North Maine Woods

welcome
On behalf of the many families, private corporations, conservation
organizations and managers of state owned land, we welcome you to this
special region of Maine. We’re proud of the history of this remote region
and our ability to keep this area open for public enjoyment. In addition to
providing remote recreational opportunities, this region is also the “wood
basket” that supports our natural resource based economy of Maine.
This booklet is designed to help you have a safe and enjoyable trip to the
area, plus provide you with important information about
forest resource management and recreational use.
inside Katahdin Ironworks Jo-Mary Multiple Use Forest
Regulations......... p6 Information......... p10 Campsite Listing......... p11 Map......... p12-13
2012 $3
experience the tradition
RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT
Under 15 .............................................................Free Day Use & Camping
Age 70 and Over ..............................................Free Day Use
Per Person Per Day ..........................................................$6 ................... $10
Camping Per Night .........................................................$8 ................... $10
Annual Day Use Registration.......................................$75 ................ N/A
Annual Unlimited Camping .........................................$175 .............. N/A
Camping Only Annual Pass ..........................................$100 .............. $100
Special Reduced Seasonal Rates
Summer season is from May 1 to September 30. Fall season is from
August 20 to November 30. Either summer or fall passes are valid
between August 20 and September 30.
Seasonal Day Use Pass ...................................................$50 ................ $90
Seasonal Unlimited Camping .....................................$110 .............. $150
Seasonal Unlimited Family Camping .......................$220 .............. N/A
Family camping allows 2 adults
and their children between 15 and 21
to camp for the season price of 2 adults.
Camping Only Seasonal Pass ......................................$60 ................ $60
Commercial Sporting Camp Visitors.........................$20 ................ $30
Per trip, for any trip over 3 days
Leaseholders and Internal Landowners of Record .....$40 ................ $40
May purchase 2 annual passes through the NMW ofce
Guest Passes for Leaseholders ....................................$60 ................ $60
May purchase up to 8 annual passes through the NMW ofce
Visiting Paticipating Businesses .................................$1 ................... $1
for meals and supplies, up to four hours limit
For Allagash Wilderness Waterway fees, see page 17 in this brochure.
For Penobscot River Corridor fees, see page 22.
2012 Visitor Fees
Visitors traveling by vehicle will pass through one of the following
checkpoints. Please refer to the map in the center of this publication
for locations.
NMW Checkpoints
Allagash 5am-9pm daily
Caribou 6am-9pm daily
Dickey 5am-9pm daily
Fish River 6am-9pm daily
Little Black 5am-9pm daily
Oxbow 6am-9pm daily
Six-Mile 5:30am-9:30pm daily
St. Francis 5am-9pm daily
Telos 6am-9pm daily
Twenty-Mile 5am-9pm daily
Canadian Border Checkpoints
Estcourt (register at gas station/gaz bar) 7am-5pm Mon-Fri
US Customs 1-418-859-2501
Canadian Customs 1-418-859-2201
St. Pamphile 1-418-356-2411 7am-5pm Mon-Fri
US Customs 1-418-356-3222
Canadian Customs 1-418-356-3151
St. Juste 1-418-244-3646 7am-5pm Mon-Fri
US Customs 1-418-244-3026
Canadian Customs 1-418-244-3653
St. Aurelie 1-418-593-3426 6am-5pm Mon-Thu
US Customs 1-418-593-3582 6am-4pm Friday
Canadian Customs 1-418-593-3971
The schedule of operation for Canadian border checkpoints and both
U. S. and Canadian Customs ofces are subject to change at any time,
so it is advised that you call the number listed for the crossing you
intend to use for current information. U.S. Customs ofces are closed
during New Year’s Day, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence
Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veteran’s Day and Thanksgiving.
U.S. citizens are required to have a U.S. Passport or U.S. Passport Card
to enter the U.S. Other travelers will need NEXUS, FAST, or SENTRI
identifcation. By Federal Law PL 99-570, there is a $5,000 fne for a
frst time ofense of entering Maine without proper permission, plus
an additional fne of $1,000 per person involved. This includes entry
by foot or by water.
page two | www.northmainewoods.org
Checkpoint Hours of Operation
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Use of New Technology Assists NMW Mission while
Reducing Costs and Helping to Keep Visitor Fees Stable
If you arrived at one of our stafed checkpoints after daily operating hours
or entered through one of the unstafed electronic gates last season, you
are aware that we have been making some signifcant adjustments in
the way we operate. These changes have been implemented so we can
continue our mission of keeping the area open to public use by protect-
ing property through managing access. We are doing this with the use
of motion sensitive cameras, satellite internet service and telecommu-
nications at some entry
points. Supplementing
people with technol-
ogy has been occurring
at many businesses in
order to improve oper-
ations and to maintain
or reduce operating
costs. NMW has been
going through a similar
transition.
Night Time Entry and Motion Detection Cameras
Up until 2009, we stafed some checkpoints 24 hours a day seven days a
week- 6 Mile Checkpoint on the American Realty Road, Telos Checkpoint
and Caribou Checkpoint on the Golden Road. In 2009 we did not fll the
night shift employee positions, but instead installed motion sensitive
lights, live time recording cameras and satellite internet service. This al-
lowed us to monitor trafc between 9 PM and 6 AM for the above check-
points, plus Fish River and Dickey, from our Ashland ofce.
Camera images are sent via satellite internet to a central control room in
our Ashland ofce where one person watches all nighttime trafc. Tele-
phone communication is available at all locations which allows visitors
to call our ofce at night to register and enter or leave NMW or get as-
sistance in case of an emergency. Although this system may not be as
convenient as having someone at the checkpoints, it is less expensive
and so reduces the need to increase fees paid by visitors. With cameras
recording trafc 24 hours a day seven days a week, it also helps us keep
track of who is traveling in and out of the area should we have theft or
vandalism problems.
Automated gates
As a non- proft organization, North Maine Woods operates on a break
even basis. The amount charged for overnight camping is directly re-
lated to costs NMW incurs for maintaining campsites. The same is true
for the amount charged for day use. Day use fees ofset costs for operat-
ing checkpoints which allow access into the NMW region. In an efort to
continue to allow access while keeping user fees low, we have installed
a number of automated, unstafed gates in recent years which is a more
cost efective way to manage access.
Visitors entering the North Maine Woods on some low trafc access
roads may encounter automated, electronic gates. These gates are not
stafed, but have instructional signs, motion sensitive video cameras
and a telephone located in a small building next to the road. Signs in-
struct visitors to call the number provided which will connect them to
one of our employees who will help them self register and pay appro-
priate fees. Once this process is complete, permission will be granted
to enter. If someone wants to enter or leave NMW via one of the auto-
mated gates, it will simplify the process if they pre-register at a stafed
checkpoint or have season passes, L Passes or Guest Passes with them.
NMW staf monitors trafc at these locations 24 hours a day, seven days
a week and the cameras record all video for the year at each location.
Dickey Checkpoint was the frst to be automated in 2005 and, following
several years of successful operation, more have been added at other
locations. In 2009, Seboomook Dam and Northeast Carry automated
gates were installed on roads leading into North Maine Woods from
Seboomook Township north of Rockwood.
In 2011, another automated checkpoint was installed on the so-called
Kelly Dam Road which enters the North Maine Woods from Route 201
a few miles north of Jackman. We encourage visitors to pre-register at
Bishop’s Store in Jackman prior to heading into the Kelly Dam Road as
pre-registering will streamline the process and reduce time required to
go through this process over the telephone at the automated gate site.
Visitors can expect to encounter additional conversions in the future as
we improve the operational aspects of the equipment and as road sys-
tems change along the NMW boundary.
Al Cowperthwaite, Executive Director
www.northmainewoods.org | page three
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Dickey Checkpoint
photo by Peter Freeman
page four | www.northmainewoods.org
History
In the early 1970s, user fees were initiated to help landowners recover part
of the management costs related to accommodating public visitors to their
lands. Before the North Maine Woods (NMW) organization was created, sep-
arate landowners had their own regulations and fee schedules for use of their
lands. Travelers might have passed through two or three checkpoints to get to
their destinations and paid separate fees on each stop.
In 1971, with the agreement between landowners to form NMW, a day use sea-
son registration for Maine residents was set at $2. Landowners also imposed a
self assessment to fund the start up the North Maine Woods program.
The self assessment share was based on the owner’s percentage of acres with-
in the designated North Maine Woods area. During the period between 1971
and 1986, these assessments amounted to nearly three quarters of a million
dollars. Since then, increased usage, prudent management and modest fee
increases have allowed the program to become self sufcient.
Although annual assessments have ceased, landowners still absorb many
costs. They provide staf time on the various operating commitees; donate
professional services of draftsmen, soil evaluators, and others; donate use of
construction equipment; and maintain thousands of miles of roads which re-
ceive wear and tear from public travel.
For more than 40 years, steps have been made to increase visitor comfort and
satisfaction with the facilities. Improvements made in the campsite program
include beter maintenance of campsites along with the creation of new ones.
Public communications, identifed as a shortcoming, has been addressed with
NMW’s own publications as well as articles in other publications, to enable
our visitors to beter understand our goals and objectives.
Visitor use has always occurred without any advertising by NMW, and this
is thought to be due, in part, to the favorable experiences of our recreational
users spreading the word after returning home from their visits.
Additional use is not promoted because the area is not like a park, commercial
campground or other area designated specifcally for recreational use. This
benefts users by keeping the NMW from geting overcrowded.
All visitors help defray operating costs. Even the landowners and their staf
members pay the regular user fees when visiting the area for recreation.
NMW staf also pay their own camping fees.
NMW History and User Fees
Purpose
Fees for each activity pay for the management of that activity.
In general, all day use fee collections ofset costs for operating the
checkpoint facilities. Receptionists are available at convenient times
for visitors to enter the area. Guidance, brochures and information are
provided. Trash bags are provided to help control liter in the area.
Receptionists also assist parties with emergencies and provide infor-
mation to game wardens looking for sportsmen to relay emergency
messages from home.
Camping fees collected are dedicated to maintaining and developing
facilities used by campers. Our travel costs are similar to those of visi-
tors. If all 300+ campsites were located on 20 acres as with most camp-
grounds, NMW camping fees would be lower. Staf frequently travel
30 to 40 miles between campsites.
Fees from the bear bait site management program are dedicated in
part to managing this program. NMW staf works with wildlife bi-
ologists, game wardens, landowner foresters, guides and hunters to
manage the locations of bait sites to minimize conficts in our working
forest.
Management contracts established over the years with the Allagash
Wilderness Waterway, the Bureau of Parks and Lands, Jo-Mary Camp-
ground, and members of the KI Jo-Mary Multiple Use Forest provide
just enough income to ofset costs for managment.
Under Maine law, NMW is established as a non-proft corporation.
There are no stockholders, no proft sharing and no dividends. None
of the fees collected at checkpoints are distributed to the landowners
in this program. Income is budgeted to meet expenses and fees refect
this arrangement.
North Maine Woods is a non-proft
corporation. There are no stockholders, no
proft sharing and no dividends. None of the
fees collected at checkpoints are distributed
to the landowners in this program.
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St. John River muskie fshing
www.northmainewoods.org | page fve
Find valuable, up-to-date information
on the Web
Whether you are planning another trip or visiting North Maine Woods (NMW) for the frst time, you will fnd an abundance of helpful information about
the NMW region on our website. Information on land use, regional history, rules and regulations, checkpoint hours of operation, user fees, camping
locations and safety can all be found at the click of your mouse.
Under the “Business Links” heading you can search a listing of many businesses that cater to a variety of outdoor activities including: cabin rentals,
charter services, guide services, outdoor products, vehicle shuttle services, sporting lodges, camps, or whitewater rafting. Our site provides
information on the St. John River canoe trip and two options for printing maps of the 3.5 million acre NMW region.
North Maine Woods also manages the one hundred eighty thousand acre KI-Jo Mary Multiple Use Forest located between Millinocket, Greenville and
Brownville. Our website contains all the information you will need for planning a trip to this unique area. Camping information is available as well as
information on these popular attractions: Gulf Hagas gorge, Katahdin Iron Works, the Hermitage, and the Appalachian Trail. Within the KI Jo-Mary
Forest is Jo-Mary Campground, also managed by NMW. It is a 70 site commercial campground with running water, fush toilets, laundromat and other
amenities not available at our remote campsites.
We also have a “Links” page that can direct you to a variety of Maine State websites where you can fnd information and regulations on canoeing, hunt-
ing and fshing and purchase hunting and fshing licenses. There are links to over two dozen other websites were you can fnd canoeable river water
fow rates, regional weather forecasts and other useful information.
New to our website are the North Maine Woods and KI Jo-Mary Campsite Guides. Each guide uses Google Earth to depict Authorized and Fire Permit
campsites thoughout each respective region; and once downloaded users can click on a campsite icon to pull up photos and a list of amenities for each
location. These guides were designed to assist you in planning your next camping trip while at the same time ofering you a virtual tour of the region.
Another feature is the homepage “Bulletin Board” which allows us to post up-to-date information on what is happening in NMW. For example, during
the spring fooding in 2008, road damage information was updated weekly which provided an accurate list of road openings/closures as well as a map
depicting the location and types of road damage. The Bulletin Board
contains important news, information, and describes current condi-
tions within NMW.
Our website is one of the most frequently visited websites for people
considering a trip to northern Maine. Remember to check www.north-
mainewoods.org as we continue to expand on the quality and quan-
tity of information on our website.
www.northmainewoods.org
To provide the visiting public with high quality,
traditional outdoor recreational experiences
that are compatible with providing renewable
forest resources which sustain approximately
20% of Maine’s economy. Forest recreation,
when managed properly, is compatible with
harvesting forest products.
MISSION
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page six | www.northmainewoods.org
Cutting live trees is not permitted. You are welcome to use dead and down
wood for your fre at an authorized location. To prevent the spread of injuri-
ous insects, long distance movement of frewood is discouraged. Extreme
caution is always the rule. Remember a small fre is best for cooking. By
Maine law, there is a $50 fne for leaving any fre unattended. The steel fre
ring provided is the only place a fre may be built at authorized campsites.
Limits on camper trailer and vehicle sizes. Only single vehicles less than
28 feet in length, or vehicle and trailer with a combined length of less than
44 feet, and with a maximum width of 8 feet, will be allowed entrance. Large
vehicles within these limits may be required to travel at certain low trafc
periods through any checkpoint if requested by the checkpoint receptionist
on duty.
Bicycles, motorcycles, all terrain vehicles and horses are not allowed in
the NMW or KI Jo-Mary Forest at any time of year. This is necessary for log-
ging road safety and avoidance of fre hazards in hard to reach locations.
Through-trafc between Canada and Maine is discouraged via the pri-
vate road system in the NMW. These roads are privately built for the purpose
of managing the woodland area. Recreationists are encouraged to travel to
their desired destinations within the area and then return to the country
from which they entered. Parties entering at a Canadian border checkpoint
must leave via the same checkpoint. Through passage between the US and
Canada is allowed for camp owners and other visitors only when at least one
night’s lodging is spent within NMW.
Information
for North Maine Woods and KI Jo-Mary Forest
Water supplies in the NMW and KI Jo-Mary Forest area are not test-
ed for safety. It is recommended that you bring in water from a known
safe source. You should not drink water directly from any stream or pond
without treating it to kill bacteria and other organisms. The safest way to
treat the water is to boil it for at least one minute at a rolling boil. While
other methods of treatment are available, they may not be totally efective
against all harmful organisms and are not recommended.
Biting insects are common most of the summer. Visitors should be
equipped with insect repellent at all times. The peak time for mosquitoes
and blackfies is from the end of May through July. Daily periods of in-
creased insect activities are during early morning and evening hours.
The weather varies greatly in northern Maine. May temperatures range
from 20 to 70 degrees on any given day, and snow may even fall. During
the summer, temperatures average 50 to 90 degrees. It is suggested that
visitors pack clothing for both extremes. Rain is unpredictable with the av-
erage seasonal amount between 35 and 45 inches. The temperatures begin
to drop below freezing in mid-September with daytime highs in the 50s. In
November it is common for temperatures to approach 0 with highs in the
40s, and snow can begin to build up. November hunters are cautioned to
camp near main roads and listen to weather forecasts.
There are very few stores or gas stations in the NMW or KI Jo-Mary For-
est. All supplies must be carried in with you.
A majority of visitors come to the NMW and KI Jo-Mary to enjoy peace
and tranquility. Although there are no rules regarding the use of genera-
tors, chainsaws, other types of motors and radios, we do ask that visitors
use common sense and be considerate of others.
All parties fying into the area must abide by the area’s rules and reg-
ulations. NMW Land Use and Camping permits are available from many
commercial bush pilots or you may obtain permits by writing to North
Maine Woods, PO Box 425, Ashland, ME 04732.
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Fireworks are prohibited in NMW. Although the State of
Maine legalized the use of freworks in 2011, the new law
also requires that users of freworks have landowner per-
mission. None of the private landowners and managers of
public land within North Maine Woods have agreed to give
permission or allow the use of freworks. Fire hazard is the
major concern, but public safety and disturbance to other
recreationists and wildlife are also factors cited in their deci-
sion to prohibit freworks in NMW.
These rules apply to all road users
Your safety is important
t Give all logging trucks the right of way! The roads in
this area were built to move wood products. For safety,
please give logging trucks the same respect provided
to fre trucks and ambulances. Logging trucks typically
travel on the crown of the road for stability. When you
see a truck coming from either direction, please pull
over to let it pass safely.
t Obey posted speed limit signs. Maximum speed is 45
mph.
t Lights on for safety.
t Always travel on the right hand side.
t Be prepared to stop at all times.
t Never stop on a corner. Always give yourself at least 500
feet of visibility front and back.
tReduce speeds on freshly graded roads. You are more
likely to blow a tire or lose control because of loose
gravel.
t Never block side roads. Even roads that seem
unused may be needed in emergencies.
tDo not linger on roads or stop on bridges. Most bridges
in NMW are one lane.
t Park vehicles well of the road.
tDo not park in front of checkpoints. Use parking area
provided
t All drivers must have a valid state or provincial
driver’s license.
t All vehicles yield right of way to loaded trucks. All trafc
yield to equipment working in roads. Pass only after
operator’s acknowledgement.
for Industrial Logging Roads
Rules
of the
Road
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Camping in
North Maine Woods
Camping permits are issued at the checkpoints upon entrance to the
North Maine Woods area. Camping is allowed at the more than 300
designated, marked camping areas for a two-week maximum time lim-
it per campsite. The North Maine Woods map in this publication shows
campsite locations. There are two types of campsites available for use:
Authorized Campsites: These campsites are marked on the NMW
map and are listed here for reference. While all campsites are rustic,
there are steel fre rings, cedar picnic tables and toilets at the autho-
rized campsites. Fires may be carefully built in the steel fre rings, and
many of the campsites have picnic shelters. A Maine Forest Service fre
permit is not required.
Designated Fire Permit Campsites: These are locations where over-
night camping is allowed but where building campfres requires a
Maine Forest Service fre permit. The locations of designated fre permit
campsites are shown on the NMW map. These campsites have fewer
facilities than authorized campsites. Although some fre permit camp-
sites are not as attractive as authorized campsites, fall hunters prefer
sheltered locations rather than windswept lake shore campsites.
Outhouse Update: North Maine Woods is currently using an active en-
zyme (Bio Quest SST-850) for the treatment of outhouse solids. We ask
that visitors do not dump lime, deodorizers, trash, or liquid materials into
outhouse openings. These foreign substances will either kill or greatly re-
duce the efectiveness of the enzyme.
Campsites on Google Earth: Campsite locations within the North Maine
Woods and KI Jo-Mary regions are shown on Google Earth. Visit our web-
site (www.northmainewoods.org) to download this new feature found
on the homepage. In addition to showing campsite locations, there pho-
tos and a written description of each campsite to help you decide which
campsite to visit.
Please carry your trash out. Do not leave trash at your campsite or
alongside roads and waters.
www.northmainewoods.org | page seven
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page eight | www.northmainewoods.org
TELOS REGION
Umbazooksus West T6R13 4 1 y y y
Umbazooksus East T6R13 2 1 y y
Kellog Brook T6R12 3 y y y
Indian Stream T7R12 2 y y
Indian Pond T7R12 6 2 y y y
Haymock Lake T8R11 8 y y y
Clif Lake T8R12 5 1 y y y
Pillsbury Deadwater T8R11 2 y y y
Spider Lake T9R11 3 1 y y y
Little Pillsbury Pond T8R11 4 2 y y y
Cofeelos South T6R11 3 y y
Cofeelos North T6R11 2 y y y
TOTAL 44
CAUCOMGOMOC REGION
Caucomgomoc Landing T7R15 5 1 y y y
Caucomgomoc Dam T6R14 2 y y y
Henrys Island T7R15 1 y y
Rowe Thoroughfare T7R15 1 y y y y
Round Pond North T7R14 3 y y
Round Pond Inlet T7R14 1 y y
Lost Pond T5R16 2 y y
Russell Stream T4R16 1 y y y
Big Bog T5R18 4 y y y
5th St. John Bridge T6R17 1 y y y y
5th St. John Dam T6R17 1 y y
Wadleigh Pond Beach T8R15 1 y y
Wadleigh Pond T8R15 3 1 y y y
Wadleigh Pond South T8R15 2 y y y
St. Francis Lake T8R16 2 y y y
Baker Lake North T7R17 4 1 y y y
Baker Lake South T7R17 1 y y y
Boulet Campyard T7R17 2 y y
Turner Pond T7R16 2 y y y
Crescent Pond T9R15 2 y y y
Johnson Pond Island T8R14 2 y y y
TOTAL 43
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FISH RIVER REGION
Gleason Brook T13R7 1 y y y
Carr Pond T13R8 4 y y y
Fish River Falls T14R8 8 2 y y y
Fish Lake T14R8 5 1 y y y
Big Brook T14R10 3 1 y y y
Fox Brook T13R9 3 1 y y y
TOTAL 24
AROOSTOOK RIVER REGION
Munsungan Branch T8R8 1 y y
Mooseleuk Branch T8R8 1 y y
Lapomkeag Stream T9R7 1 y y
Houlton Brook T9R5 2 y y
TOTAL 5
ASHLAND REGION
Little Munsungan Lake T8R9 2 y y
Chase Brook Road T10R9 2 y y y
Munsungan Falls T8R9 3 y y y
Malcolm Branch T9R8 2 2 y y y
Mooseleuk Dam T10R9 3 2 y y
N. Br. Machias River T11R7 6 2 y y y
Machias Bridge T11R7 2 y y y
Machias River T11R7 1 y y y
Chase Lake T9R10 3 1 y y y
Ragged Mountain Pond T9R10 1 y y
Jack Mountain T11R8 3 y y
S. Br. Machias River T10R7 2 y y y
Pratt Lake T11R9 1 1 y y y
Island Pond T10R10 2 1 y y
Machias Lake Dam T12R8 3 1 y y
20-Mile Bridge T12R8 3 1 y y y
Little Clayton Lake T12R8 1 y y
Moosehorn Crossing T12R7 2 1 y y y
Upper Elbow Pond T10R10 2 y y
Peaked Mountain Pond T10R10 3 y y
Russell Crossing T11R8 3 1 y y y
Musquacook Stream T12R11 2 y y y
McNally Pond T11R10 2 y y y
2nd Musquacook Lake T11R11 6 1 y y y
Squirrel Pond T11R10 1 1 y y y
Beaver Sprague T11R7 3 3 y y
Weeks Brook T11R8 1 y y y
Smith Brook T9R9 1 y y
Big Hudson Brook T10R9 3 y y y
Munsungan Thoroughfare T8R10 2 y
Little Moosehorn T8R10 2 y y
Kelly Brook T11R14 5 y y y
Squirrel Mountain T11R13 2 y y
Ross Lake T10R15 3 1 y y y
Red Pine T11R16 3 y y y y
TOTAL 86
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ALLAGASH REGION
Little Falls Pond T17R11 1 y y
Fall Brook Lake T18R10 3 1 y y y
Little Black River Plt T19R12 2 1 y y y
Upper Little Black T19R12 1 y y
Little Black River T19R12 2 1 y y y
Chimenticook Stream T17R13 2 y y y
West Twin Brook #1 Allagash 1 y y
West Twin Brook #2 Allagash 1 y y
West Twin Gravel Pit Allagash 1 y y y
Blue Pond T13R13 2 y y y
Deadeye Bridge T18R13 3 y y
3rd Pelletier Pond T16R9 3 y y y
Ben Glazier T14R12 1 y y
Big Black River Road T15R13 2 y y y
Old Camp 106 T16R13 1 y y
Big Black Fall Site T15R13 1 y y y
Connors Cove T18R10 7 y y y
TOTAL 34
page eight
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Lane Brook T2R4 4 1 y y y
Leadbetter Falls T2R18 4 y y y
Leadbetter Pit T2R18 3 1 y y y
Gilberts Crossing T2R4 3 1 y y y
Lane Brook (Boundary Rd) T3R4 1 y y y
Cheney Pond T3R4 3 y y
Penobscot Dam T4R4 4 1 y y y
Penobscot Pd (Ice Box Pit) T4R4 1 y y
Long Pond T3R5 4 1 y y y
Dole Pond T3R5 3 1 y y y
Dole Brook T3R5 1 y y
Hurricane Pond T5R20 1 y y
Hurricane Stream T5R19 2 1 y y
Snake Campsite T4R18 6 1 y y y y
Frost Pond Outlet T4R5 1 y y
Nulhedus Pit T1R4 1 y y
Little Lobster Lake T3R14 2 1 y y y
35-Mile Campsite Dole Twp 1 y y
TOTAL 45
ST. JOHN RIVER
Turner Bogan T8R17 2 y y
Flaws Bogan T8R17 2 1 y y
Flaws Bogan Camp T8R17 1 y y
Morrison Depot T9R17 2 y y
Southwest Branch T9R17 1 y y
Doucie Brook T10R17 3 y y
Knowles Brook T10R16 4 y y
Northwest Branch T10R17 2 y y
Ledge Rapids T11R16 3 1 y y
Moody Campsite T11R16 3 2 y y
Red Pine T11R16 3 y y y y
Burntland Brook T11R16 2 1 y y
Nine-Mile Campsite T12R16 2 y y
East Nine-Mile T12R15 1 y y y
Connor Farm T13R15 1 y y
Seven Islands T13R15 4 2 y y
Priestley Campsite T13R14 2 1 y y y y
Simmons Farm T14R14 2 1 y y
Basford Rips T14R13 1 y y
Big Black Rapids T15R13 3 1 y y
Ferry Crossing T15R13 2 1 y y y y
Boom Chain T15R13 2 y y
Seminary Brook T15R13 2 1 y y y y
Longs Rapids T16R13 2 1 y y y
Castonia Farm T16R12 2 y y y y
Ouellette Brook T16R12 2 y y y
Ouellette Farm T16R12 3 1 y y y y
Fox Brook T16R12 3 2 y y y y
Poplar Island Allagash 1 1 y y y y
TOTAL 63
OXBOW REGION
Lapomkeag Field T8R8 2 1 y y y
Millinocket Stream T8R8 2 y y y
Munsungan Stream T8R9 2 1 y y y
TOTAL 6
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www.northmainewoods.org | page nine
The Maine Forest Service protects hundreds of thousands of acres in the North Maine
Woods from wildland fre every year. It is everyone’s responsibility to be safe with
campfres, as well as report wildland fres that you encounter. Remember, when you
have a campfre, you must attend it at all times. It is important to put your fre dead
out before you leave your site for the day. A heavy wind and dry conditions can create
a large wildland fre from what once was an innocent campfre, and the person who
lights the fre is responsible for damages. Campers are reminded that it is unlawful
to burn prohibited items such as plastic, metal cans, bottles, and any type of trash.
Please carry your trash out.
Your actions will help ensure that the resource we all enjoy is preserved for this and
future generations. If you encounter a wildland fre, report it immediately. Informa-
tion that is helpful when reporting a fre includes: where the fre is (township, GPS
coordinates, nearest road), what fuel the fre is burning in, what type of fre behavior
is being exhibited, is there a water source nearby, and are there any camps or tree
plantations threatened. This information helps Maine Forest Service provide a quick-
er, more efcient response. To report a wildland fre, obtain fre permits, or to receive
additional information you may call:
Ashland Regional Headquarters
207-435-7963
Old Town Regional Headquarters
207-827-1800
Portage District Headquarters
207-435-6644
Allagash Unit Headquarters
207-398-3196
Aroostook Waters District Headquarters
207-435-6975
East Branch District Headquarters
207-463-2331
Moosehead District Headquarters
207-695-3721
Fire Emergency Number - to report fres after 6pm
1-888-900-3473
Maine Forest Service
page ten | www.northmainewoods.org
The KI Jo-Mary Multiple Use Forest is a 175,000 acre tract of forest land
located between Millinocket, Brownville and Greenville. At the request
of the forest landowners in this area, NMW contracted with them in
1986 to establish checkpoints and campsites to manage increasing
public use of their lands. Due to diferences in operating costs and
landowner management objectives, the KI Jo-Mary user fees are slightly
diferent from fees assessed for use of NMW. Season registrations are
not interchangeable between NMW and KI Jo-Mary. In both cases, land
use fees help ofset recreational management costs.
Recreationists traveling by vehicle will pass through one of these
checkpoints. Please refer to the map located on page twelve of this
publication. The following listing will inform you of operating hours.
All four checkpoints open the frst of May and close mid October.
Jo-Mary Checkpoint : Open from 6:00am to 9:00pm Sunday
through Thursday, and 6:00pm to 10:00pm Friday and
Saturday.
KI Checkpoint : Open from 6:00am to 9:00pm seven days a
week.
Hedgehog Checkpoint : Open from 6:00am to 9:00pm seven
days a week.
Henderson Checkpoint : Open from 6:00am to 9:00pm seven
days a week. Henderson is an electronic, unmanned checkpoint
managed by Jo-Mary checkpoint staf.
Checkpoints and Hours of Operation
Maine Non
Residents Residents
Under 15 and over 70 years of age Free Day Use Free Day Use
Per Day $6.00 $10.00
Day Use Season Registration $60.00 $75.00
Camping
Per Night $10.00 $10.00
Passage At Any Checkpoint After Hours
$20.00 per vehicle
Land Use and Camping Fees
Katahdin Ironworks Jo-Mary
General Information
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www.northmainewoods.org | page eleven
KI AREA
Number of Facilities
Name Location Sites Privies Tables Shelters
Silver Lake Field T6R9 8 3 8 0
Silver Lake #1 T6R9 1 1 1 0
Silver Lake #2 and #3 T6R9 2 1 2 0
Silver Lake #4 and #5 T6R9 2 2 2 0
Pleasant River #1 T6R9 1 1 1 0
Pleasant River #2 T6R9 1 1 1 0
Pleasant River #3 T6R9 1 1 1 0
Pleasant River #4 T6R9 1 1 1 0
Pleasant River #5 T6R9 1 1 1 0
Pleasant River #6 T6R9 1 1 1 0
High Bridge #1 T7R10 1 1 1 0
High Bridge #2 T7R10 1 1 1 0
High Bridge #3 T7R10 1 1 1 0
Big White Bk. #1, 2, 3, 4 T7R10 4 2 4 0
Pleasant River #7, 8, 9, 10 T7R10 4 1 4 0
Hay Brook Campsites T7R10 3 2 3 0
Pine Camp T8R11 1 2 1 1
Totals 34 23 34 1
HEDGEHOG AREA
Number of Facilities
Name Location Sites Privies Tables Shelters
Long Pond - Vehicle Access T7R9 3 3 2 0
Long Pond - Water Access T7R9 1 1 1 0
Horseshoe Pond W. Bowdoin
College Grant 4 2 4 0
Trout Pond Lean-To W. Bowdoin
College Grant 1 1 0 1
Totals 9 7 7 1
JO-MARY AREA
Number of Facilities
Name Location Sites Privies Tables Shelters
Gauntlet Falls #1 T8R10 1 1 1 0
Gauntlet Falls #2 T8R10 1 1 1 0
Crawford Pond TAR 11 2 1 2 0
Long Pond TAR 11 4 1 4 0
Big Pleasant Pond TAR 11 2 2 2 0
Johnston Pond TAR 10 5 1 5 0
Little Jo-Mary Pond TBR 10 4 1 4 0
East Branch Pleasant #1 TBR 11 1 1 1 0
East Branch Pleasant #2 TBR 11 1 1 1 0
East Branch Pleasant #3 TBR 11 1 1 1 0
East Branch Pleasant #4 TBR 11 1 1 1 0
East Branch Pleasant #5 TBR 11 2 1 2 0
Pratt Brook TAR 10 1 1 1 0
Johnston Brook T1R11 1 1 1 0
Totals 27 15 27 0
The KI Jo-Mary Forest is not your everyday camping
area. The sites are primitive and well spread out. You will
be able to fnd solitude, fshing, hunting, hiking, fresh
air, clean water, good times and many other outdoor
activities if this is what appeals to you. The KI Jo-Mary
Multiple Use Forest landowners are trying to encourage
and preserve this type of experience.
No party will be allowed to camp more than two weeks
in one location. No trailer, tent or other equipment is to
be stored on any campsite. Items left unattended for
more than three consecutive days may be removed at
the expense of the owner.
Camping is allowed only in the authorized campsites
shown on the map on page twelve. The checkpoint re-
ceptionists will gladly assist you in choosing a location
when you register. Fees will vary according to the num-
ber in your party and the length of your stay. A freplace,
picnic table and privy are located at each campsite.
There is no running water or electricity. Campsites are
maintained weekly.
Campsite reservations are not required, but recom-
mended for Friday and Saturday nights. For the areas
served by the KI and Hedgehog checkpoints, call KI
checkpoint at 207-965-8135. For the area served by the
Jo-Mary checkpoint, call 207-723-8944.
If you are not able to honor your reservation, please call
the checkpoint early enough in the day so others might
enjoy the campsite.
You are welcome to use dead and down wood for your
fre at an authorized location. Extreme caution is always
the rule. Remember a small fre is best for cooking and a
DEAD fre is the best when unattended. All outside fres
must be within the steel fre rings provided at the au-
thorized campsites. Building your own rock freplaces is
not permitted. By Maine law, it is illegal and punishable
by a fne to have an unauthorized cooking or warming
fre, or to leave any fre unattended.
Please carry your trash out. Do not leave trash at your
campsite or alongside roads and waters.
Camping in the KI Jo-Mary Forest
You will fnd solitude, fshing, hunting, hiking,
fresh air, clean water, good times and many
other outdoor activities if this is what appeals
to you. The KI Jo-Mary Multiple Use Forest
landowners are trying to encourage and
preserve this type of experience.
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page twelve | www.northmainewoods.org
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AMC Maine Woods, Inc.**
Pine State Timberlands, LLC
Cassidy Timberlands, LLC*
North Woods Maine Timberlands, LLC**
Greentrees, Inc.*
Katahdin Forest Management, LLC
McCrillis Timberland, LLC*
Prentiss & Carlisle Company, Inc.*
The National Park Service
Silver Ridge Land Company*
*Lands managed by Prentiss & Carlisle Management Co.
**Lands managed by Huber Resources Corp.
Landowners
within the 175,000 acres
of KI Jo-Mary
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page fourteen | www.northmainewoods.org
By Matthew LaRoche, Superintendent
Allagash Wilderness Waterway
Nestled deep in the Maine woods near the northwest end of Chamberlain Lake sit the rusting hulks of two large boilers. These boilers
provided the power that operated an engineering marvel from more than a century ago. Engineer Fred Dow oversaw construction of this
steam-powered, mechanical, log-moving apparatus.
The problem: How to get the vast quantity of pine and spruce logs from the shores of Eagle and Churchill lakes, which fow north down
the Allagash River, to Chamberlain Lake where they could be driven down through Telos Cut, Webster Stream, the East Branch of the
Penobscot, and eventually to the lucrative Bangor lumber market.
Hence, the idea of a tramway was conceived. The tramway is essentially a miniature railroad pulled by a 6,000-foot-long cable loop. The
steel “trucks” attached to the cable carried logs across the 3,000-foot-long isthmus separating Eagle and Chamberlain lakes. As the logs
dropped of at the Chamberlain end, each empty truck looped underneath to a lower track and returned to Eagle Lake for another load.
Allagash Tramway Restoration
Gaining Steam
Most of the parts for the construction of the tramway were boated up
Moosehead Lake to North East Carry during the summer and fall of 1901.
That winter, H.N. Bartley hauled what remained of the parts at Greenville,
particularly the 6,000 feet of continuous cable. It was an exhausting job
using horse teams and skids, and by the time the teams reached Smith’s
Halfway House on the West Branch of the Penobscot, they cut the cable
into two separate sections for easier hauling.
When construction was complete, the tramway posed two problems.
When the system was fred up and put in gear, workers discovered that
none of the 7/8 inch bolts that held the 600 trucks and 600 clamps to
the cable were tight enough and the whole system slipped. This occurred
because the threads on each bolt did not reach far enough down the bolt
shaft to tighten the nuts as much as necessary. The only way to overcome
the problem was to remove all 4,800 bolts and lengthen the threads with
a hand die.
When this was fnally accomplished and the system was again put into
operation, workers watched nervously as the logs crawled onto the trucks
but did not move at nearly the speed they had expected.
Continuing to watch in dismay, they were relieved to fnd that as the frst
of the logs passed slowly over the height of ground along the route of
the tramway their weight helped pull the cable along and increased the
overall speed.
When loaded and under a full head of steam the tramway moved
at a rate of about 3 miles per hour. The system could move a half
million board feet of logs per day, running from 4:00 a.m. until
8:00 p. m. It worked remarkably well for more than six seasons,
hauling 100 million board feet before its use was discontinued.
The Allagash Wilderness Waterway (AWW), with the help of many
volunteers, is in the process of restoring a 25-foot-long section of
the tramway. The section to be restored is located at the Cham-
berlain end, right next to the boilers, engine, and drive wheel.
Everything is lined up for the restoration of a section of the tram-
way this summer and fall. Materials were brought in last winter.
Two volunteer groups have committed to the restoration efort.
Roger Morneault will be heading up a crew that will clear and
grub the 25-foot-long rail bed, getting it ready for another group
headed by Steve Barns who will do the actual reconstruction of
the 22-gauge upper and lower tracks. Roger told me, “I never thought
that this would happen in my lifetime.”
Once restoration of the 25-foot-long section of the tramway is completed,
the vision is to level the drive mechanism, connect the steam pipe, and in-
stall a belt between the engine and drive wheel. The parts are all lying on
the ground right where they were when the tramway was in operation.
A static display of the tramway as it looked in 1903 is possible. All that is
needed is continued volunteer support and a few thousand dollars.
There has been tremendous support for the tramway restoration efort.
The timbers were donated by Viking Lumber: 100 miniature railroad
spikes were forged at the Windsor Fair by a group headed by Bob Brann:
Cianbro Corp. cut and donated the steel for the spikes: the late Tom
Thornton donated $2000: and Rick Denico, a local camp owner and AWW
Advisory Council member, has been working behind the scenes helping
to line up donors.
The steam-powered tramway system for moving logs is a testimony to
those who came before us, their ingenuity and willingness to take on any
problem.
If you would like to help with future restoration eforts at the tramway,
please give Matt Laroche a call at 695-3721 x4 or send an email to:
matt.laroche@maine.gov.
The Allagash Wilderness Waterway
is in the process of restoring a
25-foot-long section of a turn-of-
the-century engineering marvel:
the tramway. The steam-powered
tramway system for moving logs is a
testimony to the ingenuity of those
who came before us.
www.northmainewoods.org | page ffteen
Tramway, Chamberlain Lake End, 1908
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page sixteen | www.northmainewoods.org
www.northmainewoods.org | page seventeen
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page eighteen | www.northmainewoods.org
Throughout the North Maine Woods and beyond, the distinct shape of a taper-
ing metal tower with a square wooden cab on top has long been a landmark set-
ting certain mountain tops apart from others. Over the course of the next several
years, many of the old sentinels will be removed, making way for new communi-
cation towers and cleaning the mountain tops of a long unused system.
The threat of a forest fre devastating the vast forest resource stretching across
the State of Maine has always been a concern to both the industrial land own-
ers and the people of the state of Maine. In 1891, Maine was the frst state to
pass legislation regarding forest fre protection. In 1905, M.G. Shaw Lumber in
Greenville built a fre tower on top of Moose Mountain establishing the frst fre
tower lookout system in the nation. The idea of a fre lookout tower made such
good sense that other industrial owners continued building fre towers. After
devastating wildfres that burned over 98,000 acres in 1908, the state created the
Maine Forestry District and charged it with establishing a fre protection system.
As part of the system, the state took over the privately built and manned fre
tower system and began to add to it. For the most part, the fre towers that North
Maine Woods visitors picture are steel structures that look relatively similar to one
another. Some of the fre towers in the area, like the one on Depot Mountain in
T14 R16 WELS in far western Aroostook County, began as large logs arranged like
tee-pee poles with a lookout platform at the top. To say the least, they wouldn’t
meet today’s safety regulations! There were other towers around the state that
utilized rock foundations, had wooden staircases
or were even fully enclosed.
The Forestry District began installing steel struc-
tures in 1913. Initially, most towers had an open
observation platform at the top that was even-
tually replaced with a cab structure. Inside the
tower cab, the watchman had a hand cranked
phone, maps, a map table and a brass sighting
aid called an alidade. Maine was again a leader
in fre technology when the Forestry District de-
veloped a “panoramic alidade.” Watchmen drew a
circular map at the tower that was then sent to
draftsmen in Augusta. The draftsmen refned the
Maine Forest Service
Fire Tower Project
Some of the fre towers began as large logs arranged like
tee-pee poles with a lookout platform at the top. Others
utilized rock foundations, had wooden staircases or were
even fully enclosed. The Forestry District began installing
steel structures in 1913.
www.northmainewoods.org | page nineteen
map to show a horizon profle around the edge of the map as well as
regular scaled map features like lakes, ponds, streams and town lines on
the main body of the map.
All told, the Maine Forestry District put up 143 towers across the state.
While not all of the towers would have been operational at one time, in
1959 102 towers were stafed for the summer season. In addition to the
towers, watchman’s cabins and lightning shacks were constructed nearby
and at least 1,700 miles of telephone wire was run to connect each tower
to a dispatcher of some sort – be it a sporting camp, logging depot or op-
erator – who had phone connections further into civilization. The phone
system was eventually replaced by a radio repeater system in the 1950s
and 60s. The role of the watchman evolved to include relaying messages
from patrolmen on the ground to supervisors and dispatchers in town.
Many of the Maine Forest Service radio repeater antennas are still at-
tached to fre towers.
The watchmen and women who manned the towers were a sturdy, in-
dividualistic group with some truly amazing stories. These folks would
spend many long, often lonely, days, weeks and months by themselves
in what were very remote locations. They were known to stay in a tower
during lightning storms plotting fre-starting lightning strikes until they
absolutely had to come down and take refuge in a lightning shack. Some
of them developed a number system to play checkers in the evening using
their radios. Others had to order a month’s worth of groceries at a time over
the radio. If the watchman’s camp was on a lake, Forestry pilots like the leg-
endary Charlie Robinson would buzz the tower and drop of their groceries
at the camp. If the camp wasn’t on a lake, like at Deboullie, the groceries
would be bundled together, attached to a parachute and dumped out of
a canister hooked to the side of his pontoon. And yes, occasionally, after
the days ran together, a watchman would need to come out of the woods
because the squirrels were starting to make sense to him.
The demise of the tower system began in the 1950s when aircraft and pi-
lots became more available to perform fre detection through regular air
patrols. The state frst began using aircraft in 1927, again, leading the na-
tion in fre fghting technology. The Maine Forestry District became the
Maine Forest Service, a bureau within the Department of Conservation, in
1973. By that time, only 13 towers were functioning. In 1991, the last of the
towers, including Norway Bluf, Allagash Mountain and Burnt Mountain in
the northern region, closed. Aircraft was doing a majority of the fre detec-
tion while the watchman’s role was more as a radio relay point for Forest
Rangers on the ground. The towers were retained by the Maine Forest Ser-
Alidade system was used to pin point location of forest fres
The alidade system consisted of a round map with a hill profle along the edge that matched what the
watchperson would see out the tower windows as well as compass degree marks. The map would be
orientated on a map table to coincide with the view and cardinal directions. The map table would be
the height of the bottom of the tower windows. Between the profle and the center of the map would
be a regular fat map showing lakes, streams, roads, etc. The map was covered with a round piece of
glass the same diameter as the map table.
The alidade is in two parts that slip together to make one unit in a cross (+) shape. One of the
pieces (say the - of the +) would have a vertical piece on each end. On one end, the piece re-
sembles a peep site with a small hole in the upright to site through. The other end has a verti-
cal brass wire. When someone spotted a smoke, they would spin the alidade so that the brass
wire end was toward the fre. The watchman would then fne tune exactly where the wire end
was aligned to by using the peep site to line up the origin location of the smoke with the brass
wire. When they were done lining things up, the horizontal piece of the brass wire end would
act like a compass needle and would be pointing to (or between) a degree mark.
The watchman would call the degree reading in and a dispatcher would draw a line, or run a string, from the tower location along the azimuth on
a wall map. The watchman could also fgure out, based on the fat map below, if the bearing was intersecting a campsite or logging operation.
As soon as smoke was spotted, neighboring towers would also try to plot the smoke, fgure an azimuth and allow the dispatcher to triangulate
the fre location.
continued on page twenty X
page twenty | www.northmainewoods.org
Te Forest Society of Maine works to
conserve the recreational, cultural,
ecological, and economic values of
forestlands throughout Maine—
helping to keep recreational opportunities
available for people like you.
ll5 Franklin SLrccL, 3rd Floor · Bangor, MF 0440l
207-045-0200 · iníoøísmainc.org · www.ísmainc.org
To learn more about Maine’s land trust for the North Woods,
please contact FSM today!
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East Millinocket, ME 04430
207-746-5204 | 207-746-3901
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vice as a back up system with alidades, maps and a radio plug in. To this day,
the fre tower network has been a system the state and it’s citizens have been
proud of. The system, with it’s sharp eyed watchmen and women, worked in
detecting widfres early and helping to reduce fre size and save lives.
Following a tradition of utilizing the best new technology, the Maine Forest
Service now detects lightning strikes through a satellite based monitoring
system that plots individual strikes on a map. The map is used to help direct
and concentrate air patrols. At the same time, every year the general state of
the fre towers has continued to decline. The fre towers are subject to harsh
weather and without ongoing maintenance, they have become dangerous
for the pubic and a liability to the landowner. At most, there are approxi-
mately 30 towers with cabs and 19 steel frames left standing. Most areas of
the state have reliable road networks and almost instantaneous communica-
tions through radio and cell phone. The old towers are ready to come down.
In 2011, the tower at Moose Mountain by Greenville was removed ending
a 106 year history of a tower being on the mountain top. Occasionally, the
towers will be replaced with regional, multiagency communication towers
that will help frefghters and emergency responders get to those in need in
less time. Other towers will simply be removed, returning the mountain top
to the wind and the elements and the squirrels who occasionally make sense
if you listen to them long enough.
M. Rafford
Trucking and Construction Inc.
PO Box 526 Ashland, ME 04732
Shop 435-2024 Home 435-6530
General Trucking & Construction
For more on Maine’s Fire Tower heritage,
visit Maine Memory Network at www.mainememory.net
and search Looking Out: Maine’s Fire Towers
or visit Maine Fire Lookouts at
http://www.frelookout.org/towers/me/me.htm
To purchase a replica panoramic map from a variety of towers around
the state, including Norway visit the Maine State Archives at
http://www.maine.gov/sos/arc/
and look for Fire Tower Maps in the maps section of the online store.
W continued from page nineteen
Fire Tower Project
www.northmainewoods.org | page twenty one
Over the life span of the tower system, hundreds of people were employed to man the towers and many
people hold fond memories of walking up to a tower to visit an aunt or uncle, brother, sister or crazy
cousin. In the North Maine Woods, Norway Bluf was one of the last manned stations and many people
remember walking up and visiting with Bob Alexander, its last watchman.
In addition to being one of the last manned stations, the Norway Bluf tower and the Weeks family of
Masardis have a unique tie as well. The Chief Warden in the 1910s was a year-round employee of the
Maine Forestry District. He hired seasonal patrolmen to be stationed at camps throughout the woods and
watchmen to man the towers. Norway Bluf Tower was built in 1914 under Chief Warden J.B. Bartlett.
Chief Warden J.B. Bartlett, Ashland:
During the past summer there has been built on Norway Bluf, Township 9 Range 9, a 24 foot steel look-
out tower; a camp built on the side of the mountain for the watchman; four miles of telephone wire
hung to connect with the Maine Forestry District wire at Munsungan Lake, giving the man on Norway
Bluf lookout telephone connection with Oxbow Plantation. There has also been hung on the lower
end of the Aroostook River telephone line three miles of wire ; connecting with Libby Hotel, at Oxbow
Plantation giving the lookout man on Norway Bluf connection at two places. (Report of Forest Commis-
sioner Maine 1914)
Two years later in 1916, Charles L. Weeks became the Chief Warden covering the Aroostook and Big Ma-
chias Rivers and continued to work for Maine Forestry District for a full career. Link worked seasonally for
his father at the MFD while also farming in Masardis. Born in 1891, Link was fatally shot by a hunter he was
guiding in 1941 at his brother Harold’s sporting camp located on Spectacle Pond in T9 R8 WELS, just east
of Norway Bluf. Also pictured is John Hall, another farmer from Masardis who was often contracted to
haul the steel tower pieces up local mountains for the MFD. We know he hauled both Norway and Scopan
towers using his horses and bob sleds.
Charles L. Weeks, Chief Warden, Aroostook and Big Machias Rivers:
We changed the foor on steel tower on Norway Bluf and put a good substantial railing on it. We have
ordered the material needed, and made arrangements for hauling of the same in early winter, that the
house may be erected on tower next summer. We also painted the tower. (Report of Forest Commissioner
Maine 1917)
According to the 1919 Forest Commissioner’s Report, “The Maine Forestry District, in the past year, expe-
rienced one of the most dangerously dry seasons since its establishment in 1909. The territory between
Millinocket and Ashland, supervised by John E. Mitchell of Patten, Thomas Grifn of Millinocket and
Charles L. Weeks of Ashland, three Chief Forest Fire wardens, proved to be the most dangerous section for
forest fres in the Maine Forestry District. The particular reason for this we believe is that there were more
lumbermen and sportsmen in the woods in that particular section than in any other part of the State.” The
watchman at Norway Bluf Tower spotted 13 fres that year.
Today, almost 100 years later, Charles’ great-great-grandson is involved in the removal of the tower. Todd
Weeks, from Masardis, has been a Forest Ranger since 1985 and has long been stationed at Brown Brook
camp at Mile 35 on the Pinkham Road west of Ashland. Todd has walked up to the tower many a time and
is instrumental in its removal. Known for his quiet voice, cleverness with equipment and fre, and constant
grin, Todd has been a cornerstone for the Maine Forest Service’s Aroostook Waters District. And why not –
he and his family have been with the Service almost as long as its been around!
Norway Bluf Tower and the Weeks Family
By Amanda Barker, Maine Forest Ranger, Ashland District
Norway Bluf tower in T9 R9 WELS near Munsungan Lake 35 miles west of Ashland is scheduled to be removed in the spring or summer of
2012 ending a 98 year stand on the Bluf. The Maine Forest Service will be using one of its UH1B Huey helicopters to lift frst the cab and then
the steel tower of the Bluf. The cab and tower will be landed in the old Pell & Pell camp yard on the Pell & Pell road and then transported by
lowbed to the Ashland Logging Museum. The Museum has plans to restore the cab and a short section of the steel tower. To donate time or
money to the project, please contact Bob Sawyer, Museum president at bobs@oriontimberlands.com or 435-4100.
Clockwise from top: Todd Weeks
visits a fre tower; Watchman Bob
Alexander; Link Weeks and John
Hall atop the Norway Bluf fre
tower circa 1918 or 1919; Bob
Alexander waves from the cab of
a fre tower.
Upper West Branch
The Upper West Branch and Lobster Lake area ofer pleasant canoeing
and camping. Canoeing groups usually put in at Roll Dam Campsite,
Penobscot Farm or Lobster Lake. It is a leisurely three day trip to Umba-
zooksus Stream or fve to seven day trip to the take out at the former
site of Chesuncook Dam. Paddlers encounter quick water only from Big
Island to Little Ragmuf and (at very low water) Rocky Rips. Lobster Lake
is a popular camping spot for canoeing and fshing groups. Groups us-
ing Lobster Lake should be aware that high winds can cause danger-
ous waves. Caution is recommended in the use of small watercraft.
Chesuncook Lake
Chesuncook Lake is the third largest lake in the state, with a fowage
length of 29 miles. High winds can cause dangerous waves. Be care-
ful. Chesuncook Village is a popular stopping spot for canoe groups. In
bygone days, the village had over 100 year-round residents, a school,
post ofce, stores, church, hotel, boarding house and an organized
town government. Today the village boasts two sporting camps, a
modest store, several seasonal camps and a church that has Sunday
services during June, July and August.
Lower West Branch
The Lower West Branch ofers easy access for camping and fshing
groups. The “Golden Road” is a primary land management road used
for the transportation of forest products and runs parallel to the river
for 10 miles from Abol to Ripogenus Dam. Ripogenus Dam to Big Eddy
contains very severe rapids runable only by an experienced team in
page twenty two | www.northmainewoods.org
a whitewater craft. It is recommended that groups wishing to run the Lower West
Branch make arrangements with a whitewater rafting company.
Big Eddy to Ambejejus is mixed fat water and rapids with several falls and stretches
of heavy rapids. Canoe groups who wish to run the Lower West Branch should be
experienced and use extreme caution due to the many rapids and falls. Several por-
tages are also required. Refer to the AMC Canoe Guide.
Campsites
Camping is allowed only at sites designated by the Bureau of Parks and Lands. All
sites are primitive, many accessible only by watercraft. All sites have a fre ring, table
and outhouse. Fire permits are not required; however, fres must be contained in
freplaces provided, fre pans or portable stoves. Visitors are limited to no more than
7 consecutive nights. The Bureau of Parks and Lands may authorize an extension
on a day to day basis. Tents or other equipment cannot be left unoccupied on any
site more than one night and sites must be vacated by noon on the last day of the
permit. If you are not interested in primitive camping there are commercial camp-
grounds or camps in the West Branch area.
Camping Fees: Under 10 years of age is free. $4.00 per night per person for res-
idents. $8.00 per night per person for non-residents. Plus a 7% lodging tax.
Organized Groups
Groups of more than 30 people are prohibited. Groups of more than 12 people are
restricted to using designated group campsites. Group campsites are marked by a

on the map. Trip leaders of boys and girls camps licensed by the Department
of Human Services are required by law to obtain a permit from the Department of
Inland Fisheries and Wildlife in advance of the trip.
Penobscot River
Leisurely Flat Water, Exciting Rapids and Comfortable Campsites
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Seboomook Damto Roll Dam 2.5 miles
Roll Damto Penobscot Farm 5.5 miles
Penobscot Farmto Lobster Trip 2.5 miles
Lobster Trip to Ogden Point 3miles
Ogden Point to end of BigClaw 4.5 miles
Lobster Trip to Halfway House 8 miles
Halfway Houseto BigIsland 2.5 miles
BigIsland to PineStream 6 miles
PineStreamto Chesuncook Village 3miles
Chesuncook Villageto Chesuncook B 16 miles
Chesuncook B to Ripogenus Dam 3miles
Ripogenus Damto BigEddy 2.5 miles
BigEddy to HorseraceBrook 4 miles
HorseraceBrook to Abol Bridge 5 miles
Abol Bridgeto Nevers Corner 2 miles
Nevers Corner to DebsconeagFalls 3miles
DebsconeagFalls to Passamagamet Falls 4 miles
Passamagamet Falls to Ambajejus Lake 2 miles
DISTANCES
www.northmainewoods.org | page twenty three
Conservation Easements
In 1981 the Department of Conservation, Bureau of Parks and Lands accepted a perpetual Conservation Easement from Great
Northern Paper Company. The easement encompasses 8,090 acres along the shores of the East and West Branch of the Penobscot
River and Lobster Lake (approx. 12 miles of the lake frontage and 67 miles of river). The easement transfers to the State of Maine
substantial development rights and gives the State the right to regulate and manage recreation activities within 500 feet of the
high water mark. The recreation management plan calls on the Bureau of Parks and Lands to maintain and enhance present
recreational opportunities and maintain the natural character of the corridor. In 2002 the Department of Conservation, Bureau
of Parks and Lands accepted a renewable Conservation Easement of limited duration on portions of Chesuncook and Ripogenus
Lakes and Brandy and Black Ponds from Brookfeld Power. The easement protects 2,365 acres and 80 miles of lake frontage from
development and gives the State the right to manage recreational activities within 250 feet of the high water mark.
photo by Peter Freeman photo by PRC staf f photo by Andrew McPar tl and
page sixteen | www.northmainewoods.org page twenty four | www.northmainewoods.org
By Breanna Thibodeau
The day started with some lawn mowing up at Simmon’s Farm with my Grandparents,
who work for North Maine Woods and help out with the upkeep of the campsites.
I occasionally give a hand when I can, and this day the plan was to head up in the
woods, cut some grass, and then head down to Glacier Lake and test my luck with
some muskie fshing.
I wasn’t expecting much, taking into consideration all of the other failures I’ve had
with muskie in the past. It ranged from rod snapping to trying to wrangle one with
bare hands with zero luck, and this time I was bound and determined to reel one in.
On arrival, my friend and I hopped in a canoe and motored up the lake. Hours went
by with no luck and we decided to send out one last cast. Being so frustrated with my
bad fortune and the fsh, I started to reel the line in as fast as I could so that we could
get out of there and head home. As the lure got closer, I felt the line completely stop
on a dime and thought to myself, “Oh great, stuck on bottom”. This was the last thing I
needed and I decided to give it a jerk anyway just to see what would happen.
Within seconds, the tip of the pole began jerking and snapping, as well as myself in
excitement. Neither of us had thought to bring a net or pliers, so all we knew was
that we were going to have to haul that thing over the side of the boat with our bare
hands. After almost fipping the canoe over from our clown show out in the middle of
the lake, my friend volunteered to stick a hand in the water and take hold of the fsh.
We fnally got it into the boat and immediately took of back to the camp, threw the
fsh into the vehicle and brought our trophy back to show everyone. The muskie was
fairly small for its kind, but 38 inches is good enough for me, until next time.
NMW employee’s granddaughter catches frst muskie
Perseverance Pays Of
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www.northmainewoods.org | page twenty fve
My name is Benjamin Fullerton. I am 14 years old. I live in Greene, Maine.
I would like to share my moose hunting story. My exciting moose hunt-
ing adventure began on June 18, 2011 when my name was drawn in the
Maine Moose Lottery. After spending the summer planning the moose
hunt, with my cousins Randy Brooks, Ronnie Brooks, Robbie Brooks,
Hunter Brooks, my grandfather Gilbert Field, and my sub-permittee Alvin
Brandt, we set of for Priestly Campsite on the St. John River, which is lo-
cated in Zone 1.
I had a September permit so I was able to hunt September 26th through
October 1st. We chose to scout the area the weekend before the hunt. On
that Saturday, we were eating lunch when a huge bull walked into a bog
next to the campsite. He came back again that night around 6 o’clock so
we decided we would search for him the frst two days, once the season
opened.
We did not see much the frst couple of days we were there. It was almost
80 degrees both days. On Wednesday it was really cold so we decided
to drive. We were pulling onto a side road and about a mile up we saw a
cow so we quickly jumped out of the truck. We heard a grunt and before
I knew it a monster bull walked out into an opening. I pulled up and fred
at him with the .270 I was using. He did not go down. He ran! After he was
gone we started to follow his trail.
The bull was bleeding internally so he was only bleeding drop by drop on
the trail. We followed the trail from about 7am to 10:30 am. He had run
quite far. After a while, we found him lying down, so I fred my last shot,
to put him out of his misery. He was so big. After we were done taking
pictures and such, Randy and I gutted him. There was a large amount of
blood due to the internal bleeding. After he was gutted, we realized we
were in the middle of the woods, at the bottom of an 800 yard hill. He was
too big to carry so we had to quarter him into pieces to get him out. It
took 6 hours with the help of everybody there.
After that was all said and done, my moose came to the weight of 1100
pounds. The rack had a 50 ½ inch spread. The burrs were so big that the
tagging station had to tag my bull in the ear. It was hard to leave the park-
ing lot, because everybody wanted to see my moose. I can honestly say
that that was probably the most incredible moment of my life, to see my-
self with my big game. It was an adventure I will never forget.
Ben’s Moose
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It was hard to leave the parking lot, because every-
body wanted to see my moose. I can honestly say
that that was probably the most incredible moment
of my life, to see myself with my big game.
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page twenty six | www.northmainewoods.org
is known, the number dying from other causes and the numbers entering
the population must be determined by our research.
The Maine black bear monitoring program is a long-term project designed
to continually gather data regarding the status of our bear population. The
program began as a study in 1975 when Roy Hugie in cooperation with
the Department established 2 study areas consisting of 4 townships each -
Spectacle Pond (20 miles West of Ashland) and Stacyville (near Patten). Roy
compared population characteristics of the bears living in these 2 study
areas for his PhD. At that time, the Spectacle Pond area was lightly hunted;
whereas, bears in the Stacyville area experienced heavy hunting pressure.
Today, hunting pressure is more evenly distributed across the bears’ range
in Maine.
In 1981, the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife took over Roy’s
project and established a new study area near Bradford (north of Old Town)
in 1982. The Department also changed the focus of the project by using ra-
dio collared females in each study area to represent bears across the state
that are living in similar habitat conditions to each study area. For example,
if we found that our radiocollared females in our study area in the north-
ern commercial forest were particularly successful in raising their cubs in a
given year, then we would assume that other females living in the northern
commercial forest were also very successful.
Currently, we have three active study areas in northern, central and east-
ern Maine. In 2004, the Stacyville study area was discontinued and a new
study area was created in Downeast Maine (northeast of Beddington). This
By Randy Cross, Bear Biologist
Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife
The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is charged with
managing Maine’s abundant wildlife resources. One of our most celebrat-
ed and treasured animals is the black bear. Although many people enjoy
an abundant bear population, too many bears can create problems for the
bears and the people who live with them. Black bear management is a bal-
ancing act between maintaining a healthy and abundant population for
all to enjoy, and limiting the growth of the bear population so that bear
nuisance problems do not cross the line of public tolerance. A big part
of managing bear nuisance problems involves modifying human behav-
ior to lessen the number of negative bear/human interactions. This may
include advice on taking in bird feeders, handling outside trash, and how
to prevent damage to agricultural crops. Each fall, bear hunters enter the
Maine woods in hopes of harvesting a black bear. These hunters, and the
rules that control their methods, are the tools that managers use to ensure
the bear population is not overharvested and to keep the bear population
from “crossing the line”.
How do biologists determine the proper number of animals that needs to
be harvested? The frst part of any management program is to have clear
goals and objectives. Our management goals and objectives are set by
interested members of the public that have reviewed and discussed the
latest MDIFW bear assessment (Public Working Group). These goals are
set about every 15 years. Our current management goal for bears is to
provide hunting, trapping, and viewing opportunity for bears. Our popula-
tion objective is to stabilize the bear population (no signifcant increase or
decrease in numbers) through traditional hunting and trapping activities.
In order to maintain a stable bear population, we must have a good under-
standing of the number of bears entering the population (recruitment) to
replace losses. While the number of bears harvested by hunters each year
Black Bear Monitoring Program
In order to maintain a stable bear population, we
must have a good understanding of the number of
bears entering the population to replace losses.
www.northmainewoods.org | page twenty seven
study area was established to address a longstanding need to better represent a portion
of Maine’s bear population in eastern Maine living under habitat conditions not well repre-
sented by the other 2 existing study areas.
A total of between 85 and 100 radio collared female bears are monitored each year in all
three study areas combined. Radio collars are helpful for monitoring black bears because
their secretive nature makes them difcult to observe or count. Radio collars send out a
signal revealing each bear’s location in her den as she hibernates under the winter snow.
All of our collared female bears are visited each winter in their dens, which allows us to
determine the number of cubs born. Because these cubs stay with their mother for 16
months and den with her the following winter, we can also determine how many cubs
survive to one year of age (known as yearlings). We tag the ears of all cubs and yearlings to
identify them. Female yearlings are equipped with radio collars, which allow us to follow
them throughout their lives after leaving their mothers the following summer.
We have found marked diferences in reproduction, survival, and recruitment between
study areas as well as within study areas over time while habitat and weather conditions
change. The variables that cause these diferences are many and complicated and are not
easy to predict, measure, or even identify. Nutrition plays a major role in determining the
number of cubs that are produced, and cub survival through their frst year.
Bears in Maine utilize a wide assortment of natural foods, and the foods that are avail-
able in each study area are quite diferent. Historically, beechnut production has been
linked to cub production in northern Maine, but these nuts have been less reliable in re-
cent years and are less important in south-
ern areas. The abundance of many types of
bear foods are afected by weather, which
makes predicting the food supply and cub
production and survival difcult from year-
to-year. Closely tracking food production
might help us explain year-to-year varia-
tions in cub production and survival. With
limited funding, we can more efciently
measure cub production and survival di-
rectly during our winter den visits.
Forestry practices are continually evolving,
which changes the world the bears live in
and the food they depend on. Forestland
ownership and market conditions are constantly changing as well, which also impacts
forest resource management. Unforeseen disease or insect outbreaks may infuence forest
composition and harvest strategies in the future. Thus, the general nature of the forests
of northern Maine and the bear foods they provide are very diferent now than they were
years ago, and most likely will be diferent in years to come. The combined efects of all
these complex variables on bears are most easily measured by continually monitoring the
bears’ successes and failures directly in their dens.
A large part of our bear monitoring program involves trapping and radio collaring bears
in late spring and early summer. Trapping bears with foot-snares allows us to collar new
bears to replace collared bears that have died or that have been lost due to malfunction-
ing collars. Periodic trapping eforts are necessary to maintain a representative sample of
bears in each study area. We ear-tag many males while trapping and in the dens as well.
Because males often damage their ears while fghting, we also tattoo their inner lip for a
permanent mark. These marked males ofer additional information regarding their move-
ments and mortality when they are re-encountered through hunter harvest, roadkill or our
own trapping eforts.
We have learned a lot about bears in Maine over the last 37
years, but we are still discovering new things. Each feld sea-
son of data collection still reveals unexpected surprises. The
Department’s bear monitoring program is an ongoing source
of information providing biologists with the knowledge nec-
essary to properly manage this valuable wildlife resource. It is
“our fnger on the pulse of the bear population”.
This work is possible thanks to revenue from a federal tax on
frearms, ammunition and other hunting related items. The
funds from this federal tax (Pittman-Robertson tax) pay for
about 75% of the cost of the program. The remaining 25%
comes primarily from hunting and fshing license sales.
So, what’s new? We recently began collecting a small tooth
from each harvested bear to determine the age of these har-
vested bears. The age structure of the harvest will help us de-
termine whether the bear population is increasing or decreas-
ing in diferent areas of the state.
The Wildlife Research Foundation, a private non-proft orga-
nization, was recently established to promote education and
wildlife research. Early in the winter of 2012, we helped the
foundation install a webcam in the den of a pregnant female
in northern Maine. She has since given birth to 2 cubs and can
be seen on the web at www.WLRF.org.
page twenty eight | www.northmainewoods.org
In 2011 members of the Maine Forest Products Council recognized Comstock Woodlands as Outstanding Log-
ger of the Year. The award was given “in recognition of exemplary performance on the ground and a commit-
ment to meeting management objectives of multiple landowners through innovation, sound business man-
agement and the ability to adapt to and embrace change in one of the most challenging regions in Maine.”
H.O. Bouchard Inc. was created by Harold Bouchard in 1958 and is now operated by his son Brian Bouchard. In
the 1970s and early 1980’s, H.O. Bouchard trucked wood for Great Northern Paper Company out of the Scott
Brook Operation, north of Chesuncook Lake.
Comstock Woodlands was established in 1991 to operate independently from H.O. Bouchard’s trucking busi-
ness. While H.O. Bouchard’s main ofce is located in Hampden, Comstock Woodlands is based 120 miles north-
west and north of Moosehead Lake. Comstock Woodlands employs approximately 32 employees, most are
certifed by Maine’s Certifed Logging Professional program and they obtain re-certifcation every two years.
Ralph Ouellette is the Operations Manager for Comstock Woodlands, a position he has held since 1994. Ralph
grew up in Fort Kent, studied welding and mechanics and frst started employment with H.O. Bouchard at age
20 driving trucks. After driving for a few years he went to work in Bouchard’s truck maintenance facility in
Millinocket and in 1994 was hired as operations manager of Comstock Woodlands.
Comstock Woodlands
A Major Operation in the Maine Woods
and 2011 Outstanding Maine Logger
Comstock Woodlands is a service contractor that harvests and delivers
wood to mills in the region at the direction of the forester for the landown-
er where operations are occurring. Ralph works with foresters from sev-
eral landowning companies located in the region surrounding Comstock
Woodlands’ logging camps. He negotiates the terms of harvest contracts
and makes sure those contract terms are properly carried out.
In 2011 there were seven diferent harvest operations on three diferent
landowners:
- Llm Stream Townshlp North Woods Management
- T3Pl2 at Carlbou Lake Prentiss & Carlisle
- T4Pl8 Comstock Wagner Forest Management
- T5Pl7- 5th St. 1ohn Pond North Woods Management
- T6Pl8- 8lg 8og Wagner Forest Management
- T7Pl6- 8aker Lake Prentiss & Carlisle
- west Porks ln 8lngham Wagner Forest Management
As Operations Manager Ralph is responsible for hiring and managing 32
employees and approximately 12 subcontractors. Although the camps
are within a remote area of North Maine Woods and crews must live in the
woods during their workweek, Ralph says there is very little employee turn-
over. He said one employee has been with the company over 40 years.
The work week starts on Sunday afternoon for many employees who live
several hours of travel time away from the
job site. Many arrive at the logging camp
Sunday afternoon in order to catch a few
hours of sleep before starting at the job
site at 3 am. The average work week is
about 55 hours. The average work day
for harvest crews starts about 3 am and
harvesting ends about 4 pm with an-
other hour spent on equipment main-
tenance in preparation for the next day.
The work week generally ends Thursday
afternoon allowing workers to be home
Thursday night.
Comstock Woodlands owns and main-
tains 2 cut-to-length harvesting systems,
5 feller-bunchers, 6 grapple skidders, 6
de-limbers, and 4 cranes.
In addition to overseeing harvest op-
erations, Ralph also coordinates daily
schedules for 18 logging trucks which
deliver diferent wood products to ap-
proximately 30 wood processing mills
located in Maine and Quebec. Truck
drivers sometimes have to visit several
diferent harvest sites to make up a load
of similar wood species which is coordi-
nated by a Comstock forester at each job
site. Trucks that need to transport wood
over public highways can carry up to 18 cords and of road trucks that are
only traveling on private woods roads can haul up to 35 cords.
There is also a road and bridge construction crew which is necessary to
create new roads to access wood harvest operations. Equipment for this
crew includes excavators, road graders, backhoes and dump trucks.
In order to keep all the equipment
and trucks operating Comstock
Woodlands averages about 9,500
gallons of diesel fuel every week.
Harvest operations usually run be-
tween June, when the ground is
dry enough to operate on without
causing environmental damage,
to March when “mud season” be-
gins. Average wood production in
2011 was approximately 180 loads
or 4000 cords per week.
Comstock Woodlands is just one of
dozens of logging contractors that
operate within the North Maine
Woods region. By multiplying all
of the numbers in this story relat-
ed to number of employees, num-
ber of diferent types of harvesting
equipment, number of logging
trucks, amount of fuel used and
volume of wood supplied to all of
the wood processing facilities as
listed separately, it is obvious that
our working forest is a major eco-
nomic engine for Maine.
The award is given in recognition of exemplary
performance on the ground and a commitment
to meeting management objectives of multiple
landowners through innovation, sound
business management and the ability to
adapt and embrace change in one of the
most challenging regions in Maine.
Caribou Point operation crew members, from left to right: Ralph Ouellette, Operations
Manager; Audrey Allen, forester; Roland Boucher, Shawn McCue, Chris Johnson, Aron
Madore, Travis Brownly, Terry Theriault, Corey Charette
www.northmainewoods.org | page twenty nine
page thirty | www.northmainewoods.org
At roadside, where the skidder operator brings the harvested trees, the de-limber operator and crane operator
both sort out diferent tree species by quality and diameter. The logs are then placed on trucks which deliver
to diferent mills within a hundred mile radius or more from the harvest site. In some cases, the frst log of the
stump goes to a lumber mill and the narrower top section of the tree goes to a pulp or paper mill in another
location.
It is the job of the company forester working with the contractor’s operations manager to determine where
logs are sent depending on contracts with various mills and current prices paid. The primary goal is to maxi-
mize the value received from each tree.
Trees Harvested
Mill Location Tree Species End Product
Appalachian Green Energy Daaquam hardwood hardwood pulp
Arbotec Daaquam hardwood logs lumber
Bardobeck Daaquam cedar shingles, lumber, mulch
Columbia Forest Products Presque Isle high grade birch veneer plywood
Daaquam Lumber Daaquam spruce and fr lumber
D & G Lumber St. Aurelie spruce and fr lumber
D & G Lumber St. Come pine pine boards
Domtar (St. Aurelie) St. Aurelie low grade hardwood pulp
Gardner Dolby all chips, lumber, pulp wood
Glidden Lumber Parkman spruce and fr lumber
Hancock Lumber Bethel white pine pine boards, custom sawn pine
Hardwood Products Guilford birch birch bolts, hardwood items
Huber Easton poplar premium oriented strand board
Katahdin Paper East Millinocket spruce and fr paper
Kennebec Lumber Bingham hardwood logs boards, lumber
Maibec St. Theophile cedar shingles, mulch
Maibec St. Pamphile cedar, spruce, fr shingles, lumber
Madison Paper Madison spruce, fr, hardwood paper
Michigan Veneer Michigan hardwood logs high grade veneer
Moose River Lumber Jackman spruce and fr lumber
Pleasant River Lumber Dover-Foxcroft spruce and fr lumber
Pride Manufacturing Milo hardwood hardwood bolts, handles
Red Shield Old Town hardwood pulp
Rene Bernard Mill St. Zacharie pine lumber
SAPPI Skowhegan hardwood pulp paper
SBC St. Prosper cedar shingles, mulch
Verso Bucksport and Jay hardwood pulp paper
Ward Clapboard Patten spruce clapboards
in Comstock’s Operation go to
Mills in Maine and Canada
www.northmainewoods.org | page twenty three www.northmainewoods.org | page thirty one
Comstock Woodlands Operations Manager Ralph Ouellette has been in the log-
ging business for several decades. When we interviewed him he recalled when he
was young, he and his brother would load their truck with hay on weekends and
make a delivery to logging camps in the area around their home near Fort Kent.
The hay was to feed the horses used for logging and he said they usually also de-
livered a couple of live pigs which were used to feed the logging camp crew. Ralph
explained many of the changes that have taken place in the Maine woods since
the 1950s and he provided a collection of photos that show those changes.
2000s
1960s
1950s
1940s
1930s
In today’s forest, machines like processors and forwarders help increase production and reduce environmental impacts.
Skidders, introduced in the 1960s, are
still in use today.
A cherry picker loads
wood in 1951.
Chainsaws were in use
in the 1950s.
A tractor pulls sleds of wood in 1956.
Trucks started hauling wood
in the 1940s.
Workers load wood by hand onto a horse-
drawn sleigh in the 1940s.
Workers buck wood by hand.
Wood was moved by river
until the 1970s.
A worker drives a one-horse
sledge of pulp in the 1930s.
Workers used bucksaws to cut
trees in the 1930s and 40s.
page thirty two | www.northmainewoods.org
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Before the First Tree is Cut
Before the frst tree is cut the forester responsible for the specifc tract of forest pre-
pares a harvest management plan. The harvest plan takes into consideration any
sensitive areas containing vernal pools, eagle nests, and special old or dead trees
called “legacy trees” which provide homes for birds or wildlife. Also considered are
any Land Use Regulation Commission zones and riparian zones around water bod-
ies or along brooks and streams. The plan includes instructions for the harvesting
contractor on what tree species and sizes to harvest.
After this step is taken, the forester submits a harvest notifcation to the Maine For-
est Service and receives a forest harvest confrmation sign which is posted at the
harvest site. This posting states the landowner or land manager’s name and notif-
cation number which can serve as a tracking tool for an inquiring public or regulato-
ry agency. This notifcation also serves to trigger an end of year reporting obligation
by the landowner or agent which, when the data is rolled up with all other harvests
in Maine, serves to provide an annual statewide harvest estimate.
Ninety fve percent of the private forest lands within the North Maine Woods are
independently certifed for sustainable practices by a third party. All long term forest
management plans of certifed landowners are reviewed by a team of independent,
professional inspectors who review past harvest practices, long term plans and con-
duct on the ground inspections of the properties. Interviews are conducted with
forestry staf and harvesting contractors as well.
There are two certifcation programs utilized by landowners in North Maine Woods:
the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).
Both have rigorous performance standards to measure land management practices.
Some landowners are certifed to both standards.
SFI is unique in having a state by state implementation committee responsible for
several programs that help landowners achieve certifcation. These programs in-
clude a substantial training infrastructure for loggers and foresters as well as a pro-
cess for the public to inquire on site specifc practices they question. At each North
Maine’s Wood gate there is an SFI poster prominently displayed with the number
(888) 734-4625 which gives you access to an SFI representative and allows you to re-
port concerns you may have, confdentially. (Copies of Maine’s SFI Implementation
Committees progress report are available in the ofces as well.)
These three steps, planning, notifcation and third party certifcation assure that har-
vesting crews follow specifc directions on how each forest tract is to be harvested in
a sustainable manner. And don’t forget your ability to weigh in as well!
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The Maine Professional Guides Association and the Department
of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife have teamed up to put together a
series of videos of catch and release techniques. This project is in
response to the fact that, over the past few years, the practice of
catch and release has increased signifcantly in the angling com-
munity but the knowledge needed to successfully release a fsh
alive has not grown at the same rate. These fve videos, featuring
Environmental Educator Emily Maccabe and ten year old fshing
enthusiast Emily Douglas, are intended to teach anglers of all
ages and experience levels the best fsh handling practices for
every step of a fshing trip.
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that should be brought along on any fshing trip to ensure
that fsh are caught and released as simply as possible.
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needed to catch the hook frmly in the fsh’s mouth and
ensure that it stays on the line.
New Videos Demonstrate
How to Release Fish
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a line out of the lake and into a boat or onto the shore.
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including how to remove the hook, how to properly hold a fsh and sup-
port its weight, and how to gently release the fsh back into the water.
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consider when deciding whether or not to keep a fsh.
These videos are being shown at various public events and can be found online
at the Maine Professional Guides Association’s YouTube channel http://www.
youtube.com/user/MPGAssociation?blend=3&ob=video-mustangbase
After more than 45 years in the Fisheries and Hatcheries divisions at
the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Peter Bourque
retired this past fall.
Bourque, who lives in Farmingdale, began his career with the MDIFW
in 1965 as an assistant regional fsheries bi-
ologist in the Moosehead Lake region. He
worked under Roger Auclair at the time,
before moving to Ashland to work as the
regional fsheries biologist in the Fish River/
Allagash region in late 1968.
For 15 years, that’s where Bourque called
home – until moving to Augusta to become
the Assistant Chief of Fisheries in 1983. One
year later, he became the Chief, a position
now known as Director of Fisheries.
“Having the 18½ years in the feld was really,
really important in terms of knowing what
the needs were for the division, knowing
the type of work the (biologists) did, and
being able to support them,” Bourque said.
“The ‘boots on the ground’ really makes a
diference in fsheries. It’s really those guys
in the regions that make it work. It’s impor-
tant for them to understand their waters
Top Fisheries Biologist Retires
well and keep things rolling.”
Bourque remained the director until early last decade, when he became the
new Director of Fisheries Program Development.
He has no concrete plans for retirement, beyond traveling some with his wife
and staying involved in fsh and wildlife pursuits.
“I want to keep interested in the fsh and wildlife
feld,” said Bourque, who retreats in his spare time
to his camp near Haymock Lake. “Wherever I can be
helpful, even on volunteer basis, I want to do that.
I’m hoping to do some traveling – we haven’t done
a lot of that as a husband-wife team. “I’m going to
spend a lot of time with outdoors pursuits. Boating,
fshing, hunting, kayaking. Hopefully, with a little
more time, I can do more of that, too. Myself, I know
that I’m going to spend a lot more time in the out-
doors.”
Peter represented the Department on several North
Maine Woods committees during his career. He
served on the Campsite Committee, the Coordinat-
ing Committee and the St. John River Committee.
He was instrumental in working with NMW staf in
2011 to make improvements to the boat access and
camping area on Glazier Lake.
www.northmainewoods.org | page thirty three
“I want to keep interested in the
fsh and wildlife feld. Wherever
I can be helpful, even on a
volunteer basis.”
page thirty four | www.northmainewoods.org
By Vernon M. Labbe, Regional Manager
Bureau of Parks & Lands
You may be asking yourself what is an HMA? HMA is an acronym for Habitat
Management Area which is a long-term strategy for managing deer winter-
ing habitat. The Department of Conservation, Bureau of Parks and Lands,
Lands Division and the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife have
entered into an agreement for management of white-tailed deer and for
other species requiring mature coniferous forests. The agreement provides
an increased landbase for habitat management as well as increased fex-
ibility for management, which will provide higher and more stable levels of
mature forest habitat over time.
The Round Pond Unit, in T13R12 WELS, con-
tains 23,114 acres which consists of 20,349
acres of Public Reserve Land and 2,765
acres managed by the Allagash Wilderness
Waterway. The AWW acres are not part of
the agreement but the corridor along the
river adds signifcant habitat for a number
of wildlife species. Of the 20,349 acres,
2,030 acres are zoned by Land Use Regula-
tion Commission as P-FW, Deer Wintering
Area. The 10,000 acre HMA represents a
quintuple increase in area focused on deer
wintering habitat.
To back up a little bit for those unfamiliar with the Bureau, the Lands Di-
vision is responsible for managing nearly 600,000 acres of Public Reserve
Land. The Bureau has a mandate to implement multiple-use management
principles to produce a sustained yield of products and services. The Bu-
reau has developed a multiple-use management system based on the al-
location of specifc areas for specifc uses. In this system it is natural to
have overlapping uses. To reduce conficts, a dominant use is identifed
as priority and all other uses become secondary. As you would expect,
the dominant use for the HMA is wildlife management. The secondary
uses for the HMA in descending order are special protection, remote rec-
reation, visual consideration, developed recreation, and timber manage-
ment.
During critical winter conditions white-tailed deer utilize predominately
mature coniferous (softwood) habitat. This
period can last for 5 months or more. The lo-
cal saying that northern Maine has 2 seasons,
winter and the 4th of July, has an unsettling
amount of truth to it. Suitable wintering
habitat provides relief from wind, more stable
temperature and humidity conditions, and
lower snow depths. Quality habitat consists of
shelter interspersed with openings that pro-
vide foraging opportunities and sunlight.
The Bureau’s primary objectives for the Round
Pond HMA are to: (1) provide winter habitat in
at least 50% of the area of forest stands that
are primary softwood sites, (2) actively manage
by implementing sound silvicultural practices to improve structural di-
versity in order to achieve sustainable winter habitat for deer, (3) include
management considerations for the many other species of wildlife that
utilize mature coniferous forest habitat and associated forest habitats, (4)
improve forest health and quality, (5) ensure that these areas continue
BPL’s Round Pond Unit is an excellent example of a Habitat Management
Area on public land. While the jargon may difer, many private forest land-
owners also designate HMAs and work with staf biologists and IF&W bi-
ologists to manage for deer. (See “Deer Wintering Areas” in last year’s edi-
tion of this magazine.) In some cases there are formal written agreements
between IF&W and the landowner; in others, hand-shake agreements.
Many cooperative agreements go back a decade or more. Forestry and
habitat management are both long-term commitments and a long-term
process – trees take decades to grow into good winter shelter. If creating
more wintering habitat increases the deer herd (which we expect), results
will become gradually apparent over time.
Private habitat management
programs also succesful
Public Lands
Round Pond Unit
HMA
Round Pond Habitat Management Area
10,000 Acres
www.northmainewoods.org | page thirty fve
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to provide a broad range of public values, and (6) produce a balanced forest age
class structure that will provide stable habitat levels to support a diversity of fora
and fauna.
The minimum 50% in winter habitat is comprised of critical deer winter habitat
(CDWH) and secondary deer winter habitat (SDWH). Both CDWH and SDWH have
specifc sets of criteria regarding crown closure, basal area and stand height. Soft-
wood dominated stands that are typed as S2A, S2B, S3A, S3B, C2A and C2B meet
the criteria of CDWH. Softwood stands on poor sites and some mixed wood stands
may not have the potential to meet CDWH but would meet SDWH. At least 25%
of the HMA winter habitat must be maintained as critical deer winter habitat. The
Round Pond HMA has been mapped and is monitored annually to ensure that the
objectives are being met. In the near future computer habitat modeling will be
used to assist in harvest planning for the HMA. Most of the harvesting is scheduled
in the winter to provide food and mobility for deer, to protect regeneration, and to
minimize soil disturbance. Road construction will be designed to minimize habitat
fragmentation. Road right-of-way widths will be reduced in travel corridors. Dis-
turbed areas such as ditches, landings, and winter roads will be seeded with the
Bureau’s wildlife mix. For a variety of reasons many of the roads within the HMA will
be closed to vehicle access upon completion of the harvest operation.
There is a detailed list of forestry guidelines to be implemented for coniferous and
deciduous stands aimed at achieving habitat objectives. For example, tree species
that provide shelter and/or food for deer and are long-lived such as cedar, pine,
beech and red spruce are favored. This is accomplished mostly through retention,
release or regeneration. There are minimums for residual (post harvest) basal area
and crown closure in order for harvested stands to be CDWH or SDWH. The Bureau
marks (paints) all or most of the trees to be harvested. There are maximums for trail
width and for the percentage of the stand in total trail area. Skid trails are frequently
fagged. Guidelines are followed for selection harvests, shelterwood harvests, and
overstory removal harvests. To date, clearcut harvests by the Bureau have not oc-
curred in the Round Pond HMA. Forestry guidelines for predominately deciduous
stands include both intolerant hardwood management and tolerant hardwood
management.
Achieving the goals and objectives of the Round Pond HMA is a long-term process
requiring a signifcant commitment in staf time by the Bureau’s foresters. If the ad-
age “build it and they will come” holds true, all the eforts by the Bureau and IF&W
will have positive results on Maine’s deer herd.
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page thirty six | www.northmainewoods.org
by Tim Obrey, Greenville Regional Fisheries Biologist
An illegal introduction of rainbow smelt occurred nearly 10 years ago that has resulted in some very dramatic (and nega-
tive) changes on the Arctic charr population in Big Wadleigh Pond. Big Wadleigh Pond is one of just 12 native charr waters
left in the lower 48 states of the U.S., all of which are in Maine. Big Reed Pond located 30 miles east of Wadleigh Pond suf-
fered a similar fate of illegal smelt introduction and was reclaimed in 2010 at a cost of several hundred thousand dollars. So
it is important that the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife make a concerted efort to protect these fsh.
This past spring Fisheries Biologists Jef Bagley and Steve Seeback out of the Greenville ofce implanted 10 radio transmit-
ters in charr so they could locate them, and presumably others, in the fall just before spawning. These transmitters were
purchased in a partnership with the Greenville’s Natural Resource Education Center’s Fisheries Internship/Enhancement
fund. We travelled back to Big Wadleigh this fall on two occasions to attempt to capture native brood stock brook trout and
Arctic charr. These fsh would be stripped of eggs and milt and the fertilized eggs would be reared in a hatchery until the
pond could be chemically reclaimed. Then these native fsh and their progeny would be re-introduced.
Brook trout typically spawn in mid-October in our ponds and lakes; however, we soon discovered that the brook trout in Big
Wadleigh Pond were early spawners. Our trapnets caught very few adult trout in October and the campowner relayed to
us that he saw spawning activity in late September. This is not unheard of in this neck of the woods. We do have a handful
of trout ponds in this region with early spawning fsh and a few very late (November) spawners. So, we will have to return
this spring to collect our brook trout.
We were much more successful capturing the adult charr needed for the project. While charr typically spawn in mid-
November, we decided not to wait based on the early spawning of the brook trout. We returned in early November and
our radio transmitters really paid of. We had 100% survival of these surgically-tagged fsh and by tracking them, we were
able to net 9 of the 10 tagged fsh. In addition to these charr, we also captured 51 untagged charr. These 60 fsh were trans-
ported to Mountain Spring Trout Hatchery in Frenchville by owner Gary Picard.
We were able to strip approximately 4,300 eggs from these fsh in November. This is a terrifc start and we hope to have
some of the brood fsh available again next year. We plan to reclaim the pond in October of 2013 which will remove the il-
legally introduced smelt and restore the habitat for native brook trout and Arctic charr and we want to thank Clayton Lakes
Woodlands Holdings LLC for their kind donation towards this restoration project.
Maine is the only place in the lower 48 states where anglers can catch Arctic charr and the last location on the East Coast
with substantial numbers of native brook trout populations. Most of these waters are concentrated in northern Maine
where we have benefted from good land management, limited development, and fewer introductions of illegal fsh com-
pared to southern Maine and other states. We all play a role in protecting this very special place.
Illegal Smelt Introduction Causes
Problems at Wadleigh Pond
From left to right: IFW Biologist Steve Seeback holds a radio tagged Arctic charr; illegally
introduced smelt at Big Wadleigh Pond; a nice 18 inch charr from Big Wadleigh Pond.
Maine is the only place in the lower 48 states where anglers can catch Arctic charr and the
last location on the east coast with substantial numbers of native brook trout population.
www.northmainewoods.org | page thirty seven
Ashland
Food Mart
ROUTE 163 •PRESQUE ISLE ROAD
ASHLAND, MAINE 04732
TELEPHONE 207-435-6451
AGENCY
LIQUOR STORE
GROCERIES,
MEATS, PRODUCE
REDEMPTION
CENTER
䪪ì 1¸ ¡)1ª )ªªs)1+ 6
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l|mcstunc' º |a|s H|||' º Uakl|c|d º Pattcn' º P|csquc ls|c' º \an Bu|cn' º wasHbu|n
0ummc|c|a| luan Ull|ccs: Ban¿u| & Sca|bu|uu¿H
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www.kataHd|nt|ust.cum
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- |nsects and dlseases can be ln, on or under the bark of ñrewood, or even deep wlthln the wood ltself. People can move pests (that spread slowly on
their own) hundreds of miles in a single day.
- wlth global trade, our forests are gettlng more pressure from lnsects and dlseases lnadvertently brought to North Amerlca and then moved wlth
frewood.
- Lmerald ash borer ls one of the scarlest lnsects that can be moved wlth ñrewood. |t can
kill any ash in North America and has already killed millions of trees in the mid-west. This
insect is found in Michigan, Wisconsin, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vir-
ginia, West Virginia, Maryland and Ontario and Quebec in Canada as of 2008.
- Aslan longhorned beetle kllls maples, blrches, poplars, wlllows and many more trees. A
very large infestation was found in 2008 in Worcester, MA, not far from Maine’s border. It
is also found in New York, New Jersey and Toronto, Canada
- There ls a federal quarantlne on all ñrewood ln all or portlons of these states and P|PL-
WOOD CAN NOT BE TRANSPORTED ACROSS THESE STATELINES.
- Other serlous lnsects and dlseases can be moved wlth ñrewood as well.
- Once establlshed, lnsect pests are at best dlmcult and costly to control, and usually lmpos-
sible to eradicate.
For more information contact the Maine Forest Service Insect & Disease Lab at 287-2431
or forestinfo@maine.gov
Help us protect Maine’s forests
Firewood can move forest pests long distances
Even within Maine, the movement of
frewood is regulated to and from certain
parts of the State because of:
- gypsy moth - does not occur north of
Houlton
- hemlock woolly adelgld - only occurs ln
parts of York county
- larch canker - only occurs ln parts of
Knox, Lincoln, Washington and Waldo
counties
- plne shoot beetle - does not occur ln
Aroostook and Washington counties.
Did You Know?
page thirty eight | www.northmainewoods.org
Fr i ed Chi c ken • Pi zza • Subs
Homemade Spec i al s • Desser t s • Sal ads
Soda • Beer • Tobac c o
Gr oc er i es • Vi deo Rent al s
Stanley’s
AUTO CENTER
2184 Medway Road
Medway, Maine 04460
746-5770
Goodyear and Dunlop Tires
FULL SERVICE CENTER
Levasseur
Hardware Store
Roofing
Plywood
Wallboard
Paint
Insulation
Windows
Siding
Doors
225 Aroostook Avenue, Millinocket, ME 04462
207-723-8600
(207) 668-3411
www.bishopsstore.com
Your outdoor
headquarters
for hiking,
camping,
fishing and
hunting
supplies in
J ackman, “The
Switzerland
of Maine”
25AExchange Street, Ashland, Maine
Wind Solar
Residential Commerc ial
For All Your
Elec tric al Needs
101Main Street P O Box 6 3 3
Ashland, ME Ashland, ME
04 73 2 04 73 2
OFFICE:
207- 4 3 5 - 2171
Need a Shed?
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We al so special ize in outhouses.
Tool Rooms
Horse Barns
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2587 US Route 2
Smyrna, ME 04780
207-757-7877
j eansmooseheadr ent al s.c om j eansmooseheadr ent al s.c om
J ean Laskey
(207) 534-9703
D

&

M
SALES & SERVICE
PO Box 635, Route 157
Medway, ME 04460
Exit 244 off I-95, 6 tenths West
www.dmsales.net
(207) 746-5621
1-800-649-0580
“Where we
make friends
not money”
Lund
Lewin’s Taxidermy
& Trapping Supplies
Lisa Lewin Taxidermist
169 Bowdoin Street
Millinocket, ME 04462
Fax: 111-222-3333
Ofce: 207-731-2361
207-731-2362
207-723-6127
menmill@yahoo.com
The Industrial Road Safety Committee has existed for many years, serv-
ing in a number of capacities. Most of the larger landowners in the
north half of the state are represented on the committee. Road use by
diferent landowners has dominated the past focus along with mediat-
ing the occasional dispute and establishing agreements between vari-
ous landowners for use of one another’s roads. The recent focus of the
committee, since initiating a higher profle in 1997, has been safety.
Safety was elevated as an issue after a period of increasingly frequent
complaints about dangerous and aggressive driving as well as ex-
tremely rude behavior on the part of some drivers. Poor driving habits
and behavior spanned the spectrum of drivers
from large 18 wheel trucks to recreational cars
and pickup trucks. Complaints were generated
from the public users of private roads as well
as industrial users ( employees ) of the same
roads. Everyone knew a story, or so it seemed,
about a close call or an unpleasant experience
while driving on a woods road.
The safety committee initiated discussions to
defne problems, discuss various approaches
to correcting the problems and develop so-
lutions, as well as defne additional changes
which could help the situation. A very important
challenge was integrating public recreational use with industrial use.
Industrial use extends to large, heavy equipment and trucks traveling
on the roads as well as occasionally working in the roads. Since most
recreational users are not accustomed to heavy equipment and large
of-road trucks, the challenge became one of training on both sides, in-
dustrial and recreational. Problems relative to vehicles were identifed
basically as speed, attitude and an over-reliance on communication
from truck to truck, excluding recreational users. Other problems were
identifed as dangerous road situations including extreme curves, poor
visibility and narrow sections. Tolerance of unsafe practices, inconsis-
tent rules, lack of a disciplinary system and lack of a common approach
to administering the problems were also identifed as issues.
Frequent meetings of the committee over the last few years led to a
number of accomplishments. Involvement of representatives of the
trucking industry on the committee brought valuable input and in-
sights into possible solutions. A signifcant accomplishment is a con-
solidation of “Rules of the Road” which is supported by all members of
Road Safety
the committee. The rules are published in three languages, English,
French and Spanish and are made available to all contractors, land-
owners and trucking companies as well as the recreational public
via North Maine Woods. Extensive training in safe driving has been
provided to migrant workers and others, along with frst aid training
and communication training. Landowners who are responsible for
maintenance of the private road systems began an intensive signage
efort, including stop signs, speed limit signs, and warning signs. All
signs use the international symbols recognizable by anyone from the
US or elsewhere. Mile markers have been placed along most major
routes and are the basis for radio communica-
tion, whereby drivers call out location by mile
markers to alert others of their location.
Dangerous road situations have been addressed
through aggressive brush control eforts to
improve visibility, widening sections of roads
where needed, reconstruction of dangerous
curves and intersections and even re-routing
roads where necessary. Some side roads have
been named and signed making it easier to get
around and give directions. Frequent mainte-
nance of high trafc areas has been initiated in
an efort to improve safety. A unique truck num-
bering system has been introduced into the industrial trucking group,
to provide a means of identifying individuals that may cause prob-
lems. Each landowner/manager has developed a disciplinary system
to minimize problems, as well as correct them when possible.
The recreational public can improve their own safety by abiding by
all the rules of the road, monitoring CB and MURS radio trafc when
they can, yielding right of way to trucks, (do not expect loaded of-
road trucks to move away from the center of the road), avoid stopping
on bridges and main roads (preferably pulling onto side roads or well
out of the road before stopping), and above all, paying attention and
driving prudently.
Please note that all NMW Checkpoints close at the end of November.
Although plowed roads are open during the winter months to the
public, be aware that snow and ice can make roads dangerous, es-
pecially when meeting log trucks and other trafc. Main roads and
side roads are plowed to accommodate the movement of timber and
equipment related to the forest industry.
p
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REMEMBER...
Give all logging trucks the right of way! The roads in this area were built to move wood products.
Please give logging trucks the same respect provided to fre trucks and ambulances.
When you see a truck coming from either direction, please pull over to let it pass safely.
T›½: 207-227-7766
Eî½: info@rosslakecamps.com
Andrea Foley Ross Lake Camps, Inc.
Donald Lavoie PO Box 140
Registered Maine Guides Ashland, ME 04732
Located on the
Allagash Ri ver
A n A llagash Tr adition
ROUND POND T13R12
A guiding tradition in the Allagash since
the late 1800s. Enjoy the comfort of the
only log cabins along this wilderness river.
Custom trips arranged, all four seasons.
Camping • Canoeing • Fishing
Seasonal Foraging
XC Skiing & Snowshoeing • Hunting
Contact: Phyllis J albert 718-834-2500
213 New Gloucester Rd
No. Yarmouth, ME 04097
Email: pj@wbhinc.com
PO Box 291
Millinocket, Maine 04462
Tel: (207) 723-8800
www.bouletsportingcamps.com
T4R15 Russell Stream
ZONE 4
Fully Equipped American & Housekeeping Camps
Wilderness trips and vacations for all ages
Maine, Quebec, Labrador, Nunavut
Big Eddy Campground on the West Branch of the Penobscot
www.bigeddy.org
Debsconeag Lake Wilderness Camps on Fourth Debsconeag Lake
www.chewonki.org/about/DebsconeagLakeCamps.asp
Contact Greg Shute (207) 882 7323 x129
gshute@chewonki.org www.chewonki.org
hewonki
Nugent’s Camps, LLC
ChamberlainLake
422 Perry Road • Bangor, ME04401
(207) 944-5991
info@nugentscamps.com
www.nugentscamps.com
Your hosts, theThorntonFamily,
StellaSoucyandRobFlewelling
Red River Camps • Deboullie Township
www.redrivercamps.com • (207) 554-0420
• Deluxe Wilderness Lodge
• Fully Outfitted and
Professionally Guided
Packages
Trophy Deer Hunting
World Class Bass Fishing
www.MaineDeerHunting.com
info@northernoutdoors.com 800-765-7238
MAINE’S #1 OUTFITTER
Libby Camps
WILDERNESS LODGE & OUTFITTER
(VJEFTt'MZPVUTt"NFSJDBO1MBO
Matt & Ellen Libby and Family
Box 810, Ashland, ME 04732
(207) 435-8274
email: matt@libbycamps.com
www.libbycamps.com
Libby Camps
www.rosslakecamps.com
ROSS LAKE CAMPS
Bear •Deer •Birds •Moose •Fishing
Allagash Lakes Region, high quality, full utility and basic housekeeping
cabins on Haymock, Spider and Cliff Lakes.
American Plan at Haymock Lake Lodge. Open year round.
Boats, motors, canoes, licenses, gas. Recreational snowmobile riding,
fishing, hunting, vacationing. Pets welcome.
Mailing Address: PO Box 598-N, Millinocket, ME 04462
207-757-7097 www.macannamac.com
CAMPS & LODGE
PO Box 171
Millinocket
Maine 04462
Specializing in Seaplane Fly-I ns Since 1947
www.KatahdinAir.com
fly@katahdinair.com
1-866-FLY-MAINE (359-6246)
Sporting Camps
J udy Sirois: 418-356-3221
sir_a_way@globetrotter.net
www.northernhideawaysportingcamps.com ampscom
PO Box 54
Fort Kent, ME
04743
Hunting •Fishing
Outdoor Photography
T14 R15
Housekeeping cabins with full bath
American Plan rooms in hotel
OPEN YEAR ROUND
'JTIJOHt)VOUJOHt4OPXNPCJMJOHt+VTU1MBJO3FMBYJOH
West Branch Canoe Shuttles
Located on the lake in Chesuncook Village
207-745-5330 www.chesuncooklakehouse.com
The
Chesuncook Lake House
and Cabins
Since 1864
Allagash Outfitters
Oulded canoe 1clpo · veblc|e 1canopoc¡
canoe ken¡a| · kemo¡e camp ken¡a|
camplnq Acea · 5poc¡lnq campo
W. Hafford
keqlo¡eced malne Oulde
box 143, A||aqaob, mL O4774
(2O7) ò3ò-ò277 oc ò3ò-41òò
www.a||aqaobou¡ñɆeco.com · canoeò@coadcunnec.com
Abol Bridge Store
& Campground
“The tradition continues”
36 campsites located on the west branch
of the Penobscot River and Abol Stream
with fantastic views of Mt. Katahdin.
Gasoline, diesel, phone, flies, take out food, con-
venience store and much more! Coldest beer in the North Woods!
Mile 18.5 Golden Road
207-447-5803 www.abolcampground.com
Merchant Camps & Lodge
Ashland, Maine
Gateway to the North Maine Woods
“A year round Wilderness Adventure”
• Bear Hunts Over Active Bait
• Hunting & Fishing • Recreation
Ralph Merchant CELL 603-499-6561
HOME 603-352-7281 LODGE 207-435-7049
EMAIL rjmerch8@yahoo.com
www.merchantcampsandlodge.com
www.allagashguide.com
Chandl er Lake
Camps
www.chandl er l akec amps.com
A Traditional Maine Sporting Camp
Located just north of Mt. Katahdin, between
the Aroostook and Allagash Rivers
Private waterfront cabins
An all-inclusive, family-oriented lodge of the
highest quality and comfort
A place to relax where life is still
the way it should be
Lodge on Munsungan Lake
**Outpost Camps**
**Char ter Fl ying Service**
Landl ocked Sal mon, Br ook Tr out
Smal l Game, Deer , Bear , Moose Hunts
207-433-0660
maine@br adf or dcamps.com
www.br adf or dcamps.com
Spectacular setting on pristine Munsungan Lake.
Wild trophy brook trout and salmon.
Deer, bear, moose and grouse hunts.
First class accommodations,
dining and guide service.
Reasonable rates.
BOOK YOUR HUNT
for 2012 & 2013
Spr i ng & Fal l Bear
Mai ne Moose
Deer -- Coyot e
Days: (207) 834-3612
Evenings: (207) 834-2530
Cell: (207) 316-2187
w w w.Tr ac k dow nKennel sLodge.c om
r eser vat i ons@Tr ac k dow nKennel sLodge.c om
Kennel s
& Lodge
891 Aroostook Road
Wallagrass, ME
Contact us today to
request a full color
brochure!
P B GUIDE SERVICE
BAKER LAKE, ST. CYPRIEN, MAINE
pbguideservice.com
BEAR • DEER • BIRD
COYOTE • MOOSE HUNTS
CAMP RENTALS
Paul Beauregard, Guide
PO Box 307, Skowhegan, ME 04976
HOME: (207) 474-2644 ••• CAMP: (418) 383-5770

PO Box 327 10A Main St. Ashland, Maine 04732 207-435-4100
Visit us at: www.oriontimber.com
Excellence in Practice
A full-service, sustainable natural
resource management company.
Rooted in Stewardship; Growing Value and Opportunity
Proudly managing forests
within the North Maine Woods
since 1999
www.wagnerforest.com
SEVEN ISLANDS
LAND COMPANY
managing forest resources
for the future
Ashland-Bangor-Rangeley
Northwoods Management
Timberland Management
Accurate Accounting
Harvest Planning
Management Plans
115 Franklin Street, Suite 2B
Bangor, ME 04401
ph (207) 262-5552
fx (207) 262-5554
info@northwoodsmgmt.com
www.northwoodsmgmt.com
107 Court Street
Bangor, Maine
207.942.8295
prentissandcarlisle.com
Whether you need a single
consultant or a team of experts...a
little advice or long-term forest
management services...an appraisal
or a new road...
Prentiss & Carlisle
In-depth experience. Integrated approach.
Exceptional performance.
N management plans
N timber harvesting
N timber marketing
N woodlot services
N road and bridge building
N consultation and valuation
N tax and regulatory assistance
HUBER
RESOURCES CORP
1141 Main Street
Old Town, ME 04468
207-827-7195
Forest Management Professionals
Wherever Huber operates, our commitment
to the environment follows.
www.huberresources.com
See our website for land use policies
Northern Maine’s
Last Frontier
Separate cabins of hewn log
construction located within
ffty feet of the shoreline.
Here you will fnd an atmosphere of an honest to
goodness sporting camp in the Maine tradition
Portage, Maine 04768
Phone (207) 435-6156
Hunting • Fishing
River Trips
John F. Robertson 207-435-6211
Registered Maine Guide
2018 Portage Road, PO Box 40
Route 11, Portage, ME 04768
Specializing in
Northern Bear Hunts
• Camp Rentals
• Deer, Moose and Coyote
• Hunting and Fishing
• Canoeing and Relaxing
• Sight Seeing
• Housekeeping Cabins
DAVID PREVOST
cell: 603-381-8376
highlandingcamps@gmail.com
www.highlandingcamps.com
ON FISH RIVER
PORTAGE, MAINE
The Outdoor Adventure
Company
Guide Service & Outfitter since 1987
Jayson Allain
1250 West Main Street
DoverFoxcroft, Maine 04426
207.564.0007
www.outdoorAdventureCompany.com
Serving Timberland inveSTorS Since 1968
Timberland Marketing and Investment Analysis Services
Provided throughout the U.S. and Canada
Full Service Forestry Consulting
Across New England, New York and Pennsylvania
Foresters and Licensed Real Estate Professionals
in the following offces:
Americus, GA (229) 924-8400
Bangor, ME (207) 947-2800
Bethel, ME (207) 836-2076
Clayton Lake, ME (603) 466-7374
Portland, ME (207) 774-8518
St. Aurelie, ME (418) 593-3426
Jackman, ME (207) 668-7777
Concord, NH (603) 228-2020
W. Stewartstown, NH (603) 246-8800
Lowville, NY (315) 376-2832
Tupper Lake, NY (518) 359-2385
Eugene, OR (541) 790-2105
Kane, PA (814) 561-1018
Newport, VT (802) 334-8402
www.landvest.com
Stewardship For Your Timberland Investment
LandVest
Katahdin Forest Management
Where can you find huge expanses of forestland
containing lakes, rivers, fish, wildlife and endless
scenic views that you can enjoy all for less than
a night on the town?
The privately owned forestland that North Maine
Woods manages public recreation on is where!
Katahdin Forest Management is proud to continue
the long tradition of public recreation on its lands in
partnership with North Maine Woods.
We are the Maine Operations of Acadian Timber
www.AcadianTimber.com
Our rental cabins:
www.katahdinforestcabins.com
Russell Pond Outfitters
Join us at Russell Pond Camps for:
Hunting: Bear over Bait, Trophy Deer, Moose, Grouse
Fishing and Summer Rentals
Call us to book a full guided adventure
or to reserve a camp for that special get
away. Advance reservations required.
Remote Camps Located 70 Miles
from Greenville or Millinocket.
www.russellpondcamps.com
Russell Pond Camps
PO Box 1417
Greenville, ME 04441
866-552-2038
KATAHDIN OUTFITTERS
Canoeing and Kayaking Adventures
Allagash • St. John • Penobscot River Expeditions
Transportation and Vehicle Shuttle
Canoe and Kayak Rental and Outftting
PO Box 34, Millinocket, ME 04462
207-723-5700 • 1-800-862-2663
www.katahdinoutftters.com
North Maine Woods
PO Box 425, Ashland, ME 04732
207-435-6213
www.northmainewoods.org info@northmainewoods.org
Black River, LLC
[5]
Canopy Timberlands, LLC
[5]
Clayton Lake Woodlands Holdings, LLC
[6]
Dunn Heirs
[2]
Dunn Timberlands, Inc.
[5]
Fish River Company
[2]
Great North Woods, LLC
[7]
Griswold Heirs
[2]
Huber Resources Corp.
[4]
Irving Woodlands, LLC
John Cassidy Timberholdings
[2]
Katahdin Forest Management, LLC
Lost River Company
[2]
McCrillis Timberlands, LLC
[2]
Merriweather, LLC
[3]
North Woods Maine, LLC
[4]
Pingree Associates, Inc.
[1]
Prentiss & Carlisle Co, Inc
[2]
St. John Timber, LLC
[4]
Sylvan Timberlands, LLC
[4]
The Forestland Group, LLC
[2]
The Nature Conservancy
[4]
Timbervest, LLC: St. Aurelie Timberlands
[6]
Timbervest Partners Maine, LLC
[6]
Webber Timberlands
[2]
Yankee Fork Corp.
[2]
State of Maine
This publication is made possible through eforts of edi-
tors Sarah Medina of Seven Islands Land Company and
Barry Burgason of Huber Resources Corporation. It was
designed and produced by Melissa Arndt of Slingshot Mul-
timedia. Front cover photos by Steve Day, Peter Freeman,
Mike Langley, Bill Leach, Jen Brophy-Price and NMW staf.
Back cover photo by Peter Freeman.
Any comments or questions related to this publication
and its contents may be sent to:
Al Cowperthwaite, Executive Director
North Maine Woods Inc
PO Box 425, 92 Main Street, Ashland, ME 04732
or info@northmainewoods.org
[1] Lands managed by Seven Islands Land Company
[2] Lands managed by Prentiss & Carlisle Management Co.
[3] Lands managed by Wagner Forest Management Company
[4] Lands managed by Huber Resources Corp.
[5] Lands managed by Orion Timberlands LLC
[6] Lands managed by LandVest Inc.
[7] Lands managed by Northwoods Management LLC
Landowners and Managers
within the 3,500,000 acres of North Maine Woods