased on shore must conform strictly in pattern, material, and make-up to articles issued to ships. Fancy and embroidered stitchings are prohibited. OVERSHIRT For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks. Cuffs will be trimmed around, except for 1½ to 2 Inches of the circumference of the cuff buttoned, with stripes of white linen tape 3/16 inch wide, as follows: For petty officers, seamen, and firemen, three stripes ¼ inch apart, the middle stripe to be in the center line of the cuff; for bugler, ordinary seamen, and coal heavers, two stripes ¼ inch apart, the middle line of the space between the stripes to come over the middle of the cuff; for boys, one stripe, placed over the middle line of the cuff. The stripe ends of cuffs trimmed with two or three stripes will be joined by tape of the same width.

50.

UNDRESS JUMPER (WHITE) For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks.

WORKING JUMPER (BLUE) (NOT FURNISHED ON REQUISITION) For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks. This garment is the same as the undress jumper, except that the material Is to be of blue flannel. Men may convert overshirts into this garment, removing all tape and the stars, but not the watch mark. Men will not be required to have this working jumper. BLUE TROUSERS For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks. WHITE TROUSERS For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks. OVERCOAT For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, and wheelman. The same as for master at arms, except length to be to the tips of the fingers extended, with arm hanging naturally by the side. DUNGAREES To be worn only by members of the engineer force while on duty in the engine or fire rooms. BLUE CAP For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks.

WHITE HAT For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks. WATCH CAP For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks.

51. RAIN CLOTHES AND RUBBER BOOTS For all enlisted men except members of the engineer force, stewards, and cooks. To be required, in the discretion of the

commanding officer. Only black material may be used in rain clothes, of same pattern as Cape Ann suits. Petty officers not required to go aloft or pull in boats may wear a long coat of black material extending to the knees. FLANNEL SHIRT For master at arms, stewards, and cooks electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman,

JERSEY For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks. The jersey may be worn as an outer garment from sunset until 5 a.m. During the day It may be prescribed as an outer garment for drills, exercises, or working parties, to be worn in place of or over the overshirt or jumper. It shall never be worn without an undershirt. WHITE JACKET For stewards, cooks, and mess attendants (cabin and wardroom boys) only. UNDERSHIRTS AND DRAWERS For all enlisted men. NECKERCHIEF For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks. KNIFE LANYARD For all enlisted men except master at arms, electrician, ship’s writer, wheelman, stewards, and cooks. GLOVES For all enlisted men: Woolen gloves, iron gray in color, of fast dye, of weight about 2 1/3 ounces to the pair, to be worn with overcoats on dress occasions and on liberty, and generally in cold weather. BATHING TRUNKS Shall always be worn by members of the crew who are bathing from the ship. SOCKS For all enlisted men. LEGGINGS For all enlisted men.

52. BUTTONS (NOT FURNISHED ON REQUISITION) Gilt—The same as prescribed for officers. Black—Large size 1 3/8 inches in diameter; medium size 3/4 inch;

small size 5/8 inch. White (for stewards’ and cooks’ white coats, and for white jackets of mess attendants)—To be plain, 3/4 inch in diameter, with shank and ring. CAP RIBBON To be a black silk ribbon 1½ inches wide. The name of the vessel to which the wearer is attached, in plain block letters, ½ inch in height, preceded by the letters USRC, to be woven in gold thread through the ribbon.

MARKING CLOTHING Every article of clothing belonging to enlisted men shall be plainly marked with the owner’s name, using black paint in marking white clothes and white paint in marking blue clothes, as follows: Blankets—All the right-hand corners, 4 inches from each edge. Cloth cap—Inside crown. Drawers—On the outside of the right half waistband. Dungaree trousers.—Same as blue trousers. Jerseys—Same as undershirts. Jumpers—On the inside, on the hem, across the center line of the front, and to the right of the center line of the back; also on the underside of the collar. Leggings—Inside on centerpiece 3 inches from and parallel to top. Mattress—In center, 4 inches from each end. Mattress cover—Right corners, 4 Inches from open end. Neckerchief—In center. Overcoat—On lining, each side of split of tail, 3 Inches from and parallel to bottom. Overshirts—On the outside of front and on the inside of back, both marks being placed 1 inch from the bottom of the shirt, the former across the center line; also on the underside of the collar. Rain clothes—Same as dungarees. Particular care will be taken that rain clothes are kept distinctly marked. Rubber boots—Inside near the top. Shoes—Inside near the top. Socks—On leg near top. Trousers—On the inside of the back of both legs close to bottom hem. Undershirts—On the outside of the front 1 inch from the bottom of the shirt and to the right of the center. Watch cap—Inside, 1/2 inch from bottom. White hat—On the sweatband. 53.

REVENUE CUTTER CREW 1908 - 1910 1st LT. ( 3rd from left bottom row ) is wearing the pre -1908 button pattern on the Frock Coat. Must have had the collar converted to standing collar vs rolling collar. Shows 2 Petty Officers of the First Class & 3 Warrant Officers.

US Revenue Cutter TAHOMA 1914 54.

Worth G. Ross First Captain Commandant U.S. Revenue Cutter Service 55.