COMMON COUNCIL COMMITTEE MEETING

GENERAL SERVICES, HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT Michael O’Brien, Chair

DATE: PLACE: TIME:

Thursday, February 28, 2013 City Court Room 209 – 2nd Floor City Hall 5:30 p.m.

TOPIC OF DISCUSSION:
Ordinance Number 2.11.13 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 323 (STREETS AND SIDEWALKS) OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF ALBANY BY REPEALING ARTICLE VI (STREET IMPROVEMENTS) IN ITS ENTIRETY AND REPLACING IT WITH A NEW ARTICLE VI IN RELATION TO COMPLETE STREETS Ordinance Number 86.82.10 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ARTICLE I (GENERAL) OF CHAPTER 323 (STREETS AND SIDEWALKS) OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF ALBANY IN RELATION TO NEIGHBORHOOD TRAFFIC CALMING

PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD:

YES

Council Members Golby, Calsolaro, Conti and Fahey introduced the following

Ordinance Number 2.11.13 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 323 (STREETS AND SIDEWALKS) OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF ALBANY BY REPEALING ARTICLE VI (STREET IMPROVEMENTS) IN ITS ENTIRETY AND REPLACING IT WITH A NEW ARTICLE VI IN RELATION TO COMPLETE STREETS
The City of Albany, in Common Council convened, does hereby ordain and enact: Section 1. Article VI of Chapter 323 of the Code of the City of Albany is hereby repealed in its entirety. Section 2. Chapter 323 of the Code of the City of Albany is amended by adding new Article VI to be entitled “Complete Streets.” Section 323-88. Legislative Findings. The City of Albany Common Council finds that the mobility of freight and passengers and the safety, convenience, and comfort of motorists, cyclists, pedestrians – including people requiring mobility aids, transit riders, and neighborhood residents of all ages and abilities should all be considered when planning and designing Albany’s streets. Integrating sidewalks, bike facilities, transit amenities, and safe crossings into the initial design of street projects avoids the expense of retrofits later. Streets are a critical component of public space and play a major role in establishing the image and identity of a City. By encouraging good planning, more citizens will achieve the health benefits associated with active forms of transportation while traffic congestion and auto related air pollution will be reduced. The goal of this law is to improve the access and mobility for all users of streets in the community by improving safety through reducing conflict and encouraging non-motorized transportation and transit. Section 323-89. Complete Street Design. A. For all street construction, reconstruction, resurfacing or repaving projects that are undertaken by the City and not covered under the New York State Complete Streets Law contained in Section 331 of the Highway Law, the department planning such project shall consider the convenient access and mobility on the street by all users of all ages, including motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation users through the use of complete street design features in the planning, design, construction, reconstruction and rehabilitation. B. Complete street design features are roadway design features that accommodate and facilitate convenient access and mobility by all users, including current and projected users, particularly pedestrians, bicyclists and individuals of all ages and abilities. These features may include, but need not be limited to: sidewalks, paved shoulders suitable for use by bicyclists, Matter in strikethrough to be deleted. Matter underlined is new material. lane striping, bicycle lanes and improved bicycle parking and storage, share the road signage, street and sidewalk lighting, crosswalks or median refugees, road diets, pedestrian control signalization, bus pull outs and improved pedestrian access to bus stops, curb cuts, raised crosswalks and ramps and traffic calming measures; and recognize that the needs of users of the road network vary. C. This section shall not apply if it has been determined and set forth in publicly available documents that one of the following exists: (1) use by bicyclists and pedestrians is prohibited by law, such as within interstate highway corridors; or

(2) the cost would be disproportionate to the need as determined by factors including, but not limited to, the following: land use context; current and projected traffic volumes; and population density; or (3) demonstrated lack of need as determined by factors, including, but not limited to, land use, current and projected traffic volumes, including population density, or demonstrates lack of community support; or (4) use of the design features would have an adverse impact on, or be contrary to, public safety.

Section 323-89. Reporting requirements. A. During the planning phase of all construction, reconstruction, resurfacing or repaving projects, the Department of General Services shall provide notice to the following constituencies: regional planning organizations, public transit operators, affected business improvement districts, affected neighborhood organizations, the Department of Development and Planning and the Common Council member representing the affected ward. Written comments shall be allowed within 30 days of the notice. B. No later than two years after the effective date of this law and biannually thereafter, the Department of General Services shall publish a report showing how it has complied with this Article and improvements made to the roadways of the City. Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect immediately.

APPROVED AS TO FORM December 28, 2012
_____________________ Deputy Corporation Counsel Matter in strikethrough to be deleted. Matter underlined is new material.

TO: FROM: RE:

Nala Woodard, City Clerk Leah Golby, Council Member Request for Common Council Legislation Supporting Memorandum

DATE: February 25, 2013 ORDINANCE NUMBER

TITLE: AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 323 (STREETS AND SIDEWALKS) OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF ALBANY BY REPEALING ARTICLE VI (STREET IMPROVEMENTS) IN ITS ENTIRETY AND REPLACING IT WITH A NEW ARTICLE VI IN RELATION TO COMPLETE STREETS
GENERAL PURPOSE OF LEGISLATION: This ordinance adopts a “Complete Streets” program for the City of Albany requiring that roadwork be planned to consider all users of City streets and not just automobiles. It is consistent with Albany 2030, the City’s Comprehensive Plan which references “Complete Streets.” NECESSITY FOR LEGISLATION AND ANY CHANGE TO EXISTING LAW: This legislation insures that complete street design principles are utilized throughout our City. In 2011, Governor Cuomo signed similar legislation that applies to all City projects that are funded with state and federal dollars. This legislation expands the New York State law to cover all road projects of the City. FISCAL IMPACT: Dependent upon the number of street projects per year.

Council Members Conti, Bailey, Jenkins-Cox, Konev and Rosenzweig introduced the following: Ordinance Number 86.82.10
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ARTICLE I (GENERAL) OF CHAPTER 323 (STREETS AND SIDEWALKS) OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF ALBANY IN RELATION TO NEIGHBORHOOD TRAFFIC CALMING The City of Albany, in Common Council convened, does hereby ordain and enact:

Section 1. Article I of Chapter 323 of the Code of the City of Albany is amended by adding a new section 323-59.1 to read as follows: § 323-59.1 Neighborhood Traffic Calming.

The Council hereby approves the use of neighborhood speed humps as a geometric street feature to serve as a traffic calming device on local residential streets. The City Engineer, in consultation with the Chief of Police, is authorized to adopt rules and regulations as necessary to establish eligibility criteria for streets which may participate in the program, and to establish the location and configuration of the speed humps on eligible streets.
Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect immediately.

APPROVED AS TO FORM August 4, 2010

_____________________ Corporation Counsel

SUPPORTING MEMORANDUM ORDINANCE NUMBER 86.82.10 Introduced at August 16, 2010 Council Meeting

TITLE: AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ARTICLE I (GENERAL) OF CHAPTER 323 (STREETS AND SIDEWALKS) OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF ALBANY IN RELATION TO NEIGHBORHOOD TRAFFIC CALMING SPONSOR: Council Member Conti PURPOSE: To reduce excessive vehicle speeds on residential streets. SUMMARY: Section 1 adds a new Section 323-59.1 to the City Code approving the use of neighborhood speed humps and authorizing the City Engineer, in consultation with the Chief of Police, to necessary rules and regulations for implementation of a speed hump program. Section 2 provides for an immediate effective date. JUSTIFICATION: Excessive vehicle speed is a problem on many residential streets within the City of Albany that affects neighborhood quality of life. When motorists disobey vehicle and traffic laws, concerned citizens ask what steps they can take to "calm" the speeding problem on neighborhood streets. The use of traffic calming devices such as speed humps is one tool that can help address this problem while relieving demand on conventional police department traffic enforcement techniques. A speed hump is a rounded traffic calming device used to reduce vehicle speed and volume on residential streets. Humps are placed across the road to slow traffic and are often installed in a series of several humps in order to prevent cars from speeding before and after the hump. Common speed hump shapes are parabolic, circular, and sinusoidal. Generally, speed humps are 12 to 14 feet in length and span the width of the road. The height of humps ranges from 3 to 4 inches. The length and height of the speed humps determine the speed at which traffic will travel over the devices. Shorter lengths and greater heights slow cars most drastically. When placed in a series 350–550 feet apart, humps will reduce 85 percentile speeds by 8–10 mph. A warning sign notifies motorists before humps. Humps generally have pavement markings to enhance visibility and a taper edge near the curb to allow a gap for drainage. Speed humps are used in locations where very low speeds are desired and reasonable. Speed humps are typically placed on residential roads and are not used on major roads, bus routes, or primary emergency response routes. Placement is generally mid-block between intersections. While similar to speed bumps, humps are less aggressive than speed bumps at low speeds and are used on actual streets, as opposed to bumps which are primarily placed in parking lots. While speed bumps generally slow cars to 5 – 10 mph, humps may slow cars to 10 – 20 mph. FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: To be determined. In the City of Phoenix, Arizona each speed hump, together with required signing and striping, costs approximately $1,200 to install. Whether that is the accurate reflection of what the cost in Albany would be is unclear. However, costs of the program could also be offset by savings related to reduced need for conventional traffic safety enforcement techniques. EFFECTIVE DATE: Immediate.

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