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PRINCETON,
N.
J.

Section
Shelf.

.#..'i!

UD

Number

INTRODUCTION
TO THK

STUDY OF THE GOSPEL OF


TOGETHER WITH

ST.

JOHN

AN INTERLINEAR LITERAL TRANSLATION

G-REEK TEXT OF STEPHEIsTS,


WITH

1560

THE AUTHORIZED VERSION


CONVENIENTLY PRESENTED
IN

THE MARGINS FOR READY REFERENCE

AND WITH

THE VARIOUS READINGS OF THE EDITIONS OF ELZEVIR, GRIESBACH, LACHMANN, TISCHENDORF, TREGELLES ALFORD, AND WORDSWORTH

1624

By

J. P.

Maclean,

Ph.D.

Search the Scriptures

CINCINNATI

THE ROBERT CLARKE COMPANY


1895

" Bird of

God with boundless flight


!

Soaring far beyond the height

Of the bard or prophet old

Truth

fulfiled

and truth

to be,

Never purer mystery


Did a purer tongue unfold!"
"

But on twofold eagle pinion,

Wrought by

love in her dominion,

John, a form divinely bright.

Upward

soars in purer light."

Adam of

St.

Victor.

COPTBIGHTED BY

J. P.

MacLean,

1895.

TO

MY FATHER AND MY MOTHER


NOW LIVING AT AN ADVANCED AGE

WHOSE UNTIRING TOILS AND SACRIFICES


WERE MY OPPORTUNITIES
THIS VOLUME
IS

AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

PREFACE.
The
is

multiplicity of treatises on the Gospel of St.

John

significant, not only of the great interest

taken in this subis

ject,

but also of the unusual importance that work

to the

welfare of mankind.

For a period of over a half century


and the
inter-

special attention has been accorded this Gospel,


est manifested has

never shown any indications of abatement.

The
this

controversies between the different schools of critics have

resulted in a deeper study

and more profound knowledge of


;

wonderful historical production

which, in

its

turn, has

been reflected on the religious movement of this age, and


given an impetus to broader views, as well as awakening a

new impulse

in the Christian

Tife.

In the preparation of this work I have freely used such


helps as were best adapted for an introductory study.

In

many
and

instances I have closely followed the language of critics


editors

even as they have followed


had

others

especially

where

I found they

clearly expressed correct views in the line of

the discussion.

By

this I

have avoided burdening the text

with references of no particular value, and thus using every


advantage to express the truth in a plain and distinct manner, so that it

As so been made
to

may be comprehended by all classes of readers. many excellent commentaries on the Gospel have
readily accessible to
all

have deemed

it

best not

add another, having considered


spirit

the

of this undertaking to

harmony with give the Greek text, with the


it

more

in

(V)

vi

Preface.
critics,

various readings of learned biblical


literal translation.

and an

interlinear

This, in a measure, serves to

make

every

one his own commentator.

In presenting this feature I have

availed myself of the opportunity afforded by one of


ster's series.

Bag-

On

the whole

it

is

as faithful a

work

as could

be expected.

In some instances I prefer to render the Greek

text differently, but under the circumstances I have concluded


to let the translation stand.

February, 1895.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER

I.

INTRODUCTION.
PAGE.
I.

II.

Testimony of the Learned and Devout Life of St. John


a.
h.
c.

11

12
13

Time previous to his discipleship From his call to his departure from Jerusalem The traditional period

14
18

CHAPTER
Statement of Doubts a. Four Classes of Opinions b. History of Doubts c. Tubingen School d. Position of Renan Historical Evidences
i.

II.

AUTHENTICITY OF THE FOURTH GOSPEL.


J.

22 22

23 24
27

II.
'

29
31

Indirect evidences ot the Authenticity of the Fourth Gospel.. a. Testimony appended to the Gospel

ii.

Testimony of the Apostolic Fathers c. Testimony of the Primitive Fathers d. Use of the Gospel by the Gnostics e. Testimony of Celsus Internal Evidences of the Authorship of the Fourth Gospel a. The author was a Jew 1. Jewish opinion and points of view 2. Jewish usages and observations 3. Form of Gospel essentially Jewish 4. The source of the religious life of the author was the Old Testament b. The author was a Jew of Palestine 1. Great topographical knowledge 2. The way in which the Author quotes the Old Testament. 3. The Doctrine of the Logos
&.

32 34 37 44 48 49
51

52

52 52
53 54 55 56 57

(vii)

...

viii
c.

Contents.

The Author was an eye-witness


1.

of

what he describes

PAGE. 58
59 59 60 GO
Gl

Certain Persons brought forward with evident distinctions

d.
e.

The details of time 3. The details of number 4. The place of special acts 5. The manner of the narrative The Author was an Apostle The Author was the Apostle John 1. The narrative indicates a Special Apostle 2. A definite supposition that St. John wrote the Gospel. 3. The Gospel carefully distinguishes places and persons. 4. Features which cause objections
2.

62

63
63 63
.

64

iii.

Direct Evidence of the authorship of the Fourth Gospel beheld his glory 1.

We

64 66 66
67

2.

True conception

of a witness

CHAPTER
I.

III.

THE COMPOSITION OF THE GOSPEL.


Occasion
II.

Place

6B 70
.'

III.

Date
a.
b.
c.

71

d.

Omission of Prophetic reference to Jerusalein Second coming of Christ Explanation of Jewish names and customs The writer occupies a position remote from the events 1. Answers to the problems made by changed conditions. 2. The most striking difference between the Gospels
3.
4.

72 73 74

75 78 78 79
81

Difficulties

met

New

Intellectual position

IV. Object of the Gospel


a.
b.
c.

82
83

Purpose stated

Not

specifically polemical

84
85

Doctrines of Cerinthus

Not Supplemental V. Plan and Analysis a. Outline and Analysis


d.
b.

Chronology

86 87 88 9^
91

VI. General Review VII. Important Features a. The truth and the witness 1. The witness of the Father
2.
3.

108 108
109

The witness The witness

of Christ of

works

HO HO

Contents.
4.
5.

ix
PAGE.
110
Ill

6.

h.
c.

witness of the Spirit 7. Light and Glory

The The The The

witness of Scripture witness of the Baptist witness of the disciples.

Ill Ill

112
11."

Judgment and
Extreme

life

VIII.

The Style
a.
6.
c.

116
simplicity
IKi 117

Frequent repetition Sequence pointed out


Parallelism

118
119 119

d.
e.

Minuteness of detail /. Favorite words and phrases g. Table of usages IX. HisTOKiCAL Exactness
a.
h.
c.

119
121

133
l.'U

Representative incidents historically exact The Peison of the Lord


Historic development

135

136 137
137
"

d.

Distinguishing Language
Discourses in the Discourses on the

X. The Last Discoukses


a.
h.

Chamber

140

Way

140

CHAPTER
I.

IV.

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE GOSPEL.


11.

Spiritual Gospel Lifelike Groups

141

142

III.

Symbolism

143 146 148

IV. Relation to the Old Testament V. Unfolding of the Messianic Idea

CHAPTER
I.

V.

RELATION OF THE FOURTH GOSPEL TO OTHER APOSTOLIC WRITINGS.

The Fourth Gospel and the Synoptics


a.
h.
c.

151

d.

Limited range of the Fourth Gospel Limited range of the Synoptics Differences between the Synoptics and St.* John 1. Scene and extent of Christ's ministry 2. Difficulty in respect to the Person of Christ Coincidences of the Fourth'Gospel with the Synoptics 1 The Baptism of John 2. Feeding of the five thousand

152 153

153
163 155 156

156 156

X
3.

Contents.
PAGE,

Walking on the Sea


Anointing at Betliany The Triumplial Entry into Jerusalem The Last Supper

156

4.
5.

156
156 156

6.
7.

8. 9.

10. 11.

The The The The The

Betrayal
Trial

157
157 157
157

Crucifixion
Burial

Resurrection.

157
157 159 159

12.

Implied acquaintance
coincidences

13. Striking

II.

III.

Thought and Language The Gospel and the First Epistle op St. John Relation of the Fourth Gospel to the Apocalypse
14.
a.

160
162
. .

Internal proofs of
1.

St.

John's authorship of the Apocalypse.

163 163

Diction

2.
b.

Metaphor

Contrast of the Apocalypse with the Gospel

164 167

CHAPTER
I.

VI.

HISTORY OF THE FOURTH GOSPEL.

The Text
a.
b.
c.

169 169

Codex Vaticanus Codex Sinaiticus Codex Alexandrinus

170 170

II.

III.

Other Codices Interpolations Literature of the Gospel


d.

170
171

172

CHAPTER
I.

VII.

THE INTERLINEAR LITERAL TRANSLATION.


The Greek Text
a.
b.
c.

175
175 175

Griesbach

Lachmann
Tischendorf
Tregelles

176 176 176


177

d.
e.

Alford

Wordsworth II. Interlinear Translation III. Marginal References IV. List of Signs and Editions
/.

178
;

178

179
St.

The Text of the Gospel According to

John

180

STUDY OF THE GOSPEL OF


CHAPTER
The Gospel of
John
In
it

ST.

JOHN.

I.

INTRODUCTION.
St.
is

the real ideality of the


all

life

of

Jesus the Christ, and the glorification of


sustains to the world.

the relations he

he comes into the purest light of personality. The Gospel breathes through its verses an atmosphere as from Paradise, and He who walks before us in its holy light is instinctively felt to be Divine. This Gospel has been called the Gospel of Gospels; and is the most remarkable as well as the most important literary production ever composed by man. In it is represented the
highest knowledge of Christ, and also his deepest love.
possesses an irresistible
It

charm

for contemplative minds,


for

and

furnishes inexhaustible food

meditation and devotion.

The profoundest minds in the Church, from Clement of Alexandria down to the present, have expressed their sense of
its

singular and surpassing value.

I.

Testimonies of the Learned and Devout.

Origen, the greatest scholar of the Ancient Church, and


the father of biblical exegesis, spoke of the Fourth Gospel as the main one, and declared that only those can comprehend it

who lean on the bosom of Jesus, and there imbibe the spirit of John, just as he imbibed the spirit of Christ. Chrysostom extols it as more love-bewitching and elevating in its influence than Jerome proclaims that "John exall the harmonies of music. cels in the depths of divine mysteries." Augustine affirms *i John did but pour forth the water of life which he himself

12

Study of
in."

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

had drunk
others."

Luther

calls it

leading Gospel, that

should
it,

Lessing declared

"the unique, tender, genuine, preferred by far to the without qualification, to be the
be

most important portion of the New Testament. Ernesti pronounced it " The heart of Christ." Herder exclaims it was " Written by the hand of an angel !" Schleiermacher expresses his own preference for it. Tholuck said it has "a peculiar originality and charm, to which no parallel can be
found.
light,

Meyer recognizes its " fullness of grace, truth, peace, and life." Canon Westcott writes, "ITo writing, per-

we view it simply as a writing, combines greater simwith more profound depths. At first all seems clear in the child-like language which is so often the chosen vehiand then again cle of the treasures of Eastern meditation of Western thought is found to lie under the utmost subtlety abrupt and apparently fragmentary utterances." Quotations similar to these might be given indefinitely. careful study of the Fourth Gospel will demonstrate that the encomiums pronounced upon it have not been overdrawn. In order to understand this remarkable production it becomes necessary to know something of its remarkable author.
haps, if
plicity
;

II.

The Life

of St. John.

in a different

and character of St. John touches the heart manner from that of the other Apostles. He was that disciple whom Jesus loved, and consequently bore a

The

life

close relation to the Savior.

As

his

name

is

indissolubly con-

life should acpaper relating to its consideration. the Apostle John naturally divides itself into three periods, only the second of which is regarded with certainty. Over the first and third periods broods the shadow of uncertainty. There are but two sources of information

nected with the Fourth Gospel a sketch of his


special

company every The life of

concerning him.
tains the evidence

The

first is

the

from

his birth to the departure

rusalem after the Ascension.

Testament which confrom JeThe second, embracing the

New

The Life of

St.

John.

13

remainder of his life, depends solely upon the traditions of Both sources present harmonious the Primitive Church. fragments, containing definite traits and characteristics, establishing an imperfect and unique portrait, but so related as to forbid a continuous history. The first period presents only a few isolated facts, which require inference and conjecture in order to bring them together as a connected whole. The latter end of his life affords distinct images, which may be halftraditional

and half-mythical.
a.

Time Previous

to

His

Discijpleship.

The date
younger than

of the Apostle's birth can not be determined.


his brother

The Grospel-narrative leaves


cedes his (Matt.

the impression that he was James, whose name usually preix. 28),

iv. 21, x. 2, xvii. 1, &c.:

times reversed, as in

Luke

possibly also than his Master.

but the order is someyounger than Peter, and He was the son of Zebedee

His father was a fisherman of the Sea of GaliMarki. 19, 20), and, as he employed servants, he was doubtless removed several steps from poverty. Some critics claim that Salome was the sister of Mary, the mother of Jesus, in which case John w^ould be the Lord's first cousin. This, in a measure, might account for that close relationship and special intimacy granted to the beloved disciple, and also the final committal of the Virgin to John's care (John xix. 26, 27). St. John, similar to all the other Apostles, save Judas Iscariot, was a Galilean. By his pious mother he was trained in all that constituted the ordinary education of Jewish boyhood. Though not taught in the schools at Jerusalem, yet by the periodical pilgrimage to that city, he became familiar with the stately worship of the Temple. It must be conceded that the inhabitants of his district would also have an influence over him. To a great extent they had remained untouched by the culture of the rest of the nation, and ignorant of the glosses of tradition, they kept strictly the old simple

and Salome.

lee (Matt. iv. 21, 22,

14

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

faith in the letter of the law.

They were industrious, hardy and warUke. This influence may account for the fiery temper which earned for him and his brother James the name of " Sons of thunder " (Mark iii. 17). Galilee was not so remote but that the political changes which agitated the nation would also be subject for discussion among the fishermen whilst plying their vocation. The influence of Judas of Gamola, the great teacher of the freedom of Israel against Rome, must not only have been felt, but also awakened aspirations in the breast of the younger men. Early in life John formed an intimate fellowship with Peter, and learned to admire and love the impetuosity of this older Notwithstanding such environments as would lead friend. to develop his fiery nature, there was in him another element which, in after years, was fully developed, and made him

known

as the " beloved disciple."


lost sight

was brought

to such a degree of perfection that the

This side of his character former is

almost wholly
b.

of
His Departure from Jerusalem.

From His

Call

to

The monotony of John's Hfe was suddenly broken by a thrill which went through the land that God had again visThe voice of John ited them in raising up another prophet. the Baptist was heard in the wilderness of Judfea. It was not a call to armed resistance, but a cry to withstand their

own

temptations, and break the bondage of their own sins; "Repent, ye; for the kingdom of heaven is at hand." The

publicans, peasants, soldiers and fishermen of Galilee gathAmong those who heard and followed ered around him.

were the two sons of Zebedee and their friends. The Baptist directed John and James to follow Jesus, "And looking upon Jesus as he walked, he saith. Behold the Lamb of God !" (i. 35, 36.) From that day the whole tenor of the life of John was changed. The disciple of the Baptist was now a follower of Jesus. At once he had an interview with his

Master, which was the starting-point of that entire devotion

The Life of
of heart and consecrated
life

St.

John.

15
so indellibly im-

which has

pressed

all

believers in Christianity.

From
feast of

the narrative as given by John, he followed his

into Galilee, was with him at the marriageCana, journeyed with him to Capernaum, thence to Jerusalem (ii. 12, 13), and from there returned through Sa-

new Teacher

maria (iv. 8). John, then, for an uncertain interval of time, resumed his former occupation. Jesus visits him, and again calls him, possibly more than once (Matt. iv. 18, 21, Luke v. 1-11), to become an Apostle and fisher of men. He leaves his chosen vocation and takes up the work in God's spiritual kingdom, being joined, at the same time, by his brother James, and also, Peter, a chosen three whose number was soon to be augmented to twelve, not as disciples only, but as special representatives, to be termed Apostles. In this list the foremost names have always been, John, James, and Peter, sons of Zebedee and Jonah. They belonged to the innermost circle of the Lord's friends, and unquestionably John was foremost in his confidence and love. Peter, John, and James were with him in the chamber of death when he raised the daughter of Jairus (Mark v. 37-42), in the glory of the transfiguration (Matt. xvii. 1, 2), when he foretold them of the destruction of Jerusalem (Mark xiii. 3, in this instance Andrew was present), and in the agony of Gethsemane (Matt, In this group Peter w^as always the chief spokesxxvi. 37). man, owing to his impetuous nature, yet to John belongs the more memorable distinction of being the disciple whom Jesus loved, and consequently the nearest and dearest to the Master, which love, in turn, was reciprocated with a more single and undivided heart than that portrayed in any of the other

disciples.

character of

There are certain striking facts which indicate why the John was worthy of the love of Jesus. The name, Boanerges, implies vehemence, zeal and intensity. On three specified occasions his burning nature displayed itself; once when he rebuked one who cast out demons in the Lord's

16

Stady of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

name because be was not of tbeir company (Mark ix. 38, Lake be stood ready to call down fire from beaven tbat tbe ix. 49) Samaritan villagers, wbo refused to receive Jesus, migbt be
;

Jerusalem, Salome, as tbe

and once again, on tbe last journey to moutb-piece of ber two sons, begs tbat tbey migbt sit, tbe one on tbe Messiab's rigbt band, and tbe otber on His left, in His kingdom. Tbis ambition, notwitbstanding bis close intimacy witb tbe Master, sbows tbat be was still ignorant of tbe true nature of Cbrist's kingdom. Being cballenged, tbe same bold temper and burning zeal were made manifest. He was willing to go tbrougb tbe fiery furnace in order to be close to tbe companionsbip of Jesus (Matt. XX. 20, 22), and bis after life proved tbat bis acceptaTbis strong nature properly attion was fully exemplified. tuned by Jesus, lost none of its zeal, but brougbt to tbe surface tbe ijentleness of tbat love wbicb constitutes tbe principal

consumed (Luke

ix. 54),

feature in tbe mission of Cbrist.

As tbe motber of Jobn bad taken ber place among tbe women wbo followed Jesus in Galilee and ministered unto Him of tbeir substance (Luke viii. 3), and journeyed witb bim
Jerusalem (Luke xxiii. 55), it is more tban probable tbat tbrougb ber tbe son came to know more of Marv of Magdala wbose cbaracter be depicts witb a master stroke and tbat otber Mary wbom be was afterwards to

on bis

last visit to

lionor
(xi.),

by a special command. Tbe fulness of bis narrative omitted in tbe Synoptics, leads to tbe conviction that be was well acquainted witb tbe family of Betbany. It is not necessary to dwell upon tbe bistory of tbe Last Supper, prepared by Peter and Jobn. It is enougb, in tbis
connection to point out tbat Jobn was tbere, as ever, tbe disciple wbom Jesus loved, and favored by reclining at tbe table witb bis bead upon tbe Ma&ter's bosom (xiii. 23). To bim tbe eager Peter makes signs of impatient questionings tbat be

sbould ask wbo it was tbat sbould betray Him (xiii. 24). He returns witb Jesus to tbe Mount of Olives, and is witbin sigbt or bearing of tbe conflict in Getbsemane; and wben tbe be-

The Life of
trayal
is

St.

John.

17
of confusion,
fol-

accomplished, after the


off,

first

moment
all

with Peter he follows afar


safety in flight (xviii. 15).

whilst the others have sought


alone, of

He

the disciples,

of the

lows Jesus to the council-chamber, and even to the prsetorinm Roman Procurator, and there hears the conversation between Jesus and the Roman governor (xviii. 28-38). From
casion,

notwithstanding the sorrows and terrors of that ocbuoyed up by that love which is stronger than death, he followed, accompanied by a few faithful women, to the place of crucifixion, and there he was to be a son to that mother who was then left desolate (xix, 26, 27). It would appear that the Sabbath which followed, John spent with the same faithful believers, and regardless of the denial of Peter he does not break his old friendship, and on Easter morning they go to visit the sepulchre. To them Mary of Magdala first runs with the information that the sepulchre is empty (xx. 2); and together they were first to see w^hat the strange words meant. John is first at the tomb, but Peter, the less restrained by awe, is the first to enter (xx. 4-8). After remaining about Jerusalem for at least eight days, together they return to Galilee and seek refreshment in their suspense by resuming their former occupation (xxi. 1-3). Here the dififerex\t characteristics of the two companions shew themselves. John is the first to recognize the form of the Lord as seen in the morning twilight, and Peter the first to spring overboard and swim towards the shore where He stood speaking to them The Gospel closes with a view of the deep afl'ec(xxi. 5-8). Peter was not satisfied tion which united the two disciples.
tlience,

with the revelation of his

know

that of his friend

"And

own

future, but also desired

to

what

shall this

man do?"

(xxi. 18-21).

The
friends

history of the Acts of the Apostles proves the two


united.

still

They were present


;

at the

Ascension and

on the day of Pentecost


as worshippers (Acts
iii.

together they entered the

Temple

Sanhedrin (Acts

iii.

15).

1), and boldly protested against the John's views having become greatly

18

Study of the Gospel of


tlie

St.

John.

Samaritans as brethren (Acts viii. 14). Jernsalem (Acts viii. 25) after the return from Samaria; but he was not there at the time of St.
enlarged he receives

We

lose sight of

him

at

Paul's

first visit (Gal.

i.

18, 19).

Some

fifteen years still later

and v^nth the other Apostles (A. J). considered the difference between the Jewish and the Gentile Christians (Acts xv. 6). At this time his reputation was great, for Paul speaks of him as being one of the three "pillars" of the Church (Gal. ii. 9), while the Scriptures are silent con50) he
w^as at Jerusalem,

cerning his work during this period, yet his character, the intaken iii Paul and Barnabas, and the command given them, would lead to the assumption that he was engaged to
terest

and organizing the Christians of Judea. Evidently his life was undergoing a change by being mellowed, and rising step by step to that high serenity which was
in teaching, exhorting

perfected in the closing period of his


c.

life.

The Traditional Period.

more or less show of up that gap which separates John from Jerusalem and leaves him at Ephesus. He may have been detained in Jerusalem by the sacred trust imposed on him by Christ in the case of the Virgin. During his prolonged stay in and around the Holy City he acquired that minute knowledge of its topography which marks the Fourth
The
traditions of a later age, with a

likelihood,

come

in to

fill

Gospel.

The date of John's final departure from Jerusalem is unknown. It is also uncertain whether or not he journeyed direct to Ephesus. It may be confidently assumed that he was not at Ephesus before the work of the Apostle Paul had been completed. It may be safely affirmed that
he ministered at Ephesus during the
latter part of his life;

but what was the extent of his work and the circumstances of his outward life, we are hopelessly left in doubt. He is
described (Eusebius' Eccl. Hist. B. III. C. 31) as a priest wearing the sacredotal plate, which was the special badge of the

The Life of
liigh-priest (Ex. xxxix. 30).

St.

John.

19

On the .assumption that he was the author of the Epistles ascribed to him, and also of the Apocalypse, then the writings imply that certain persecutions, either local or general, drove him to Patmos (Rev. i. 0); that the seven Churches, of which Asia was the center, were objects
of his special solicitude (Rev.
i.

11)

that he encountered un-

believers in the truth,


iv.
1,

2 Jno.
(3

7);

on which he grounded his faith (1 Jno. and that he was withstood by malicious

words

Jno. 10).
traditional picture of

The

John presents
is

botli the prob-

ship-wrecked off Ephesus, but arrives in that city in time to check the heresies which were being propagated in the Church. About this time he numbers among his disciples, Polycarp, Ignatius, Papias and Afterwards taken to Rome, under Domitian's perseothers. cution, and there thrown into a cauldron of boiling oil which, however, has no powers to do him injury from there sent to labor in the mines of Patmos returns to Ephesus on the accession of Nerva settles the canon of the Gospel-history, and writes his. own to supply what was wanting; meets heresies with the strongest possible protests; through his agency the temple of Artemis is despoiled of its magnificence introduces Jewish mode of celebrating the Easter feast without harm drank the cup of hemlock that when he felt death approaching he calmly laid himself down in the sepulchre, which had been prepared for him under his own direction, and quietly passed away that after his interment there came strange movements in the earth over him, and when the tomb w^as opened it was found to be empty. Among the many traditions w^hich cluster around the name of John, the three following deserve more than a passing notice: Once going to bathe at Ephesus and perceiving Cerinthus within, he immediately rushed out crying, "Let us fly, lest even the bath-house fall on us, because Cerinthus, the enemy of the truth, is within." Cerinthus had denied the realtv of the Incarnation. The storv was doubtless invented
able and the improbable.
; ;

He

20
for the

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

purpose of opposing the views of those

who

lield

sim-

ilar doctrines.

John, after his return from Patmos, made a tour of the he might appoint presbyters. In one of the cities his attention was attracted by a lad of noble bearing, whom he specially commended to a presbyter for instruction, but who neglected him. Soon after the young man went from
cities that

bad to worse, and

finally

became chief of a

set

of bandits.
for

When
he

the Apostle returned to that city he confounded the


dehis

me my deposit," knew he had received no money from John. He then manded the young man, but only to receive the story of
presbyter by saying, " Come, restore to
downfall.

The

Apostle, without delay,

mounted

a horse, and

in haste rode to the region infested

by the

robbers,

taken by them. to fly, but the aged Apostle entreated him to stay, and by his loving tears and kindly exhortations induced him to return to the Church, to which in due time he was restored. The third story is that towards the close of his life, when he was so infirm that he had to be carried to and from the church,
the chief recognized

When

and was him he turned

and was too weak to preach, at the close of the service he would often say no more than this, "Little children, love one His hearers having become wearied of this, said another."
to him, " Master,
this alone

why
it is

dost thou always say this ?"


is

erable Apostle replied, "It


is

the Lord's

The vencommand; and if

done,

enough."

both of which are intense.

two sides of his charactei-, have the intensity of action, intensity of thought, intensity of love and intensity of hate. His love was not only tender, but also keenly spiritual. His love of truth and devotion to Jesus were so great that he hated lukewarmness, insincerity, falsehood and all other manHe never hesitated to rebuke evil and all ner of wrong. other opposition to the truth. Yet in these rebukes and stern integrity he was ever alive to the wants of humanity, and never swerved in his love for the brotherhood of man.

The

traditions represent the

We

The Life of

St.

John.

21
stories concern-

From one

})oint of

view the traditions or


In vain
is

the false from the true.

to separate ing him are disappointing. All our conceptions of the Apostle's

the

efl'ort

solely from the New TesThere the truest conception is given in the announcement that he was "the disciple whom Jesus loved;" who possessed a burning zeal for the Master's glory the great Apostle of Love, not on account of an easy temper, an indefinite benevolence, or a character soft, yielding and feminine, bat as one continually growing, more and more, into the likeness of Him whom he tenderly loved. His vision became unclouded in the possession of the Eternal Word, and his recollections of Him who spake as man never spake were acute and positive. And thus, near the end of a long and noble life he was specially fitted to write that Gospel which has been called " the Gospel of Eternity," and " the Gospel of Love," for, from his early manhood upwards, he bad been an Apostle his head had rested on the bosom of the Savior of Man; he had stood beside the Cross; had witnessed the Ascension; had cherished till her death the mother of the Master; had seen the close of the Jewish dispensation, and the overthrow of the Holy City, and finally a long life of contemplation and an eye-witness of the spreading of the Gospel. It is universally conceded that St. John lived to a great age, and probably died about the year 100 a. d., and was buried at Ephesus.

mind and character must be derived

tament.

22

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

CHAPTER
The Fourth Gospel
historical

II.

AUTHENTICITY OF THE FOURTH GOSPEL.


is

one of singular charm and surpass-

ing value, and must be regarded as one of the main pillars of

Indeed Christianity would remain Christianity. were the apostolic authorship, or its credibility, disproved
it was written, the doctrines of Jesus and had been extensively proclaimed, and churches

because, before
his resurrection
established.

But without this Gospel our conceptions of would be materially changed. Christianity
I.

Statement of Doubts.
of the Fourth Gospel has not only been

The genuineness
of the

called in question, but also has been

made

the battle-ground

New

Testament.

In the prolonged controversy some

of the most acute minds in the Christian Church have been

The engaged, and divers schools of thought established. formed upon supposed critical grounds may be opinions ranged into four classes, of which the following will serve as
an abridged expression
a.
: :

Classes of Opinions.

" The Fourth Gospel was written by the First Opinion Apostle John, the son of Zebedee. The statements contained the discourses which the author in that Gospel are all true puts into the month of Jesus were actually held by him." This is the orthodox and traditional view, and held generally by the vast bodj^ of Christians, and supported by such critics
;

and others. Second Opinion " The Fourth Gospel is, in ftict, by the Apostle John, although it may have been revised and reas Godet, Keil, Schanz, "Westcott,
:

Statement of Doubts.

23

touched by

liis

disciples.

The

facts

recounted in that Gospel

are direct traditions in regard to Jesus.

often from compositions expressing only the

The discourses are manner in which

mind of Jesus." This is the Ewald, and in some respects that of Beyschlag, opinion of Ritschl, Weisse, Sanday, Reuss, and E. A. Abbott. Third 0[)inion " The Fourth Gospel is not the production of the Apostle John. It was attributed to him about the year A. D. 100. The discourses are almost entirely fictitious but the narrative parts contain valuable traditions, ascending in part to the Apostle John." This is the opinion of Renan, Weizsaecker, and Michael Nicolas. Fourth Opinion " The Fourth Gospel is in no sense the work of the Apostle John. And whether, as regards the facts or the discourses which are reported in it, it is not a historic book; it is a work of the imagination and in part allegorical, concocted about the year 150, in which the author has proposed to himself, not to recount actually the life of Jesus, but to make believe in the idea that he himself had formed of Jesus." This constitutes the radical view, and with some variations held by Baur, Schw.egler, Strauss, Zeller, Volkmar, Helgenfield, Schenkel, Scholten, Renille, Tayler, and Iloltzmann.
the author had conceived the
: :

b.

History of Doubts.

doubts of the authenticity of this Gospel, based grounds, were brought forward in the seventeenth century, in England, by an unknowm writer, which
first

The

upon

critical

were refuted by the great scholar, Le


ever, to this, certain

.Clerc. Anterior, howquestions arose concerning this Gospel. Cerdon, Marcion, the Montanists, and other ancient heretics

did not deny the authenticity of the Gospel, but held that the Apostle was mistaken, or else the Gospel had been interpolated in those passages which were opposed to their tenets.

Sometime

in the latter half of the


is

eccentric individuals (there

constituted a sect)

second century, a few no ground for supposing they denied the genuineness of the Gospel of

24

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

John. They received the nickname of Alogi, which has tlie double signification of " deniers of [the doctrine of] the Logos" and " men devoid of reason." Their difficulty with this
Gospel was solely a doctrinal one.

They

likewise rejected

the Apocalypse, and ascribed both books to Cerinthus, a cotemporary of St. John; but appealed to no tradition in support of their view. The next recorded instance belongs to the year 1792,

when

was renewed by Edward Evanson, in a book The sientitled, On the Dissonance of the Four Evangelists. lence was again broken in 1820, when Bretschneider, in his His arguments are strong in Probabilia, renewed the assault.
the attack

comparison with those of his predecessors. He relies chiefly on the strangeness of such language and thoughts as those of St. John coming from a Galilean fisherman, and the dift'erence between the representations of the person and manner of the speech of Jesus given by the Apostle and the Synoptists. The Probabilia aroused a multitude of critics who so thoroughly replied to it that Bretschneider retracted his opinion, and admitted that his objections had been fully answered. No other opponent of the genuineness of the Gospel appeared until 1835, when Dr. Strauss, in his Life of Jesus, renewed the contest. He was answei-ed by Neander, Tholuck, Hase, Liicke, and others. Moved by these replies. Dr. Strauss retracted his doubts in 1838, but again advanced them in 1840.
c.

The Tubingen School.

Next comes the fiimous school of Tiibingen, from which


have been derived
pel.
all

The

leader of this school

the recent adverse criticism on the Goswas the late Dr. F. C. Baur, a

man

possessed of vast learning, great industry and acute incharacteristic of his criticism is the doctrine of insight. Thus he ascribes to the New Testament writers a tention.

special aim,

which leads them to exaggerate certain facts, and omit or invent others. He seeks everywhere for some party or private purpose which colors the narrative, and to the au-


Statement of Doubts.
tlior

25

of the Fourth Gospel he ascribes the deUberate purpose of passing himself off as the Apostle, in order to impose on the Church his doctrine of the Logos.

The
is

rejection of John's Gospel

by the Tubingen
there

critics

a part of their plan

in the attempted reconstruction of

early Christian history.


difference

They

declare

was a

radical

between the Jewish and Gentile types the one led by Peter at the head of the of Christianity, original disciples, and the other party that adhered to Paul. Several books of the New Testament they ascribe to the effort, made at a later day, to bridge over this gulf; and the Fourth Gospel is a product of this pacifying tendency, affirming it to have been written about the middle of the second century, by a Christian of Gentile birth, who assumed the name of John in order to give an apostolical sanction to

and

hostility

his production.

Iloltzman, one of the leading exponents of the Tubingen


school has recently (1885) given the following reasons for his views: The prologue contains the only passage in the Gospel

Jesus,

and eternal being of wholly in tone from the Synoptic Gospels. The historic element, in John, yields to the supernatural and

which and

treats of the pre-existence


differs

philosophic one.
characters, places

New

historic facts are introduced, besides

and situations which are not in the tirst three Gospels. In John the scene of Christ's labor is laid chiefly at Jerusalem, but in the Synoptics around Galilee.
Important events recorded in the first three Gospels are omitted by John, such as the Temptation, the Sermon on the Mount, the Transfiguration, and many miracles relating The Synoptics give but one year to demoniacal possessions.
for the public life of Jesus, while

John

requires more.

The

events in the Fourth Gospel are for the sake of introducing the conversations, not for their own sake, as in the Synop-

John's Christ teaches in. allegories instead of popular The teachings of Jesus in the first three Gospels parables. bear immediately on earthly life and human conduct, and
tics.

2t)

>'^tu(ly

of the Gospel of St. John.


ideal themes.

that

ill

Jolni on

more
;

In the Synoptics Jesus

and in John, he inculcates faith in himself. In John there is no development in the ideas of Jesus, or only trace of growth and struggle; for all is in broad contrast of light and shadow, of good and evil, and lacking that variety of earthly color which is found in the other narrations.
teaches moral trnth

The Synoptics
facts,

are a collection of single, scarcely connected


is

while John's

a connected whole, and tilled with a spir-

be found in the others. Holtzman thinks these contrasts are so difficult to explain that the easiest way out is to suppose the Fourth Gospel not the w^ork of an apostle, but the frnit of a long development of Grecian thought. However, Holtzman ends by declaring that, owing to the variety of views still existing among the ablest critics, the. problem of the Fourth Gospel is more and
itual life, scarcely to

more an open question. The constant shifting of the date of the Gospel, by the destructive critics, must even present an alarming state of afThere is now a general agreement that fairs to that school. the very late date assigned by Baur and Schwegler somewhere between the years 160 and 170 a. d. can not be main-

Scholten and Zeller retreat to 150 Hilgenfeld goes back to 130 or 140, being at last constrained to admit its use by Justin Martyr; in the first volume of his History of Jesus Keim, with great confidence, placed it between the years 110 and 115, but soon perceiving the fatal consequences of such an admission, in the last volume, and in the abridged edition of his work, he goes back to the year 130; Dr. Schenkel, although contributing nothing new on the subject, says, "From the fact that the Alexandrian Gnostics were acquainted with
tained.
;

this

Gospel about the year 120-130,


it

we

are justified only in


earlier (110-

concluding that
120)."

was written

at least
I.

some years

Character of Jesus, Vol.

It is thus seen that there has

been an enforced shifting of

the date of the Gospel of John to the earlier part of the second century. This [)resents serious difficulties on the suppo-

Statement of Doubts!.
sition that the

27

Upon the weight of the Gospel is spurious. uniform tradition that St. John spent the latter part of his life in Asia Minor, and died about the year 100 a. d., how could a spurious Gospel, so peculiar and different from the Synoptics, and so utterly unhistorical, as it is claimed, have gained currency as the work of an apostle both among the Christians
and the Gnostic
years after
or not
heretics, if it originated only

some

thirty

when there were still living so many who must have known whether he wrote such a work
St. .John's death,
?

attempt has been made to obviate this dilRculty by denying that the Apostle John was ever in Asia Minor. This view, originated in 1840 by Liitzelberger, a very wild writer, has been revived by and found strenuous advocates in Keim, Scholten, and others, though rejected and fully refuted by critics of the same school, as Hilgenfeld Baur and Strauss deemed it unworthy of notice. The historic evidence is decisively against it, and to attempt to support it by merely ar;

An

bitrary conjectures, as Scholten does, leaves the impression

that the writer has

become desperate
d. Position of

in defending his cause.

Renan.

Renan, differing from the Tiibingen school, affirms that " convinced that the Fourth Gospel has an actual connection with the Apostle John, and that it w^as w^ritten about the end of the first century," {Life of Jesus, Preface xv.) I " hold that the Fourth Gospel was not written by John himself, that it was for a long time esoteric and secret in one of the schools which adhered to John. To penetrate into the mystery of this school, to learn how the writing in question was put forth, is simply impossible " (p. 315). " This question of the authorship of the Fourth Gospel is assuredly the most singular that there is in literary history. I know of no question of criticism in which contrary appearances are so evenly balanced and which hold the mind more completely in sushe
is

pense.

One

of two things must be true; either the

28

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

author of the Fourth Gospel is a disciple of Jesus, an intimate disciple, and belonging to the oldest epoch or else the author has employed, in order to give himself authority, an artifice
;

which he has pursued from the commencement of the book to the end, the tendency beitig to make believe that he was a witness as well situated as it was possible to be to render a Either we must acknowltrue account of the facts. edge John, son of Zebedee, as the author of the Fourth Gospel, or regard that Gospel as an apocryphal writing composed by some individual who wished to pass it oft' as a work of John, son of Zebedee " (p. 313). " The author of the Fourth
.
.

Gospel was assuredly a personage of the first order." (Pre" There is one thing, at least, which I regard face xxix). as very probable, and that is, that the book was written before the year 100; that is to say, at a time
tics

when

the Synop-

had not yet a complete canonicity." (Introduction xlv.) The above extracts, which might be further extended, are' taken from the thirteenth edition of Renan's Life of Jesus. The admissions cited, and the fact that Renan bases his Life of Jesus on the Fourth Gospel, should have placed him in that class which admits the Johannine authorship, but afiirms that In this it has been revised and retouched by a later hand. category Renan placed himself in the first edition of his Life It would be much easier to believe the latter than of Jesus. He to assume the opinion afterwards embraced by Renan. not produce arguments to prove his assumptions, but does proceeds upon the idea that they are true, and must be acTo receive the views as held by Renan requires many cepted. suppositions, much imagination and a degree of credulity hardly admissible. It is not tenable that the Gospel was kept
'

secret.

The

intelligence of the Christians, at that period,

would not permit of a forgery. The extreme views put forth by Baur and his disciples, more moderate tone of Renan, and the discussions engenthe
dered thereby have resulted favorably to the opinion of the Johannine authorship of the Fourth Gospel.

Historical Evidences.

29
criticisms con-

Having presented a resume of the adverse


cerning the authenticity of
is

tlie

Fourth Gospel, our attention


its

next drawn to the evidences of


II.

credibility.

Historical Evidences.

In considering the historical evidences for the Johannine authorship of the Fourth Gospel, it is necessary to bear in mind that it is agreed by all who maintain this position that
the book was written towards the close of the
tirst

century,

and

time when the Synoptic Gospels had gained general currency; also, that the substance of its record deals with problems which belong to the life of the Church, and to a
at a

faith

more

fully developed.

The
tically
lian,

theological literature of the Christian

Church prac-

begins with Irenseus, Clement of Alexandria and Tertulwhich writers use the Four Gospels as fully and as de-

cisively as

apostolic treatises

any modern author. What remains of the letters, and fragments few in number that rep-

resent the earlier literature of the second century, give very


little

scope for the direct use of the

New

Testament.

Regarding these ancient testimonies there is one point, too frequently overlooked, upon which special stress should be laid, and that is, the main evidence for the genuineness of the Gospels is of an entirely different character from that adduced to prove the authenticity of any classical work. It is not the testimony of a few eminent Christian writers to their private opinions, but the evidence which they aflbrd of the whole body of Christians and this respecting books in which they were deeply interested and such books as were the very foundation of that faith which separated them from that world which exposed them to hatred, scorn, and persecution, and which often demanded the sacrifice of life itself.
;
;

It should also here be noticed* that the greater the differences between the Gospels, real or apparent, the more difficult
it

must have been

for

them

to gain that universal reception,


last

which,

all critics affirm,

was accorded them during the

30

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

quarter of the second century, unless they had been handed

down

as

plies peculiarly to the

genuine from the beginning. This observation apFourth Gospel as compared with the
it

Synoptics,

Nor should
lost,

be overlooked, for

it is

a matter of great

significance that Eusebius,


in his Ecclesiastical

who had

access to

many works now


St.

History, speaks without reserve of

the Fourth Gospel as the unquestioned


there
to

work of

John.

If

had been any doubts among the Christian writers, prior his time, he certainly would have noticed them, for he has

quoted the criticisms of Dionysius of Alexandria on the Apocalypse. The unanimity of the churches during the second half of the second century, although widely separated, in the acceptance of the Fouth Gospel, as the production of St. John, is such an inexplicable fact supposing it to have been forged that some of the destructive critics have resorted to the assumption that the early Christians were not critical and accepted as authentic any writing which seemed edifying, without an examination of its authority. This is a mere assumpti(m contradicted by the facts in the case. In the preface to his Gospel

St.

Luke assumes

the critical position, rejecting the false and

many had taken in hand by the Christians, and that "certainty" might be known he would write in order the things wherein Theophilus had been instructed. What was this but a critical purpose to separate the uncertain and doubtful accounts of Jesus from those well-ascertained and verified? This gives sanction to the idea that critical judgment was exercised in the Apostolic Church, and that influence must have produced an effect in the succeeding age. It is a well-known fact that many apocryphal and doubtInstead of ful Gospels were in circulation at the beginning. being hostile to Christ they were zealous to exalt him to the utmost, to heap miracle on miracle; to paint the lily, and add a perfume to the violet. Love for Christ might have reretaining the true.
affirms that
to set forth the things believed in

He

Indirect Evidences.

31

tained them, but' the sense of truth rejected them. If, as it has been so confidently asserted, the critical faculty at first

was

absent,

and only blind feeling

existed,

why were

al!

these

well-meant but spurious narratives excluded, one after the other, from the received Scriptures ? What has become of the " Gospel of the Infancy," ascribed to the Apostle Thomas
;

the " Protoevangelium," ascribed to James, brother of" the Lord the " Gospel of the Nativity of Mary ;" the " Gospel of Nicodemus," and the " Gospel to the Hebrews," which
;

once had high authority? The Churches rejected them one by one by that sense of truth which was just as much an element of primitive Christianity as the spirit of love the spirit of truth which Jesus promised should he gi^'en his disciples, and which should " take of his, and show to them."
;

The

earliest historical evidence,


itself,

Testament
century.

must be found

in the

subsequent to the IN^ew remains of Christian

literature belonging to the first three-quarters of the second

These are scanty and of such a character that defimust not be expected, save what A few letters, such as the Epistle of actually occurs therein. Clement of Rome to the Corinthians, the Epistle ascribed to Barnabas, the short Epistle of Polycarp to the Philippians, the Epistles attributed to Ignatius, the Shepherd of Ilermias, the Clementine Homilies, and the writings of the Apologists, Justin Martyr, Tatian, Theophilus, Athenagoras, and Hermias constitute nearly all the literature of that period which has been preserved. The nature of the writings of the Apologists hardly admit of the Gospels being mentioned by name.
nite references to the Gospels
i.

Indirect Evidences of tub Authenticity of the Fourth Gospel.

Proceeding to the historical evidence of the genuineness


of the Fourth Gospel the following points must be considered
a.
:

The

attestation to this Gospel


to the

which has come down

to us

appended

book

itself.

32
b.

St>xdy of the Gospel of St. John.

The testimony derived from the Apostolic Fathers. c. The testimony of the Primitive Fathers. d* The use of the Gospel by the various Gnostic sects. c. The use of the Gospel by Celsus, an oi)poser of Chris-

tianity.

The above enumeration would necessarily present an unThis would not be necessary in orline of evidence. der to prove the genuineness of the writing. Even if the
broken
line

should be broken, the universal acceptation of the Gospel during the last quarter of the second century, would prove The line of evidence, its existence in a jjrevious period. however, is a remarkable one, and one of great strength, when
is

the object of the^arly documents


a.

considered.
to the

The Testimony Appended

Gospel.

first and earliest external evidence of the genuineJohn's Gospel is attached to the writing itself, and is ness of found in all the copies which have been preserved, whether It is true that the last in the original or in ancient versions. verse of this Gospel (xxi. 25), according to Tischendorf, is

The

written in a different hand in the Codex Sinaiticus, though by a contemporary scribe. On the pal?eographical question,

it is

however, Tregelles does not agree with him. In many copies said in a note that this verse has been regarded by some
as a later addition.

The Gospel concludes


verse of the

at the

middle of the twenty-fourth

twenty -first
:

chapter.

The

last tliree verses of

the

chapter read thus

" This report therefore

went abroad among


it

the brethren, that this disciple

was not
;

to die.

did not say to him,

He will not die


what
is it

but. If
?

And yet Jesus be my will that he


the disciple

remain

till

I come,

to thee

This

is

who

and hath written these things." Here the author of the Gospel concluded. The addition is, "And
testifieth of these things,

we know that

his testimony

is

true.
;

And

there are also

many

other things which Jesus did and if they were to every one written, I suppose that not even the world itself could contain

Indirect Evidences.

33

the books that would be written,"

Canon Westcott makes

the Gospel end with the close of the twenty-third verse, and on the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth verses remarks, " These

two verses appear


before
its

to be separate notes attached to the

Gospel
not

publication.

The form

of verse twenty-four, conit is

trasted with that of xix. 85, shews conclusively that

the witness of the Evangelist.


tive

The words were probably

added by the Ephesian elders, to whom the preceding narrahad been given both orally and in writing. The change of person in verse twenty-five (/ suppose compared with we It is quite possible that kno'io) marks a change of authorship. this verse may contain words of St. John (comp. xx. 30) set here by those who had heard them." Comments in loco.
In the phrase, " we know that his testimony is true," we have either a real or forged attestation to the genuineness of the Gospel. If the Gospel had been forged at a period later than that of St. John, what possible credit could its author have supposed would he given to an anonymous witness? forger would have named his pretended authority. The attestation clearly presupposes that its author was known to

those

who

first

received a transcript of the Gospel.

Upon

Norton observes, "According to ancient accounts, St, John wrote his Gospel at Ephesus, over the church in which city he presided during the latter part of his long life. It is not improbable, that, before his death, its circulation had been confined to the members of that church. Thence copies of it would be afterwards obtained; and the copy for transcription was, we may suppose, accompanied by the strong attestation which we now find, given by the church, or the elders of the church, to their full faith in the accounts which it contained, and by the concluding remark made by the writer
this point

of this attestation in
Gospels,
2?.

his

own

person,"

Genuineness of

the

461,

It is further to

from that of John, and was

be observed that the language is difierent at first probably written a little

34

Stiuly of the Gospel of

>SY.

John.

separate from the text, and at a very early period became in-

corporated into
b.

it.

The

Testimoivj of the Ajiostolic Fathers.


is

The Apostolic Fathers

name given

to certain writers

and communed with the Apostles. Those generally included under the title are Clement of Rome, Ignatius, Polycarp, Barnabas, and Hermas. Sometimes the name is extended to Papias of Hierapolis and the

who were

disciples of

author of the Epistle to Diognetus. The writings ascribed to these men are among the earliest utterances of the Christian "With the exception of the Shepherd of Hermas, they faith.
are of the nature of occasional productions.

They contain

no attempt to formulate the truths of Christianity, but breathe a spirit of deep piety. There are but few references to the ]^ew Testament in them, and very few quotations. The Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians probably antedates the Gospel of John, although it shows traces of the thought which is characteristic of that book. The Epistle of
(a. d. 120-130) offers some correspondences and more contrasts with the teacliings of St. John. Keim, although denying the authenticity of the Gospel, admits the probability that Barnabas refers to it. The Letters ascribed

Barnabas

to Ignatius certainly fall within the first half of the second

century, and they contain allusions to and adaptations of this

Gospel which can

not seriously be

considered

doubtful.

Among

be cited those which state that the true meat of the Christian is the "bread of
the

more

direct passages

may

God, the bread of heaven, the bread of life, which is the flesh of Jesus Christ," and his drink is " Christ's blood, which is love
incorruptible" (Rom.
vii.

comp. John

vi. 32, 51, 53).

"The
which

Spirit

is

not led astray, as being from God.


it

Again: For it
that

knoweth whence

cometh and whither

it

goeth

and

testeth

(Philad. vii.; comp. John iii. 8, xvi. 8). is hidden This coincidence with John iii. 8, is too strong to be accidental; for the application in the Gospel is natural, while that in Ignatius strained and secondary. And again the

Indirect Evidences.

35
ix.)

is

words "being himself the door of the Father" {Philad. probably an allusion to John x. 9.

The

decisive

testimony,

however,

of

the

Apostolic

Fathers, to the authenticity of John's writings, belong to Poly carp and Papias. The Apostles appointed Polycarp a

Recent investigations, independent of all theological interests, have fixed his martyrdom iu 155-6 A. D. (Lightfoot, Contemporary Review, 1875, p. 838), having been a Christian eighty-six years, and consequently having been alive during the greater part of St. John's residence in Asia. There is no good reason for questioning the statement that he associated with the Apostles John, Andrew and Philip. Irenseus, who had seen him in his youth, says, " I can tell the place in which the blessed Polycarp sat and taught, and his going out and coming in, and the manner of his life, and the form of his person, and the discourses he made to the people, and how he related his conversation with John and others who had seen the Lord," {Letter to Florinas). One short letter of Polycarp has been preserved, and in it there is a striking passage taken from I. John "For whoso:

bishop of the church in Smyrna.

ever does not confess that Jesus Christ


he,
is

Antichrist, {Philippidns

vii.;

come in the comp, I John iv.


is

flesh,
2,
3).

an exact reproduction of St. John's thought in compressed language which is all borrowed from him. He places St. John's words, so to speak, in a popular formula. It is admitted that the Gospel of John was written by the same one who penned the First Epistle of John. testimony to one is necessarily a testimony to the other. Now the external evidence of the genuineness of this Epistle is very weighty. Not only have ^ve the quotation from Polycarp, but Papias also " uses testimonies from the first Epistle of John" (Eusebius Ecccl. Hist. b. iii. c. 39), and frequently cited by
is

This

Irenseus.

The testimony
ngeus,

of Papias to St, John's Gospel,

is

like that

of Pol}' carp, secondary and inferential.

Papias was a litarer

According to Ireof Jolin and a companion of

86

Study of the Gospel of

St.

John.

Polycarp (Eusebius Eccl. Hist. b. iii. c. 39). In the preface to his " Exposition of Oracles of the Lord," Papias does not say he saw or heard any of the Apostles, but that he had received the things concerning the faith from those who were well acquainted with them, and of them he made dilHe igent inquiiy concerning all that they had related. thus attempted to illustrate the Sacred Records by such information as could be obtained from the earliest disciples. The use of the first Epistle of John, by Papias, points to his acquaintance with the Gospel. There are also several minute details in the fragment of Papias' preface, which tend Also, a remarkable tradition found in the same direction. in a preface to a Latin MS. of the Gospel, which assigns to Papias an account of the composition of the Gospel similar to that given in the Muratorian fragment (Canon of N. T.
p. 76).

by John
said,

Irenseus,

In close connection with Papias stand " the elders " quoted among whose words is a clear reference to St.
{Iren. v. 36)
:

" for this reason (they taught) the

Lord

There are many mansions in my Father's house" (comp. John xiv. 2). Although the quotation is anonymous, yet it is taken from a writing, and the context makes it highly probable that the passage is from Papias' " Exposition." The main value of the testimony of Polycarp and Papias lies in the fact that they represent what may justly be termed a School of St. John. While it is possible that Papias never saw John, yet he had a strong point of connection with the Apostolic body, for, at Hierapolis, he conversed with two
daughters of the Apostle Philip (Eusebius Eccl. Hist. v. iii. c. 39), and had studied with Polycarp. The anonymous author of the Epistle to Diognetus re-

John (L John iv. 9, 10, 16, passage " For God loved mankind
fers to
:

17, 19), in the following

....
will

to

whom

he

sent his only begotten Son, to whom he has promised a kingdom in heaven, and will give it to them that love him. And

when you know him, with how great joy

you be

filled?

Indirect Evidences.

37

And how

will you love him, whoso loved you before? And having loved him, you will be an imitator of his goodness." This testimony is of the same nature as that of Polycarp and

Papias.
It would appear that the Shepherd of Hermas quotes from the Fourth Gospel in the following passage " The gate is the only way of coming to God. For no man shall go to his Son," {Sim. ix. 12; comp. John xiv. 6). God, but by The whole third command in Hermas and the Epistles of St. John might well be compared together. It is more than probable that he had read the Apocalypse, for he imitates it.
:

c.

Testim.ony of the Primitive Fathers.

The first half of the second century presents us with a name deserving of special mention. Justin Martyr was born
about the year 89, and was thus a contemporary of the Apostle John. His acquaintance with the church was very His writings consist of his Apologies, addressed extensive. to the Roman Emperor, the Senate and the people, written about the year 140, and a dialogue in defense of Christianity with Trypho the Jew, written somewhat later. Justin was

one of the
is

earliest

as such

and not

and ablest of Christian apologists, and it as a theologian he is to be considered.

He

defended Christians, not Christianity. In his time there was a Jewish reaction against Christianity, which found its expression in the formal curses of the synagogue, in the dissemination of atrocious slanders against the Christian life, and in the bloody persecution of the Christians by the ringleaders of the Jewish
revolt

under Hadrian.

rabbis forbade

all

religious discussions with Christians.

The Jewish But

these dangers to which the infant

Church was exposed were

of far less significance than those which threatened from the antagonism of heathendom. It was a time when the Christian
liarly fitted

was put on the defensive, and Justin's education pecuhim for the Avork, and the influence of his writ-

ings

may

be traced in those of Tatian, Irenaeus, Minucius

38

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.
transcribe, translate,

Felix, Tertullian,

and Theophilus, who

and imitate passage after passage.


Justin's First

Apology

is

a noble appeal for liberty of

conscience, a
Christians,

manly and a lofty vindication of the character of the Christian religion. The Second Apology, much shorter, re-

protest against persecuting Christians as

pels the

mockery of the heathen enemies of

Christianity,

gives the reasons


tion,

why the Christians complained of persecuand why God did not interfere in behalf of His people.
and redempprophecy, and the

In the Dialogue with Trypho the prejudices of the Jews are


corrected, the doctrine of Christ's incarnation
tion

through him proved by reference to shown to be the true spiritual Israel. As Justin addressed the enemies of the Church, he would not appeal for proofs to the New Testament, and in giving account of the Christian doctrines he would use such statements In his as would bear directly upon the points he presented. he speaks of "Memoirs," or "Memorabilia" of writings Christ, and of these he commonly mentioned the " Memoirs made by the Apostles which are called Gospels." From these he quotes as the authentic and recognized sources of knowledge reflectins; the life and teachings of the Savior. There is no citation by Justin, from the " Memoirs," which is not found in the canonical Gospels. He cites our present canon, and particularly the Four Gospels, continually, about two hundred times. From all of his works there might be exChristians
tracted almost a complete
life

of Christ.

obvious and striking passage to be noted in which Justin makes use of the Fourth Gospel, is that recorded "For Christ in the sixty-first chapter of his First Apology also said, Except ye be born again, ye shall in no wise enter

The

iirst

into the

kingdom

of heaven.

But that

it

is

impossible for

those
those

who have once been born to who brought them forth, is

enter into the

wombs
all "

of

manifest to

(comp.

John iii. 3-5). of John that

This passage is so characteristic of the Gospel it is precluded from being attributed to any

Lidired Evidences.
other source.
It will
is

39

be observed that the conchision in the


evidently intended as an observation of

passage, by Justin,

his own, but it breaks the connection in which it stands. In John, on the other hand, it is a logical part of the discourse between Jesus and Nicodemus. To affirm that the autliQr of the Fourth Gospel, in this instance, as has been claimed, borrows from Justin, is to do violence to the ordinary use of language. Justin puts the concluding part forth as a serious proposition which, as it stands, is idle and betrays its nonoriginality,

Justin's views of the doctrine of the

Logos were more

or less influenced by Philo and the Alexandrian philosophy, but the doctrine of the Incarnation was utterly foreign to that

and could only have been derived from the Gospel of John. Frequently he speaks in language similar to that of John (i. 14) of the Logos as " made flesh," or as " the Logos himself who took form and became man " [First Apol. c. 5, With reference to the deit}' of the Logos and his instru&c.). mental agency in creation note especially, " through him God created all things (2 Apol. c. 6 comp. John i. 1-3). It is
school,
:

known

succeeded Justin, Theophilus, Irenoeus, Clement, and Tertullian, founded as their doctrine of the Incarnation of the Logos on the Fourth
Gospel, the presumption
is

that the Fathers

who immediately

that Justin did the same.

Canon

'"the Synoptics do not anywhere declare Christ's pre-existence " [Introduc. Gospel St. John, p. Ixxxiv.).

Westcott admits that

John for this doctrine. That Christ is the first-born of God, being the Logos of which every race of men have been partakers (1 Apol. comp. John i. 4,. 5, 9), we have been taught and have dec. 46
Justin could only have relied on

Again
:

"

clared before."

In one place Justin appears to refer to the


as the source

"Memoirs"

which

he, as well as other Christians,

that Christ as the Logos was the "only-begotten"

God, a

title

applied by
that he

writers:

"For

John alone of all was the only-begotten of the Father

had learned Son of the New Testament

40

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

him in a peculiar manner as his Logos and Power, and having afterwards become man through the virgin, as we have learned from the Memoirs," {Dial. c. 105; comp. John i, 14, 18; iii. 16, 18).
of the universe, having been begotten by

This passage is a part of a very long comparison instituted between the twenty- second Psalm and the recorded events of Christ's life. The argument would be that the " only-begotten"(Ps.xxii. 20, 21) of the Psalm referred to Christ, which might be fully appreciated by Trypho, and perfectly valid

from Justin's point of view. In the Dialogue (c. 88) Justin

cites as the

words of John

"I am not ing" (comp. John i. 20,


the Baptist:

the Christ, but the voice of one cry23;


iii.

28).

The

declaration,

"I am

not the Christ," and this application to himself of the lan-

guage of Isaiah
in the Gospel of

(Isa. xl. 3), are attributed to

the Baptist only

John.

Hilgenfeld here recognizes the use

of this Gospel.

Justin uses the following peculiar language "The Aposhave written " that at the baptism of Jesus, " as he came up from the water the Holy Spirit, as a dove, lighted upon him," (Dial. c. 88). The descent of the Holy Spirit as a dove is mentioned only by Matthew and John (Matt. iii. 16; John i. 32, 33). This is the only place in which Justin uses the expression, " the Apostles have written." These references can be farther extended, but the passages
:

tles

cited will give sufficient evidence that they are not accidental

agreements.
tin's

Then

the universal reception of the


is

Four Gos-

pels in the time of Irenasus

"Memoirs"

a strong presumption that Juswere the same books, is decidedly confirmed


his use of the

by the evidences of

Fourth Gospel.

The fragments of Christian literature that have come down to us from the second half of the second century, afford
both positive and presumptive proof of the authenticity of the Fourth Gospel. The first distinctive declaration that the Apostle John was its author, comes from Theophilus, bishop
of Antioch,
a. d.

169-181.

In his work to Autolycus, he de-

Indirect Ecidences.
scribes John's Gospel as a part of the

41

Holy Scriptures, and as a writer guided by the Holy Spirit, for he declares, "The Holy Scriptures teach us, and all -who were moved by the Spirit, among whom John says, In the beginning was the word (or Logos), and the word was with God,' " {Lib. ii. c. 22). Jerome states that Theophilus composed a commentary on the Gospel, in which he handled their contents synoptically. As Jerome appears to have been thor-

John himself

'

oughly acquainted with the work, there


questioning his statement.

is

no just reason for

The testimony of
tin,

Tatian, the Assyrian, a disciple of Jus-

must be regarded as decisive. Baur and Zeller, conceded that in


peatedly from the Gospel of John.
is

Even the extreme

critics,

his apologetic treatise, the

Oratio ad Graecos, written about the year 170, he quotes reTatian's literary activity

a harmony of the Four Gospels which he called the Diatessaron e. " the Gosof Four "). pel made out This fact is attested by Eusebius, who says, " The Diatessaron is still in the hands of some," {Ecd. Hist. B. iv. c. 29) and Theodoret, in his work on Heresies {Haer. Feb. i. 20), says he found more than two hundred copies of the work in his diocese, and for it substituted copies of our Four Gospels. He further tells us that Tatian had " cut away the genealogies and such other passages as show the Lord to have been born of the seed of David after the flesh." ITotwithstandingthis mutilation the work appears to have been very popular in the orthodox churches of Syria, where it was used as a convenient compendium. Ephraem,*the deacon of

placed at

a. d.

155-170.

He composed

(?'.

Edessa, who was a celebrated Syrian Father, and died in the year 373, wrote a commentary on it. In an apocryphal Syriac work, entitled Doctrine of Addai, written about the middle of the third century, it is represented that the Christians of

Edessa come together " to the prayers of the service, and to (the reading of) the Old Testament and the ISTew of the Diatessaron."
exists in

Ephraem's Commentary on the Diatessaron an Armenian Version of the Svriac, of the

still

fifth

: ;

42
century,

Study of
It agrees

the.

Gospel of

St.

John.

with what is known of Tatian's, in omittini;^ the genealogies, and in beginning with the iirst verse of It presents some very ancient various readJohn's Gospel. ings, which accord remarkably with those of Justin Martyr.

So difficult and laborious a work as the Diatessaron would hardly have been undertaken, except to meet a want which had been widely felt. It implies that the four Gospels were used and recognized by those for whom it was intended as
authoritative.

There

is

another very important fact

as

Ta-

tian

was a disciple of Justin Martyr, it is the Harmony represented the set of books called by Justin " Memoirs," or " Memorabilia " of Christ.

just to assume that

Among the noted Fathers was Irenseus, a Greek, born in Asia Minor about a. d. 140, Bishop of Lyons in France, in 178, and possessed of a wide acquaintance with the Church both in the East and the West. In his youth he had conversed with the aged Polycarp, and retained a vivid recollecHe tion of the person and words of that remarkable man. testifies of the universal acceptance of the four Gospels, and argues there could have been no more nor fewer than four In a fragment, from Irenaeus is the following {Lib. iii. c. 11). passage relating to John's Gospel: "John, the disciple of the Lord, being desirous by declaring the Gospel to root out the
had been sown in the minds of men by Cerinthus, and a good while before by those who are called Nicolaitans, that he might confute them, and satisfy all that there and not, as is one God who made all things by his word they say, one who made the world, and another the Father of the Lord and one the Son of the Creator, and another from
error that
.

the super-celestial places, even Christ,

tinued ever impossible,


the Creator, and fled
.
.

who they say also conwho descended upon Jesus the Son of
into his pilcroma (or fulness)

away again

cut

ofi"

the disciple therefore of the Lord, willing at once to these errors, and leave a rule of truth in the Church

that there is one God Almighty, who by his word made all things visible and invisible; declaring hkewise, that by the

l)i<liircf

Evidences.

43

Word, by which God


;

finished the Creation, b}^ the

same

also

he bestowed salvation upon those men who are in the creation he thus begins in his doctrine, which is according to In the beginning was the Word,' " (Lardner's the Gospel
:

'

CredibUitij of the Gospels^ \o\. 11. p. 296).

It

may

be seen that Irenseus

expresses himself clearly

and
fore,

positively.

To assume

that John's Goapel

was made
violates

known during

Irenseus' lifetime, or at least a short time be-

draws heavily upon one's credulity, and

the

entire spirit of the writings of this Christian Father.

The

evidence of Irenseus affords strong probability that Polycarp If the Apostolic Avas acquainted with tlie Fourth Gospel.

Fathers knew nothing of this Gospel, why should those who immediateh' followed them have become so imbued with it ? There is a fragment entitled On the Resurrection, which belongs to the time of Justin Martyr, and in it we read, " The Logos of God, who was {or became) his Son, came to us clothed in the flesh', revealing both himself and the Father, giving to us in himself the resurrection from the dead and the eternal life which follows," (c. 1. comp. Jno. i. 1, 14; xiv. 9; xi. 25, 26). The allusions to John's Gospel are unmistakable.
A. D. 166, in a treatise

Claudius Appollinaris, bishop of Hierapolis in Phyrgia, on the Paschal Festival, refers to the

apparent difference between John and the Synoptic Gospels as to the time of the death of Jesus. Relying on the Gospel of John, Appollinaris held that it was on the day on which the paschal lamb was killed, the 14th of Nisan while his opponents, appealing to Matthew, maintained it was on the day In the same work, he also refers to the piercing following.
;

of Jesus' side and the effusion of w^ater and blood, which is only mentioned by John (xix. 34), Other references might be made, especiall}^ from Melito, bishop of Sardis (a. d. 165), in his work on Incarnation The Epistle of the Churches of Vienne and Lyons (a. d. 177) Athenagoras, the Athenian (a. d. 176) in his Plea for Christians
;
;

44
the Muratorian

Study of

the.

Gospel of
d.

St.

Jolm.

Canon (a. must be deemed sufficient.

170) and a few others, but this

tinually quoted

a. d. 180 the Fourth Gospel has been conand referred to by all the great writers of the close of the second and beginning of the third century, among whom may be mentioned Clement of Alexandria, TertuUian of Carthage and Origen. IsTone of these eminent theologians express any doubt concerning the authorship of the Gospel, and so numerous are their quotations from it, that were it lost, it might almost be re-constructed from their writings.

From

the year

It is in

evidence that near the close of the second century the

Fourth Gospel was not only received by the Church, but it was also widely disseminated, which could not have been true, had it not also been generally known prior to that time. Origen was the greatest scholar of that age, and one of the most distinguished of any age, and the most prolific writer of the ancient church. If there had ever been any doubts as to the authenticity of John's Gospel, it could not have escaped his knowledge. Born in the year 185 of Christian parents, from his birth to his death by martyrdom, in 254, he lived under the influence of the Christian religion and breathed its spirit. Of all meji he would be most likely to know the history of the Gospel of John, and he. accepts its genuineness without a shadow of a doubt. So great were his attainments that he has been called " The Father of Biblical criticism and exHe examined critically all the books egesis in Christendom,"
of the jSTew Testament,

marked

the

diflerence of style be-

tween the Epistle to the Hebrews, and the undisputed writings of the Apostle Paul, and says of it that " who really wrote it God only knows." He says that the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, are the " only undisputed ones in the whole Church of God throughout the world."
d.

Use of the Gospel by

the Gnostics.

The evidence of the use work of the Apostle John, by

of the Fourth Gospel, as the the Gnostic sects, of the second

Indirect Emdcnces.

45

century,

is

of more than secondary importance.

Those with

which we are concerned became conspicuous


(a. d.

in the second

quarter of the second century under the reigns of Hadrian

117-138) and Antonius Pius (a. d. 138-lGl). The most prominent of these sects were those founded by Marcion, Valentinus, and Basilides, to which may also be added the
Ophites.
to Rome about prepared a Gospel for his followers by striking from the Gospel of Luke what was inconsistent with his system. The other Gospels he rejected, not on the ground that they were spurious, but because he believed their authors were influenced by Jewish prejudice. careful comparison of John's Gospel with Marcion's doctrines demon-

Marcion was a native of Pontus, and came


a. d.

the year 130,

He

strates that

absolutely that

purpose.

them in so many places and so would have been utterly unsuitable for his He made a selection of the Gospels, and found that
it

contradicts

it

by mutilating that of Luke


purpose.

it could be best adapted to his " Marcion," says Tertullian, " having got the Epis-

tle of Paul to the Galatians, who reproves even the Apostles themselves for not walking straight, according to the truth of the Gospel, endeavors to destroy the reputation
. .
.

of those Gospels which are truly such, and are published under the name of Apostles, or also of apostolic men in order that

he may give to his own the credit which he takes away from them," {Adv. Marc. iv. 3). Addressing Marcion, Tertullian says, "If you had not rejected some and corrupted others of the Scriptures which contradict your opinion, the Gospel of John would have confuted you," {De Came Christi, c. 3). On
the other hand, the theosophic or speculative Gnostics, as the Valentinians, Basilidians and the Ophites, found more in

John's Gospel, which, by ingenious interpretation, they could use in support of their system. Valentinus was the author of the most vast and complete of all the Gnostic systems. He came to Rome about the year A. D. 140. Ptolemy, a disciple of Valentinus, in his Epistle

46

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

to Flora, preserved by Epiphanius {H(r. xxxiii. 3j, quotes John i, 3 as what " the Apostle says ;" and in the exposition

of the system, as given by Irenaeus, a long passage

from Ptolemy,

quoted one of his school, in which he is represented as saying that " John, the disciple of the Lord, supposes a certain Beginning," citing and commenting on John i. 1-5, 14, 18, in support of the Valentinian doctrine of the Ogdoad. Elsewhere, Irenseus tells us, that the Valentinians used the Gospel of John abundantly {Hcer. iii. 11). Heracleon, another disciple of Valentinus wrote a commentary on John's Gospel, large extracts from which are preserved by Origen (Grabe's Spic. SS. Pair. ii. 85). The book, commonly cited as Doctrina Orientalis, a compilation from the writings of Theodotus and other Gnostics of the second century, contains many extracts from one or more writers of the Valentinian school, in which the Gospel of John is quoted and commented upon as the work of the Apostle. This evidence is presumpThere is, tive proof that Valentinus also used John's Gospel. its use by Valentinus, for Ilyppohowever, direct proof of
is

as

lytus, in

therefore,

an account of his doctrines, says: "All the prophets, and the Law spoke from the Demiurgus, a foolish God, he says (and spoke) as fools, knowing nothing. ThereAll who have come before me fore, says he, the Savior says,
'

are thieves and robbers' (John x. 8); and the Apostle (Eph.

The mystery which was not made known to former generations." {Eef Hcer. vi. 21-37). Here, Hyppoiii.

4,

5),

lytus

must have been quoting


till

direct

his regular exposition of his disciples Secundus,

from Valentinus, because Ptolemy, and

Heracleon, does not begin

afterwards.

When
is

the interior structure of the system of Valentinus


it is

examined,
are

wrought John The to the feons.

seen that characteristic terms employed by into it, some of them being names attached
artiticial

and fantastic scheme of Valentinus wears the character of a copy and a caricature with the
simplicity of John.

Next

to

Marcion and Valentinus, the most eminent among

Indirect Eridences.

47

the founders of early Gnostic sects, was Basilides, of Alexandria,


states that

who flourished about the year a. d. 125. Hyppolytus among the proof-texts, which Basilides employed,
i.

were John

9:

" This

was the true


the world;"

light that lighteth every

and John, ii. 4: "My not yet come" {Hiirpol. B. vii. cc. 22, 27). In the is passage containing these citations, and in the closest connection with them, stand the essential principles and characteristic expressions of Basilides. The Ophites, and the Peratfe, a kindred sect, are generally Hippolytus regarded as the earliest of the Gnostic sects.

man

that cometh into

hour

pel

from their writings numerous quotations from the GosJohn {Ref. Hoer. v. 7-9). If it be admitted that Hj'^ppolytus was describing the opinions and quoting the
cites

of

writings of later representatives of this sect,

proof that the founder must also


Gospel.

it is presumptive have used the Fourth

The use of the Gospel of John by the Gnostic sects, in the second century affords, not only a strong, but also a deHowever ingeniously it cisive argument, for its validity.
might be distorted
in order to

prove their tenets,

it is

in re-

ality diametrically opposed to their system.

The

Christian

Fathers found it an armory of weapons in their contest with the Gnostics. If the Gospel of John was forged about the middle of the Second Century, upon what law of the relation of facts is it to be accounted that the followers of the Gnostic sects, which flourished ten, twenty, or thirty years before, should

have received it Avithout question or discussion? The legitimate conclusion is, that it was accepted by the founders of the various Gnostic sects, and received as evidence and if so, also by the Catholic Christians, who would hardly have borrowed a spurious work from their opponents. It was then generally received, both by the Gnostics and their opponents, between the years a. d. 120 and 130. Before leaving this division of the subject it may be
;

48

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

necessary to remark that the great doctrinal battle of the Church, in the second century, was with Gnosticism, The
struggle had
its

beginning early, for the germs of


in

it

are dis-

tinctly perceived

the Apostolic age.

The

conflict

with

these elaborate systems

was raging during the middle of the

second century. By all the parties to this wide-spread conflict, the Fourth Gospel, as the work of John, is accepted without a lisp of opposition or doubt. Could this Gospel have suddenly appeared in the midst of this distracted period, without exciting hostility, or its pretensions challenged ? The acknowledgment of the Gospel of John by the Gnostics, who were obliged to pervert its teachings, and by the ortho-

dox theologians, furnishes an


uineness.
e.

irresistible

argument

for its gen-

The Testimony of Celsus.

Near the middle of the second century lived Celsas, a celebrated heathen philosopher, and particularly noted as an
adversary of Christianity. His treatise against Christianity was replied to by Origen. The former is lost, but the latter remains. Celsus professed to derive his statements concerning the history of Christ on " the writings of his disciples,"
(Origen, Cels. ii. 13); and his accounts are manifestly based on the four Gospels, although the authors are not named. He
refers to several circumstances

peculiar to the narrative of

John, as the blood which flowed from the body of Jesus at the crucifixion (Origen, Cels. ii. 36; comp. John xix. 34); the fact that Christ " after his death arose, and showed the marks of his punishment, and how his hands had been pierced" (Cels. ii. 55 comp. John xx. 25, 27) that the Jews " challenged Jesus in the temple to produce some clear proof that he was the Son of God" [Cels. i. 67; comp. John ii. 18; X. 23, 24); alludes to the cry of Jesus, "I thirst," recorded only in John (Cels. ii. 37; comp. John xix. 28), and further says that Jesus "after rising from the dead showed himself secretly to one woman only, and to his boon companions," Here the first part of (Cels. ii. 70; comp. Jno. xx. 14-18).
;

Internal Evidences.

49

the statement seems to refer to Jolm's iiccount of the appear-

ance of Christ to Mary of Magdahi, The external evidences present an irrefragable proof of It hasibeen seen that the genuineness of the Fourth Gospel. the Christian Churches of the hitter half of the second century although widely disseminated accepted the Gospel, that during the first controversies with heretics and pagans, it was

used as authoritative.
controversy, and taking
services?

Is it possible for a spurious history


itself

of Christ to have imposed


its

upon such a raging

sea of

place every-where in the public

Was

there no one of the

many who had

personally

known

the Apostle John, to expose the gigantic imposture, or

raise a note of surprise at the unexpected appearance of so important a document? Why did the populous church at EphesuSy where John lived and died, accept it? The Ephesian people must personally have known of its origin and

authenticity.

ii.

Internal Evidences of the Authorship of the Fourth


Gospel.

The authenticity of the Fourth Gospel is also disputed from internal evidence, which may be distributed under three heads: 1. Its difference from the three Synoptics; 2. Its dift'erence from the Apocalypse; 3. Its difference from the
'

writings of St. Paul.

The

first

idea has been fully set forth

by M. Albert Reville {Revue dcs Deux Monies, liv. de Mai " In the first three Gos1866) and may thus be described pels, Jesus is a teacher of the Truth but in the Fourth, he In the Synoptics, he appears as a man is the Truth itself. in the Fourth Gospel, as the Word of God. He finds in its author a scholar of Philo, who had appropriated his Platonic
1,
: ;

theory of the Word, as the indwelling, unuttered thought of God, and as the manifested divine reason. This Word, ac-

cording to him, apj^eared

among men

as Jesus of l!^azareth,

and, being essential light, was opposed by the darkness. He calls on all men to believe in himself as 'the Way, the Truth,

50

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

and the Life;' as 'the True Vine;' as 'the Living Bread which came down from heaven;' as the only open 'Door' to

God;

as the 'Well-beloved Son, dwelling in the

bosom of the

Father.'"
noptics."

"This," says M. Reville, "makes an essentially different character from the simple country-rabbi of the Sy-

While

it

may

be perfectly in order to discuss these ques-

tions at this point, yet they necessarily


divisions of the subject
sidered.

come under other


be properly con-

where they

will

In all matters relating to the Fourth Gospel, it should be accepted that the book itself is its best interpreter, and should form satisfactory evidence of its origin. The internal evidences of its authorship may be treated indirectly and directly. The following proofs maybe enumerated under the, indirect
evidence
a.
6.

The Author of the Fourth Gospel was a Jew. The Author of the Fourth Gospel was a Jew of

Palestine.

The Author was an Eye-witness of what he Describes. The Author was an Apostle. The Author was the Apostle John. e. The condition of Palestine during the life of Jesus Christ
c.

d.

may

izations of the world

be regarded as phenomenal. There the three great civilmingled Rome, as the representative
:

of law and conquest; Greece, as the representative of philosophy and commerce; and Judaism, the embodiment of an The relation existins; between these three eleold reliirion.

ments was intricate and varied. It was difficult for the Greek and the Roman to understand the Jew, for to them he remained an enigma owing partly to his proud reserve, and doubtless to a greater extent, the wide difference between Eastern and Western modes of thought. Again, if a Greek or a Roman of the first, or even the second century, had taken the pains to study Jewish literature or manners, his knowledge of them M'ould have been greatly defective and mislead;

Internal Evidences.
ing, because so

51

much had been added or changed by tradition With the destruction of the Temple, the keeping of the Mosaical Law had become a physical impossibility. The changes were so great that a Jew of the second century
and custom.
might be mistaken
iirst.

as to the usages of his nation in the early This being true, then a Gentile would be more likely to go astray. It may be safely affirmed that the intricate combination of Jewish and Gentile elements in Palestine between a. d. 1 and a. d. 70 was such that no one but a Jew living in the country at the time would be able to master them; and that the almost total destruction of the Jewish element in the latter part of the century would render a proper appreciation of the circumstances a matter of the utmost difficulty even to a careful antiquarian. As antiquarian research in that age was hardly known, it does not seem possible that one would undertake it in order to give an accurate setting to a historical fiction. Could it be possible that a Greek of the second century, or even the last quarter of the first would have gcrne through a course of archaeological study, necessary for attempting the writing of the Fourth Gospel? He must have fallen into far more serious errors than those which critics have assumed to point out. There is substantial indirect evidence to prove that the writer of the Fourth Gospel was a Jew, and a Jew of Palestine, who was an eye-witness of most of the events which he relates. If this can be reasonably proved, then the circle of possible authors is very much restricted. There .s further evidence which may be adduced to show that he was an Apostle, and moreover he was the Apostle John.

part of the

a.

The Author of

the

Fourth Gospel was a Jew.

The whole
its

narrative of the Fourth Gospel bears


for the writer
;

upon

was a Jew, with Jewish opinions and customs


face that its author

is

familiar

his composition is impressed with Jewish characteristics; and he is permeated with

52

Study of

the,

Gospel of

St.

Jokn

the spirit of the Jewish dispensation.


justified
1.

These statements are

by the following
is

facts:

home in Jewish opinions most strikingly sliown by the AND POINTS OF VIEW. outline which he gives of the contemporary Messianic expecThe author
perfectly at
is

This

tations.

This
(i.

is

referred

to in detail.
iv.

The passages
In
all

are

numerous

19-28, 45-49, 51;

25;

vi. 14,

15; vii.^26, 27,

31, 40-42, 52; xii. 13, 34; xix. 15, 21).

these cases the

points are noticed without the least eflbrt as lying within the

natural scope of the writer's thoughts.

Besides these
(iv. 9,

we have
(iv.

the hostility between


48); the casual

Jews and Samaritans

20, 22; viii.

mention of the estimate of


(vii.
;

women
(vii.

27);
;

the importance attached to the religious schools

15)

the

disparagement of "the Dispersion"


transmitted punishment of sin

35); the belief in the

(ix. 2)

the supercilious con-

tempt of the Pharisees for "the people of the earth" (vii. 49); estimate of Abraham and the prophets (viii. 52, 53). 2. He is quite familiar with Jewish usages and observThe law of ances, and touches upon them with precision. sabbath is shown to be overruled by the requirement of the circumcision (vii. 22, 23); the ceremonial polution which is contracted by entering a Gentile court (xviii. 28); "the great day" of the feast (vii. 37), which a Jew only would be likely to describe, for it was added to the original seven; domestic life at the marriage feast (ii. 1-10); the burial of Lazarus (xi. 17-44); baptism (i, 25; iii. 22, 23; iv. 2); law of evidence
(viii.

17, 18).
3.

The form

of the Gospel is

essentially Jewish, es-

pecially the style of the narrative.

The language

is

Greek,

but the arrangement of the thoughts, the structure of the sentences, the symmetry and numerical symbolism of the composition, and the vocabulary are essentially Hebrew, the source of w^hich is the Old Testament. This is proved not
only by frequent c[Uotation8 but by the imagery employed, illustrated in the terms, "light," " darkness," "liesh," "spirit," "life," "the lamb/' "the living water," "this world," "the

Internal Emdenc'es.

53
" the vine "

kingdom of God,"

" the

manna," " the shepherd,"


;

and the simpHcity of the connecting particles and symmetry of the connecting clauses.

the parallelism

4. The source of the religious life of the writer was THE Old Testament, which is borne out by the fact that the Jewish foundation underlies the whole narrative. The people of Judfea were " His own people" (i, 11); w^hen Christ first entered the Holy City, he claimed the Temple as being "the house of His Father" (ii. 16); the Scriptures can not be broken (x. 35) that which is written in the prophets (vi. salvation is of the Jews (iv. 22) Moses wrote of Christ 45) (v. 46) the types of the Old Testament given in the brazen the manna (vi. 32) serpent (iii. 14) the water from the rock (vii. 37) all applied to Christ by Himself as of certain and acknowledged significance; Abraham saw his day (viii, the hatred of the Jews prefigured in the words "written 56) in their Law, They hated me without a cause " (xv. 25) much that He did was done " that the Scripture might be
; ;

fulfiled (xiii. 18; xvii.

filments of Scripture

12; xix. 24, 28, 36, 37); and the^se fulare noticed not as interesting coinci-

dences, but "that ye

may

believe" (xix. 35).

Such words

of Christ must be considered both in themselves and in the consequences which they necessarily carry with them, as showing conclusively that this Gospel represents that the

Old Testament

is

fulfiled in

him.

It also follow^s that the

writer of the Gospel, in setting

down

these sayings of Christ,


;

accepts the teachings therein conveyed

and

as the

words of

Jesus, recorded in the Gospel, confirm the authority of the

Old Testament, so also the author, when he writes

in his

own

person, emphasizes the same principle. This is confirmed by the record itself; the first public act reminded the disciples of

a phrase in the Psalms


their
faith in

(ii.

17)

the Resurrection confirmed

"the Scripture, and the word which Jesus spake" (ii. 22), as if both were of equal weight; the words of Isaiah made the public ministry of Christ an apparent
failure
(xii.

37-41).

Special

incidents

of the

Passion

are

54

Study of

the

Gospel of
:

St.

John.

connected with the Old Testament casting of lots for the seamless robe (xix. 23); the expression of thirst (xix. 28);
the limbs

unbroken (xix. 36), and the side pierced (xix. 37), all of which are significant parallels of the treatment of the paschal lamb, and give occasion for quotations from the Law, the Psalms, and the Prophets. These fultilments of the ancient Scriptures are put forth as solid grounds of faith
left

(xix. 35).

as a

The evangelist unfolds the character of "the Law" only Jew could have treated it. He wrote to show that Jesus

was not only the Son of God, but also the Christ, the promised Messiah of the Jews (xx. 31), just as JSTathanael, the true representative of Israel (i. 47) had recognized Him at Writing as a Christian the Evanfirst under this double title. " We as Jews worship that gelist records a central truth which we know, for the salvation is from the Jews" (iv. 22). The knowledge which the Jews had was the result of their acceptance of the continuous revelation of God from age to age while tlie Samaritans who refused to advance beyond the first stage of Divine manifestation, worshipped the true they worshipped "that which they object, but ignorantly knew not" (iv. 22).
:

b.

71ie

Author mas a Jew of

Palestine.

That the author was a Jew of Palestine might be imThe intimate knowlplied in what has already been treated.
edge of the state of parties among the rulers of the Jews, at the time of the Crucifixion, could only be set forth by one
intimately acquainted.

The state of the parties was radically changed when the nation was overthrown. The part which the hierarchical class took in the Passion is distinctly marked, and the points at issue between true and false Judaism, which in their first form had passed awaywhen the Christian society was firmly established, are caught up and tersely stated. In estimating the value of the conclusions already drawn, and also what will follow, it must be remembered that the old

Internal Evidtnces.

55

land-marks, material and moral, were destroyed by the Roman war, and that the destruction of Jerusalem revealed the
essential differences of Judaism and Christianity, and between them raised a barrier, and at the beginning of the second century the growing Church substituted the school of Alexandria for the influence of Judaism, 1. The author's great topographical knowledge, which is used with ease and precision, is more or less conclusive that he was of Palestine. The desolation of Jerusalem was complete and no creative genius could call its lost site into being. The writer is evidently at home in the city, and knows much which may be learned from independent testimony. He lives again in the past and mentions locations with simplicity and In speaking of a fresh place he commonly throws certainty. some fact respecting it, adding clearness to the narrative. in If a forger had undertaken this he would have avoided such gratuitious statements, as being unnecessary, and likely to Thus Bethany is " nigh unto Jerusalem, lead to detection. about fifteen furlongs oft",'' (xi. 18); another, " Bethany beyond Jordan," (i. 28), a place which had been forgotten in the time of Origen, but obviously distinguished from the familiar one near Jerusalem; Cana of Galilee (ii. 1, 11, iv. 46, xxi. 2), thus clearly distinguished, but not noticed by any earlier writer; Ephraim situated "near the wilderness," (xi, 54) may be identical with Ophrah (I Sam. xiii. 17); ^non " near to Salim," (iii. 23), although not known from other sources, but the form of the name is a sure indication of the genuineness

of the reference
(vi. 19);

the implied dimensions of the sea of Tiberias

the relative positions of Cana and

Capernaum

(ii.

12);

the city of Samaria

named Sychar

(iv. 5),

described with the

its harvest fields (v. 85), the heights of Gerizim and the depth of the well of Jacob {v. 11). 20), This knowledge of topography is the more remarkable " There is at Jerusalem by the in the case of Jerusalem sheep-gate a pool, which is called in the Hebrew tongue Bethesda, having five porches " (v. 2); Siloam is "a pool, which is

prospect of
{v.

56

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

by interpretation sent" (ix. 7); over the brook Cedron, there " was u ga-rden " (xviii. 1); Golgotha is " nigh to the city," and "there was a garden there" (xix. 17, 20, 41); and only the Fourth Gospel notices the Pavement, the raised platform of judgment, with its Hebrew title, Gabbatha (xix. 13). The allusions to the Temple show a familiarity, on the part of the writer, with the localities in which he represents
Christ as teaching.

The

first

scene, the cleansing of the

Temple, is more lifelike than that given in the Synoptics (ii. 14-16), and in its separate parts bears the impress of an eyewitness, for the groups engaged stand out distinctly, the sellers of oxen and sheep, the money-changers sitting at their work, the sellers of doves each group dealt with individually; following which is the singularly exact chronological note, "Forty and six years was this temple in building" (r. 20); an accurate knowledge of the Temple ritual is conveyed in the incidents of the Feast of Tabernacles (vii. viii); he says, "These words spake he in the treasury, as he taught in the The treasury was in the court of the Temple," (viii. 20). women where the great candelabra were placed, looking to which Christ said, " I am the light of the world" (viii. 12).
:

On
Porch "
in every
2.

lated, " It

the visit of Jesus, at the Feast of Dedication, it is rewas winter and Jesus was walking in Solomon's
(x. 22),

which was a part of the great eastern

cloistei*,

way suited to the scene with which it is connected. The way in which the author quotes the Old Testaa presumption in favor of his being a Palestinian Jew.

ment

is

He

is

not dependent on the

LXX.

for he appears to

have

known

the original Hebrew, which had become a dead lan-

guage, and was not much studied outside of Palestine. The following is a list of the quotations: First, by the Evangelist: (Ixviii.) 9; xii. 14, 15: comp. Zach. ii. 17: comp. Ps. Ixix.
ix.

9;

xii.

38: comp. Isa.

liii.

1;

xii.

xix. 24:
37:

comp. comp. Zach.


vi.

Ps. xxii. 18; xix. 36:


xii.

40: comp. Isa. vi. 10; comp. Ex. xii. 46; xix.
38: no exact parallel;

10; Second, quotations in the Lord's disliv.

courses:

45: comp. Isa.

13;

vii.

Internal Evidences.
X. 34:

57

comp. Ps.

Ixxxii. 6; xiii. 18: coinp. Ps. xli. 9; xv. 25:


: :

comp. Ps, xxxiv. 19; Third, quotations by others i. 23 comp. comp. Ps. Ixxvii. 24, An examination of these fourteen quotations shows that three (vi. 45, xiii. 18, xix. 37), agree with the Hebrew against the LXX.; not one
Isa. xl. 3; vi. 31:

agrees with
differs

LXX.

against the

X. 34, XV. 25)

agree with the

Hebrew; four (xii, 38, xix. Hebrew and LXX.; one (ii.

24,

17)

from the Hebrew and LXX. where these both agree; two (xii, 14, 15, xii. 40) differ from the LXX. and Hebrew where they do not agree; and four (xix. 36, vii. 38, i. 23, vi. 31) are
free adaptations.
3.

The

author's doctrine of the Logos or

Word

is

con-

firmatory that the writer was a

used the Greek terra course or Reason, in a peculiar sense, to designate any utterance of the Divine Will, or agency of the Deity, although never with the idea that it could be permanently separated, except in imagination, from God himself. The w^ay to this bold personification may have been paved by such passages as

Jew of Palestine. The Jews Logos, commonly meaning Word, Dis-

God were the heavens set "sent his Logos and healed them" (Ps. cvi. 20). The Fourth Gospel applies the term Logos to the complete and personal revelation of God in Christ. This Logos was not a mere abstract idea, but a religious truth, and
the following
:

"By
6);

the Logos of

fast" (Ps. xxxii.

God

an historical

fact.

It is true that

Philo had

made
;

use of the idea of the Lo-

gos for religious purposes, and had accommodated it with the Hebrew idea of the Messiah although the connection was

and the idea of the Messiah was abstract, and, in the Jewish sense, not historically realized. In contrast with this, on the other hand, the Christian idea of the Logos (the speculative and divine), and the idea of the Messiah (the national and human), are historically realized in the person of Jesus
loose

of Nazareth.

view there are some features which would seem to favor the Gnostic view of the second century. The general
first

On

58

Stndy of
is,

the

Gospel of

St.

John.
an(^

tone of the Gospel


there are

however, against this imputation,

two texts, which sum up the theology of the Evanupon this point, and which are abhorrent to u Gnostic gelist " The Logos became flesh " (i. 14), and " Salvation is of the Jews " (iv. 22). It was a monstrous supposition to the Gnostic that the Infinite should limit itself and be united with impure matter, and this w^as implied in the Abstract (Logos) becoming flesh. Again, that the longed-for salvation of mankind should come from the Jews w^as a flat contradiction of
one of the cardinal principles of Gnosticism. In considering the teachings of the Fourth Gospel on the Logos, "the Word," it should be remarked that it is propWhen the author speaks of erly a question of doctrine. "the Word," "the Only-begotten," and of his relations to God, to man, and to the w^orld, he employs a vocabujary and an expression of thought already known when he wrote. If this were not true his language w^ould have been unintelligiHis words lay down new ble, without special interpretation. teachings, but it is more than probable that the Christians had The aulistened to the same before the Gospel was written. that Jesus of Nazareth was "the thor w^as enabled to see Christ," and "the Son of God," and this conviction he brought home to others (xx. 31). The truth was clear to his own mind, and to present it to others forcibly, he used, with necessary modifications, the current language of the highest and thus to the region of history he religious expression transferred the phrases, spoken before him of "the Logos," and laid open the majesty of "Jesus come in the flesh."

c.

The Author was an Eye- Witness of what he Describes.

The narrative is crowded with figures w^hich live and move. The action throughout is harmonious, and indicated with a simplicity and distinctness which would be the most consummate art, were it not taken from real life. The literature of the second century does not aftbrd a single example
of such skilful delineation of fictitious characters as
is

shown

Internal Evidences.
in the portraits given of the Baptist, John, Peter,
Phillip,

59

Andrew, Thomas, Judas Iscariot, Pilate, Nicodenms, Martha and Mary, the Samaritan woman, the man horn hlind. Even the persons less prominent are thoroughly lifelike and real; Nathaniel, Joseph, Mary of Magdala, Annas, Caiaphas. The narrative is so marked b}' minute details of persons, time, number, place and manner that the knowledge of which could only be derived from an eye-witness. To this must also be added various notes of fact, which, apparently have no special significance, where they stand, though intelligible when referred to the impression originally made upon the

memory
1.

of the author.

Certain persons are brought forward with evident disThere is no tinctness as they arise in the mind of the writer.

purpose or symbolism to influence the record, for the names belong to living recollections. The first chapter is crowded with many figures. Momentous questions are connected with " lie saith unto Philip, Where shall we buy certain persons. Philip answered him" bread, that these may eat? (vi. 5, 7); certain Greeks said to Philip, " Sir, we would see
.
. .

Philip cometh and Jesus. drew and Philip tell Jesus"

telleth
(xii.

20-22); "

Andrew; and again AnThomas saith unto


5);

him. Lord,
saith,

we know

not whither thou goest" (xiv.


(xiv. 8);

"Philip

Lord show us the Father"

"Judas

saith, not

Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself to us, and not unto the world? " (xiv. 22); " The disciple whom Jesus loved falling back upon His breast, saith, Lord who is it? " (xiii. 25 comp. xxi. 20). Nicodemus (iii. 1, vii. 50, xix. 39), Lazarus (xi. 1, xii. 1), Simon, the father of Judas
Iscariot,
.

Iscariot (vi. 71, xii. 4, xiii, 2, 26) and Malchus (xviii. 10), are mentioned only in the Fourth Gospel, This Gospel alone mentions the relationship of Annas to Caiaphas (xviii. 13), and identifies one of those who pointed to Peter as the kinsman of him whose ear Peter cut oW (xviii. 26).
2.

The

details

of time

furnish

interesting testimony.
seasons,

Although the Synoptics do not notice the greater

60

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.
tradition, as the first
1), 2),

which might have been preserved by


(ii.

Passover 13, 23), the Feast of the New Year (v. second Passover (vi. 4), the Feast of Tabernacles (vii.

the

and

the Feast of Dedication (x. 22); but there are other specification of dates which can only be referred to experience. Such are the indications of the two marked weeks at the beginning

and end of Christ's ministry


31, XX. 1), of the

(i.

29, 35, 43,

ii.

1, xii. 1, 12,

xix.

week

after the Resurrection

(xx. 26), the

enumeration of the days before the raising of Lazarus (xi. 6, 17, 39), the duration of Christ's stay in Samaria (iv. 40, 43: comp. vi. 22, vii. 14, 37). More remarkable still is the mention of the hour or of the time of day which occurs under circumstances which would have impressed the writer, as " the tenth hour" (i. 40), "the sixth hour" (iv. 6), "the seventh

hour"

"about the sixth hour" (xix. 24), "it was "in the early morning" (xviii. 28, xx. 1, xxi. 4), "the evening" (vi. 16, xx. 19), "by night" (iii. 2). 3. The details of number are hardly less significant, alIt is only experience that will make imthough fewer. material and definite statements such as recorded by the writer of the Fourth Gospel. He mentions the two disciples
(iv. 52), (xiii.

night"

30),

of the Baptist

(i.

35),

the six water pots

(ii.

6),

the five loaves

and twenty furlongs (vi. 19), the four soldiers (xix. 23), the two hundred cubits (xxi. 8), the hundred and fifty and three fishes (xxi. 11). Other records of number show the clearness of the writer's information, as the five husbands (iv. 18), the thirty and eight years' sickness (v. 5), the estimate of three hundred pence (xii. 5), the weight of a hundred pounds (xix. 39). 4. The scene or place of special acts and the utterances introduced show that they belong to the immediate knowledge of the writer. The jtlace, in the narrative, appears to have
and the two small
fishes (vi. 9), the five

been an integral part of the recollection of the incidents. The scenes of John's baptism are given at Bethany and ^non (i. 28, iii. 23); the nobleman's son was sick at Capernaum while Jesus was at Cana (iv. 46); Jesus found the paralytic, whom

Internal Evidences.

61

he had healed, in the Temple (v. 14); Jesus went "beyond Jordan into the place where John at first baptized" (x. 40); "Jesus was not yet come into the town, but was in that place where Martha met him" (xxi. 30); on the eve of the Passion Jesus was in the "country near to the wiklerness, into a city called Ephraim" (xi. 54); Christ spoke certain memorable words at Capernaum (vi. 59), in the treasury (viii. 20), in Solomon's porch (x. 23), before crossing the Cedron (xviii. 1), 5. The MANNER of the narrative impresses one that he is reading after an eye-witness. The countless small traits in the description evince the skill of an accurate observer and makes it more impressive. Take the record of any special scene and mark its several points, there will clearly appear the impressions of an eye-witness, as, for example, the calling of the first disciples (i. 35-57), or the foot washing (xiii. 1-20), or the scene in the high-priest's court (xviii. 15-27), or the draught of fishes (xxi. 1-14). Each one of these narratives presents a vivid touch which can only correspond with the actual experience of one who had looked upon what he describes. This is doubly made clear in the kind of particuThe loaves used at the feeding larity on which stress is laid. of the five thousand were " barley " loaves which a boy had

when Mary came to Jesus she " fell at his feet" (xi. from the ointment " the house was filled from its fragrance " (xii. 3); the branches placed before Jesus were taken from "the palm trees" which were by the roadside (xii. 13); *' it was night" when Judas went forth (xiii. 30); Judas brmgs a band of Roman soldiers as well as ofiicers of the priests to apprehend Jesus (xviii. 3); Christ's " tunic was without seam, woven from the top throughout " (xix, 23); the napkin was "wrapped together in a place by itself" (xx. 7); Peter "was grieved" (xxi. 17). Each phrase is a definite
(vi. 9);

32);

expression of an external impression.

In some instances a saying


the Baptist says, "Behold the

is

left

unexplained, the ob-

scurity in a previous but unrecorded conversation, as

when
In

Lamb

of

God"

(i.

29).

62

Study of

the.

Gospel of

St.

John.

other cases in a personal but unexpressed revelation, as


fore Philip called thee, saw thee " (i, 48).
d.

"Be-

when thou was under

the fig tree, I

The Author was an Apostle.

A
of the
(iv.),

further examination of the narrative shows that the

eye-witness was an Apostle.


first disciples

This would necessarily follow

from the character of the scenes which he depicts, as the call


(i.

19-34), the journey through Samaria


(vi.),

the feeding of the five thousand

the successive
fact is further

visits to

Jerusalem

(vii. ix. xi.),

the Passion, and the appear-

ances after the Resurrection (xix. xx. xxi.)


the feelings of the disciples.
critical

The

indicated by the intimate acquaintance which he exhibits with

He knows

their thoughts at

moments, and such thoughts which sometimes surprise us, and which no fictitious writing would have attributed to them (ii. 11, 17, 22, iv. 27, vi. 19, 60, xii. 16, xiii. 22, 28, He recalls words that were spoken by the disciples xxi. 12.)
in private to Christ or

among themselves
5).

(iv. 31, 33, ix. 2, xi. 8,

12, 16, xvi. 17, 29, xxi. 3,

He

is

familiar with the haunts

of the disciples

(xi. 54, xviii. 2,

xx. 19).

He is

acquainted with

the erroneous impressions

of the disciples received at one


(ii.

time, and afterwards corrected

21, xi. 13, xii. 16, xiii. 28,

XX.

9,

xxi. 4).
all

Besides

this the

author stood very near to Jesus and

was conscious of
15, vii, 1, XV, 19)
;

his emotions (xi. 33, xiii. 21);


(ii.

was

well ac-

quainted with the grounds of his action


open.

24, iv, 1, v. 6, vi.

and to him the mind of the Lord was

laid

This Jesus " said trying him, for he himself knew he was about to do" (vi, 6); "Jesus knew in himself" what the murmurings of the disciples (vi, 61); "Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that believed not, and who should betray him" (vi. 64); he knew the hour of His Passion (xiii, 1, 3) and who should betray him (xiii. 11); he knew "all things that should come upon him" (xviii. 4) he knew when all things were accomplished (xix, 28.)
;

Internal Evidences.

63

e.

The Author was

the Apostle John.

It would appear from the previous considerations that it had been proved that the author of the Fourth Gospel was the Apostle John. But the evidence has not all been enu-

In the Synoptic narrative there are three disciples These were Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, James and John. The presumptive evidence is that one of these was the evangelist. St. Peter can not be the evangelist, because he was put to death long before the earliest date to which the Fourth Gospel has been assigned. Moreover its style is wholly unlike'the undoubted First Epistle of Peter. Of the two sons of Zebedee, James was martyred early (Acts xiii. 2) and long before Peter, so that he could not have been its author. Therefore, John alone remains, and he fully satisfies all the conditions required. 1. The narrative indicates a special Apostle as the writer. In the Epilogue the authorship is assigned to "the disciple whom Jesus loved" (xxi. 20 comp. v. 24). Under the same title this disciple appears twice in the narrative of the
merated.

standing very near to Jesus.

Passion
20),

(xiii.

and once

23, xix. 26) as well as twice afterwards (xxi. 7, in connection with St. Peter under a title closely

there

resembling it (xxii. 2). Though his name is not mentioned is nothing mysterious or ideal about him. He is known

to the high-priest (xviii. 15)

and stands

in close relationship

to St. Peter

(xiii.

24, xx. 2, xxi. 7).

He moves .about among

the other Apostles quite naturally, and from the enumeration (xxi. 2), he is either one of the two unnamed disciples or else

he must be St. John. 2. There is a definite supposition that St. John wrote the Gospel. St. John is nowhere mentioned by name in the Gospel. It is incredible that an Apostle who stands in the Synoptics, in the Acts (iii. 1, iv. 13, etc.), and in Paul (Gal. ii, 9) as a central figure among the twelve, should remain a
tion.

nameless disciple, unless the narrative was his own composiIn the first call of the disciples, one of the two follow-

64

Study of

the.

Gospd

of St. John.
(i.

ers of the Baptist is expressly

named Andrew

40)

the

unnamed. Andrew, it is said, first found " his own brother Simon " (i. 41). These words naturally suggest that the brother of some other one, and, if so, of the second disother
left

ciple.

The

last

tain inference that these


3.

scene at the sea of Galilee leads to the certwo brothers were the sons of Zebedee,

The Fourth Gospel carefully distinguishes places and PERSONS. While this point may be a small one, it is of grave Let it be noted that he distinguishes Cana of significance. "Galilee" (ii. 1, xxi. 2) from Cana of Asher; Bethany "be" from Bethany " nigh unto Jerusalem " (i. 44), Bethsaida, "the city of Andrew and Peter (xi. 18) from Bethsaida Julias he distinguishes Simon Peter after his call, from others named Simon, by invariably adding the new name Peter, whereas the Synoptists often called him simply Simon; Judas Iscariot is distinguished as "the son of Simon " (vi. 71, xii. 4, xiii. 2, 26) from the other Judas wlio is expressly said to be " not Iscariot " (xiv. 22), while the SynSt. Thomas optists take no notice of the traitor's parentage is three times out of four further marked by the correlative Greek name Didymus (xi. 16, xx. 24, xxi. 2), which is not

yond Jordan "


;

(i.

28)

Synoptics; E'icodemus is identified as "he that Jesus by night" (xix. 39) Caiaphas is identified by came to the title of his ofiice as " the high priest of that year " (xi.

found

in the

40, xviii. 13).

In spite of this habitual particularity the Evangelist nemake a distinctiou which is common to the SynopThey distinguish John the son of Zebedee from the tists.
crlects to

forerunner of Christ, by calling the latter " the Baptist." To the Fourth Evangelist " the Baptist " is simply " John." In some places the identification might have been awkward but elsewhere it could be expected (i. 15, v. 33, 36). If however the writer of the Gospel was the other John, there is for
;

him no chance for confusion, and it does not occur to mark the distinction. 4. There should be noticed two features in the Gospel

Internal Evidences.

65

which have caused certain objections to be raised. contended that some one, other than St. John, must be the author, because the writer could not have studiously elevated himself in every way above the Apostle Peter; nor could have spoken of himself as " the disciple whom Jesus loved," claiming in this way for himself, a pre-eminence over the other Apostles, and thus implying a self-glorification at the expense of others. The idea that the author of the Fourth Gospel wishes to
narrative
It is

represent the superiority of St. John over St. Peter is mainly based upon the incident of the Last Supper, where the latter beckoned to the former to ask a question which he did not

put himself
place
is

(xiii.

24).

careful reading

shows that

in

no

St.

Peter's

worth depreciated.

On

the other hand,

as in the Synoptics, St. Peter takes a leading position.

His

introduction to Christ and significant naming stand at the very opening of the Gospel (i. 41, 42) in the name of the Twelve he gives utterance to the critical confession of Christ's
:

he is prominent, if not the first at the feet 6); he takes the lead in defending the Master betrayal (xviii. 10) the news of the Resurrection is at the first brought to him (xx. 2) his companion does not venture to enter the sepulchre until after him (xx. 6, 8) he is menmajesty
(vi.

68)

washing

(xiii.

tioned

first in
;

the

list

of disciples (xxi.

2)

and there takes the

he continues in the lead when Jesus appears to he receives the last great charge with which the Gospel concludes (xxi. 15-22) and in respect to the incident of the Last Supper (xiii. 23, 24), it is best understood by
lead (xxi. 3)

them

(xxi. 7, 11)

a description of the relative positions. At that time the Jews had adopted the western mode of reclining at meals. The
left arms, stretched obliquely, so that the back of the head of one guest was in the bosom of the dress of the guest above him. If three reclined together, the center was the place of honor, the second place that above, or to the left, and the third that below, or to the right. If

guests rested upon their

66

Study of the Gospel of

St.

John.

the chief person desired to converse with the second, he must


raise himself

and turn round,

for his

head was turned away

when he

reclined.

Peter, thus reclining in the second place,

was not in a favorable position for listening to any whispers from the Lord, which might fall readily upon the ear of John. Then the person who occupied the third position would naturally act the part assigned to John. The nearness of St. John to the Lord is a relation of
sympathy, for the element of love in the Apostle approached
nearest to the Master's ideal.

He certainly

was the recipient

of honors from the Lord. To him alone the Master entrusted the care of the Virgin (xix. 26), and to him was allowed the privilege of being the first one, at the sea of Tiberias to recognize the

Lord

(xxi. 7).

ISTow to say that he

was

" the disciple

whom

Jesus loved," was not only the attestation of a truth, but also an expression of gratitude on the part of the Evangelist for the special benefits bestowed upon him; besides being a modest explanation of the prominent part which he

had been

called

upon

to perform.

The

indirect internal evidence of the Fourth Gospel, as

may be

seen, converges to one point relative to its authorship.

author was the Apostle John. The next consideration is the direct evidence which the Gospel oft'ers upon this question.
It is not difficult to discover that the
iii.

Direct Evidences of the Authorship of the Fourth


Gospel.

There are two passages which appear

to point directly to

the position and person of the author, although it is admitted that each passage includes some difficulties and uncertainties IS'otwithstanding this the passages are of interpretation.
clear within themselves
1.

without special pleadings.

flesh, and dwelt Chapter i. 14, glory." The main point here is as among us, and we beheld his " are to be taken. to the sense in which the words ''ice beheld " That which was from In the first Epistle of John it is affirmed,

"The "Word was made

Direct Evidences.

67

wc have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we behehl, and our hands handled, concerning the Word of life " (I Jno. i. 1). There can be no question but that the words "we beheld" as here used, are to be taken literally. Now the word translated " we beheld " is not only the same in both passages, but also is the same in tense and in its general connection, and moreover is never used in the New Testament in the sense of " mental vision." The point
the beginning, wliich

of the passage

is

that the Incarnation

was

historical,

and that

the disciples, one of

whom was

the writer, were witnesses.

2. Chapter xix. 35, "And forthwith came there out blood and water. And he that hath seen hath borne witness, and his w^itness is true: and he knoweth that he saith true, that ye also may believe. For these things came to pass that." In some respects this passage is remarkable. In tlie original text there is no repetition as given in the English translation. The contrast between the two words rendered "true" cannot be adequately given in an English rendering. The witness is described as fulfiling the true conception of witness, and not

simply as being correct.

It brings

out the idea that he


exact,

who

gives testimony should be competent to speak with authority,

and that the account of his experience should bo


represents the care of the writer.

which

The general result To any one, (save such


at the direct

of this examination
as

is

made

distinct.

may

specially be disposed to carp


to pick flaws that exist
it

meaning of language and

either in the imagination or the will),

must seem

clear that

the claim that the Fourth Gospel was written by an eye-witness is attested by the strongest internal evidence, whether obtained directly or indirectly from the narrative itself.

QS

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

CHAPTER

III.

THE COMPOSITION OF THE GOSPEL.


This chapter necessarily embraces quite a wide range of must be considered the occasion, place, date, object, plan, style, historical exactness, and the last discourses.
I.

subjects, for here

Occasion.

The earliest authorities represent that the Gospel of St. John was written at the request of those who were intimate with the Apostle. Doubtless St, John had often delivered its contents to them orally and the elders desired that before his death it should be placed in permanent form, and thus be a perpetual guidance for the Church. The tradition in its simplest form has been preserved by Clement of Alexandria
;

on the authority of "the earliest presJohn, perceiving that the external fects had been made plain in the Gospel, being urged by his friends, and inspired by the Spirit, composed a Spiritual Gospel" (Eusebius' Ecd. Hist. B. VI. c. 14). With additional details this statement is given in the " Muratorian Fragment" (a. d. 170), which says, "The Fourth Gospel is that of John, one of the disciples. When his fellow-disciples and bishops, entreated him, he said, 'Fast ye now with me for the space of three days, and let us recount to each other what(a. d.

190).

He

states

byters," that "last of

all,

ever

it was reJohn should narrate all things in his own name as they called them to mind." There can be no question but Jerome had before him either this fragment, or else the original narrative upon which it is based, for he says that " ecclesiastical history

may

be revealed to

ns.'

On

the same night

vealed to Andrew, one of the Apostles, that

Occasion.

69

records that John,

when he was

constrained by his brothers

he would do so, if a fast were appointed and all joined in prayer to God and that after this was ended, filled to the full with revelation, he indited the heaven sent preface 'In the beginning was the Word' " (Com. Matt.
to write, replied tliat
;
:

ProL).

Unquestionably
Christian Church.
ity after the

difficulties

of doctrine had arisen in the

new turn had been given to Christiandestruction of Jerusalem. The lingering and

hampering connection with Judaism had been severed, and a readjustment of the interpretations of Christ's promises had

become

necessary.

Added
;

to this

was the

rise

of a Christian

philosophy, shading of by strange comparisons and colorings


to pagan speculation all of which, called for a direct statement, in terms adequate to meet the emergenc}-, by a voice of authority. Hence, we have the external evidence of the circumstances under which St. John was induced to compose his Gospel. Besides the records already cited, others attempt to define this more cleaFh^ Irenseus supposes John to have written his Gospel as a polemic against Cerinthus (III. 11. 1.). In the Scholia, attributed to Victorinus of Pettau (a. d. 301) it is said that " he wrote the Gospel after the Apocalyse. For, when Valentinus and Cerinthus and Ebion and the others of the school of Satan were spread throughout the world, all the bishops from the neighboring provinces came together to him, and constrained him to commit his own testimony to writing' '(Ji<_^?, Patrol. Y. p. 333). This last statement appears to be only an amplification of the Asiatic tradition as preserved by Irenseus. As this view was widely disseminated it is more than probable that all point back to one account, which could not have been far removed from the time of the Apostle. It is safe to affirm that the Fourth Gospel was written after the

Synoptics, at the request of certain Christian Churches, and


presents a

summary

of the oral teachings of St.


it

the

life

of Christ, and that

John upon met a want which had grown up

70
in the
it is

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.
;

Church near the

close of the

Apostohc age

althougli

impossible to procure specific details by which the whole

truth might be elucidated.


II.

Place.

Early writers have mentioned both Patmos and Ephesus but as the home of John at the time he wrote his Gospel favor of the last named city. the weight of evidence is in Irenseus states that John wrote his Gospel whilst he dwelt in Ephesus of Asia (iii. 1) Jerome states that John was in Asia when he complied with the request of the bishops of Asia, and others, to write more profoundly concerning the Divinity
;
;

of Christ {Prol. in 31atth.); and Theodore of Mopsuesta relates


that

John was

in

Ephesus when he was moved by

his disciples

to write his Gospel.

The evidence in favor of Patmos comes from two anonymous writers, one the author of the Synopsis of Scripture, which states that the Gospel was dictated by John in Patmos, and afterwards published in Ephesu^ and the other, the author of the work, I)e XII. Apostolis, which aflirms that John was banished by Domitian to Patmos, where he wrote the The later date of these writers would hardly overGospel.
balance the statements of the earlier Fathers

who

seemingly
the city of

had more accurate knowledge.


After the destruction of Jerusalem,
a.
d. 69,

Ephesus became the center of the active life of Eastern Christendom. Even for a time Antioch became less conspicThe city was half-Greek, half-Oriental, and was visited uous. by ships from all parts of the Mediterranean, and united by great roads with the markets of the interior, was the common meeting-place of various characters and classes of men. It contained a large church of faithful Christians, a multitude
of zealous Jews, an indigenous population devoted to the worship of a strange idol
East,
its

whose image was borrowed from the


In the Xystus of Ephesus,
nations disputed over their
all

name from

the "West.

free-thinking philosophers of

Date.
favorite tenets.

71

The city was famed for its Temple of Diana, one of the seven wonders of the world. This marvellous building was despoiled of its treasures by Nero, burned by the Goths, and finally destroyed by the iconoclasts, in the reign of Theodosius I., who issued his celebrated edict against the ceremonies of the Pagan religion, a. d. 381. This city would especially be favorable for St. John in his work of extending the Christian Church.
III.

Date.
is

The time when the Gospel was written


portance in
tion
its

of great im-

interpretation,

and

to this phase of the ques-

more than ordinary


it

attention must be accorded.

Among
Basnage

the learned various opinions have been entertained.

and Lampe supposed


struction

to
;

of Jerusalem

have been written prior to the deand in conformity to this opinion


;

Dr. Lardner fixed the date in the year 68 Dr. Owen in 69 Michaelis in 70; Chrysostom and Epiphanius, among the ancient fathers, and Dr. Mill, LeClerc, and Bishop Tomline

among
98
;

the moderns, refer


last

its

Bertholdt to the

decade of the

date to the year 97 Jones to first century, and Dr.


;

Plummer from

the year 80 to 95.


''

The principal argument for the early date is derived from John V. 2, where the Apostle says, Now there is at Jerusalem, by the sheep-gate, a pool, which is called in the HebreAV
tongue Bethesda, having five porches." It has been urged that Jerusalem must have been standing when these words were written; and if written after the destruction, the words would have been, "Now there was at Jerusalem a pool," etc. This argument is quite superficial, for it presupposes that the pool of Bethesda was dried up or destroyed at the time of the overthrow of the ill-fated city. It is well-known that when Vespasian ordered the city to be demolished, he permitted some things to remain for the benefit of the garrison stationed there. It would be but natural that the wells and bathing places should be spared, for the soldiers would not purposely

72

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

be deprived of a grateful refreshment. The statement of the Evangelist looks no farther than the pool of Bethesda, and has no view of the state of Jerusalem. The argument deduced from the above passage, in favor of an earlier date, is more specious than forcible, and must be considered as inconclusive.

There are marked


ibly argue that
it

peculiarities of the

was written

Jerusalem was destroyed.


the following
a.

Gospel which forcnumber of years after Among these we may enumerate


quite a

The omission

of all prophetic reference to the de-

struction of Jerusalem.

Before that event


it,

all

the sacred
Epistles.

writers frequently referred to

as

is

manifest from an in-

spection of the Synoptics, the Acts and

some of the

Afterwards there was less occasion to mention it, partly because the event was known to have verified the prophecy, and especially because it was no longer necessary for the disciples to be on their guard against the danger of perishing in the general destruction, and moreover they needed not the assurance that they should obtain rest, by the prostration of the persecuting Jews.

The Synoptics
its

contain a

full

spirit in his foretelling the destruction

account of Christ's prophetic of Jerusalem, and of

celebrated Temple, with

all

its

preceding signs and con-

The signs which comitant and subsequent circumstances. were to precede the destruction of Jerusalem are thus enumerated: the appearance of false Messiahs (Matt. xxiv. 4, 5, Mark xiii. 5, 6, Luke xxi. 8); wars and commotions (Matt,
xxiv.
6,
7,

Mark

xiii.

7, 8,

Luke

xxi. 9, 10); famines, pesti7,

lences and earthquakes (Matt. xxiv.


10, 11); fearful sights

Mark

xiii. 8,

Luke

xxi.

and signs from heaven (Luke

xxi. 11);

the persecution of the Christians (Matt. xxix. 9, Mark xiii. 9, Luke xxi. 12); and the preaching of the Gospel throughout

the

known world (Mark

xiii. "10).

The circumstances
:

of the

destruction of Jerusalem are thus given

Jerusalem compassed

by armies (Matt. xxiv.

15,

Mark

xiii.

14,

Luke

xxi. 20);

when

Date.

73

the Christians were to escape from the city (Matt. xxiv. 16-18, Mark, xiii. 14-16, Luke xxi. 21); false Christs and false pro-

phets during the siege (Matt. xxiv. 24,

Mark

xiii. 22);

misery

of the Jews (Matt. xxiv. 19, 21, Mark xiii. 17, 19, Luke xxi. 22-24); and the total destruction- of the Temple and City (Matt, xxiii. 37, 38, xxiv. 2, Mark xiii. 2, Luke xiii. 34, 35,

As these words fell from the lips of the 6, 24). Master, and upon a point vital to the Jewish nation, it would he most unaccountable that John should fail to record them,
xix. 44, xxi.

unless the event

had passed some years previous

to the date

of his writing.
b.

The Second Coming


is

tators

of Christ, by the ablest commenrecognized to have been in spirit and power; and

that this took place at the destruction of Jerusalem,


resulted in the abolition of the Jewish dispensation,

which and the

establishment of the
fifty-seven passages

kingdom of heaven
referring to this

in the earth.

Of the
are

event, seventeen

found in the Synoptics (Matt.


39, 44, XXV., xxvi. 64;
ix.

x. 23, xvi. 27, 28, xxiv. 3,

29-35,

viii. 38, ix. 1, xiii. 3, 4, 28-31; 27-32 xii. 40, xvii. 22-24), and none in the Gospel of John. The subject is an important

Mark

Luke
one.

26,

27, xxi. 5-7,

Three chapters in Matthew (xxiv.-xxvi.) are devoted to and the Epistles contain frequent allusions to it. The Apostles expected the event to occur in their day and so taught, as they had a right to, for Jesus had declared that their generation would not pass away till all was fulfilled. The teachings of Jesus on this subject must have been known to John, aud his silence on a theme so frequently spoken of can only be accounted for from the fact that he recognized that the fulfilment had taken place prior to his composition
this event,

of the Gospel.

There are seven passages, two of which occur in John's 3, and 1 Jno. iii. 2), that are generally supposed to refer to Christ's final coming at the resurrection of the dead. The passage " If I will that he tarry till I come,
writings (xiv.

what

is

that to thee?" (xxi. 22)

is

simply explanatory, belong-

74

Study of

the

Gospel of St John.

ing to a saying that went abroad among the brethren that John should not die. It was equivalent to saying, If I will that he escape martyrdom and die in peace, what is that to thee? The early persecution against the Christians was almost wholly instituted by the Jews and when their power was broken, by the'fearful calamity which befell them (Matt. xxiv.), the disciples had rest for several years. Although not connected with this question, yet it should
;

probably be referred to, that, inasmuch as, it has been declared that " this same Jesus which is taken up from you into
heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen him go into heaven" (Acts i. 11), must mean the bodily coming of
Christ at the end of time, because he did not

come

in like

manner

It is only necessary at the destruction of Jerusalem. to observe that ov-rpoTrou, here rendered " like manner," oc-

curs in the l^ew Testament eight times.

It is

rendered as six
xv. 11, xxvii.

times (Matt,
25, 2

xxiii. 37,
8),

Luke

xiii.

34,

Acts

vii. -28,

and once conversation (Heb, xiii. 5). In the first passage (Matt, xxiii. 37) it would hardly be affirmed that Jesus would gather " thy children together in like manner as a hen gathereth her chickens under wings." c. Tlie particularity with which this Evangelist explains THE Jeavish names AND CUSTOMS indicates that he wrote for the information of those, who, by distance of phice and lapse of Similar explanations time, were unacquainted with them. occur in the Synoptics, but they are less frequent and parIn John these explanations would be necessarily ticular. more marked because many more Gentiles, and of more distant countries, had embraced Christianity, which would require such explanations in order that the facts might be fully set The feasts and other peculiarities of the Jews would forth. be but little understood by the Gentiles of Asia Minor, thirty
Tim.
iii.

years after the destruction of Jerusalem. Under the consideration of " Occasion and

Date" West-

cott has copiously set forth the reasons for ascribing a late

Date.

75
less

date to this Gospel.

As

it

bears

more or

on the interpre-

tation of the Gospel, it is here transcribed in fuU. d. " jSTo one can read the Fourth Gospel carefully with-

out feeling that the writer occupies a position remote from


the events which he describes.

However

clear

it

is

that he

was an eye-witness of the Life of the Lord, it is no less clear that he looks back upon it from a distance. This is the impression which is conveyed l>y the notes which he adds from time to time in interpretation of words or facts (vii. 39, xii. These notes offer a remark33, xviii. 9, 32, xix. 36, xxi. 19). able contrast to those in which attention is called in the First Gospel to the present and inmiediate fulfilment of prophecy. One plain proof of this is found in the manner in which he records words which point to the spread of the Gospel beyond the limits of Judaism. This characteristic view is distinctly brought out in the interpretation Avhich he gives of the judgment of Caiaphas 'Now this he said not of himself,
:

but being high-priest in that year, he prophesied that Jesus should die for the nation, and not for the nation only, but in order that he might gather together in one the children of God that were scattered abroad (xi. 51, 52). It is beyond question that when tlie Evangelist wrote these words, he was reading the fulfilment of the unconscious prophecy of Caiaphas in the condition of the Christian Church about him. " The same actual experience of the spread of the Gos'

pel explains the prominent position which St.


to those sayings of Christ in
'
:

John

assigns

which he declared the universality of his mission Other sheep I have which are not of this fold them also must I lead and they shall become one flock, one shepherd' (x. 16); I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto myself (xii. 32) the Son has authority over all flesh (xvii. 2) all that which the Father giveth me, shall come to me and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out (vi. 37) the knowledge of God and of Jesus Chi^ist'is eternal life' (xvii. 3); and this knowledge, the knowledge of the truth, conveys the freedom,
;

....
'

'

'

'

'

70

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

Jolm.

of which the freedom of the chUdreti of

Abraham was
is

only

a type
'

(viii.

31)

the final form of worship

the worship of

all local and temi)oral worships, typiJerusalem, should pass away (iv. 21). fied by Gerizim and " This teaching receives its final seal in the answer of

the Father,' in which

Thou sayest that I am a king. To this end have I been born, and to this end am I come into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the The relation of the betruth heareth my voice' (xviii. 37). liever to Christ is thus shown to rest on a foundation which Christ, while he fulfiled'the Law.' is of all most absolute. which was the heritage of the Jews, revealed and satisfied the Truth, which is the heritage of humanity. " There are indeed traces of the announcement of this universalism of the Gospel in the Synoptic narratives, and It is taught there that Christ especially in that of St. Luke. came as the salvation prepared before the face of all the peoples, a light for revelation to Gentiles, and a glory to God's people Israel (ii. 31, 32); 'repentance unto remission of sins' was to be preached in his name unto all the nations beginning from Jerusalem (xxiv. 47). It may be possible also to see in the face of the Prodigal Son an image of the restoraPilate
:

'

'

'

'

'

tion of the brethren in their Father's

home.

But

in these
;

cases the truth

is

not traced back to

its

deepest foundation

nor does it occupy the same relative position as in St. John. The experience of an organized Christian society lies between
the two records.
" This
is

plainly intimated by the language of the


lie speaks in
his

Evan-

gelist himself.
crisis

own person
:

of the great
to his

of the choice of Israel as over

'

He came
;

own

and his own people received him not' (i. 11) and so in some sense, the choice of the world was also decided, the light hath come into the world, and men loved the darkness rather than the light' (iii. 19). The message of the Gospel had already been proclaimed in such a way to Jew and Gentile that
'

Date.

77

a judgment could be pronounced upon the general character


of
its

acceptance.

example serves to show how St. John brings into their true place in the completed edilice the facts of Christ's teaching which were slowly realized in the course of the apostolic age. And while he does so, he recalls the words in which Christ dwelt upon that gradual apprehension of the meaning of his life and work, which characterized in Throughout the fact the growth of the catholic Church. last discourses of the Lord, the great change to the a})ostolate we seem to hear the warning addressed to St. Peter at the outset 'What I do thou knowest not now, but thou shalt
" This typical
:

come
cital

to

know

afterwards

'

(xiii. 7).

It is

implied in the

re-

had found their accomplishment by the mission of the new advocate I have yet many things to say unto you, but ye can not bear them now
:

that the words of patient waiting

'

howbeit when He is come, even the Spirit of Truth, He shall guide you into all the truth (xvi. 12 comp. xv, 26). Even
' ;

if

Christ had already

'made known

all

things' (xv. 15), there

was need of the long teaching of time, that his disciples might master the lessons which they had implicity received. " The record of these appeals to a future growth of knowledge can admit of only one interpretation. In dwelling on
such aspects of Christ's teaching, it is clear that the Evangelist is measuring the interval between the first imperfect views of the Apostles as to the kingdom of God, and that just ideal which he had been allowed to shape, under the teaching of the Paraclete, through disappointments and disasters. Xow at length, on the threshold of a new world, he can feel the divine force of much that was before hard and mysterious. He had waited till his Lord came and he was enabled to recognize His Presence, as once before by the lake of Galilee, in the unexpected victories of faith. " In the last quarter of the first century, the world relating to the Christian Church was a new world and St. John presents in his view of the Work and Person of Christ (1)
;

78

Study of

the

Gospel of

*SV.

Joh./L

THE ANSWERS WHICH HE HAD FOUND TO BE GIVEN IN HIM tO


the problems ^vhicll were offered by the changed order. The overthrow of Jerusalem, carrying with it the destruction of the ancient service and the ancient people of God, the estab-

lishment of the Gentile congregations on the basis of St. Paul's interpretation of the Gospel, the rise of a Christian philosophy from the contact of the historic creed with Eastern and Western speculation, could not but lead one who had lived with Christ to go back once more to those days of a divine discipleship, that

he might find in them, according to the prom-

ise, the anticipated rephes to the questionings of a later age. This St. John has done and it is impossible not to feel how
;

in each of these cardinal directions he points his readers to words and facts which are still unexhausted in their appli-

cations.

" We have already touched upon the treatment of the Jewish people in the Fourth Gospel. They appear as the heirs of divine blessings who have Esau-like despised their The prerogatives of the people and their misuse birthright. But in this respect their is (2) one are alike noted. of them DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE FoURTH GoSPEL AND MOST STRIKING THE OTHER THREE. The Syuoptic Gospcls are full of warnings of judgment. Pictures of speedy desolation are crowded into

the record of the last days of the Lord's ministry (Matt, xxiv., Mark xiii., Luke xxi.) His coming to judgment is a central
topic.

There are no prophecies all is changed. Holy City there is no reiterated promise of a return; the judgment had been wrought. Christ had come. There was no longer any need to dwell upon the outward aspects of teaching which had in this respect found its accomplishment. The task of the Evangelist was to unfold the essential causes of the catastrophe, which were significant for all time, and to show that even through apparent ruin and
In
St.

John

of the seige of the

failure the will

of

God found

fulfilment.

Inexorable facts

had revealed the rejection of the Jews. It remained to show that this rejection was not only foreseen, but that was also

Date.
morall}' inevitable,

79

and that involved no fatal loss. This is He traces step by step the progress of unbelief in the representatives of the people, and at the same time the correlative gathering of the children of God by Christ to Himself. There was a divine law of inward affinity to good'or evil in the obedience and disobedience of those who heard I am the good Shepherd and I know mine own, and mine own know me, even as the Father knoweth me and I
the

work

of

St.

John.

'

know
not of

the Father'

(x. 14, 15);

'

my

sheep.

My sheep

hear

Ye believe not, because ye are my voice, and I know them,


'

This is the judgment, that and men loved the darkness rather than the light, for their works were evil (iii. 19). " The Fourth Gospel reveals in these and similar passages the innermost cause of the rejection of the Jewish people. The fact underlies the record, and the Evangelist lays open the spiritual necessity of it. He reveals also the
(x. 26, 27);

and they follow me'


is

the light

come

into the world,

'

'

constitution of the Spiritual Church.

The

true people of

God

survived the ruin of the Jews

the ordinances of a

new

society

replaced in a nobler shape the typical and transitory worship of Israel. When this Gospel was written, the Christian congregations, as

we see from St. Paul's Epistles, were already organized, but the question could not but arise, how far this organization was fitted to realize the ideal of the kingdom

which Christ preached. The Evangelist meets the inquiry. He shows from the Lord's words what are the laws of his service, and how they are fulfiled by the institutions in which they were embodied. The absolute worship was to be in 'spirit and truth' (iv. 23), as distinguished from letter and shadow; and the discourses with Nicodemus and at Capernaum set forth by anticipation how the sacraments satisfy this
the other hand, the general contained only in the Fourth Gospel (xx.), gives the foundation of the wliole. In that lies the unfailing assurance of the permanence of the new society.
ministerial commission,

condition for each individual.

On

which

is

3.

''So far the

Fourth Gospel met

difficulties

which had

80

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

lem.

not been and could not be realized till after the fall of JerusaIn like manner it met difficulties which had not been
felt till

and could not be

the preaching of St. Paul had

moulded

the Christian Society in accordance with the law of freedom. Then first the great problems as to the nature of the object of

personal faith, as to the revelation of the Deity, as to the universality of the Gospel,

were apprehended

in their true vast-

ness; and the Evangelist shows that these thoughts of a later The experienceage were not unregarded by Christ himself.

of the

life

of the Church

which

is

nothing

less

than the

historic teaching of the

Holy

Spirit

made clear in

due time

what was necessarily veiled at first. Sayings became luminous which w^ere riddles before their solution was given. Christ, in relation to humanity, was not characteristically the Prophet or the King, but the Savior of the world, the Son of Man, the Son of God. In this connection the fact of the Incarnation
obtained
its full

significance.

By

the Incarnation alone the

words which were

partially interpreted

through the crowning


all

miracle of the Lord's ministry were brought home to 'I am the Resurrection and the Life' (xi. 25).

men

"Thus by the record of the more mysterious teaching of the Lord, in connection with typical works, St. John has given a historical basis for the preaching of St. Paul. His
once the most spiritual and the most concrete. He shows how Faith can find a personal object. The words 'He that hath seen me hath seen the Father' (xiv. 9) mark an epoch in the development of religious thought. By them the idea of God receives an abiding embodiment, and the father is thereby brought forever within the reach of intelligent devotion. The revelation itself is complete (xvii. 6, 26),
narrative
is

at

and yet the interpretation of the revelation is set forth as the work of the Holy Spirit through all ages (xiv. 26). God in
Christ
is

placed in a living union with

all

creation

(v. 17:

comp. i. 3). The world, humanity and God are represented in the words and in the Person of Christ under new aspects of fellowship and unity.

Date.

81
is

"It
that of

will
St.

be evident

how

this teaching

Paul.

Two

special points only

may

connected with be noticed:

the doctrine of the sovereignty of the divine will, and the doctrine of the union of the believer with Christ. The foundations of these two cardinal doctrines, which rise supreme
in the Pauline Epistles, lie
first,

deep in the Fourth Gospel.


in

The
it

the doctrine of Providence, Predestination, however

be called, not only finds reiterated aifirmation

the disit is
life.

courses of the Lord contained in the Fourth Gospel, but


also implied as the rule of the proc:ress of the Lord's

His 'hour' determines the occurrence of events from man's point of view; and the Evangelist refers to it in connection with each crisis of the Gospel history, and especially with the Passion in which all crises were consummated (ii. 4, vii. 30, viii. 20, xii. 23, 27, xiii. 1, xvi. 4, xvii. 1; comp. vii. 6-8). So also the will or tlie gift' of the Father is the spring of the believer's power (iii. 27, vi. 37, 44, 65, xvii. 12); and Christ fulfils and applies that will to each one who comes to
'

him

(xv. 16, 5, v. 21).

"Faith again Uf^snmes a new aspect in the narrative of St. John. It is not merely the mediative energy in material deliverances, and the measure (so to speak) of material power; it is an energy of the whole nature, and active transference of the whole being into another life. Faith in a Person in One revealed under a new 'name' is the ground of sonship (i. 12), of life (xi. 25), of power (xiv. 12), of illumination (xii. 36, 46). The key-words of two complementary views of truth are fully combined This is the work of God, that ye believe' believe with a continuous ever-present faith 'on him whom he sent' (vi. 29; comp. viii. 30). Once again when the Fourth Gospel was written Christianity occupied a new intellectual position. In addition to social and doctrinal developments, there were also those still vaster questions which underlie all organization and all special dogma, as to the function and stability of knowledge,

'

(]

82

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

as to the interpretation and significance of life, as to the connection of the seen and unseen. The new faith had made

more urgent than before, and the teaching of Lord furnished such answers to them as man can appreKnowledge was placed in its final position by the hend. The Truth shall make declaration I am the Truth. you free (xiv. 6, viii. 31). Every thing real is thus made
these questions

the

'

'

tributary to religious service.


as present,

and

life is

laid

Again, the eternal is revealed open in all its yjossible nobility.

The separation which men are inclined to make arbitrarily between 'here' and 'there' in spiritual things, is done away: He that heareth my word This is life eternal (xvii. 3) Once more, the essential unity and hath life eternal' (v. 24). All the actual divisions of the world are alike recognized things were made through him [in the Word] (i. 3) 'and the Light shineth in the darkness ' (i. 5); and 'the
'
' ;
' :

'

'

Word became

flesh,'

Thus

in Christ there is offered the his-

toric reconciliation of the finite

and the

infinite,

by which the

oppositions of thought and experience are

made capable of

being reduced to harmony.

"These

internal

indications of date completely accord

with the historical tradition, and lead to the conclusion that


the composition of the Gospel must be placed late in the generation

which followed the destruction of Jerusalem.

The

shock of that momentous revolution was over, and Christians had been enabled to interpret it. There is no evidence to determine the date exactly. St. John, according to Asiatic tradition recorded by Irenseus (ii. 22, 5; iii. 3, 4) lived 'till the times of Trajan' (a. d. 98-117), and the writing of the GosIt is probable pel must be placed at the close of his life. therefore that it may be referred to the last decennium of the first century, and even to the close of it" {Introd. to St. John's
Gospel).

IV. Object of the Gospel.

The Gospel
detail,

narratives,

however
object.

different they

must have the same

may be in There may be external

Object of the Gospel.

83

circumstances which might cause certain points to be brought more prominently forward, and the cause or origin may be discovered in a close study of the wording of the narrative

and the spirit of the age that gave it birth. Much conjecture and criticism has resulted in tlie study of the object of John's
Gospel, although the primal reason
a.

is

clearly given.

The pukpose
its

guage of
"

Many

best given in the lanthus clearly expresses himself; other signs did Jesus in the presence of his disciples
is

of the Gospel

author,

who

in this book; but these have been written that ye may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that believing ye may have life in his name" The object then w^as not to write a life of (XX. 30, 31).

which have not been written

Christ; for

John

certainly

had

stores of

knowledge concern-

one was better equipped for that purpose, and his Gospel is far from being a biography. Out of his abundant personal recollections he made a careful selection with a view to producing a particular eftect upon his readers, and thus open to them an inestimable treasure. He could have poured forth a stream of information which would have ardently been received. But he nmst impose upon himself the
ing him.
self-denying task of eliminating every thing that might obscure his argument; he therefore rigidly limits himself in

No

order that the desired efiect might be produced. As announced by the Evangelist his object was two-fold. First, to convince men that Jesus was the true Messiah and for this
;

purpose he urges the evidence of the miracles most earnestly, as well as the language of our Lord. Secondly, the ultimate object was to assist in imparting life to men through the influence of faith in the Son of God and in his truth (comp. iii. This is the great design of the Gospel, 15, 17, v. 24, xvii. 17.) to purify the hearts of men, through faith, to turn them from

and lead them to the practice of holiness, and the enjoyment of God's grace. The Evangelist would prove to the Jew that Jesus, the
sinfulness,

man who had

been

known

to

them personally

or liistorically,

84

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John,

was the promised Messiah, for whom they liad been looking and in him all types and prophecies had been fulfiled, and to him all allegiance is due. The Evangelist would prove to tlie Gentiles that this Jesus, of whom the world was hearing so much, is the Son of God, and that his mission was coextensive with the human race; and that both Jew and Genand that tile were to be partakers of the truths he uttered
;

there

is

neither Gentile nor Jew, circumcision nor uncircum-

cision, barbarian, Scythian,

bond nor

free; but Christ


iii.

is all
;

and
iii.

in all; all

are one in Christ Jesus (corap. Col.

11

Gal.

28).

The object is not to be looked for beyond that expressed by the Evangelist himself, for it must be regarded as concluStill there may have been influences which caused the sive. Evangelist to write for the purpose of presenting the two While presenting the main obpoints so clearly elucidated. could cover different special purposes, which possibly ject he might have been minor motives in the work. Hence discussions have arisen on the polemical, supplemental, didactic and conciliatory character of the work. Whatever might be
the truth in the matter a consideration of these points will assist in the interpretation of the character of the composition.

The Gospel is not specifically polemical, although speaking it is doctrinal. The early Gospels are imstrictly plicit dogmas, containing the fundamental facts and words which experience afterwards interpreted, while the Fourth
b.

the exactness of historical


cases.

Gospel reviews the facts in the light of their interpretation truth being paramount in both

references to

shown much ingenuity in discovering Docetism, Ebionitism, and Sabianism. Designed polemical opposition to any of those errors does not lie in the contents of the Gospel; and yet it would be difficult to main-

Some

writers have

tain

that

forth

the

they were not unnoticed by John. In setting faith he has introduced passages that confute

Object of the Gospel.

85

those erroneous tendencies. Irenseus gives the following account on this subject " John being desirous to extirpate the
:

errors

sown

in the

minds of men by Cerinthus, and some time


:

before by those called Nicolaitans, published his Gospel

in

which he acquaints us that there is one God, who made all things by his word, and not, as they say, one who is the Creator of the world, and another who is the Father of the Lord one the Son of the Creator, and another the Christ from the super-celestial abodes, who descended upon Jesus the Son of the Creator, but remained impassible, and afterwards fled back to his own pleroma or fulnGss"(^ceres. B. iii. c. 11). This testimony of Irenseus has been opposed by quite an array of
but the evidence confirms the view that Gnostic had crept into the Church before John wrote his Gospel. That there are passages in John's Gospel which are conclusive against Ebionitic and Docetic errors may be seen by referring to the same (comp. also I John ii. 22, iv. 2) but it does not follow that St. John's object was particularly to If controversy had been his refute these false assumptions. object, the First Epistle shows with what directness the
biblical critics,
ei'rors
;

Apostle could have dealt adversaries. c. Cerinthus was an important personage in Ephesus during a portion of the time that St. John was there, and between them there was more or less antagonism. As it has been affirmed that the doctrines of Cerinthus had an indirect influence in calling out the Fourth Gospel, it is proper here to note that he was a Jew by birth, and had studied philosophy and literature at Alexandria. He attempted to create a new and singular system of doctrine and discipline, by a monstrous combination of the doctrines of Jesus Christ with the opinions and errors of the Jews and Gnostics. From the latter he borrowed their ijleroma or fulness, their jEons or spirits, their Demiurgiis or creator of the visible world, and so modifled and tempered these fictions as to give them a semblance of Judaism, which considerably favored the progress of his teaching. lie affirmed that the most high

86

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

God was utterly uiikuowii before the appearance of Christ, and dwelt in a remote heaven called P/eroma with the chief spirits or jEons; that this Supreme God first generated an only begotten S071, MoNOTENEz, who again begot the Logos, which was that Christ was a still lower seon, inferior to the first born
;

though

some others; that there were two from Christ, one called zoh, or Life, and that from the eeons again prothe other Phos, or the Light ceeded inferior orders of spirits, and particularly one Demiurgus, who created this visible world out of eternal matter; that this Demiurgus was ignorant of the supreme God, and much lower than the JEons, which were wholly invisible that he was the peculiar God and protector of the Jews, and to them sent Moses, whose laws were to be perpetually observed that Jesus was a mere man of the most illustrious that the ^on Christ descended upon sanctity and justice him in the form of a dove when he was baptized, revealed to him the unknown father and empowered him to w^ork miracles; that the -^on. Light, entered John the Baptist in the same manner, and therefore, in some respects, John was preferable to Christ that Jesus, after his union with Christ, opposed himself with vigor to the God of the Jews, at whose instigation he was seized and crucified by the Hebrew priests, and that when Jesus suft'ered, Christ ascended on high, so that the man Jesus alone passed through an ignominious death; that some day Christ will return to the earth, and renewing his former union with the man Jesus, will reign in We possess three difi'erent auPalestine a thousand years.
far

superior to

higher seons, distinct

thorities for the opinions of Cerinthus, to


sistent wMth each other,
ter,

some extent incon-

Irenseus, Cains the


is

Roman

presby-

and the name of the third d. That the Fourth Gospel is supplemental to the Synoptics was early maintained in the Church, and that this record was to preserve what the others had omitted. Eusebius quoting from his predecessors says, " The Apostle John gave in his Gospel an account of the period which had been omitted by

unknown.

Plan and Analysis of

the Gospel.

87

the earlier Evangelists, and of the deeds done by the Savior

during that period; that is, of those which were done before The Gospel acthe imprisonment of the Baptist. cording to John contains the first acts of Christ, while the others give an account of the latter part of his life. And the genealogy of our Savior, according to the flesh, John quite naturally omitted, because it had already been given by Matthew and Luke, and began with the doctrine of his divinity, which had, as it were, been reserved for him, as their superior, by the divine Spirit." {Eccl. Hist. B. iii. c. 24.) There is no question but John does supplement the other three Gospels
. .
.

to a large extent, especially as regards the ministry in Judsea.

Where something

not recorded by them would equally sup-

port his purpose he would naturally prefer

it; but he does not hesitate to retell what had already been recorded by one or all three of them, if it is necessary for the object had

In the general chronology as well as in the deit is a supplement, only in the sense that it is the vital analysis of faith and unbelief.
in view.

tailed incidents of the Lord's life

The gradual development of the popular views among the disciples is carefully traced and the
;

of Christ
successive

crises in the divine revelation which happened in Jerusalem, then the center of the religious activity of Jewish theocracy, are brought out in strong relief.

Although this Gospel, by high critical authority has been pronounced a supplementary one, yet those who hold to this theory in its extreme and exclusive form will find it diflicult
to account for the fact that St.

mon

John has many things in comwith his predecessors and those who reject the theory entirely will find it hard to account for his omissions, especially of such events as the Transfiguration, which he was admitted to see, and under any theory would have been
;

within the scope of his history.

V. Plan and Analysis of the Gospel.

The plan of the Fourth Gospel

is

more manifest than that

88

Study of

t/ie

Gospel of

St.

John.

of the other three.

The

different scenes

from the

life

of

Jesus Christ which he puts before us, are not only carefully selected but well arranged, leading up step by step to the full

view of the Messianic character and mission.

To

those

who

accept Jesus as the Messiah there is a development of faith and love, and on the other hand there is an unfolding of unbelief

and hatred on the part of those who

reject

and perse-

cute him.

Every part of the narrative is referred to one final truth, that "Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God." There is no promise to compose a life of Christ, or even give a general view of his teachings. The author works out his own plan,
ture of Christ.

according to his expressed purpose of revealing the true naHaving the complete composition, its analy-

This should sis is a necessary point in its true interpretation. be considered at length and indicated in tabular form, that a minute survey should be portrayed. a. The outline and plan may thus be given
:

I.

Prologue or Introduction,
14-18.

i.

1-18.

The Logos as the Energy of God, i. 1-5. The Logos revealed to men and rejected by them, i. 6-13. The Logos becomes Incarnate and reveals the Father,
II.

i,

First

main

division,
i.

Christ's revelation of

Himself

to

the World,
i.

19-xii. 50.

The Testimony to a'. The testimony


to the people,
to
//.
c'.
i.

Christ,

i.

19-ii. 11.
i.

of the Baptist,
29-34.
i.

19-37.
i.

to the deputation

from Jerusalem,
35-37.

19-28,

Andrew and John,

The Testimony of Disciples, i. 38-51. The Testimony of the First Sign (water turned
wine),
ii.

to

1-11.

ii.

The Work of Christ, ii, 13-iv. 54. a'. The work among Jews, ii. 13-iii.
Cleansing of the Temple,
ii.

36.

13-22.

Plan and Analysis of


Belief without devotion,
ii.

the Gospel.

89

23-25.
iii.

Discourse with Nicodemus,


6'.

1-21.

The Ba[)tisni and final testimony of John, iii. 22-36. The Work among Samaritans, iv. 1-42. c'. The Work among Galileans, iv, 43-54. iii. The Conflict am(^ng mixed Multitudes, v.-xii.
a'.

Christ the Source of Life,

v.

The The The


b'.

sign at the pool of Bethsaida, v. 1-9.

sequel of the sign, v. 10-16.

discourse on the

Son
:

as the Source of Life, v. 17-47.


vi.
vi.

Christ the Support of Life,

The The The The

sign on the land


sign on the lake
:

feeding the 5,000,


signs, vi. 22-25.

1-15.
vi.

walking on the water,

16-21,

sequel of the

two

discourse on the Son as the Support of Life,

vi.

26-59.

Opposite results of the discourse,


c'.

vi.

60-71.

Christ Represents Truth and Light, vii.-ix.

The controversy with his brethren, vii. 1-9. The discourse at the Feast of Tabernacles, vii.
Opposite results of the discourse,
vii.

10-39.

40-52.

[The

woman

taken in adultery],

vii. 53-viii. 11.

Christ's true witness to himself


viii.

and against the Jews,

12-59.

Illustrates his doctrine

by a

sign, ix.

Prelude to the sign,

ix. 1-5.

The
d'.

sign (healing the blind man), ix. 6-12.


ix.

Opposite results of the sign,

13-41.
xi.

Christ the Representative of Love, x.

Allegory of the Door of the Fold, x. 1-10. Allegory of the Good Shepherd, x. 11-18. Opposite results of the teaching, x. 19-21. The Discourse at the Feast of the Dedication, Opposite results of the discourse, x. 39-42.
Illustrates his doctrine

x. 22-38.

by a

sign, xi.

The prelude

to the sign, xi. 1-32.

90

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

The
e'.

sign (raising of Lazarus), xi. 33-44.

Opposite results of the sign, xi. 45-57. The close of Christ's Public Ministry, xii.

III.

The devotion of Mary, xii. 1-8. The hostility of the priests, xii. 9-11. The enthusiasm of the people, xii. 12-18. The discomfiture of Pharisees, xii. 19. The desire of the Gentiles, xii. 20-33. The perplexity of the multitude, xii. 34-36. The conclusion of the Ev^angelist, xii. 37-43. The declaration of Christ, xii. 44-50. Second Main Division. Christ's Revelation of Himself

to His Disciples, xiii.-xx.


i.

The Last Ministry of Love, xiii.-xvii. a'. The last acts of love, xiii. 1-30. b'. The last discourses, xiii. 31-xvi. 33.
In the chamber,
xiii.

31-xiv.

On

the way, xv.


allegory of the vine, xv. 1-11.

The

Thei^ union with one another, xv. 12-17.


c'.

The hatred of the world, xv. 18-25. The Promise of the Paraclete, xvi. The world and the Paraclete, xvi. 1-11. The disciples and the Paraclete, xvi. 12-15. The sorrow turned into joy, xvi. 16-24.

Summary and
d'.

conclusion, xvi. 25-33.


xvii. xvii. 1-5.

The Prayer of Christ, The prayer for himself,


for the

for the disciples, xvii. 6-19.

ii.

whole Church, xvii. 20-26. Christ in His Passion, xviii.-xix.


a'.
b'.

The Betrayal, xviii. 1-11. The Jewish or Ecclesiastical Trial, xviii. c'. The Roman or Civil Trial,' xviii. 28-xix. d'. The Death and Burial, xix. 17-42. The crucifixion and the title on the cross,

12-27.
16.

xix. 17-22.

General Review.

91

The The

four enemies and the four friends, xix. 23-27.


last

words ("I

thirst."

"It

is

finished"), xix.

28-30.

iii.

The hostile and the friendly petitions, xix. 31-42. The Resurrection and Manifestations of Christ, xx. a'. The first Evidence of the Resurrection, xx. 1-10. b'. The Manifestation to Mary of Magdala, xx. 11-18. c'. The Manifestation to the Ten and others, xx. 19-23, d'. The Manifestation to St. Thomas and others, xx.
24-29.
e'.

The Conclusion and Purpose of the Gospel,


Epilogue, xxi..
Christ

xx. 30-31.

IV.The
a'.

b'.

appears to the Seven and the Miraculous Draught of Fishes, xxi. 1-14. The Commission to St. Peter and Prediction as to his

Death, xxi. 15-19.


c'.

The Misunderstood saying


20-23.

as to the Evangelist, xxi.

d/.

Concluding Notes,

xxi. 24, 25.

b.

The data

for fixing the

The following appears main events, which has

to be the best

chronology are very meager. arrangements of the

yet been suggested: Early Spring: the calling of the first disciples, i. 19-ii. 11. First Passover (April), ii. 13-iii. 21 iii. 22-iv. 54. The Feast of the New Year (September), v.
;

Second Passover

(April), vi.
vii. viii.

The Feast The Feast

of Tabernacles (October),
(April), xiii.-xx.

of Dedication (December), ix.

x.; xi. xii.

Third Passover

VI. General Review. The Gospel having been w^ritten in Asia Minor, and among whom the term Logos was more familiarly used than

any other

to express the attributes of

God viewed
to

in relation

to his creatures,

John adopted the same term

convey his

meaning, because from their associations with

it, it

was par-

92-

SfiuJi/

of the Gospel of St. John.

ticularly fitted to impress

and

affect
lie

necting the great truth which

their minds; thus contaught with their former

modes of thinking and speaking. Clearly and concisely he opens his theme, and with brevity sweeps to one side Philo's
doctrine of an impersonal or quasi-impersonal Logos.
the idea primarily expressed by this term, he gives a

Upon new
and

conception of the proper personality of

tliose attributes,

invigorates the teachings of Christianity with a nomenclature

which manifests God


the same divine

in his works.
St.

ing of the introduction

origin as

Hence in the very openJohn declares Christianity has the universe itself. Under the

name of "the Logos," he speaks of the attributes of God as displayed in the creation and government of the world.
Unfortunately the English language has no equivalent for
the direct import of the term "the Logos," which
it was in"Energy of

tended to express.

In

all

probability the term

God"

represents the equivalent as nearly as

pressed.

Lindsay, Lardner,

Priestl}',

it could be exWakefield and others

prefer the term

"Wisdom"
"

dering of Logos.
or ability to

Energy

instead of "Energy" as the ren" appears to express the meaning


signifies right

with more exactness, for Wisdom

know.

Lor/os literally

means

"

Word"

knowledge, but this

may
this

figuratively denote

Energy
it

as well as

Wisdom.

mode

of expression,
is

may be
it

said that the "

Adopting Energy of
afterits re-

God

" personified,

the subject of the introduction or proFirst


is

logue of this Gospel.

said to be
it is

God, and

wards

to

have become a man.

First

regarded in

and afterwards in its relation was manifested. As thus viewed, whatever may be said of the "Energy of God" is true of God, for the terms become identical in their purport; and, whatever is said of the "Energy of God" is true of Christ, considered as the minister of God. His words were the words of God, and his miracles were performed l)y the power of God. The language is poetic, and when thus used, the leadlation to

God

in

whom

it

resides,

to Jesus through

wliom

it

ing term seldom preserves

its

significance throughout the do-

General Review.
scription, for
its

93

meaning must vary when it assumes a new An attribute may be spoken of as personified, then aspect. simply as an attribute, and again as identified with the subject in which it resides. St. John adopts the same mode of expression which Moses em})loyed in the commencement of liis history: "In the beginning" (Gen. i. 1). This coincidence was hardly accidentaL Like Moses, he was about to speak of the creation of the world, and of the Divine Energy by which it was accomplished. The world was created by the direct Energy of God himself; and that Energy was subsequently manifested " The Word was with God," or in the Lord Jesus Christ. God's Energy had never been wanting; for it had always been present to him, as an inseparable attribute. So absolutely was this Energy identified with himself that it might appropriately be called God. Thus does the Apostle, in the strongest possible manner, affirm tliat the creation (i. 3) was accomplished by the Supreme God, not by a personal emanation from himself, but by his own indwelling Energy. The Energy which had always existed, which was with God and in God, had been with God from the beginning {v. 2.) It had never been separated from him, nor united to him anew. " In him was life and the life was the light of men " (y. 4). This revelation made by the Energy of God through Christ, which
;

is

the Light of the moral world,

is

the source of blessedness

men. The same divine Energy, which created the world, also communicated that Spiritual Light which should purify and bless men and in order that this Light might be communicated, the Logos became flesh. Here was either an infor
;

tentional or unintentional side-thrust at the false-philosophy

of that day, for according to its tenets. Life was one of the highest seons; Light was another of the same order, and darkness an antagonist being, or seon, to Light. John shows
that Life and Light were not particular and separate spirits, but were inherent in the creative Word, in God, and were derived from him, and

him alone

to bless

mankind.

Light

is

94

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

often put for truth,


tures.

and darkness

for ignorance in the Scrip-

Jesus appeared to reveal the glory of divine truth, darkness covered the earth, and gross darkness the peoThis moral and intellectual condition of the people had ple.

When

not materially changed when John wrote his Gospel. With striking propriety he declared that the Light shineth in the midst of darkness, hut it was not comprehended {v. 5), or illuminated. That is, men were so profoundly ignorant of
spiritual truth,

and so completely under the dominion of


it

error,

that

when

the truth was revealed,

did not obtain ready ac-

cess to their minds.

At the sixth yerse the discourse is broken in order to introduce the Baptist. There was a heresy, current in the days of the Apostle, that atfirmed that the ceon Light descended upon the Baptist and endowed him with superior knowledge. Some indeed claimed that he was the promised Messiah. Even in the city of Ephesus there were disciples of John,

who had

kept themselves so entirely aloof from the disciples of Jesus, that they had " not so much as heard whether there be any Holy Spirit" (Acts xix. 1-3). It became necessary
also to correct

John

at once proceeds to

erroneous opinions concerning the Baptist. show that the Baptist was not the
it

Light, or the

medium through which

was communicated to
;

men, which he confirms by the testimony of the Baptist himJohn was not the Light, but a witness to the Light and self.
at the very outset of the public life of Jesus, the Baptist de-

though the law was given by Moses, the gifts of came through Jesus, and that He, being the only begotten Son in the bosom of the Father, has
clares that

divine grace and truth

manifested the invisible God to men (i. 6-18). The baptism of Jesus by John is omitted but John bears witness to the
;

visible descent of the Spirit

upon

Jesus, adding that

it

"

abode

on Him" {v. 32), and affirms that his own baptism with water is but to prepare the way for Him who will baptize with the

Holy

Spirit

and that

He

on

whom

the Spirit thus descended

General Review.
is the Sou of God, " the Lamb of God, which taketh the sin of the world " {v. 29).

95

away
38-51)

The

narrative of the calling of the disciples

{vs.

implies that this Gospel will not follow the


;

common

tradition,

nor will it be a complete record for of the twelve it names only the calling of six, and one of these, ISTathanael, is so far from being universally identified with one of the twelve that grave doubts have been entertained whether or not he should be excluded from the number. The second chapter opens with a sign, of which the symbolism is reflected in the w^ords, " Mine hour is not yet come" {v. 4), which seem to look forward to the hour when the "blood of the grape" should stream from the wounded side of Jesus. The water turned into wine may be said to typify the substitution of grace for the law. This was the first miracle of the Lord, of which we have any account and it is
;

which succeeded it, manifested a spirit of benevolence, and a desire to promote the happiness of men. He never exerted the divine power for the injury of any man; but uniformly exhibited in his works, the same benevolence which his words expressed. The prediction he made (ii. 4) in Cana, was soon after followed by a similar prophecy for not long after he went to Jerusalem to attend the Passover, and there he purified the Temple. Being asked of the Jews for a sign, he replied, "Destroy this temple, and in three* days I will raise it up" (ii. 19). It is explained that he " spoke of the temple of his body [v. 21). The whole of chapter three is devoted to purification by water and the Spirit. The learned but timid JSTicodemus, a member of the Sanhedrim, exhibits the blindness of carnal learning as contrasted with the knowledge that belongs to
this as well as all
;

worthy of record, that

those

the wilderness

The figure of the serpent in introduced as a thousjht of faith and siorht; perhaps called up from the fact that Nicodemus came by nisrht, and further brought forth the statement of the difl^erare born of the Spirit.
is

who

96

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

ness

ence between the children of light and the children of darkIn the second section ot this cliapter the {vs. 18-21).

contrasts his

Baptist again takes up the subject of water-purification and own inferior work with the higher purification

of the Messiah, and declaring his own decrease, describing " himself as " earthly," whereas the Messiah is " from heaven

path of

the idea of faith, and that the through faith in the Son of God (r. 36). It is mentioned that "John was not yet cast into prison" The Synoptists give no account of the public appear(y. 24). ance of Jesus till after the imprisonment of John. The pub(y.

31).

The Baptist impresses

life is

lic

ministry of Jesus did not begin in Galilee until after the

imprisonment of John. The events in Galilee already narrated (ii. 1-12) were preparatory to the manifestation in Jerusalem, which was the real commencement of the Messianic work. The other Evangelists commence with the Galilean ministry, while John records the first course and issue of
Christ's manifestation.

Nicodemus is the first of the eleven Lord which form the main portion and are among the leading characteristics of this Gospel. They have been relied on as one of the principal arguments for the rejec-

The

discourse with

discourses of our

tion of

its

authenticity

because they are unlike the discourses

in the Synoptics, are suspiciously like the First Epistle of St.

John, and finally because this likeness to the First Epistle not only pervades the discourses of our Lord, but those of the Baptist also, as well as the writer's own reflections throughout the Gospel. The inference of all which is that the Gospel is the ideal composition of its author. The doctrine and the discourses in the main can not be the writer's, because they Neither St. John nor any are principally out of his reach. one else could invent such words. " Never man spake like Every one must write in his own style. this man" (vii. 46). In his own way St. John gives the Lord's meaning. The discourses of the Lord, given by the Apostle, are longer, more They are, however, for the most reflective, and less popular.

General Review.
part, addressed to the educated
isees,
:

97

and learned, the Elders, Pharand Rabbis even the discourse on the Bread of Life, although spoken before a mixed multitude at Capernaum,

was largely addressed to the educated portion (vi. 41, 52). In the Synoptics the discourses there recorded were addressed to the rude and simple-minded peasants of Galilee. The discourses in the four Gospels are translations from an Aramaic dialect. Two translations may differ ver}^ widely, and yet be
faithful
;

each

may

bear the impress of the translator's style,


life,

original. It must be recovering not less than half a century, separates John from the time when he heard these discourses to the date when he committed them to writing.

and yet accurately represent the


that an eventful

membered

teach you

Although Christ had promised that the Holy Spirit " shall all things, and bring all things to your remem-

brance, whatsoever I have said unto

yon"
it

(xiv. 26),

we have

no right to assume that in so doing


ordinary laws of psychology.

would override the The material was stored up so

long in the breast of the Apostle that it could not fail to be touched by the workings of his own mind. His words are sometimes a literal translation of the very words used, and sometimes ou\j the substance of what had been said but no hint given where one shades off into the other.
;

section of the Gospel.

The following chapter (iv.) may be called the foreign The Lord changes the scene of his

ministry that he

may

Pharisees, and again

prophetic work.
at

avoid a premature collision with the to Galilee there to carry on his His route takes him through Samaria, and

went

he has the notable conversation with a Doubt has been cast on this conversation, and it has also been regarded as an allegory. The whole picture is in keeping with the facts and the teachings of our Lord. The Samaritans were looking for the Messiah.
Jacob's
well

woman

of Samaria.

teuch.

Though they rejected the Prophets, they held to the PentaThe topography is well preserved; and the gradual
7

98

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.
psycbologically true.
it

developrnent of the woman's belief

is

In short, there are no just grounds for assuming that other than a faithful record of actual facts.

is

The

notice of Christ's Galilean

work

consists of a gen{vs.

eral account of the

welcome which he found

43-45) fol-

lowed by the narrative of a second sign {vs. 46-54). The conIt has been questioned whether tents are peculiar to John. " the healing of the nobleman's son " is not identical with
" the healing of the centurion's servant" (Matt.
vii. 2).
viii. 5,

Luke
at

Both miracles were wrought


all

at

Capernaum, and

distance; but in
teristically

other respects, the incidents are charac-

In one case the king's man pleads for probably a Jew the healing words spoken at Cana the malady is a fever; the father wishes Jesus to come Christ does not comply the father has weak lu the other case the centurion pleads faith and is blamed. the Jewish elders plead for him the cenfor his servant turion is a Gentile the healing words spoken at Capernaum; the centurion begs Jesus not to the disease is paralysis come apparently Christ goes the centurion has strong faith and is commended. 'There is no difficulty in supposing two somewhat similar miracles, for they were signs or vehicles
unlike.
his

son in person
;

is

for conveying the spiritual truths


It is

which Christ came

to teach.

almost certain that he repeated the same instructive say.

and he doubtless repeated the same instructive acts. Thus far in the narrative the Lord has offered himself to typical representatives of the whole Jewish race at Jerusalem in Judsea, in Samaria, and in Galilee, in such a way as
ings,

to satisfy the elements of true faith.

conflict

now begins
more

which
fully,

issues in the Passion.

As

Christ reveals himself

between him and the ruling party and the fuller revelation not only becomes more intense excites the hatred of his opponents but also serves to sift the disciples; some desert him and others have their faith
the
opposition
;

strengthened.
into

This part
:

(v.-xii.

50)
(v.

of the narrative
vi.)

falls

two

divisions

The Prelude

and The Contro-

General Revlein.
versj
(vii. xii.).

99

Two
The

miracles form the introduction to tM'o


liealing at

great discourses.
set forth

Bethesda and the feeding


is

of the five thousand lead to discourses in which Christ


as the Source

and the Support of Life (v. vi.). Then he is set forth as the Source of Truth and Light, which is illustrated by his giving physical and spiritual Then he is set forth as Love sight to the blind (vii.-ix.). under the figure of the Good Shepherd giving his Life for the Sheep and this is illustrated by the raising of Lazarus, And finally a work of love which cost him his life (x. xi.).
;

the account of the close of his public ministry


idea of " Life "
is

(xii.).

The

quite prominent in this part of the nar-

rative, for in chapters v.

and

vi.

the word occurs eighteen

times,
It

and

in the rest of the Gospel, the

same immber.

be also observed that hitherto the Gospel has of the Word as purifying and nourishing. treated The type has been water, w^ine, flesh, blood and bread. Jesus now be-

may

comes Light, which is another aspect of the doctrine of the Spirit, and the doctrine of Baptism gives way to the expanded form of this higher revelation. The idea of Light implies darkness, and the development of the doctrine of Light naturally belongs to the period of the conflict between the Word and the leaders of the Jews. The violent spirit manifested after the cure of the impotent man (v. 16, 18) breaks out again, and the Pharisees make a direct attempt to arrest Jesus (vii. 32), which is frustrated by the wonder of his words (vii. 46), and leads him to predict that he will soon pass away from them, and finally concludes by exclaiming in the last day of the feast " He that believeth in me, as the
:

Scriptures hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living

water water
the

(vii.

39)."

is

very striking.

The spiritual climax given to the doctrine of The well of living water, promised to

of Samaria, is not only to spring up in the believer but is also to flow forth from Him to others, and thus preparing the way for the Spirit of fellowship which is the higher doctrine, spoken of by St. John in the next
(iv. 14),

woman

100
verse:

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

"But this he spoke of the Spirit, which they that Then follows the believe on him should receive" (vii. 39).
dialogue between the people, which beautifully illustrates the dramatic character of the Gospel. The author does not stop to correct their errors, because he now addresses those who are in the Light, and able to see through them all. The episode of the woman taken in adultery (vii. 53-viii. 11) by most critical editors of the New Testament is regarded It is found in some MSS., but not in as an interpolation. Some have represented it as having been ancient. the most transcribed from the apocryphal Gospel according to the Hebrews, and others have ascribed it to Papias. The eviIts tone dence against its genuineness is overwhelming. and style are wholly unlike that of St. John's writings; and it breaks the narrative, which runs smoothly enough if this paragraph is omitted. On the other hand, it is not inconsistent with the teachings of Jesus, and may possibly be a

fragment of apostolic times. The doctrine of Light is elucidated in the following The mention of the Father and Son, as being two section.
witnesses testifying to the Son, according to the saying of " the law," that " the testimony of two men is true " (viii.
true origin.
12-17), brings out the divine nature of the teachings And the connection between the Light

and the and the

Truth, and between Truth and freedom, and the dialogue that follows upon the genuine children of Abraham, are in harmony with the Baptist's teaching about the children of Abraham (Matt. iii. 8, Luke, iii. 8); of Paul's teaching concerning the freedom of " Jerusalem which is above " (Gal. iv. The teaching concerning Light terminates appropri26). ately with the sign of the opening of the eyes of the blind man,

who is sent to wash


(ix. 7).
:

his eyes in the waters of the pool of Siloam

The section on Light concludes with an important doc" For judgment I am come into this world that they trine which see not might see, and that they which see might be made blind" (ix. 39); and the climax introduces the Pharisees
;

General Review.

101

in a tone confidently suggesting the utter impossibility of their being in the darkness, "Are we blind also " (v. 41) ? The an-

swer of Jesus distinguishes two kinds of darkness in the the involuntary darkness arising from inexperience of the light, and the voluntary darkness which arises from experience and the rejection of the light. The Pharisees were in darkness, and like other men had received gleams from " the Light which lighteth every man," convicting them of
soul:

their darkness,

and leading them

they had been honest.

They

to say, " see not," if claimed " to see," and hence

We

remained in their sin (ix. 41). These latter words furnish a suitable ending to Jesus' discourses on light, bringing prominently forward that " reproving " power of light which is one of the special attributes of that Holy Spirit which the Fourth Gospel, step by step, continually leads to. The tenth chapter opens with a double atfirmation peculiar to this Gospel, and which never begins a discourse, but
is

either a continuation, in order to introduce

truth, or else a reply.

from

facts

some important The metaphor employed is drawn and customs well known in the East, and is de-

it is a distinguishing characteristic of the good shepherd that he should provide for the security and comfort of his fiock, so the kindness of Jesus towards men,

signed to show that as

and

his labors

and

sacrifices for their benefit

gave

sufiicient

evidence that he was the Great Shepherd of souls. The form of the discourse is remarkable in that it suggests an important difierence between the Fourth Gospel and that of Matthew and Luke for in the first there is an absence of all allegory
;

and almost
author,

all

parable.

It is

important to

know why

the

after

rejecting

so

many

other parabolic

subjects,

should retain only this parable of the shepherd. It has been suggested that it is based upon the teachings of Philo, who
distinguishes between

mere indulgent "keepers of sheep" and "shepherds," somewhat in the same way in which the parable distinguishes between " hirelings " and shepherds and adds that the Supreme Shepherd is God, who orders all his flock
;

102

Sludij of the Gospel of St. John.

of created things through the Logos, His first-born Sou {Plantatio, V. 11).

A more

reasonable view

is

that the parable

was

introduced at the conclusion of the doctrine of light, and before the narration of the death of Christ, so as to prepare the way for that death, by exhibiting the reason for it in a clear
light.

Jesus had previously predicted that he was to be "lifted


14, viii. 28)

and slain (vii. 19, viii. 40); and now it needs mentioned that he will not only be slain, but voluntarily slain hence, the motive needs to be expressed, and The is given in the metaphor, " I am the Good Shepherd. " (v. 11). This is Good Shepherd giveth his life for the sheep

up"

(iii.

to be distinctly

more emphatically stated in the life, that I might take it again"

declaration,
{v.

"I

lay

down my

17).

Two

points in this chapter


that
8),

(x.)

remain to be considered.

The words, "All


and robbers"
{v.

came before me are thieves have naturally caused some difficulty


ever

Jesus surely did not refer to Moses and nor John the Baptist, either collectively the prophets, or singly. "Salvation is of the Jews" (iv. 22); "they are they which testify of me" (v. 89); "if ye believed Moses, ye would believe me" (v. 46); "John bare witness unto the
in interpretation.

truth" (v. 33): texts, like these, are conclusive against any such Gnostic interpretation. Nor is it probable that he referred to persons who had previously pretended to be the Messiah, for there is no evidence that any false Christ appeared before the true one, though such imposters afterwards sought to deceive the people. It is probable that he referred to the scribes and Pharisees, who pretended to be religious and spiritual guides; the same whom he elsew^here styles
"blind leaders of the blind," and whose
positions, even
evil

and corrupt

dis-

when

professedly engaged in their calling as


vii. 15,

spiritual teachers,

he portrays in vivid colors (Matt.


is

XV. 14, xxiii.

4, 14, 15, 23).

The second point

of more importance.

There

is

charge of blasphemy, and a defence of a special teaching of Jesus declares, "I and my Father are Christ (vs. 30-36). one," {v. 30), and for this the Jews took up stones, and

General Review.

103

charged him with blasphemy, because, " being a man, makest thyself God " {v. 33). It has been boldly asserted that Jesus teaches {v. 30) that he and the Father are but " one substance," and if this be not true, then Jesus should have corrected the mistake of the Jews as implied in the declaration that thou "makest thyself God" {v. 33); and furtlier the

word " One " " Substance."

is

If this position

neuter in the Greek, and hence refers to is tenable, then Christ prays

that his disciples "maybe one" (xvii. 11) in "Substance," for the word " One " is here also in the neuter in the Greek.

The only consistent construction is that the Father and Son were united in desire and purpose in regard to the great work in which Jesus was engaged. It is possible, and even probable, that the Jews understood that Christ made himself God but however that may be, it was immediately pointed out to them the impropriety of such an interpretation of the language used, inasmuch as they themselves were accustomed to even stronger expressions of a similar kind, which they did not account blasphemous, or indicative of equality with God. In the answer their attention is called to their own scriptures, in which they professed confidence, and showed them that he had by no means trangressed the authorized forms
;

of speech.
called gods,

The magistrates or judges, as was Moses, were on account of their dignity and authority (Ex. iv.

16, vii. 1; xxii. 28; Ps. Ixxxii. 1, 6, cxxxviii. 1). The point could readily be appreciated by a Jewish audience. It was such an answer that only one thoroughly conversant with Jewish thought could have dreamed of using. When carefully con-

sidered the verses under discussion are sufficient to discredit the theory that this Gospel is the work of a Greek Gnostic
of the second century.

The narrative continues by an account of the raising of Lazarus, the last of the pre-resurrection " signs " of Jesus. This was the culminating point of the miraculous acting of our Lord, and its significance important. The act is far deeper and greater than the revivification of the brother of

104

Study of the Gospel of

St.

John.

Mary and Martha.


of man,

The

Scriptures recognize the

two natures
(1

one the " living soul," or fleshly animal nature, and


Cor. xv.
is

the other the " quickening or life-giving spirit "


45)
;

second In the " sign " or miracle, the second Adam raises the first Adam from Spiritual death, by imparting to him His own life. Before describing how the Savior laid down his life, the author gives the best possible proof of the spontaneousness of the action by showiflg that he was the source of life to others. As a preparation for his resurrection on the third day what better action than that he should raise from the dead one who had been four days lying in the grave ? Moreover, if a preparation was needed for the doctrine of the Spirit, which is soon to come before us, then the resurIt is in rection of Lazarus would also serve this purpose. keeping with the doctrine of the Light of the world which was preceded by the miracle of giving light to the blind. Thus the doctrine of the quickening Spirit should be preceded by some miracle of quickening the dead. It has been a matter of controversy why the Synoptics not mention a miracle of such an extraordinary character, do
the former
the
first

Adam

and the

latter the

Adam.

and especially so because St. John tells us that it was the proximate cause of Christ's arrest and condemnation. It must be remembered, in the consideration of this question, that the province of the Synoptics is the ministry in Galilee, and that they omit almost all events in or about Jerusalem, unIt is possible that Lazarus til they reach the last Passover. was still living when the Synoptics were w^ritten, and that a
reference to his case

tion

should hav^e and perhaps a violent death. According to tradition Lazarus died about thirty years after his restoration to life. When John's Gospel was written there was no longer any reason to suppress the proclamation, for all his enemies were dead. The feast at Bethany (xii.) is attended by the act of
anointing Jesus, which was symbolic of consecration to a di-

was omitted, lest the rage of the Jews been excited anew, and he subjected to persecu-

General Review.
vine work.
rendered.

105

Mary felt that an important service had been Freely she poured the precious ointment on his feet. So large a quantity of a substance so costly is evidence of her overflowing love. Jesus regarded the anointing as an
act symbolical of the

preparation for his burial.

The day

following the feast witnesses the triumphal entry into Jerusalem.

The

close of Christ's ministry presents us


(xii. 23, xvii.

with a series

of discourses

26) relating to the doctrine of the

Spirit, being the highest and most esoteric doctrine of all, and revealed to the inner circle of his disciples. The battle between light and darkness, between Jesus and the Pharisees, ends with a recapitulation and conclusion of the doctrine of
light.

The Gentile world,


{v.

in the person of certain Greeks,

seeks the Messiah

20)

a voice from heaven attests his

God pronounces the fall of evil (v. announces the victorious ending of his misthe people are exhorted to walk in the light {v. sion (v. 32) 35) followed by the Evangelist pronouncing against the rebellious nation the sentence of condemnation, because the people had "blinded their eyes and hardened their heart" {v. For the last time the voice of Jesus is heard warning 40). those he has left in darkness that in rejecting him they rejected the Father also (vs. 37-56). Jesus teaches his disciples humility by washing their feet, (xiii. 1-17). It is a parable of action, and is aimed at two those who reject the washing of Jesus, to classes of heretics whom he replies " If I wash thee not, thou hast no part with me " (r. 8) and those Avho laid stress on repeated baptisms and purifications, " He that is washed needeth not save
glory
31),
(v.

28)

the Son of

and

at once
;

to

wash his feet" {v. 10). The scene shifts rapidly. When it was night, Judas, a child of darkness, went forth from the chamber [v. 30). Yet in the hour of darkness the hour of glorification is hailed by Jesus and seizes the opportunity to impart to the disciples a new commandment, " That ye love one another " [v. 34)
;

106

Study of
this shall

the

Gospel of

St.

John.
disciples."

and
his

be a sign that "ye are

my

After

death, the

memory

of his love, enhanced by his ab-

sence,

would spring up as an entirely new power within their and thus "love" would assume a new meaning and a fervent power in the promulgation of divine truth. The dochearts,

trine of the Spirit can reveal

no higher manifestation than


is

that of
finds
its

Love

and the

Spirit itself

a Spirit of love, which

home

The solemn

only in the hearts of those that love. scenes and freighted words of betrayal

troubled the hearts of the disciples (xiv. 1), which introduces ns to the last great discourse, which may be considered under these heads (1) the departure and the return, (2) the Paraclete, (3) the vine and its branches, (4) the disciples and the
:

"While Jesus comforts the disciples with promises of his return and that he will be with them, yet his presence is not to be regarded as material, but as spiritual. He gives

world.

them the assurance


has done
{v.

that they will do greater works than he


is

12).

Christ's future presence

to be in the hearts

of his disciples, which is variously described in different pasHe describes the functions of the Paraclete (xiv. 16, sages. 17, 25, 26, XV. 26, xvi. 8-15, 23-25), and the relation of the

Church and the world

(xiv. 22-24, xv. 18-25, xvi. 1-3).


is

The

described as a consequence of the work of the Paraclete departure of the Son to the Father. Then the discourse touches upon the enmity which the disciples must be pre-

pared to meet, and enforces the necessity of unity through In this there are two points which appear to suggest love. the influence of Philo, and in both of which Philo is corrected rather than followed. This Gospel emphasizes the work of the Spirit in " convicting " the world of sin, and is careful to say that the gift of the Spirit shall be permanent, " not as the world giveth give I unto you " (xiv. 27); and that the disciples are to remain in Jesus, nevertheless they be not taken out of the world (xvii. 15). The Savior is no more in the world, and the disciples are in the world (r. 11). The discourse concludes with the prayer that all future believers may

General. Review.

107

bo knit together into one great body, which shall be in the Father and the Son, while at the same time the Father and the Son are in it (vs. 21, 23); and the last words of all recur in the plain expression of His presence, and " I in them" (v. 23), reminding one of the promise given in the First Gospel,

with you alway " (Matt, xxviii. 20). Doubtless there is a i)urpose in the accumulation of statements of the local relations between the Father, the Son, the " I am in the Father, and the Father Spirit, and the Church
*'

am

in

you ;" " I go unto the Father;" *'The Holy Spirit whom the Father will send in my name;" " The Comforter whom I will send unto you from the Father;" " I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world." The object is obviously to form spiritual conceptions and that there is agreement between the Father and the Son in the

me

;"

"

Ye

in

me, and

I in

mission of the

latter.

St. John having given the inner glorification of Christ in his last discourses (xiii.-xvii), next proceeds to set forth his outer glorification in his passion and death (xviii., xix.). This may be divided into the following heads (1) the betrayal (xviii. 1-11), (2) the Jewish trial (12-17), (3) the Roman trial In this (xviii. 28-xix. 16), (4) the death and burial (17-42). and the remaining portions of the Gospel the narrative style preponderates, with evident marks that the writer was an eye:

witness,

who

clearly sets forth the voluntariness of Christ's


30);

sufterings (xviii. 4, 8, 11, 36, xix. 28,

the fulfilment of a
4, 9, 11, xix. 11, 24,

divine plan in Christ's sufterings (xviii.


28, 36, 37); the

ings (xviii.
rative

6,

majesty which shines through Christ's sufter20-23, 37, xix. 11, 26, 27, 30). Thus the narearlier

becomes explanatory of the end (x. 17, 18, xiii. 1, 31).

words which point

to

The

Evangelist, preserving the character of the Gospel

to the end, gives the record of resurrection

and threefold

manifestation of Christ (xx.).


itself into (1)
(2)

The chapter

naturally divides

evidences of the resurrection (1-10), the manifestation to Mary of Magdala (11-18), (3) the
the
first

108

Study of

the

Gospel of St. John.

tion to

manifestation to the ten and others (19-23), (4) the manifestaThomas and others (24-29), the conclusion and purpose

of the Gospel (30, 31). The account of the resurrection is not intended to be complete, but embodies a series of typical scenes selected to represent spiritual truth yet true to the
;

marked by singular disThe traits which distinguish Peter, John, Thomas, tinctness. and Mary of Magdala are not only clear in themselves, but are in harmony with what is told of the four elsewliere. The Epilogue (xxi.) is peculiar to John's Gospel. It
narrative, with undivided characters
falls into the following parts (1) the manifestation to the seven and the miraculous draught of fishes (1-14), (2) the commission to Peter and prediction as to his death (15-19),
:

the misunderstood saying respecting the Evangelist (20It has been affirmed 23) and (4) the concluding note (24, 25). that when John had written chapter xx., he had no intention
(3)

signs," but .afterwards added the remaining chapter (xxi.) in order to give an exact and full account of Christ's words respecting himself, about which there had been serious misunderstanding. That this might be made clear the Apostle gives in detail the circumstances

of narrating

any more "

which led

to

what was spoken.


VII. Important Features.

The composition of the Fourth Gospel brings out many important features which should here receive attention, and may bo thus noted Christianity not only claims a. The Truth and the Witness. " to be "the Truth," but Christ declares himself as "the Truth The message of the Gospel is " the Truth." This (xiv. 6). title is not found in the Synoptics, the Acts or the Apocalypse, but occurs in the Catholic Epistles (James v. 19, 1 Peter i.-22, 2 Peter ii. 2) and in the Epistles of St. Paul (2 Thess. ii. 12, 2 Cor. xiii. 8, Eph. i. 13, etc.). It is especially characteristic of
:

the Gospel and Epistles of St. John. According to the teachings of St. John, Christ is the revelation of the Father, and

Important Features.
the perfect "pattern of
life,

109

word but In the presence of Pilate he revealed the object of his coming to be a " witexpressing not only in
(xiii. 34).

also in act the absolute

law of love

ness to the truth " (xviii. 32) and this was a permanent fact. *' The Truth " was among men but unrecognized, but in him
it

was made manifest. There were some " who were of the Truth," drawing, in some sense, their power of life from it. Christ maintains this " Truth " and makes known its fulness.
"
; ;

Truth came through him " (i. 17) liis teaching was "the Truth" (viii. 40) he is himself " the Truth " (xW. 6). This work is carried on by the Spirit (xvi. 13) which is sent by the Father (xiv. 26). Under this aspect the Spirit, like Christ, is the Truth which he makes known (1 Jno. v. 6). The Spirit, as the Spirit of Truth, brings " the Truth " into direct communication with man's spirit (xiv. 17, xv. 26, xvi. 13), and " the Truth " becomes an inward power in the believer The reception of the Truth brings freedom (1 Jno. i. 8). (viii. 32), because Truth is related to the laws of our being. Ey the Truth we are sanctified (xvii. 17). It would then appear to be a direct argument that the apostolic conceptions of Christianitv, or the divine truth, are in nowise antagonistic to the highest responsive chord of the human soul. Truth is the light and the human aspirations are to be kept in unison with it. The message conveyed by St. John in his Gospel is '' the Truth " which, by various forms of witness, is commended to men. The witnesses to Christ are manifold, and in due suc-

The

cession are set forth as,

1,

witness of Christ himself,


ness of Scripture,
5,

3,

the witness of the father, 2, the the witness of works, 4, the wit-

of the disciples, and,

6, the witness the witness of the Spirit. 1. The witness of the Father must be the highest and most conclusive of all, for He is the source of all things. Christ appeals to the Father as the proper witness of himself
7,

the witness of the Baptist,

" I receive not testimony from

man.

The Father

himself which hath sent me, hath borne witness of

me

" (v.

110
34, 37)
'*'
;

Study

erf

the

Gospel of

St.

John.
witness
is

If I bear witness of myself,

my

not true.

another that beareth witness of me, and I know tliat the witness which he witnesseth of me is true" {vs. 31, 32); "The Father that sent me beareth witness of me" (viii. 18.)

There

is

The witness of the Father

is

continuous, present and abiding,


as the Father, thus

and reposes upon the conception of God


standing in the paternal relation to
presses the Fatherhood of
all

men.

The Son

ex-

God

absolutely.

As such man can

recognize the witness as supremely authoritative. 2. The witness of Christ reposes on a conscious fellowsship with

God

" I

and the Father are one


(iii.

" (x, 80)

absolute knowledge of divine things

11, 32);

on an on a divine
;

mission seen in its totality (viii. 14). The power of Christ as a witness is derived from his character and the nature of his

To this must be added man"s aftinity to truth found perfectly exhibited in Christ, illustrated in the The familiar image that his sheep " know his voice " (x. 4). " He that believeth on the Son of God end of all which is, hath the witness in himself" (1 Jno. v. 10). 3. The witness of works is addressed to man's moral consciousness, and consequently becomes special and limited in Thus Christ said, " I have greater witness than that its form. of John for the works which the Father hath given me to finish, the same works that I do, bear witness of me, that the Father hath sent me" (v. 36). In his works men could see the tokens of his real nature and authority, for they bore witness concerning him (x. 25). John does not draw the line between such "works" as were natural and those belonging All these works, whether of power or to the supernatural. of love, wrought on the body or on the spirit, had the same The works were" signs" (vi. 26), but secoffice and end.
teachings.

which

is

ondary
4.

to his teachings (xiv. 11, xv. 22).

Christ necessarily bore a direct relation to the past.


his coming,

The Hebrew prophets had foreshadowed


Jewish people looked for a Messiah. for in them ye think ye have eternal

and the

" Search the Scriptures


life:

and they are they

Important Features.

Ill

which testify of me. And ye will not come to me, that ye might have life (v. 39, 40). According to the writings of Moses and the prophets he was the goal and fuliilment of immemorial hopes. Withont him the Old Testament is a ridbut with him a strong and intelligent witness. dle 5. In John the Baptist the Old Testament found a final expression for the latest of the prophets. His position was unique. He " came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through him might believe" (i. 7). His witness was such as to attract and arrest (v. 35), and served to prepare the way for that which should follow. The witness was an accommodation to the moral condition of those who came under his influence. It was the attestation of a personal " Ye sent unto John, conviction based upon specific proof. and he bare witness unto the truth"(i'. 33). The Baptist recognized his own character and mission (i. 23), and by the sign {v. 32) made known unto him understood who was the Christ. He lived in the severest form of Judaism, but knew the universality of that in which Judaism should be crowned. 6. The witness of the disciples was in various degrees that of intercourse with Christ, and consequently a testimony to facts. "Ye also shall bear witness, because ye have been with me from the beginning " (xv. 27). He that saw it bare record "(xix. 35). "This is the disciple which testifieth of these things, and wrote these things" (xxi. 24). The witness disciples is that of actual hearers and observers. of the 7. The mission and person of Christ were not understood
'
;

"

so long as he dwelt

among his

disciples.

It w^as necessary that

he should be withdrawn from their immediate presence that they might be able to receive the full revelation and contemplate his nature. The Spirit becomes an interpreter as well
as a witness.

" When the Paraclete is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit of Truth,
shall testify

which proceedeth from the Father, he


(xv. 26).

of

me"
the

This

is

the witness that continually unfolds the sighis

nificance

of Christ and

mission,

and keeps

alive

112

Stiuhj of the Gospel of St John,


life.
it

yearning for a better


is

The

Spirit takes of that

which
"It is truth"

Christ's

and declares

(xvi. 14).

As

St.

John

says,
is

the Spirit that beareth witness, because the Spirit


(1

J no.

V. 6).

On surveying

the subject, to which the Apostle appeals

in his Gospel, it will be seen that these various types of wit-

nesses cover the whole range of religious truth, both internal

of the Father and Christ is inupon that correspondence of the Gospel which exists with the absolute idea of the divine which reThe witness of works and of Scripture is exposes in man. ternal and historical, and draws its force from signs and such The predictions which had not previously been fulfiled. witness of the Baptist and the disciples was personal, and found in the declaration of what men know the Gospel to be. While the witness of the Spirit is internal, yet it is to the believer the crown of assurance and the pledge of the tri-

and

external.

The witness

ternal

and

rests

umph
b.

of Truth.

Light and Glory. The words Light and Glory, which also characterize John's Gospel, to a certain extent, correspond with the Witness and the Truth. The Witness be-

comes
Glory.
19-21),
still

eflective

The Word
(i.

through Light, and the Truth as Light visited men (ix.


9);
still

is

revealed in
before the
iii.

5)

Incarnation

at

the Incarnation
(xiv. 21);

(viii.

12, xii. 46,

and he

comes

even as the Spirit

who

interprets His
St.

name

(xiv. 26, xvi. 13).

John regards

revelation in nature, in conscience and

in history as but parts of

one harmonious plan, and the understanding of revelation depends upon the abiding of the

divine

word within (v. 37). The condition of illumination is Love (xiv. 22-24); and the object, or end of Christ's coming, was that believers should move in a new realm of life (xii. 46), and become sons of light (v. 36), and as the last issue of faith, "have the light of life" (viii. 12).
Christ, as " the

manifested glory of God.

Light of the world," is seen to be the This truth the Apostle gives at

Important Features.
the outset:
us,

113

"The Word was made

flesh

and dwelt among

The very beginning'of Christ's signs 14). was a manifestation of his glory (ii. 11). The glory of the Son was not of his own seeking (viii. 50), but wholly the expression of the Father's will {v. 54). And Christ, by conforming to the will of the Father, glorifled the Father upon earth (xvii. 4), wherein he was also glorified himself {v. 10). The glory of Christ, in a true sense, was also the glorj^ of God. "This sickness is not unto death, but for the glory of
God, that the Son of God might be glorified thereby" (xi. 4). so the revivification of Lazarus was a vision of "the glory of God" (y. 40), as producing faith in Christ {v. 42). The historic work of Christ was the glorification of "the name" of the Father (xii. 28). When the crisis was past, *' Jesus said, ]^ow is the Son of man glorified, and God is

and we beheld of the Father" (i.

his glory as the glory of the only begotten

And

glorified in

of Christ's glory must be extended beyond Incarnation, for he had glory with the Father "before the his

him" The thought

(xiii. 31).

world was" (xvii. 5); and when the prophet Isaiah looked upon "the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up" (Isa. vi. 1), he saw the glory of Christ (xii. 41). As the glory of the Son is extended backward, so also is it to be realized by men in future ages. His kingdom is the
rule or reign of righteous in the
is

human

heart.

The
is

believer

invited to petition the Father in his

name

(xiv. 13);

and

their fruitfulness, already regarded as attained,


this glory (xv. 8).
is

a source of

Also, one of the chief ofiices of the Spirit


Life.

to glorify Christ (xvi. 14).


c.

Judgment and
"
(iii.

Judgment

is

used as a contrast

of salvation, or " Life."

condemned
life"
life (vi. 58).

18).

He that believeth on him is not He has " passed from death unto
"
life
(i.

(v. 24).

Christ has

4, v. 26),
(iii.

and

his

words are
''

28, xvii. 2).

He He

gives
is

life

to

men

15, v. 40, vi. 40, x. 10,

" the Life " (xi. 25, xiv. 6)

and the

bread

114
of
life

Study of
"
(vi.

the

Gospel of
Eternal

St.

John.
the

33, 35, 48, 51).

life is

knowledge of
is

the Father and the Son Christ hath " eternal "
V. 24, vi. 47,

(xvii. 3),
life

and he that

united with
(iii.

as a present possession
life

36,
53.)

54)

otherwise he can not have

(vi.

"We

with the Father is living by Christ {v. 57). " Because I live, ye shall live also " (xiv. 19). The true believer sustains a vital connection with the Father and the Son, and, therefore, he has passed beyond judgment or condemnation. " This is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darknsss rather than light, because and by contrast the unbetheir deeds were evil " (iii. 19) He " hath one that judgeth liever is convicted from within him the word that I have spoken, the same shall judge him " God sent not his son into the in the last day " (xii. 48). but that the world through world to condemn the world him might be saved" (iii. 17). "I came not to judge the world, but to save the world " (xii. 47).
live
;
: :

While judgment
cumstances of
yet there
is
life,

is

realized as fulfiled in the actual cirfully taught in the

as

is

above quotations,
to Christ,

a sense in which
its

judgment belongs

utmost ideal, because it reposes upon Hence it is recorded, the Father adequate knowledge. " For " hath committed all judgment unto the Son " (v. 22) judgment I am come into this world " (ix. 39) " I judge no man. And yet if I judge, my judgment is true" (viii. 15, "As I hear, I judge and my judgment is just " (v. 30). 16) There is a striking contrast between these passages, and Spiritual judgment is intheir harmony must be visible. volved in the rejection of Christ's revelation. The will of the Savior was to unite men to himself, in order that they might enjoy spiritual life, and thus be near to the Father. "When they rejected and stood away from him, he judged them, which was a condemnation. His teachings developed both belief and unbelief, according to the character of his hearers. "Whatever might be the result the message must be de-

and he

satisfies

Important Features.
livered
:

115

true; and I speak to tlie world those things which I haye heard from Him " (viii. 26j. Judgment, in one sense, like the gift of life, is immediate. It belongs to an actual relation (iii. 18) and with it carries its final consequences, which is regarded as continuing into the future. Meanwhile the process of redemption is going on, " for as the Father hath life in himself, so hath he given to the Son to have life in himself" (v. 26). The Lord has ample authority to accomplish his mission effectually. The Father hath imparted to him power to quicken the spiritually dead to newness of life {v. 21) and to impose on

"He

that sent

me

is

unbelievers the just penalty for their unbelief


result of faith in the Gospel
is

(vs.

22, 27).

The

spiritual life; as

a necessary

consequence men must remain in death so long as they remain in unbelief; yet the kingdom of God was now instituted, under which all the spiritually dead should be aroused to spiritual life {vs. 24, 25, 28, 29).

All of this Jesus should accom-

plish in the
fore he

name and by
entitled to be

the authority of the Father.

was

Therehonored as the Father's representa-

tive {vs. 19, 20, 23, 30).

In the divine dispensation Christ does not seek to assert and vindicate his supremacy for "there is One that seeketh and judgeth " (viii. 50). The idea of Divine action is never lost si^ht of in the Scriptures. The eternal necessity of judgment is set forth, and its historical execution is recognized as belonging to the
;

was committed by virtue of his mission. The Father judgeth no man, but hath committed all judgment unto the Son " (v. 22). The Father " hath given him authority to execute judgment, because he is the Son of Man " {v. 27). His judgment thus becomes essentially united with his complete sympathy with human nature. This sympathy finds expression always and every-where. The question of faith and unbelief forms a very importSon, inasmuch as
"
it

ant part of St. John's Gospel.


condition of eternal
life
(i.

Faith in Christ

is

made

the

12, vi. 40).

To produce

this faith

116

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

was the object in writing the Gospel (xx. 31), and the narrative marks in typical crises its progress and development.

VIIL The
The
unique.
critic

Style.

style of the

Any reader

Gospel and of St. John's First Epistle are can not help but notice it but the ablest
;

can not give it a satisfactory analysis. Ever since Dionysius of Alexandria (a. d. 250) wrote his masterly criti-

cism of the differences between the Fourth Gospel and the

Apocalypse (Eusebius' Ecd. Hist. vii. xxv.), it has, for the most part, been assumed that the Gospel was written in very pure Greek, consequently free from all barbarous, irregular, or uncouth expressions. The term "very pure Greek" as applied to the Gospel is misleading. It is in pure Greek only
in the sense of its simplicity.

Elegant, idiomatic, classical Greek

it

is

not.

It is free

from blemishes because


structions.

it

avoids idioms and intricate conis

The grammar

the same as that which

is

com-

mon

to almost all languages.


;

It is strong in its very sim-

plicity

for the characteristic

marks of

its

separate sentences

are directness, circumstantiality, repetition


Its

and

j)ersonality.

thoughts and sentences are grouped together in a corresponding manner. The sequence of its reasoning is not always wrought out, but left for sympathetic interpretation. In pointing out the peculiarities of the style recourse will be had to its presentation by divisions. The first, , idea being The clauses and sentences are not its extreme simplicity. made to depend one upon the other, but are joined by simple
conjunctions, as, of men " (i. 4).

"In him was Even where

life,

and the

life

was the

light

a simple " and " is standing ;" " He came unto his own, and his own received him not " {o. 11). In passages of great solemnity the sentences are placed side by side without even a conjunction " Jesus answered Jesus Pilate answered answered" (xvii. 34-30). The words of others are given di. . . . . .

a strong contrast is indicated preferred to " nevertheless " or " notwith-

The
rect

Style.

117

and not by oblique oration. This characterivStic maj^ be ilany of the detailed incidents of the narrative "This is the record of John, when the Jews sent to ask him, Who art thou ? And he confessed I And they asked him, What then ? Art am not the Christ. thou Elijah? And he saith, I am not" (i. 19-21). Again,
lustrated in
:

...

"

Many

of the people therefore,

when they heard

this say-

Of a truth this is the Prophet. Others said, this is the Christ. But some said, Shall Christ come out of Galiing, said,
lee
?

(vii.

40, 41).

This directness of construction


(iv. 51),

is

so uni-

versal in the Gospel that only one

sentence has been noted


servants

example of an oblique where it should read, " His

met

him, saying, that his son lived " (as in the

"New
Thy

Revision"), and not

"met him and


Authorized^
(xfii.

told him, saying.

Son
be of

liveth " (as in the

On

the other

hand the
it

common

oblique reading " that he should ask

who
for "

should

whom

he spake "

24)

must give way

and saith

unto him, Tell us who it is," the reading now preferred. Belonging to the same method, we find the illustrative details added parenthetically or as distinct statements, and not wrought into the texture of the narrative (iv. 6, vi. 10, x.
22, xiii. 30, xviii. 40).
b.

The simple

co-ordination of sentences and avoidance

of relatives and dependent clauses 'wiwcAyq^ frequent repetition: and even where a repetition is not necessary it is employed
for the sake of close connection

and emphasis.

Repetitions

are singularly

marked

in the record of dialogues, in

which
Sen-

the persons are constantly brought into prominence.


tence after sentence begins with "Jesus said," "the
said,"

Jews

and similar ones, so that, in sharp contrast, the characters are kept clearly present to the mind (ii. 18, iv. 7, viii.
This usage exhibits the personality of John's naris further illustrated by the frequency with which he introduces a demonstrative pronoun in order to call back the subject, when a clause has intervened between the subject
48, x, 23).

rative;

and

and the verb.

Sometimes the pronoun of present reference

118
is

Study of
:

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

employed

"

He

that abideth in me, and I in him, the


fruit " (xv. 5).

same

Sometimes, which is the more characteristic usage, he eniploys the pronoun of remote, isolated reference " He that entereth not by the door the same is a thief and a robber'' (x. 1). The frequency witli which St. John uses the personal pronouns, and especially of the pronoun of the first person,
bringeth forth
: .
.

much

is

a feature of the same kind.

The Lord's teachings depend,

in his discourses,

reference to

judgment
that sent
c.

is

emphatic " If I judge, my undivided personality. true; for I am not alone, but I and the Father
careful recognition of the
his
(viii. 16).

upon a

me"

St.

John frequently

points out a sequence in fact or in

thought, although he connects his sentences so simply, and sometimes merely places them side by side without conjunctions.

His two most characteristic particles are '' therefore" and "in order that.*' The Greek word (o5v) translated " therefore " occurs two hundred and two times and in the Authorized version is translated "therefore" sixty-four times, and as thus used is found almost exclusively in narrative, and points out that one fact is a consequence of another, sometimes in cases where this would not have been obvious;
"Jesus came again into Cana of Galilee" (iv. 46), because of the reception he had previously received there. The frequent use of "therefore" points to the conviction that nothing hap-

pens without a cause, consequently the frequent use of "in order that" points to the belief that nothing happens without a purpose. The Greek particle (ivo) occurs in John's Gospel one hundred and forty-five times, and is used not only where some other construction would have been suitable, but also

where some other construction would appear to be more de" I am not worthy to unloose" (i. 27), " My meat is to sirable do the will" (iv. 34), "This is the work of God that ye believe" (vi. 29), " Who did sin, this man, or his parents, that he was born blind " (ix. 2), " It is expedient for you that I go away " (xvi. 7). This is a favorite construction of St. John,
;

The

Style.

119

who
and
29).

uses

it

to point out the

also of the fulfilment of

The

elliptical

working of the Divine purpose prophecy (xviii. 9, xix. 24, 28, expression "but that" is not uncommon;

"Neither hath this


etc. (ix. o).

man

sinned, nor his parents; but that"

end an
of the

This multiplication of simple elements produces in the effect of imposing grandeur; and thus whole sections

work

are

marked by

this

method of

directness

and

simplicity.
d.

parallelism.

In some cases the repetition leads to a perfect poetic John was full of the spirit of Hebrew poetry,
essentials

run through the whole record, both in its and in the structure of its parts. Each incigeneral structure dent and discourse presupposes what has gone before and adds to the result something new. "The servant is not

and

its

greater than his lord; neither he that


that sent

is

sent greater than he

him"
it

(xiii. 16);
.
. .

"Peace

I give unto you.

with you, my peace Let not your heart be troubled,


I leave

be afraid " (xiv. 27.) Sometimes the parallelism and the second clause denies the opposite of the first; "lie confessed, and denied not" (i. 20); "I give unto them eternal life and they shall never perish " (x. 28). e. Minuteness of detail is another peculiarity, which also is St. John uses two or three words in statof Hebrew origin. ing the details of an action instead of summing the whole "They asked him and said" (i. 25); action in one word " John bare record, saying " (f. 32) " Then cried Jesus in the temple as he taught, saying " (vii. 28). The phrase " answered and said " occurs in this Gospel thirty-four times, and only two or three times in the Synoptics, where it is " having answered said," or " answered saying." f. St. John's favorite loords and phrases also bear special mention. "Abide " especially in the phrases expressing abiding on one another " believe on " a person " true " as opposed to lying, and "true" as opposed to spurious, "truly" and "truth;" "witness" and "bear witness;" "the darkness"
neither let
is

antithetic,

120

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

of moral darkness; "the light," of spiritual light; "life;" " love ;" " eternal life ;" " in frankness " or " openly;" " keep

my

word;" "manifest;" "the Jews," of the opponents of "the world," of those alienated from Christ. The following words and phrases are used only by St. John " the Paraclete" or the "Advocate," of the Holy Spirit; "the Word," of the Son; "only-begotten," of the Son; "come out from God," of the Son " lay down my life," of Jesus
Christ;
:

Christ

" Yerily, verily

;"

" the ruler of this world

;"

" the

This apparent sameness of phraseology produces last day." throughout an impressive emphasis. It is probable that as the Evangelist made this record when old, he has given the
utterance of others in his

own

language, at least in part,


the answer of Pilate.

though scarcely when giving

(xviii. 38)

This part of the discussion is further illustrated in the appended comparison. The left' hand column gives the language of the Evangelist, the right gives that of others as reported by him. The latter is the reported language of Jesus,
except where the

name

of another

is

subjoined.

The
(D

Style.

121

;^

'^

Ph

H M
P3
I

"5:

<A

c.

O
2

CM

O O
CO
c3
:::

OJ
c3

O
C3

'^^

-<

^
s o
>

5 w c
CD

:b r^
3

|.s

S o a c _

;:^ c3

o
p^
(D

O S
rd
^J

P^
5J 5CO

O ^ r^
c^

EH

^^
^
P-I 00

m CO
13

OJ CD ;3

bo'

d ^
t>^

g S

H P w H O H
a H O
CO CM

w
o
Tt<

^ MH
c3
11

0^

22 (^i CO CO

*! -+

>o CO t^
rt*

Ph. -3

M
to

r^
OS

PL,

o O

O H m
CO

SP
P5

W
CO

m
^
'-^

^ ^

1^

O hH

s ^

PS

122
^

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

^cr^

The
o

Style.

123

a 9

O
P.
03

^
<x>

^
o
o'
CD C3

^
1*^
:^
-l-i

_G

-C3

o
ffl

^
1:ft

CO

EH

O
'^

> o

^
.

124

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

The

Style.
'^

12i

5^

I
-M
-it;

~
s
CO

O
S

5i

S o S la
O
>
c3
^^-'

ii

o
> hJ
1:^

^
O.
CO OQ

cc

O
PQ

'^

^
CI

W
"^
02

w o

o
CO

03

Oi CO CO

O
o o
5=

: -p.

H- O

03

>

5^ "^ O -^

o ^
>

O
o3

o
;b

=?

> >
o
C!

o
OQ

-^ .?

o
03
i~i

O)

>

^ O
-73

^
cS

S 3 O O a> o s
03

o3

S
c3

ti
ft;

fe-^
05 Oi

-M j3
o3

03 !3 c3
<1>

^ +^
1^

c3

fq PQ

+j<^'^5coco'^t^QO

126

Study of

the

Gospd

of St. John.
-

S
s
<ij

S:

>

c3

-a
7^

-s

K
.

o
<
O)
(X)

S
C3 OQ

>
O)

i^o

^
~^
-Ki

O O
'3

I 7 !.

O O

(D CQ

^
"^^

--^

-t-i

c^

-^ cc

pq

M
<
CO

9 ^
o^^

-5 ~S '5
n.

-i

<^

hS Dh

PI
01

W ^

lO CO CD Tl rH CO

o
Ct5

.^ -^

O
(1

g
bJO

'^

^fe.

.0

O o
X!
c3

m o

s
O
<3

:g ra

x
CO

;>

S
o

I ^

O o
CO

00

fe

~
-^

+J

<x>

The

Style.

127

O m
rJ5

fee

O
"
><

CO

^ O
^
Tl
5^

o
-^

<z

-<

~tt <^ ~si

2
<z>

> o o .^ S c c -^ =^
^3

o
H >
Si

12;

B o ^
pj3

^ o o

o
O
t>r-l rt^

^ hH H H O O o CO
C
-^
rti

4J
<^

jj

a
-;

cp
f-i

o
f] (D

bii

rH

rJH

-3 Pi

(M Tfl CM (M

GO

X X > O "

o
W o

w o
E-i

^ ^

c3

128

Study of the Gospel of

St.

John.

The
O

Style.

129

C3

C3

3
.rrC!

"^ 1-

-^ -M
.5

.'^^

^
<X)

^
O C
O)

c3

-S

>>

>

CJ c3

O ^

>
--

E3

e3

CO

130

Study of the Gospel of

St.

John.

The
53

Style.

131

o c
ca

132

Stud]i of the Gospel of St. John.

It should be observed that the expression " abide in,"

sometimes translated "remain, continue, or dwell

in," is

not

uncommon

as the designation of physical residence in a place.

Moreover, its figurative use is not entirely peculiar to St. John, for there are four passages in St. Paul's writings, i. e., 1 Cor. vii, 20, 24, abide in the calling 1 Tim. ii. 15, if they continue (abide) in faith, charity and holiness; 2 Tim. iii. 14, abide in the things which thou hast learned which are analogous to some, though not to all of the above expressions. The frequency, however, and some forms of the figAnd in his Gospel urative use, are peculiar to St. John. alone do we find it in the reported language of the Savior. In the Synoptics there is but one instance of its use by the
;

Savior, and that in the physical sense Luke x. 7, " in the same house remain (abide)." The characteristics which have been above treated, com:

bined in St. John's Gospel, stand alone in Christian literature, as its author must always stand alone among Christian teachThe book was the work of one who for three score ers. years and ten labored most efficiently as an Apostle. "When
a lad he was called to follow the Baptist, and by him was soon transferred to the Christ, and in all probability was the

who from his youth up was a Christian. No man could have been found better able to grasp and state in their true proportions and with fitting impressiveness the great truths His manner of life and environments of the Christian faith. were eminently calculated to fit him for such a wonderful production. Commencing at an early stage of his existence the Gospel found an unobstructed path, and consequently experienced no sudden wrench from deep-seated prejudices. Kor had he the trying excitement of wandering abroad over the face of the earth like most of the Twelve. He remained at his post in Ephesus, directing, teaching, meditating; until at last, when fully ripe, the fruit was given to the Church in the fulness of its power and beauty, and is preserved for the genfirst
,

erations to profit

by

its lessons.

Historical Exactness.

133

IX, Historical Exactness.

been demonstrated, in previous sections, that the Fourth Gospel was intended to and does fultiU a profound, and beneficent purpose. It has been wrought with singular symmetry, and by careful examination it may be shown to reveal the presence of an informing idea throughout its details. From beginning to its close it is true to the one conception that formed it. It is not, nor does it pretend to be, a com[>lete exposition
It has

of the incidents in the

life

of Christ.

Some

features of his
;

nor from can there be put together a complete picture of Jesus of Nazareth as he went about teaching and healing. So far as this Gospel is a biographical sketch, it must be regarded as
it

work which were very prominent

are not preserved

conlined to certain limited aspects of Christ's person,

life

and

works. Whilst these facts must be conceded, yet, on the other hand it is correct to affirm that the literal accuracy of the contents of the Gospel is not in any way prejudiced by
the existence of the particular purpose which the Evangelist

had
cal

The entire composition is the Apostle's true in mind. conception, and his historical illustrations are no less historibecause they are illustrations. The writer fulfills his in his own language, and according to his own ex-

work,

pressed purpose. As has been previously noted the Apostle writes in the hope of creating in others the faith which he

holds himself (xix. 35, xx. 31). St. John's faith, as given in the Gospel, was a special interpretation of all history drawn from a spiritual conception
of Jesus Christ.

Nor does

this idea forfeit his claim to

be a
is

truthful historian, because, whilst giving the facts, his eye

turned towards the great central truth, the being of Christ and the object of his mission. This must be sought in the

These conditions include choice of words, combinations and compression. Every record of fact is limited to the record of representative details
concerning
it.

conditions of the historian's work.

The

truthfulness of the historian lies in his

134

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

power of

selecting such details as best convey to others the

true idea of the subject sought to be set forth.

To

give true
literal

impressions

is

the leading and accurate motive.


is

The

no guarantee of the truth of a narrative, only in so far as such details are concerned. The question must be regarded as a whole. It is therefore no disparagement of the strict historical character of the Fourth Gospel that the writer has fuliiled his design of recording such "signs" out of the whole number of Christ's works as he considered the most likely to produce a specific
effect.

accuracy of a number of details

must be must be reproduced of the entire discourse, but the power of the historian must enter into the spirit and give an outline sketch without swerving from the right idea. The thought of the speaker is more important than his words. It is true that the
a.

The

representative incidents of a narrative

of historic exactitude; not that literal words or phrases

style of the

speaker enters largely into his teaching, but


drift of his exposition.

is al-

ways governed by the


order to catch the
illustration
full

At

times, in

meaning, the keen saying or the vivid


exactly, or the character will

must be preserved

be

lost.

It is

undeniable that the discourses of the Lord, which

are peculiar to St. John, for the most part are very brief

sum-

maries of elaborate discourses and expositions relating to cenFrom the necessities of the case the tral topics of faith.
writer has condensed his narrative.
ple of
xii. 34.

In this

we must

trust to

the insight and power of the narrator.

As

a simple exam-

how

a conversation

is

compressed take that found in

Here the question of the Jews turns upon the title Man," w^hich has not been recorded in the context. The Evangelist has noticed only the fundamental facts. There is another and more complicated example of the compression of an argument (viii. 34). Only the extreme forms are recorded; and the course of words which followed can be determined only by careful thought. In other cases the answers
" Son of

Historical Exactness.

135

of the

Lord evidently point

to detailed expression of feeling

or opinion with which the writer was familiar, and which yet

he has not detailed

(xii. 23, 35).

Without any connection of

place or time the Apostle gives a general

summary

of the

Apparently Lord's judgment on his hearers (xii. 44-50). this passage is a compendious record and not a hteral transcription of a single speech.

These considerations are supplemented by the fact that most of the discourses recorded in this Gospel were spoken in Aramaic. A large and miscellaneous crowd had gathered at Jerusalem, and all were able to understand what was spoken to them "in the Hebrew tongue" (Acts xxi. 40), and by it the favor of the multitude was conciliated. St. Peter must have spoken in an Aramaic dialect in the court of the high priest, and the bystanders not only understood him but noticed his provincialism (Matt. xxvi. 73). In Acts (i. 19) it is said that Aramaic was the proper language of " the dwellers The title, Rabboni (Jno. xx. 16), with which in Jerusalem." Mary addressed the risen Lord was " Hebrew," These indications lead to the conclusion that in intercourse with the inner

used the vernacular Aramaic diaThen it would necessarily follow that St. John not only presents a summary of what w^as said, but also that summary was a translation. The question might be raised whether or no St. John was
circle of the disciples Christ
lect.

capable of summarizing the teachings of the Lord.

No

one's

experience and
bor.

Long

could have been more fitted for such a laexperience and contemplation would lead him to
life

correct

any misapprehensions. His intellectual ability was and his name stands pre-eminently above all others who are favored by the same appellation. There is no valid reason for doubting his ability to choose the best possible method of reproducing the substance. b. St. John writes with the evident purpose of revealing the Person of the Lord, and shows him to be "the Christ," and " the Son of God." Naturally he would record those discertainly great,

13C

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

courses that liave a bearing on his theme.


to see Christ as he

He

desired others

This record does not appear to represent examples of the Lord's popular teachThere is nothing in it which corresponds with the cirings. cumstances under which the Sermon on the Mount, or the great group of parables were spoken. On the other hand the private discussions with Nicodemus and the woman of Samaria find no parallels in the Synoptics, and yet they answer The other discourses to conditions which must have arisen. (except those in chapter vi.), which oft'er some peculiar feaThey were distinctively tures were all held at Jerusalem. festival discourses, and addressed to men whose religious
to be.

had found him

emotions and opinions were moved to a greater or less degree by their environments. The festivals commemorated the crises of Jewish history; and the discourses had an intimate
connection with the ideas which the festivals represented. So long as the Jewish system remained, this teaching would be
unnoticed, or unintelligible.

When
possible

the
to

Hebrew

polity

was
full

swept away, then


.

it

was

apprehend the

significance of the Master's words.


c.

St.

John presents a

clear advance

and

historical develop-

ment in the self-revelation of Christ.

The

discourses, for the

most

part,

occasioned.
ernacles

grew out of the circumstances by which they were The idea of the Passover (vi.), the Feast of Tabthe Dedication
(x.),

(vii., viii.),

represented in the

fesis

tival discourses,

bear the color of the seasons.

Also there

a psychological

harmony between the words and the hearers


This
is

for the time being.

illustrated in the scene

by the

well ot Sychar
at

(iv.

4-42);

and the discourse

after the healing

Bethesda

(v.

19-47).

The progress of the self- revelation of the Lord as recorded by the Evangelist may be given in an illustration which shows the inner harmony of the testimony. Without reckoning the exceptional personal revelations to the woman of Samaria (iv. 26), and to the man born blind (ix. 37), the Lord reveals himself seven times with the formula"! am,"

The Last Discourses.


five

137

times in his public ministry, and twice in the last disThe titles will here be only enumerated, for their general connection is obvious.
courses.

I I
I
"

I
I

I I
d.

am the Bread of life (vi. 35). am the Light of the world (viii. 12). am the Door of the sheep (x. 7). am the good Shepherd (x. 11). am the Resurrection and the Life (xi. 25). am the Way, and the Truth, and the Life am the true Vine (xv. 1).
The language which
is distinguishable^

(xiv. 6).

St.

John

attribntes to different

notwithstanding the admitted style of the composition of the Gospel and the compressed form of the utterances as given by the Evangelist. While he deals with one aspect of the truth and uses the same general forms
of speech to present the difierent aspects of the narrative, yet beneath this resemblance there are preserved the characteristic traits of each speaker. The words of the Baptist keep strictly within the limits suggested by the Old Testament. What he says spontaneously of Christ is summed up in the

speakers

two

figures of the "

Lamb " and

" the Bridegroom."

He

gives

the specific testimony that Jesus "is the Son of God" (i. 34). The language ascribed to the Baptist has its peculiarities. The short answers, "I am not;" "No;" "I am not the

Christ" (i. 20), are unlike any thing else in the Gospel, no less than the answer in the words of prophecy (v. 23).

X. The Last Discourses.

The last They belong


livered

discourses of the Savior ofter


to an occasion

jl

unique problem.
parallel,

and deunder such circumstances as forbid the disciples from understanding their significance at the time. The sayings would be retained because, in that age, the power of the memory was depended on, and sayings of importance were

which has no

not always reduced to writing.

The

whole

oiFer several peculiarities.

discourses taken as a Three topics are specially

138
conspicuous
:

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

the mission of the Paraclete, the departure and marked the coming of Christ, the Church and the world. Faith. stress is also laid on the moral aspects of

It

was eminently proper that such

topics should be the

object of instruction at such a time.


ble that Jesus should not

It is scarcely conceiva-

have prepared them by this kind of

teaching before his departure. It is also to be observed that the The teachideas are not made definite by exact limitations. gain their full meaning from the later history, though ings

they have not been modified by the facts of that history. The promises and warnings remain in their typical forms. When the fall of Jerusalem placed them in their proper light, then they were recorded. The moral impress of the last discourses is clear throughThey complete the Sermon on the Mount. Out of out. Christ's self-sacrifice springs the doctrine of Love (xv. 13, Christian love is at once the pattern and the founxiii. 34). dation of the true relation of man to man. The time had now come when it could be grasped under the influence of the events which were to follow. The three following passages indicate the successive forms under w^hich the principle of

Love is inculcated: "If ye love me, ye will keep my commandments" (xiv. 15). "He that hath my commandments,
and keepeth them, he
it is

that loveth

me and
:

he that loveth

me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself to him" {i\ 21). "If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love; even as I have kept my
Father's

commandments and abide

in his

love" (xv. 10).

What

appears in these texts as a repetition is a vital movement. There is the advance from obedience resting on love to progressive knowledge, and then to a divine certainty
of
life.

A similar progress is
describe the

noticed in the four passages which


:

work

of the Paraclete

"I
;

w^ill

and he shall give you you for ever, even the

another Paraclete, that he


Spirit of truth

pray the Father, may be with whom the world can

The Last Discourses.'


not receive
Spirit,
(xiv,

139

the Holy name, he shall teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all that I said unto you " {v. 26). " When the Paraclete is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall bear witness of me " (xv. 26). " If I go not away, the Paraclete will not come unto you but if I go, I will send him unto you. And he when he is come, will convict the world. When he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he shall guide you into all truth" (xvi. 7-13). Step by step the Paraclete is presented (1) I will ask, another Paraclete; (2) the Father will send in my name; (3) I will send; (4) if I go I will send him. The work is also delined more and more (1) be with you ibrever; that I said unto you (3) bear (2) teach all things witness of me; (4) convict tlie world, guide into all truth.
10, 17).

"The

Paraclete, even

whom

the Father will send iu

my

This subtle correspondence belongs to the fulness of life. The teaching on the relation of the Church to the world moves forward no less plainly. It is shown that the world i& destitute of that sympathy with the divine Spirit which is the
necessary condition for a divine revelation (xiv, 17, 22). Afterwards it is foretold that the hatred of the world is natural (xv. 18) and then the hatred is followed out to its consequences (xvi. 1). On the other hand it is promised that the Spirit shall convict the world; and further, Christ declares
;

that he himself has already conquered the world

{vs.

16, 22).

These examples demonstrate the existence of a real coherence and development of thought in the discourses; although it is difficult to follow the same in detail. A brief outline of the general course which the addresses take, may be useful, in addition to the analysis of the Gospel, previously given, under another section. These discourses form two groups, the discourses in the chamber (xiii. 31, xiv.) and on the w^ay (xv., xvi). The principal thoughts of the iirst are those of separation from Christ in the second, of realized union with Christ, and of victory after conflict.
:

140
a.

Study of

the

Gospel of
the

St.

John.
{xiii.

The Discourses in
its

Chamber

31, xiv.)

1.

Separation,
a'.
b'.

necessity

and

issue, (xiii.

31-38.)

Victory, departure, the

new

Society (31-35).
(St.

The

discipline of separation

Peter) (36-38).

2.

Christ
a!.
h'.
c'.

and

the

Father (xiv. 1-11).

The goal and purpose of departure (1-4). The way to the divine (St. Thomas) (5-7). The knowledge of the Father (St. Philip)
and
the disciples (xiv, 12-21).

(8-11).

3.

Christ
a'.
b'.
c'.

The

disciples continue Christ's

work

(12-14).

He still works for them (15-17). He comes to them himself (18-21).


the progress of revelation (22-31).

4.

The law and


a'.
b'.
c'.

The conditions of revelation (St. Jude) 22-24). The mode of revelation (25-27). Christ's work perfected hy his return (28-31).
b.

The Discourses on

the

Way

(xv., xvi.)

1.

The
a'.
b'.
c'.

living union (xv. 1-10).

The fact of union (1, 2). The conditions of union (3-6). The blessings of union (7-10).
issues of

2.

The
a'.
6'.

union

the disciple

and

Christ (11-16).

Christ's joy comes from

sacrifice (12-13).
is

The

disciples'

connection with Christ

by love

(14,

3.

4.

It is stable as resting on his choice (16). The issues of union; the disciples and the world (17-27). a'. Love of Christ calls out hatred of the world (17-21). b'. With this hatred the disciples must contend (22-27). The wmid and the Paraclete (xvi. 1-11).
c'.

a'.

The
The

last issues

of hatred, (1-4).

fe'^-The necessity of separation (4-7).


c'.

conviction of the world (8-11).


the disciples (12-15).

5.

The Paraclete and


a'.
6'.

He
and

completes Christ's

work

(12, 13),

glorities Christ (14, 15).

A
6.

Spiritual Gospel.

141

Sorrow turned
a'.
b'.
c'.

to

Joy (16-24.).
(19-22).

new

relation 61-17).

Sorrow the condition of joy Joy fulfiled (23, 24).

7.

Victory at last (25-33).


a'.
b'.
c'.

A summary (25-28). A confession of faith


of the discourse

(29, 30).

Warning and assurance


is

(31-33).

The form
ciples

changed.
till

terruptedly reveals the


eral voice.

new

truths

the close,

The Lord uninwhen the dis-

no longer speak separately, but,

Under the
befit

lines there
;

as it were, with a genruns a spiritual connection.


easily

The words
the Lord.

the occasion

and might
in

have been

preserved by the disciple

who was

closest

sympathy with

CHAPTER
The
characteristics of the

IV.

THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE GOSPEL.


Fourth Gospel have been either
indirectly considered or else important features pointed out in the sections already treated. However, the subject is of such

importance as to demand special attention, even at the risk of repetition. There are special leading points which are distinctive features of the Gospel.

I.

Spiritual Gospel.

From the time of Clement of Alexandria (a. d, 190) this Gospel has been distinguished as a " Spiritual Gospel " (Eusebius B. VI. c. xiv. 7), because it presents glimpses of the inner
life

and

spirit

tain the external acts.

of the Son of God, while the Synoptics conThe narrative of the latter is chiefly
manifold^ and ceaseless dealings with

composed of

Christ's

142

Study of
;

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

men

in the

former

we have

rather his tranquil and unbroken

union witli the Father. a heavenly atmosphere.

John's Gospel continually breathes In harmony with this characteristic it is natural that it should contain a much larger portion of Christ's words than may be found in the Synoptics. His discourses form the principal part, especially the latter half of the Gospel. The discourses recorded by St. John give more of the spirit of Christ than can be obtained from the

Sermon on the Mount.


is

And what

is

true of Christ, as the

numerous characters which central figure, give such life and definiteness to St. John's narrative. The principal feature of this consists more in what they say than in what they do. This suggests the following characalso true of the
teristic
:

II.

The Lifelike Groups.

such typical

genius has ever arisen who has been able to create and thoroughly real and lifelike groups and inThe dividuals as those represented in the Fourth Gospel.

No

various individuals are

made

to

sketch themselves with a

vividness and precision which has never been equaled, and

the same could only have been recorded by one who was an eyewitness and a close observer of men. Among these groups are the disciples who have the constitutional faculty of misapprehending Christ (iv. 33, xi. 12) yet firmly believing on him (xvi. 30) his own brethren reject;

ing him seek to dictate a policy for him (vii. 3-5) John's disciples, with their care and jealousy for the honor of their masthe Samaritans, who refused the testimony of a ter (iii. 26) woman, but proud to believe from their own experience (iv. 42);
;

the fluctuating and divided opinion of the multitude (vii. 20, the Jews claiming to be Abraham's seed, yet seeking 26, 41) the Pharisees haughtily to kill the Messiah (viii. 33, 37, 40) " Have any of the rulers or of the Pharisees bedemanding,
;

lieved on

him ?"

(viii.

48),
;

and are sneeringly asking, -'Are

we

blind also ?" (ix. 40)

the chief priests atfirming that Christ's

;:

Symbolism.

143

success would be fatal to the national existence (xi. 48), and declaring to Pilate, " have no king but Csesar " (xix. 15).

We

The sketching of these groups displays a master mind and


;

the depicting of the conflict and fluctuations between belief and unbelief among the multitude and " the Jews " is indicative of a

contemporaneous observer.

When the

types of indiwill be the

vidual character are considered the


picture.
flict,

more varied

Individuals exemplify both sides in the great con-

as well as those

who wavered between

the two.

Unfail-

ing in their allegiance are the mother of the Lord (ii. 3-5, xix. 25-27), the beloved disciple on his former master the
Baptist
xxi. 17)
(i.

6-37,

iii.

23-36),

Andrew and Mary

of Bethany
(xviii. 27,
8.)
;

Peter believing,
;

falling, yet rising to

deeper love
(xi.
{v.

Philip passing from eager to firmer faith (xiv.

Thomas

willing to die with the

Lord

16),
28).

then doubting

(xx. 25), but returns to implicit faith uninformed faith of Martha (xi. 21,

The sober but


and

24, 27) is earnest,

the passionate aflfection of

Mary

given with a master-stroke. stantaneous conviction of Nathanael

of Magdala (xx. 1-18) is Among conversions is the in(i.

49), the

courageous
(iv. 19),

and enthusiastic
uninstructed

belief of the

woman

of Samaria

the

and the timid, hesitating confessions of IN'icodemus, the learned Rabbi (iii. 1, vii. On the other hand we have the cowardly waver50, xix. 39).
born blind
(ix. 30, 31),

man

ing of Pilate
ery of Judas
acters there

(xviii.

38, 39, xix. 1-4, 8, 12, 16), the


(xi. 49, 50),

unscrupu-

lous resoluteness of Caiaphas


(xiii.

27, xviii.

2-5).

and the dark treachAmong the minor char-

be given the " ruler of the feast" (ii. 9, 10), the " nobleman " (iv. 49), the man healed at Bethesda (v. 7,
11, 14, 15).
III.

may

Symbolism.

From
events.

typical characters

we

pass to typical or symbolical

St. John is careful to explain that all which he saw when he wrote his Grospel was not clear to the disciples at first " What I do thou knowest not now; but thou shalt know hereafter" (xiii. 7). To this advance in knowledge the Res-

144

Study of

the

Gospel of St John.
;

urrection was the first great help (ii, 22, xii. 16) and the meauiug of the Resurrection itself was extended when Christ raised a new Temple and established his Church. The Gospel not only contains the three great allegories of the Sheep-fold, the Good Shepherd, and the Vine, from which Christian art has drawn its symbolism from the earliest times, but also, from end to end, it is permeated with the spirit

of symbolical representation.
lustrations of his

This

is

apparent in the eight


il-

miracles which the apostle has selected for his instructive

method.

miracles as " signs."

To St. John they They are " signs " so

are not so

much

far as they lead

men

to look beneath the surface for some deeper revelation. They are also " works " (v. 20) in so far as the}'' take their

among the ordinary phenomena of them not because they involve any more
place
tion.

life,

differing

from

real manifestation

of divine energy, but because they are suited to arrest attenAs " signs " they make men feel the mysteries which underlie the visible order of things. As " works " they make

them feel that this spiritual value is the attribute of all life. The Evangelist has recorded in detail eight miracles wrought by Christ which are as follows The water turned to wine (ii. 1-11). The nobleman's son healed (iv. 46-54). The paralytic at Bethesda (v. 1-15). The feeding of the five thousand (vi. 1-15). The walking on the sea (vi. 16-21). ^ The restoration of the man born blind (ix. 1-12). The raising of Lazarus (xi. 17-44). The miraculous draught of fishes (xxi. 1-12). The first two are introductory, and as such seem to be pointed out by St. John. They are given without any comment save the record of their effects. There are two brief notes (ii. 11, iv. 53) which give the clue to the interpretation of the " sio^ns." Thev show from the besrinuing that ChrisThe turning of the watianity is the ennobling of all life. ter into wine exhibits the Messiah's sovereign power over in-

SijinboUsm.

1-15

animate matter, and the healing of the nobleman's son his power over all living bodies. From them it may be learned that Christ's presence hallows the commonest events and turns any element into the richest; also the way to win blessings is to trust the One who bestows them. The third sign, healing the paralytic, sliows the Messiah as the great Restorer,
repairing the physical as well as the spiritual ravages of sin In the feeding of the five thousand the teaching is (v. 14.).
Christ appears as the support of life thus revealing himself as sufficient to supply every craving of man. The walking on the sea exhibits Christ as the Guardcarried a step further.
;

ian and

Guide of his

followers.

He

will brine:

them through

man born In order to go forward man must be able to see. In a sense he is " blind from his birth." Christ opens his spiritual vision. Before the blind man gained his sight at Siloam, Christ said, "As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world " (ix. The sign conflicted with the prejudices of the Pharisees, 5). and they refused to read it rightly. And he then added
the difficult passes.
blind shows that
sight to the

The giving of

man

needs enlightenment.

For judgment I am come into this world, that they which see not might see and that they which see might be made blind " (ix. 39). So far as any single fact oftered to the senses can confirm the truth, the raising of Lazarus shows that there is a
"
;

Life sovereign over physical

life,

a Life victorious over death.

wrought by the risen Savior, sums up and concludes the whole series. Man, restored, fed, guided, enlightlast sign,

The

ened, delivered from death, passes to the everlasting shore of peace.

In JSTicodemus coming by night, in Judas going out into the night, in the dividing of Christ's garments, and the blood and water from his side, we find instances of the same love of symbolism. As to the source of this mode of teaching, there can be no doubt about the answer: it is the form in
10

146

Study of
all

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

which almost
veyed.

the lessons of the Old Testament are con-

IV. Relation to the Old Testament.

Though

written in Greek, the Fourth Gospel

is

in

thought

and tone, and sometimes in the form of expression also, thoroughly Hebrew, and based on the Hebrew Scriptures. The Gospel sets forth in tragic contrast that the Jewish Scriptures in endless ways, by commands, types, and prophecies, pointed and led to Christ and that precisely the people who possessed these Scriptures, and studied them most diligently, failed to recognize the Christ or refused to believe on him. In this aspect the Gospel is a long comment on the mournful text, " Ye search the Scriptures because in them ye think ye. have And ye eternal life and they are they which testify of me. will not come to me, that ye may have life " (v. 39, 40). Therefore to show the way out of their superstitious reverence for the letter of the law and a scornful rejection of its true meaning this Gospel is given. To his fellow-countrymen
;
;
:

the Evangelist points out that they are right in taking the Scriptures for their guide, but ruinously wrong in the use

they

make

of them.

When
This
is

rightly interpreted,

Abraham,

Moses and the prophets,

will lead

them

to adore that

One

whom
detail,

they crucified.

done

in general statements, ia

and by direct references. must be regarded as a significant fact that only three of the old saints, Abraham, Moses and Isaiah, are mentioned by the Lord or the Apostle in connection with the Messiah. These three represent the three successive periods

by

allusions,
it

However

of the training of the people. Christ claimed for himself testimonies from the patriarchal, the theocratic and the monarchical stages of the life of Israel. " Your father Abraham
rejoiced to see

my day:

and he saw
lies in

it

The point

of the reference

the

first

and was glad" (viii. 56). typical example of

faith reaching

forward to a distant fulfilment.

The

refer-

ences to Moses

show that

just as Christ

whom

the patriarch looked in

was the object to the future and in the present,

Relation
so he

to the

Old Testament.
all

147

WHS the
:

object to

whom

the discipline of the law was

shaped
rae
:

ye believed Moses, ye would have believed for he wrote of me" (v. 46). Jesus said to Nicodemus:

"

Had

lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up" (iii. 14). The Jews said: " Our fathers did eat manna in the desert; as it is written, He gave fhem bread from heaven to eat. Then said Jesus unto them. Verily, verily, I say unto you, Moses gave you not that bread from heaven but my Father giveth you the true bread from heaven. I am the bread of life" (vi. 31-35). Here Christ placed in direct connection the most significant deliverance from the effects of sin, and the most striking gift
;

"As Moses

...

of Divine Providence recorded in the Pentateuch.

Of the same character


inner
life

is

the Apostle's dealings with the

He deals specially with the of prophecy, and represents Christ as being at once the Temple (ii. 19), and the King (xii. 13). He preserves the
later teachings of the prophets.

words
45);

in

which the Lord gives the prophetic description of

the Messianic times:

"They

shall all be taught of

God"

(vi.

and those again in which he gathers up the whole doc" If any man thirst, let him trine of Scripture on this head come unto me and drink. He that believeth on me, as the
:

water"

Scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living (vii. 37, 38); and those in which he shows that the

conception of the union of


the Old Testament, even

God and man was not foreign to when it was said of unjust judges,

"Ye are Gods" (x. 34), because the Word of God, in which was a divine energy came to them. On the other hand the Apostle has recorded how the Lord recognized the hostile unbelief of the Jews in the spirit of " They hated me without a cause " (xv. 25), and their fathers the treachery of Judas had its counterpart in that of Ahithophel " He that eateth my bread lifted up his heel against
:

me

"

(xiii. 18).

There

is

recognition of a spiritual undercurrent in

common

life in

the references to the later books of Scripture.

148
It is related

Stadij of the Gospel of St. John.

the disciples were enabled to see fulfiled in tbe Lord tbe words of tbe sufiering propbet, " Tbe zeal of
thine house shall eat

bow

me up "

(ii.

17).

At tbe

close of Christ's

was pointed out how the unbelief of tbe Jews bad been foreshadowed of old " These things said Isaiah, because be saw his glory and he spake of him " (xii. 41). These passages, and others that might be cited, suggest that tbe writer of tbe Fourth Gospel penetrated the spirit of tbe Old Testament. He brings them into connection with Christ, and enforces an application which accords naturally with tbe true harmony of interpretation. Taking the Old Testament as a it is a basis tbe Fourth Gospel becomes more than a poem
public ministry
it
:

continuous life-giving revelation.

V. The Unfolding of the Messianic Idea.


been sufficiently noticed that the primary object Fourth Gospel was to convince men that " Jesus is the of the Christ, the Son of God and that believing ye may have life To present bis argument clearly and in bis name " (xx. 31).
It has
;

convincingly the Apostle gradually unfolds the Messianic idea. Its true conception was in direct conflict with popular exThe opening chapter reveals the contrasted elepectation.

by the preaching although his words and testimonies (i. 19) 29, 33, 36) were eminently fitted to check tbe popular zeal, yet so chosen as to quicken the faith of those who were prepared to receive that greater One who should follow, according to tbe divine promise {vs. 29, 36). In Jesus some immediately found tbe fulfilment of the old promises {vs. 35-42), who attached themselves to the new Teacher and acknowledged him to be the Messiah, the Son of God, and King of
ments of expectation
of the Baptist
(i.

as called into activity

Israel

{v.

49).

Tbe personal
a " sign "
(ii.

faith of these first followers


;

was

11) confirmed by not yet been given as to the manner in which the titles were The clearing of the temple was a decisive to be realized. Tbe Messiah offered himself in tbe Father's house and test.

although the evidence bad

TliC Unfolding of the Messianic Idea.

149

to his

people, but they misunderstood that sign which he gave them. But he " did not trust himself unto them, for that he knew all men and what was in man " (ii.
;

own

23-25).

The

origin of this unbelief

is

shown

in the imperfect

confession of

Nicodemus
(iii.

(iii.

2),

and

in the complaint of the

Baptist's disciples

26.)

On

the other hand the testimony


is

of Christ and the Baptist set the real issue before men, as

shown by the comments of the Apostle. The state of opinion in Samaria was such as permitted Jesus openly to confess that he was the Christ, inasmuch as the claim was better understood (iv. 25), in consequence of which the Samaritans sought for more knowledge, and
sViowed that they were far from resting in any temporal or
exclusive hopes
(y.

42).
visit

During the next

to

Jerusalem

(v.)

there was given

the fundamental exposition of the nature and

work of

the

Lord and of the manifold witnesses to him. Side by side with this is an analysis of the causes of Jewish unbelief. There came a time when there was a decisive division among the followers of Christ, which occurred in Galilee. The " multitude," governed by its own ideas, desired to precipitate matters
(vi. 14).

In order to thwart this attempt

Christ presented the most startling imagery from things out-

ward, and foreshadowed his own violent death. His discourse drove many from him (vi. 60), but brought out a more complete confession from the twelve (r. 69). The issue was more slowly brought out at Jerusalem, where divisions were created among the multitude (vii. 30Some thought Jesus was the Christ from his works (v. 43). 31), and from his teachings {vs. 26, 37, 46), and even questioned whether or not their leaders had reached the same conclusion {v. 26). But l:o them he did not satisfy the prophetic tests which they applied to the Messiah (vs. 27, 42, 52). In the midst of this uncertainty the rulers openly declared themselves (vs. 32-48) and under their influence the masses fell away when Christ set aside their pecuhar claims and purposes
;

150
(viii,

Study of
33, 58).

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

Unmoved by this disaiFection Christ continued and revealed himself as the Son of man (ix. 35). Other divisions took place (ix. 16, x. 19) and at last the ques" tion is clearly put, " If thou art the Christ, tell us plainly The result of the answer was a more bitter hostility (x. 24). and an increase in believers (v. 42), {v. 39), The raising of Lazarus precipitated the crisis. No reason now existed why Christ should shrink from receiving the homage of the believers. Openly he accepted the title of King when he entered the Holy City to die there (xiii. 13) and the public ministry now closed with the questioning of the people as " to the Son of man " {v. 34). The history carries with it its own verification. In one Scene follows scene continuous progress it moves along. Thoughts are repetition and without anticipation. without revealed, met, and defined from point to point, and the characters change under intelligible influences as the narrative
his teachings
;

goes forward. All this is exhibited in the narrowest limits and in a writing of transcendent simplicity. The characteristics recorded in the Gospel of St. John

form a book which stands alone in literature. It is the production of one who for threescore years and ten labored as an Apostle and of whom, it may be said, he stands alone as a Christian teacher, not that he teaches difterent doctrines from
;

the other Apostles, but in the presentation realizing an experience of them.

CHAPTER

V.

RELATION OF THE GOSPEL TO OTHER APOSTOLIC WRITINGS.

As a Christian document and the work of an Apostle the Fourth Gospel can not be taken independent of the other sacred writings; for in the nature of things it must sustain a direct relation to the rest of the New Testament, and espeIt must be regarded with grave cially to the Synoptics.

Tlic

Fouiik Gospel and

the Synoptics.

151'

another.

doubts that the four Gospels are designed to supplement one It is more reasonable to assume that each of the

Gospels completes in its own way the subject it introduces; although the whole set forth the fulness of the life of Christ. So far as the effect is concerned the Fourth Gospel might be regarded as supplemental to the Synoptics; but its fulness The independent original forbids that it was so designed.
character of the

work

is

every- where noted

and to

it

we owe
of the

not only some of the most weighty facts in the

life

Lord, as well as some of his most important discourses, but also the exhibition of his ministry from the very beginning, the extended account of his labors in Judea, as well as an accurate chronological sequence of events.

And

of

still

greater

importance
life

the communication of the deepest and highest self-revelations of the Lord, and the exhibition of the whole
is

of Jesus in the most exalted light of an ideal apostolic in-

tuition.
I.

The Fourth Gospel and the

Synoptics.

Every one who has carefully read the four Gospels must have been impressed that there is a general difference between the Fourth and the Synoptics that reaches throughout their whole composition. There is an impression that the two convey a difference in the duiation, the scene, the form, and the substance of Christ's teachings, and also in regard to the circumstances under which they were composed. The latter
difference

furnishes the

explanation of the former.

The

study of the New Testament brings to the student a discusIn the early sion of such things as belong to all the Gospels. the Fourth Gospel at variance with Church no teacher found
the other three.

The

consideration involves the fact that

all

the narratives are partial, and recognize a large area with


It becomes necessary to point out the fragmentary character of the documents which must here

M^hich they do not deal.

be compared.

152
a.

Staciij

of the Gospel of St. John.


tlie

Limited range of

Fourth Gospel.

So far as the purpose of the Fourth Gospel is concerned, but taken as an external history it forms a complete whole It is not a Biography, but it is obviously very incomplete. decidedly a Gospel, based upon facts which have a permanent bearing upon the salvation of the world. Its fragmentary character is seen in the notice of periods of teaching of undefined length, narrating no more than the occurrence: "After these things came Jesus and his disciples into the land of Judea; and there he tarried with them, and baptized (iii. 22), making and baptizing more disciples than John " (iv.
; .
. .

See also iv. 54, vii. 1, x. 40-42, xi. 54). In the last pas54) Jesus appears to have retired for a period, but in the others imply action and continuous labor in Judea, Galilee, and Perea, of which the Apostle has preserved no de1-3.

sage

(xi.

tails.

There are frequent general notices of "signs" and works " which find no special recital " Many believed on See his name, beholding his signs which he did " (ii. 23.
"
:

also

iii.

2, vi. 2, vii. 3, 31, x. 32, xi. 47, xii. 37,

xx. 30, xxi. 25).

These passages open glimpses of a variety and energy of acOf all that the Lord did at tion on the part of the Savior. Jerusalem St John has only noticed the cleansing of the temOf the healings of the sick in Galilee, he records but ple. He tells us nothing of "the disciples in Judea" (vii. 3) one. who might desire to see works such as Christ wrought in
fair appreciation of these things will leave other places. no doubt that the Apostle omitted far more events than he reHe expressly declares lated out of those which he knew.

"

Many

disciples,

other signs therefore did Jesus in the presence of the which are not written in this book" (xx. 30). It is
it

even probable that

was understood among

St.

John's

disci-

ples that the greatest " signs" were not recorded for fear that " the world could not contain " or believe them, as seems

to be implied by the certificate at the close of the Gospel


(xxi. 25).

The Fourth Gospel and

the Synoptics.

153

w^as

The abrupt breaks in the narrative prove that the Apostle guided by something entirely difterent from a purely his22, V. 1, vi. 1)

toric performance.
(iii.

The simple phrase, " after these things " is used to mark an interval in time and
the Synoptics.
for,

place.
b.

Limited range of

but point to earhe heard that John was delivered up, he withdrew into Galilee" (Matt.
lier

The Synoptics not only leave room

w^orks than the Galilean ministry:


"

"Now when

iv. 12);

Now

after that

into Galilee preaching the

John was delivered up, Jesus came Gospel of God" (Mark i. 14).

These words have force only on the supposition that there was an earlier ministry in Judea which is deliberately passed over (comp. Jno. ii., iii.). The Sermon on the Mount impliessome previous teaching in Judea in which the character of the Scribes and Pharisees has been revealed. It is improbable that their " righteousness" would have been denounced (Matt. V. 20) unless the Lord had met and proved them in the seat of their power. More instructive is the great episode in Luke (ix. 51-xviii. 14) which shows how much material was
at hand.
c.

The

differences between the Synoptics

and

St.

John.

The
optics
is

differences betwefen the


;

Fourth Gospel and the Syn-

marked but not so great as exaggeration has dethem to be. The differences may be conveniently grouped under two heads the iii'st relating to the scene and extent of Christ's ministry and the second to the view given
scribed
:

of his Person.
1. With regard to the scene and extent of Christ's ministry has been urged that the Synoptists represent the Lord's ministry as lasting for one year only, and includes but one Passit

Jerusalem, while St. John describes the ministry as extending over three years, and includes three
visit to

over and one

Passovers and several

visits
it

to Jerusalem.

In taking these
in

things into consideration

must be borne

mind, in the

; ;

154
first

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

place, that the four Gospels are incomplete and fragmentary, as has already been noted. There are gaps in the Synoptic narratives, and in them is plenty of room for all So also, in the spaces left by that is peculiar to St. John. carefully arranged scenes, there is plenty St. John, between his

of room for all that is peculiar in the Synoptics. Even if all be pieced together there still remain large insterstices which could have been pre-occupied. It would then be reasonable
to

assume that there is no difeculty in that there is much of the Fourth Gospel having no parallel in the other three. Regarding the uncertainty of the date and duration of the Lord's public ministry there exists no contradiction. In the Synoptics it is nowhere recorded that the ministry lasted
only for one year. The three Passovers of St. John compel the admission of over two years to the ministry of Christ. But nowhere does St. John declare or imply that he has

mentioned all the Passovers within the period. That the four Gospels do not limit the ministry to a definite period is not only evident from their own testimony, but also from the impressions of the early Christian

Fathers.

Irenseus
until he

testifies

that our Lord fulfiled the office of a Teacher forty years old, " even as the Gospel and all the elders bear
witness,

was over

who
5).

Asia, that
e.

John had handed


According
to

consorted with John the disciple of the Lord in this down to them " {Heer. B. ii,
Irenseus Christ's ministry
thirty years of age

menced when he was

com(Luke iii. 23) so that he gives it a duration of about ten years on what might be affirmed as very high authority. It may be affirmed with
xxii.
;

certainty that the ministry did not begin earlier than a. d. 28


(the
earlier alternative
iii.

for the

fifteenth

year of Tiberius

and ended not later than a. d. 37, when Pilate was recalled by Tiberius -shortly before his death. Indeed Pilate found that Tiberius was dead when he reached Rome the recall probably having taken place in a. d. 36; and the

Luke

1),

Passover of
fixion.

a. d.

36

is
is

the latest possible date for the Crucinot given with precision by any of the

Chronology

The Fourth Gospel and


Evangelists, for this

the Sy^ioptlcs.

155

The

fact that St.


is

was a minor consideration with them. John spreads his narrative over a longer
will cause a difficulty

period than
Gospels.
2.

found in the Synoptics

only to those

who have mistaken


difficulty

the direct purpose of the


in regard to the Person

The second

urged

is

of Christ. It is claimed that in the Synoptics Jesus is represented as a great Teacher and Reformer, witli the power and authority of a prophet, who exasperates his countrymen hy

denouncing their immoral


attributes,

traditions, while the

Fourth Gos-

pel instead gives a mysterious Personage invested with Divine

who

infuriates the hierarchy

by the extraordinary

claims he puts forth.

A careful reading of the Synoptics shows


and
easily understood,

and that they which are enforced and illusThe Fourth Gospel contrated by parables and proverbs. tains many and intricate discourses, inculcating deep and spiritual truths, which are enforced by constant reiteration, hut devoid of illustrations by parables properly so called. These differences are to be discussed with a careful view to the peculiarities of St. John's own temperament, and the circumstances under which he wrote. The main features of St. John's character have been His temperament would affect treated in a former chapter. his choice of incidents, discourses, and the mode of narrating them. Although the Holy Spirit should bring to his remembrance all that had been said to the disciples (xiv. 26), yet such guidance would work with, rather than against, the mental endowments of the person operated upon. The intensity of St. John, both in thought and language, both in devotion and sternness, is in the Gospel. The circumstances under which he wrote were very different from that governing the Synoptists. Christianity had rapidly grown from infancy to manhood. Bold speculations had been mingled with Christianity, and efforts had been made to subvert the true faith. Between the Jew and the Christian the great gulf had
to be simple, direct,

them

inculcate high moral principles,

15G

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

been further widened, and an extreme hostility had arisen. Other troubles rapidly came to the fore and a Gospel was needed which could meet the changed condition of society, both in its external and internal relations, and one obviously
;

very different from those which had suited the infancy of the Church. The reverent mind will trace the hand of Providence in that the " beloved disciple," the Apostle John, was
preserved to meet the crisis. The careful student of the history of the second century of the Christian Church has observed that St. John fully and completely met all the require-

ments.
d.

The coincidences of

the

Fourth Gospel with

the Synoptics.

Synoptics are important.

The correspondences- between the Fourth Gospel and the The similarity in most cases is too

subtle for the picture in the Fourth Gospel to have been drawn from that of the Synoptic account. The common in-

cidents with
1.

which they deal are the following The Baptism of John (St. John adds the mention of
i.

" the Levites,"


V.

19

the questions,

v.

20

the place, Bethany,


v.

28

the abiding of the spirit on Christ,


to Christ,
V.

32

the after tesnotices the

timony
2.

26).
the five

The feeding of
rs. 5,

thousand
vi.

(St.

John

time, "the Passover

was near"

the command miracle and the retirement of Jesus, v. 14). the issue of the 3. The walking on the sea (St. John mentions the disthe result). tance, vi. 19; the feeling of the disciple, v. 21

Andrew,

4; the persons Philip and to collect the fragments, v. 12 ;

4.

The anointing
days before
7,

at

Bethany

(St.

John mentions the time,


v.

xii. 1, six

the

Passover; the persons, Mary.,


xiv. 3

comp. Matt. xxvi.


full details
5.

Mark

and

Judas,

vs.

4,

the

of the action,

v. 3).

The Triumphal Entry


day,
xii.

(St.

John mentions the


v.

time, on

the next

12; the reference to Lazarus,


v.

18; the judg--

ment of the
6.

Pharisees,
I^ast

19).
(St.

The

Supper

John records the feet-washing,

The Fourth Gospel and


xiii.

the Synoptics.

157

2; the question of St. John,


V.

v.

28; the ignorance of the

Apostles,

28

the discourses in the

chamber and on the

way).

The Betrayal (xviii). The Trial (xviii). 9. The Crucifixion (xix). 10. The Burial (^St. John notices the action of Nicodemiis, xix. 39; the Garden, v. 41). 11. The Resurrection (xx). In each case of the parallels St. John adds such details which appear to mark his personal knowledge; nor in the Synoptics do they appear to have been drawn from a foreign
7.
8.

source.
12. Implied acquaintance.

The passages

in

which

St.

John

implies an acquaintance with incidents in the Synoptics are

numerous.
i.

Capernaum the later residence of Christ. The family of Christ (comp. vi. 42, vii. 3, xix. 25). 19. The false accusation (Matt. xxvi. 61). iii. 24. The date of John's imprisonment (Matt. iv. 12; c'omp. John iv. 43).
ii.

40.
46.
vi. 3.

19.

32.

The general effect of John's preaching (Matt. iii. 5). The circumstances of the Lord's Baptism (Matt.
iii.

16).
is

Simon Peter

well

known.
ii.

Nazareth the early home of Christ (Matt.

23).

12.


xi.

62.

67.

Retirement to "the mountain." The Ascension. "The twelve" (comp. vs. 13, 70, xx.
of the Jews." Barabbas suddenly introduced.

24).

1, 2.

xviii. 33.

Mary and Martha The title "the King

are well

known.

40.

xix. 25.

The ministering women

(Matt, xxvii. 55).

There are also several coincidences in the use of imagery l:)etween the Fourth Gospel and the Synoptics, and many sayings of which the substance is common to them.

158

^tadij of the Gospel of St. John.

Common
iii.

Imagery.

29.

iv. 35.
xiii.

4.
1.

XV.

2.

The Bride and the Bridegroom (Matt. ix. 15). The harvest (Matt. ix. 37). Serving (Matt. x. 24, Luke xii. 37, xxii. 27). The vine (Matt. xxi. 33). The unfruitful tree (Matt. vii. 19).

Common
iv. 44. vi. 69.

Sayings.
vi. 4,

xii. 25.
xiii. 16.

20.
2.

xiv.

Comp. Comp. Comp. Comp. Comp. Comp.

Matt.

xiii. 57,

Mark

Luke

iv. 24.

Matt. xvi. 16 and parallels, Matt. x. 39, xvi. 25,

Luke

xvii. 33.

Luke

vi. 40,

Matt.

x. 24.

Matt. x. 40 (xxv. 40), Matt. xxiv. 10.

Luke

x. 16).

Some
i.

of the parallels contain verbal coincidences

23. " I

am

the voice of one crying in the wilderness,

Make


iii.

straight the
26. " I baptize

way

of the Lord."
. . .

with water. He that cometh after me, the latchet of whose shoe I am not worthy to
unloose,"

32. "

43.
5.
8.

V.

Descending as a dove." " Follow me " (Matt. viii. 22). " Enter into the kingdom of God." " Arise, take up thy bed, and walk " (Mark
;

ii.

9).

vi. 20.
viii.

xii.

xix.

" It is I be not afraid." 52. " Taste of death " (Mark ix. 1). 5. " To be sold for three hundred pence and given to the poor " (Mark xiv. 5).
''

13.

Hosanna, blessed
the Lord."

is

he that cometh in the name of

xiii. 21.

"

38. "

One of you shall betray me." The cock shall not crow till thou
thrice."

shalt

deny

me

3.

XX. 19. "

"Hail, King of the Jews." He saith unto them. Peace be with you."

The Fourth Gospel and


13.

the Synoptics.

159

160

Study of
17. 22.
27.

the

Gospel of
XX.

St.

John.

_
_

xi.

28.

3, 6.

xxiv. 12 (the

xxii. 23.
xxii. 3.

reading
19.

is

doubtful).

xxiv. 36.

These connections prove nothing as to the direct literary relation of the two Gospels, nor do the few significant words which are common to both but they clearly show the currency of a form of the Apostolic Gospel with characteristic features approximating those in St. John.

The Fourth Gospel and the First Epistle of St. John. The correspondences between the Fourth Gospel and the First Epistle of St. John are so marked that it would be more difficult to believe that both were written by two per-,
II.

While the resemsons than to believe in one authorship. blances in form and thought are very striking there are suf:ficient

characteristic differences

show something of a change

in the style;

between the two that would but no more than


at ditierent periods.

would naturally occur when written

If

the date of the Epistle is a. d. 68, and that of the Gospel A. D. 80 or even later, a period of a dozen or more years, especially in such a nature as that of St. John, would make changes more or less striking. The Gospel teaches both the humanity and the divine glory of Jesus, with the
latter

predominating, and the former is a special feature of the The Epistle urges the doctrine that " the Christ is Epistle.

Jesus," and the writer presses his argument from the divine to the human, from the spiritual and the ideal to the human.

On

Christ,"

the other hand the burden of the Gospel is "Jesus is the and the argument is from the human to the divine,
historical to the spiritual

from the

and the

ideal.

While

this

be only diflerent modes of expressing the same truth, yet that mode may be necessary from the documents them-

may

The Epistle in its true character is a treatise, and its method must be governed not only for its object, but also One belongs to the for the class for whom it was intended.
selves.

expounder, the other to the historian.

The Fourth Gospel and

the First Epistle of St.

John.

161

The

difference in the foretelHng of certain events belong

to the fundamental principles governing the two, and the

changed circumstances under which they were written. In the Gospel the "coming" of the Lord (xxi. 22) and " of the last day" (vi. 40,44) and of a judgment (v. 24-29) are touched upon generally in order to preserve the force of the teachings; while in the Epistle "the manifestation of Christ" (ii. 28) and his " presence " stand out as clear facts of history. They were to know it was now " the last time " because antichrists had come (1 Jno. ii. 18, 19). Evidently reference is here had to the predictions of the Lord as given in the Synoptics (see Matt, xxiv., etc.). The diflerence and the difficulty consist
case.

only in a misapprehension of the facts in the

There are Christian doctrines specially taught in the which are more clearly brought out. Among these may be noted that of propitiation (1 Jno. ii. 2, iv. 10); the confession of sins (i. 9), and the office of the Lord as Advocate (Paraclete) (ii. 7). It must also be noted that no use is made in the Epistle of the language of the discourses in John iii. and vi. However the "Unction" (1 Jno. ii, 20, 27), is given as an interpretation of the gift of the spirit which
Epistle

Christ
erally

had promised.
the closest parallels
it

By comparing

will

be found, genare

speaking, that

the Apostle's

own words

more

formal in expression than the words of Christ which he records. In the Epistle the words of the Lord have been

moulded
nection
;

into aphorisms, thus breaking their historic conalthough its language, in the main, is direct, abstract,

and unfigurative. examples


"I

The

contrast

may
:

be illustrated by two

he that followeth me have the light of life " (John viii. 12). " This then is the message we have heard of him, and declare unto you, that God is light, and iu him is no
shall not

am

the Light of the world

walk

in darkness, but shall

11

162
darkness
the light,
"
at all.

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.
is

...
me

If

we walk

in the light as he
(1

in

we have

fellowship one with another"

John

i.

5, 7).

" Whosoever denieth the Son, the same hath not the 23). Father; but he that acknowledgeth the Son hath the Father

He

that hateth

hateth

my

father also " (John xv.

also"

(1

Jno.

ii.

23).

consists in the atmosphere of the two In the Gospel St. John once more lives in the veritable presence of Christ and of his immediate enemies, yet bringing out the significance of the events not fully understood at the time he wrote. In the Epistle the Apostle treats freely the truths of the Gospel in direct conflict with the char-

The

difference

books.

acteristic perils of his

own

time.

III.

The Relation

of the

Fourth Gospel to the Apocalypse.


a. d. 64, as

Almost every one regards the year

the term(Rev.

inus a quo of the composition of the Apocalypse, inasmuch as

the bloody persecution of the Christians in


7, xvii. 6, xviii.

Rome

xiii.

presupposed in the narrative. Many critics have claimed that the difference between the Fourth Gospel and the Apocalypse is so great, that if St. John wrote close examthe one, he could not have written the other. proves that these differences are more suination of the text The latter was written in the midst of the perficial than real. horrors of the first persecution, when St. John was comparatively young, and all the passionate fire of his nature was The Gospel was written thrown into this ecstatic vision. much later; and both for purposes occasioned by circumEven Baur himself, the very stances radically different.
20-24),
is

front of the

Tiibingen. school of destructive

critics,

finds

points of contact between the two writings, though he thinks the writer of the Gospel purposely imitated the Apocalypse
" It can not be denied," says Baur, {Das Christenthum). "that the evangelist wished to give his book the authority of the Apostle who wrote the Apocalypse, and so assumed the same intellectual position. There is not merely an outward

The Relation of

the

Fourth Gospel

to the

Apocalypse.

163

support in the name of the highly revered apostle, but there are not wanting- many internal resemblances between the Gospel and the Apocalypse. In fact, one must admire the

deep genial sympathy and the delicate skill which the writer has shown in the Apocalypse elements, which could be developed into the loftier and larger views of the evangelist. He has thus spiritualized the Book of Revelation into a Gospel." The coincidences and relation of parts between the two productions are even much greater than Baur and his school are
willing to admit.

We are

not obliged to choose between the

Apocalypse and the Gospel.


a.

Internal Proofs of St. John's Authorship of the Apocalypse.

The Gospel and


that he

Epistles of St. John, in general, are di-

dactic, tender, persuasive,

and

in

was a Boanerges.
full

He was moved
is

them no one would conclude powerfully by the


representative of the

teachings of Jesus.

The Apocalypse

writing of one in the


palled

one who was outward discrepancies, there are strong resemblances in the compositions, which may be summed up under the headings of Diction and Metaphors.
the
1. The first consideration is that of word " Logos " to denote a person is
i.

possession of his vigor; indeed, of truly a Boanerges. Notwithstanding the so-

(John

1, 14).

IsTo

The use of John other 'New Testament writer uses it. The
Diction.

peculiar to St.

same phraseology
the

is employed in the Apocalypse; for in speaking of Jesus, the revelator says: ''His name is called

Word of God" (xix. 13.) The favorite expression of the Gospel, bearing witness, for declaring of the Gospel, and witness, record, or testimony, for the truth declared, is very .comin the style of

mon
lypse

John

(i.

7, iii. 11,

32, 33, v. 31-36, viii. 13,

14, xviii. 37, xxi. 24, 1 Jno. v. 7-11).

Turning to the Apocasame phraseology prevails. The Revelator "bears record of the word of God, and the testimony of Christ" (i. 2) he was banished to Patmos for the word of God and the testimony of Christ {v. 9); the souls under the

we

find that the

164
altar

Study of

the

GosjkI of

St.

John.

were

slain for the


(vi. 9)
;

they held
the
XX.

word of God and the testimony which and the saints overcame the accuser " by

word
4,

of their testimony"
18, 20).

xxii.

The Gospel

"This is the disciple who and in closing the Apocalypse he


these things saith " (xxii. 20).
It

See also xix. 10, with the words, testifieth of these things" (xxi. 24);
(xii.

11, 17.

closes

said, "

He who

testifieth

was very common for St. John to use hour for time, or season, as " Mine hour is not yet come" (ii. 4) " The hour cometh and now is when the true " worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth
;

(iv.

23.

See also

v. 25, 28, vii.

30, xvi. 32).


(iii.

This

is

also a

prevailing idiom in the Apocalypse

3, 10, xiv. 7).

The

use of the words overcome and overeometh, for successful perseverance in the Christian duties in the midst of trials and dangers, is another peculiarity of the Apocalypse.

For instance

To him that overeometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne " (iii. 21. See also ii. 11, 17, 26, iii. 5, 12, This manner of speech appears strikingly in the xxi. 7). First Epistle (ii. 13, 14, iv. 4, v. 4, 5). There is one fact in regard
"

the crucifixion that John only has recorded, viz., the piercing of the Savior's side with a spear (xix. 34-37), to which he applies the prediction of Zechariah " They shall
to
:

There is no look on him whom other instance in the New Testament where this fact is mentioned save once in the Apocalypse (i. 7). While in itself this may be only an unconscious coincidence, yet when taken with similar instances it strongly bears the impress of one hand. There seems to be not only the recognition of the fact of the piercing of Jesus' side in both cases, but that they that
they have pierced "
(xii. 10).

pierced

him should look on him. Passing over this phase of the argument we come to the following consideration 2. The second argument is the characteristic resemblance
:

in Metaphors.

As

previously noted, Jesus represents himself

and his truth under the figure of Light. This was impressed upon the mind of St. John during the whole of his life. He

The Relation of
incorporuted
it

the

Fourth Gospel

to the

Apocalypse.

165

metaphors of the Apocalypse. Of the New Jerusalem he said " The city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it: for the glory of God did lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof: and the nations of them which are saved shall walk in the light of it"
into the
:

(xxi. 23, 24.

See

also,

John

i.

4, 5, 7, 8, 9,
i.

iii.

19, 20, 21, viii.


8, 9, 10,
is

12, ix. 5, xi. 9, 10, xii. 35, 36, 46, 1 Jno.


xxii. 5).

7,

ii.

use of the phrase "Sons of God" portant feature " But as many as received him, to

The

Rev. an imthem gave

he power to become the Sons of God, even to them that beon his name" (John i. 12); "Behold what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the Sons of God" (1 Jno. iii. 1). In the Apocalypse we read, " He that overcometh shall inherit all things; and I will be his God, and he shall be my son " (xxi. 7).
lieve

The

Apocalypse

prevailing character in which Christ appears in the is that of a Lamb (v. 6, 8, 12, 13, vi. 1, 16, vii, 9,

10, 14, 17, xii. 11, xiii. 8, 11, xiv. 1, 4, 10, etc.).

This figure

Behold the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the world" (i. 29, 36. If it be objected that the same Greek word is not used in both books, it is replied that the idea is the same). There are but two instances in the other books of the l^ew Testament in which Christ is represented by the word Lamb (Acts viii. 32, 1 Peter Turning from this point, we find that the Revelator i, 19). represents the Church as the Bride and Jesus as the Bridegroom. "And I John saw the holy city, New Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband " (xxi. 2); " Come hither, I will show thee the bride adorned for her husband" (y. 9. See also xxii. 17). This metaphor occurs in no other place in the New Testament except in the Gospel of John. It came originally from the Baptist " Ye yourselves bear me witness, that I said,
occurs in the Gospel
:

"

sent before him he that but the friend of the bridegroom, which standeth and heareth him, rejoiceth greatly, beI

am

not the Christ, but that I


is

am

hath the bride

the bridegroom

166

Study of

the

Gospel of
:

St.

John.
therefore
is ful-

cause of the bridegroom's voice


filed" (John
iii.
;

this

my joy

Here unquestionably, Christ' was the bridegroom and the Baptist was the bridegroom's friend, who rejoiced to hear his voice. John is the only one of the Evangelists who recorded this, and it has a direct tendency to fortify the one authorship of the two writings. Among the most beautiful metaphors of the Apocalj^pse is that of icate7\ used to represent truth and its infiaences. The following description of the felicity of the redeemed is both beautiful and striking: "For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters; and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes" (vii. 17). Again: "And the Spirit and the bride say. Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And And whosoever will, let him let him that is athirst come. of life freely" (xxii. 17). This same doctrine take the water is strikingly represented in the Gospel of St. John by "living water," of which if the thirsty drank, they should thirst no more (iv. 10-14. See also vii. 37, 38). John is the only one of the New Testament writers who has given the metaphor
28, 29).

water a great significance as a representation of the truth of


Jesus.

With the exception of Hebrews manna that was kept in the temple

ix. 4,
is

where the pot of

referred to,

manna

is

mentioned in no part of the New Testament except in St. John's Gospel and the Apocalypse (see John's Gospel, vi. 31, 49, 58, Rev. ii. 17). St. John is the only ISTew Testament writer who has preserved the metaphor /oo^ as a figure of the Gospel. "He gave them bread out of heaven to eat" (John vi. 32); " The bread of God is that which cometh down out of heaven" (v. 33); "I am the living bread" {v. 51). The same figure occurs in the Apocalypse: "To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the tree of life, which is in the midst of
the paradise of
dise of

God"
all

Of

God" (ii. 7). The "tree of life in the parabut another metaphor for the heavenly bread. the New Testament writers, St. John has given the
is

The Bdation of

the

Fourth Gospel

to the

Apocalypse.

167

most prominence to the metaphor of blood to represent the cleansing power of divine truth. In this sense there is scarcely any mention of blood by any other writer. It is the purifying power of the truth to which John refers when he
says
:

"And

there are three that bear witness in earth, the


;

spirit,

and the water, and the blood


;

and these things agree

The blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin " (i. 7). The metaphor is continued in the Apocalypse " Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood" (i. 5) " Thou art worthy to and hast redeemed us to God by thy take the book " (v. " Have washed their Tobes, and made them blood 9)
"
:

in one " (1 Jno. v. 8)

born of water and the Spirit " (John iii. 5) was being cleansed by divine truth. With one exception (Matt, v, 6) St. John is the only evangelist who uses hunrjer and thirst as metaphors to represent the need which the human soul hath for the truth of Christ. " Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst" (John vi. 35). To this agrees the metaphor in the Apocalypse " They shall hunger no more, There may be many other neither thirst any more " (vii. 16).
(vii. 14).
;
:

wdiite in the blood of the

Lamb "

Being

"

strong points omitted, but these will amply illustrate the striking peculiarities of the two. Comparisons in points of doctrine

have been purposely omitted, because the books of the New Testament essentially agree with each other in this respect. However a comparison of the manner in which the doctrine oi judgment is stated in the Apocalypse, with the manner in which it is stated in the Gospel of St. John, will confirm the opinion that the Apocalypse and the Gospel were the product of one hand.
b.

Contrasts of the Apocalypse toiih the Gospel.

Side by side with the coincidences of thought and expression

may be found important contrasts in their subjectmatter and their modes of dealing with common topics. In

168

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.
is

the Apocalypse the conflict between good and evil

por-

trayed under several distinct forms as a conflict

or Christ

Judaism, with idolatry, with the Roman empire false prophecy in the Gospel it is conceived in its essence as a continuous conflict between light and darkness. The Apocalypse gives a view of the action of God in regard to men, in a life full of sorrow, and of partial defeats, and cries for vengeance. The Gospel gives a view of the action of God with regard to Christ who establishes in the heart of the believer a Presence of completed joy. In regard to Judaism the contrast assumes a special form. In the Apocalypse, under the image of Judaism, the triumph of
with
false

allied

with

Christianity

is

described.

filment of Old Testament prophecy.

The Church is the embodied fulThe outlines are drawn


(vii. 4),

of the universal, ideal, Israel


12, xxi. 2, 10),

the ideal Jerusalem

(iii.

that there
contrasts,

is

and the ideal worship (xx. 6, no longer any temple (xxi, 22).

xxii. 3), yet so

In the Gospel

Christianity

forth

But these is proclaimed as the absolute truth. however much they may be multiplied, are drawn by certain environments, one previous to and the other

The subsequent to the overthrow of the Hebrew polity. Apocalypse was addressed to seven churches in the most Judaizing fraction of Asia Minor, all of them within eighty
miles of Ephesus.

The phraseology

of the

book

is

largely

borrowed from the Old Testament, and in its treatment is the most characteristically Hebraic of any of the New Testament writings. It is less developed in thought and style than the Gospel. The crisis of the Fall of Jerusalem exIn the plains the relation of the Apocalypse to the Gospel. Apocalypse that " coming " of Christ was expected, and painted in figures, and in the Gospel the " coming " is interpreted.

The

Text.

169

CHAPTER

VI.

HISTORY OF THE FOURTH GOSPEL.

The Revised Version of the Bible of a. d. 1884, owing to some of the startling changes in the text, has aroused much attention relating to the history of the documents which
have been preserved. This is a healthy state of affairs. The attention of every one should be quickened on every question relating to the Book of Books. Inquiry should be aroused, because no one can investigate without learninof somethiner, and the rusult will be the laying aside of unreasonable prejudices, and clear perceptions of the truths revealed will be received.
I.

The Text.

St.

The John

materials for determining the text of the Gospel of are, as in the case of the other Gospels, and of the

books of the

Testament generally, ample and varied. It most important authorities in which the Gospel of St. John is preserved. These are in Manuscripts, the copies of the Scriptures in the original Greek, over fifteen hundred of which are in existence. The oldest copies of the Bible in the world are named respectively the Vatican, Sinaitic, and Alexandrian Manuscripts; and curiously enough in the possession of the three great branches of the Christian Church. The Vatican {Codex B) is in the Vatican
will be sufficient to notice the

New

Library at

Rome;

the Sinaitic (Codex.^^), a treasure of the


;

Greek

Church at St. Petersburg and the Alexandrian {Codex A) belongs to Protestant England, and is kept in the manuscript room of the British Museum.
Codex Vaticanus (B) belongs to the 4th century. It hundred leaves of the finest vellum, about a foot square, bound together in book form. Although fifteen hundred years have elapsed since it was written, it is
a.

consists of over seven

170
still

Study of
perfectly clear

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

and legible. It contains the entire Gospel John. of It was b. Codex Sinaiticus. (J^) belongs to the 4th century. discovered by Tischendorf in 1859, at the monastery of St. Catherine on Mount Sinai. It is written with four columns Its characteristics are probably of Palestinian orito a page. gin. It contains the entire Gospel of St John. It c. Codex Alexandrinus (A) belongs to the 5th century. was presented to Charles I. of England, by Cyril Lucar, PaSt.

triarch of Constantinople, a. d. 1628,

and therefore arrived

in

England seventeen years too


Version of 1611. It contains the whole of
is

late to

be used in the Authorized


It

written two columns on a page.

St.

John's Gospel.

d. Besides these there are Codex Ephrcemi (C) of the 5th century in possession of the Royal Library at Paris. As to the Gospel fragmentary. Codex Bez(E (D) of the 6th or 7th century, given in Con1581, by Beza to the University Library at Cambridge. and xviii. all of St. John's Gospel except i. 16-iii. 26 tains Codex Regius 13-xx. 13 has been supplied by a later hand. It is^ kept Parisiensis (L) belongs to the 8th or 9th century. It contains the whole of the Fourth Gospel except at Tours. Among the ancient versions we have the xxi. 15 to the end. Old Syriac (Curetonian) 2nd century, four fragments of the
;

Gospel. Gospel.

Vulgate Syriac (Peschito) 3rd century.

The whole

Harclean Syriac

(a revision

of the Philoxenian Sy-

riac; 5th or 6th century) 7th century.

Old Latin (Vetus Latina).


tinct forms.

The whole Gospel. The whole Gospel in several dis-

Vulgate Latin (mainly a revision of the Old Latin by Jerome, a. d. 383-5) 4th century. The whole GosMemphitic (Coptic, in the dialect of Lower Egypt). 3rd pel.
century.

of

The whole Gospel. Thebaic (Sahidic, in the dialect Upper Egypt), fragments of which have been published.

Among

the English versions the most noted are Wiclif,

1380; Tyndall, 1534; Cranmer, 1539; Genevan, 1557; AngloEhemish, 1582; Authorized, 1611 Revised, 1884.
;

Inteiyolations.

171

II.

Interpolations.

tery (the whole text from

taken in adulis now generThe external evidence ally conceded to be an interpolation. may be thus briefly summed up It is omitted by all the oldest Greek MSS. with one exception, and by a considernarrative of the
vii.

The remarkable

woman

53 to

viii.

11)

able

number

of the later

MSS. which generally give


contain
it

a very
is

ancient text.

In

many MSS. which

the 7:)assage

marked by

asterisks or obeli.

1118), the earliest

Euthymius Zygadenus (a. Greek commentator who writes upon

d.
it,

observes that
genuine.

not found in "the accurate copies," oris obedized in them, and that therefore it is not to be counted
it is

In one MS.

it is

inserted at the end of the Gospel,

and

It is omitted by important Latin copies, by the Egyptian versions, the Old Syriac, the Gothic, the best MSS. of the Peshito, and of the Armenian
in ten others at

other places.

versions.
lian,

It

was not read

as a part of the

Gospel by Tertul-

Origen, Theodore of Mopsuesta, Chrysostom, Cyril of Alexandria, nor is there any evidence that it was known to

Cyprian or Hilary.

The

earliest

Greek text
text.

(that in
it

D)
is

dift'ers

considerably from the

omitted by the oldest representatives of every kind of evidence (MSS., and the critical character of the text is versions, fathers) such as to distinguish it from the rest of the book with which it is connected. On the other hand it is found in Codex D and in the mass
;

common

In short,

of the later uncial and cursive texts Jerome says it was found in his time in many Greek and Latin MSS.; in the Gospel ac;

cording to

St,

John

in
;

most Latin copies of the Vulgate;


;

in

used as a part of the Gospel by Augustine and Ambrose, and read in the service at Kome in the time of Gregory the Great. Here it should be observed that Codex D is conspicuous for additions similar in
character to this narrative, though less in extent, and some of which obtained wide currency Jerome did not speak on crit;

the Jerusalem Syriac

in the Ethiopic

172

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

ical questions after a

very large examination of authorities;


is

the early Latin copies are just those which admitted interpolations
is

most freely; the Jerusalem Syriac

a lectionary, and

not earlier than the 11th century. The internal evidence shows that the language of the narrative is different from that of St. John hoth in vocabulary
-

and

structure.

The tone of the

narrative

is

alien

from

St.

John, and akin to that used in the Synoptics. It is true there was a narrative similar to this preserved by Papias, and was Paalso found in the "Gospel according to the Hebrews." pias collected traditions illustrative of "the oracles of the Sometimes interpolations were first written on the Lord," margins, and afterwards incorporated into the text. The genuineness of the xxi. chapter has been called in The words of John xx. 30 have been supposed to question. form the evident close of the Gospel and the remainder to
;

careful estimate of the total bear traces of spuriousness. structure of the Gospel leads to a plan which constitutionally includes the 21st chapter. In this view we distinguish the Pro-

logue, the Historical Gospel, and the Epilogue.

The

style

and

general character of the language of the last chapter lead to


it was written by the author of the Gosno evidence to show that the Gospel was given out before the concluding part was added. The concluding part of the xxi. chapter {vs. 24, 25) has already been referred to. The Gospel closes with the words " This is the disciple which testitieth of these things, and wrote these things " (v. 24). The remaining words were probably added by the Ephesian elders, to whom the preceding narrative had been given both orally and in writing.

the conclusion that

pel.

There

is

III.

The Literature

of the Gospel.

The works
numerous.
all

It

relating to St. John and his writings are very would be out of the question to mention
this

of

them

in

place,

or even

to

give

an

outline
part, at-

sketch of the most important ones.

For the most

The Literature of

the Gospel.

173

tention will be called to those of easy access to the English


readers.

The

first

commentary on
is

St.

John, of which any distinct

record has been preserved,


flourished about a.
d.

that written by Heracleon


his

who

commentary on St. John have been brought together by Grabe in the second volume of his Spicilegium. The manner in which he treats the book shows that he regarded it as of divine author125.
ity in the minutest details.

The portions of

The Commentary
first five

of Origen

was written

at the instiga-

tion of his friend Ambrosius.

The work was begnn and the


Eusebius
his

books written
:

at Alexandria, a. d. 225.

work on the entire Gospel (John's) only twenty-two volumes have come down to us." At present there remain nine books, and fragments of two
(JEccL Hist. vi. 24) says

"

Of

others.

Of the Greek commentators of the fourth century, Theo-

Didymus of Alexandria, very little has come down to us. The eighty-eight Homilies on the Gospel, by Chrysostom, have been translated in the Oxford " Library of the Fathers." Augustine's one hundred and twenty-four Lectures on St. John have been translated by Gibb. The Comdore of Heracla and

mentary of Cyril of Alexandria has been translated by Pusey. With Cyril the line of great patristic interpreters of St. John
ends.

Coming
ries

to

modern times the following


:

foreign

commenta-

have been published in English Bengel, Godet, Luthardt, Meyer, Olshausen, Tholuck, Lange. Of these probably Lange, Meyer and Godet rank the highest. Among original English commentaries the most noted are Alford, Dunwell, McClellan, Watkins, Wadsworth, the Speakers, and the Cambridge. Other books have been of very valuable assistance, such as EHicott's " Historical Lectures on the Life of our Lord," Liddon's " Bampton Lectures," 1866, Sanday's "Authorship and Historical Character of the Fourth Gospel," and " The Gospels in the Second Century," Westcott's " Introduction to the

174

Study of

the

Gospel of

St.

John.

Study of the Gospels," and "An Introduction " to the " Speakers Commentary on St. John," Norton's " Genuineness of the Gospels," Abbott's " External Evidences of the Authorship of the Fourth Gospel," Fisher's " Essays on the Supernatural
Origin of Christianity,"
etc.

CHAPTER
Whether
Greek or
not,

VII.

THE INTERLINEAR LITERAL TRANSLATION


a student has a thorough knowledge of the

interlinear literal

he certainly should be equipped with a good It translation of the New Testament. brings to view certain points of interest that no other translaAs an illustration take the tion has ever pretended to give. " master," which is used in the Authorized Version to word translate six difierent Greek words, all bearing different shades
of meaning; the

word "judgment"
"for"
eighteen,

stands for eight different

Greek words
twelve,

in

the original; of particles

"by"

eleven,

"in"

fifteen,

"but" represents "of" thirteen,


is

"

on " nine; and so of many others. The Greek text of the Fourth Gospel

given with an

interlinear translation as literal as


;

be in order to be useand in the margin the Authorized Version, divided into ful paragraphs to correspond to the Greek text. In the notes are given not only the various readings of six different editors of
the Greek Testament, but also these variations in English whenever the sense is affected thereby, but without attempting in every case to give all the minute shades of meaning which a Greek scholar might attach to them. Many of these variations

may

may be thought to be of no great importance, descendeven to the different spelling of the same word but from ing All this they rise to variations of the greatest importance.
;

The Greek
are

Text.

175

of interest because they concern the word of divine


I.

revelation.

The Greek Text.


is

The Greek
which
is

text here followed

that of Stephens, 1550,

as the edition of the one often called the Received Text, although later than the Authorized Version, its readings are

the one
is

commonly followed; hut

Elzevir, 1624,

given in the notes, and marked E. In the main both are the same, and either of them may be called the Textus Receptus.

Of each of the editors referred to in the notes the following remarks may be of use
:

a.

Griesbach.

This

pleted edition in 1805.

scholar brought out his last comIn critical labors he excelled by far

any who preceded him.


gathered.

He

used the materials others had


into three families

and then These were the Alexandrine, the Western and the Byzantine. In the first he
dealt with each family as a witness.

He

classified the

MSS.

B, C L of the Gospels the Egyptians and some lesser versions. The second he represented by D of the Gospels and Acts, by those that contained a Latin as well as Greek text; the Old Latin and the Vulgate, and quotations in the Latin Fathers. The Byzantine recension embraced the great mass of other MSS., the Versions and the

placed the ancient copies

Greek Fathers. He attached the most importance to the first two. Where two of these families agreed in a writins:, that settled the text in his judgment, although the rule was not
always rigidly carried out.
In his larger editions Greisbach

encumbered his text with different readings, making them as more or less probable. In 1805 he published a smaller edition which represented his final judgment on all points, devoid of these gradations in his text. It is from this edition the readings in the notes are taken.
b.

Lachmann.

This

editor started with the theory of

ancient evidence only, thus

sweeping away many copies and

much

He

evidence, because they dated below his fixed period. did not seek to discover the " original " text in name so

176

Study of

fhe

Gospel of
it

St.

John.

much

as to recover the text as

was

in the fourth century.

He

did not actually restrict himself to evidence of or before

would have had but little in any was he often had but four Greek copies, in some places three, and in some two, and in parts of the Revelation but one. To his scanty stock of evidence he added old Latin His smaller edition of the ]^cw Testacopies and Fathers. ment appeared in 1831, and the larger, in two volumes, in 1842-50. At first he was misunderstood and severely critithe fourth century, or he

shape.

As

it

but since his work has been better understood, he has always held a place among the principal editors of the Greek Testament. For a long series of years this critic inc. TiscHENDORF. dustriously worked at the New Testament, deciphering and Four main recensions of his text may be discollating MSS. dating respectively from his editions of 1841, 1849, tinguished, From the mass of critical material used the 1859, 1869-72.
cised,

edition of 1849

may be

portant

that of 1859

regarded as historically the most itnis distinguished from Tischendorf 's

other editions by coming nearer to the received text; in the eighth edition the testimony of the Sinaitic MS. received
great weight. The readings of the Vatican MS. were given with more exactness and certainty than liad been possible in the earlier editions. The final edition of his labors will not

be soon superseded, for

it

sums up a vast

series of

most im-

portant services to Biblical study. This critic for thirty years industriously d. Tregelles.

worked at his New Testament and in collecting MSS. for it. The great edition of Tregelles appeared in 1857-72, and rests
exclusively on the most ancient authority, resembling Lach-

mann's work
materials.
e.

in conception,

though using much more copious

Greek Testament was completed in 1861, and occupies the first rank among English " The text which I have adopted," says this editor, editions. "has been constructed by following, in all ordinary cases, the
Alford.
scholar's

This

The Greek Text.

177

united or preponderating evidence of the most ancient authorities; in cases where the most ancient authorities do not agree

nor preponderate, taking into account later evidence; and in cases where the weight of diplomatic testimony is interfered with by adventitious circumstances (such as parallelism or the like) applying those principles of criticism which appear to furnish sound criteria of a spurious or genuine reading. The object of course is-, in each case, where evidence is divided, to

mount

up, if possible, to the original reading from lohich all the


:

in other words, to discover some word or some arrangement which shall account for the variations, but for which none of the variations will account " {vol. i., c. vi., sec. As there have been several editions of his work, the i. 18). date is given of each volume from which the collation has

variations sprung

been taken.
b. (vol.
i.,

Wordsworth.
p. xiii.),
is

In his Preface to the New Testament bishop Wordsworth says: "The text of the
not a reprint of that received in any imTestament. The editor has endeavored

present edition
pression of the

New

which have been supplied by others, and to offer to the reader the result at which he has arrived after an examination of those collaHe feels it his duty to state, that he has not tions. far from the text commonly received, as has been deviated so done in some recent editions." From the foregoing summary it will be seen that each of the editors took up more or less a different line. Lachmann was the first to cast aside wholly the received text, and Wordsworth has taken it up again. Though the editors had each his own plan, in some places, all came to one conclusion, pointing out that the common Greek text ought to be abandoned for the one they give. In such a cas^ the reader would
.

to avail himself of the collations of manuscripts

be justified in taking their united verdict. The date at which work should be remembered for since the time of Lachmann the Codex Sinaiticus (a verv important " 12
the editors did their
;

178
factor) has

Study of the Gospel of

St.

John.

been discovered.

If Laclimanii

and Griesbach had

possessed the same evidence as Tischendorf, Tregelles, Alford,

and Wordsworth, their readings possibly vi'-ould have coincided more frequently with those of later editors.
II.

The Interlinear Translation.

In the plan adopted the Greek words have invariably been kept in their right order, and where the interlinear English would not make sense in the same order, the words have been numbered to show how they must read. To prevent this numbering, and transposition, being increased unnecessarily, a few words are often made into a phrase. This has been done at the commencement of each sentence, where needed, two or more words being joined with a low hyphen. Where a Greek word occurs which the English idiom requires should vot be translated, the word stands alone with no EnIn some places, on account of the double glish under it. negative used in the Greek, a double translation is given, where they do not immediately follow one another.
III.

Marginal References.

The
ing

references to the notes are


far the variation extends.

marked

in the text,

show-

how

loithin a note. posed by some editors but not by others, these latter may want to alter a word in the sentence. In such cases one tick stands shows the termination of the inner note. This mark for omit; and + for add; but in some places all the editors do not actually omit, some putting the word in brackets as doubtabrou [L] TTr"; which In that case it is put thus, " ful. Lachmann marks the word as doubtful, and Tischenmeans that dorf and Tregelles omit it. In some cases, all mark a word The mark [ ] apas doubtful, and it is thus put, [oe] LTTr. plied to the Greek or the editors in the notes always refers to readings which the editors point out as doubtful. They must not be confounded with the same marks in the English text

occurs

In a few instances a note If words are to be omitted or trans-

List of Signs

and

editions Used.

179

and

which always point out that there is no corresponding word in tlie Greek. In some places wliere a word is added by the editors, another English word is added in the note to show the connection of the new word.
notes,

IV, List of Signs and Editions Used.

E Elzevir, 1624. G Griesbach, 1805. L Lachmann, 1842-1850.


T
Tr
Tischendorf, Eighth Edition, 1865-1872.
Tregelles, 1857-1872.

Alford, vol.

i.

1868, vol

ii.

1871, voL

iii.

1865, vol

iv.

1862, 1870.

W
-j-

Wordsworth, 1870.
signifies
signifies signifies

an addition.

[ ]

cm omission.
in the interlinear translation, that there
is

no Greek word corresponding to the English.


[ ]

signifies in the notes that

an editor marks the reading

as doubtful.
[ ]

signifies

how

far the variation in the

Greek text ex-

tends.

^ Text. Rec. refers to both Stephens 1550 and E. The title of the Gospel is no part of the book

itself,

although found in very difl'erent forms in ancient authorities. The simplest form is given by the earliest authorities Accord:

ing
is

to

John.

The

wx)rd Gospel which

supplied by the mass of


definite article.

MSS.

implied in this title Many of the later MSS.


is

add the

A few MSS. have:

"Of

the Gospel
:

according to John."

The printed

texts of the Peshito give

"The Holy

Gospel of the Preaching of John the Preacher." The English versions also give a variety of titles.

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO


ST.

JOHN.

KATA 'TO THE 'ACCORDING


IN
the beginning

IQANNHN ATION EYArTEAION."


'TO

"JOHN
0.pxy
?IV

'HOLY

'GLAEl ^TIDINGS.

was '-^

Word was' wtth God and the Word was God.

^
j^aJ

[the^

6 XoyOf, Kui 6 beginning was the Word, and the


r]V

\6yOg qV TTpOQ TOV QtOV^


Word was with
iv
God,

QiOQ

\6yoq.

2 oirOQ

r)V

He waa in [the] beginning with '^V'^'i/^'*^'t'^''*^^'l; ^ 3 All things were made QsoV dl Kal X<^P'C CLVTOV aVTOV SySVETO, 3 TlaVTU by him and without q.^^^ ^^ things through him came into being, and without him hmi was not any thing - ~ , / , i,.x ,^ > ^, ^ v made that was made. tV O tySVETO OVOS yeyOVSV. 4 ev" aVT(ft (,UIJJ 4 In him was life and came into being not even one [thing] which has come into being. In him "life the life was the light ,~. ^ n > Ij 4W?y r]V TO (piOQ TOJV aVupWTTUIV' O KOtt TO <pU)Q SV of men. 5 And the light 'tJJ/," Bhineth in darkness; 'was, and the life was the light And the light in. of men. and the dai'kness com> '\ < > /^ Ty (Tkotk^ (paivei, Kai rj OKOTia avTO ov.KaTsKapsy. prehended it not. Mt, 'apprehended not. the darkness appears, and the dariness

^PXV

TTOug TOV^

L'^nnTnTwUh'Vod!
;

>

ii

,,

KM^,v.T
, /

>,-

>

^^

~.

.>

>

6 'EykvETo dvOpioTTog
6 There was a man wiK>se sent from

There was

man

cLTrtaTaXfifvog' Trapa sent from

Qeov,
God,

ovofia
''nai^s

avT(^ ""'IwawTjc:." 7 oliTog f/XOEv Big fiaprvpiav, 'iva fjiapTVa-witness. ^e came for J^^^^that he might __ saTeTamefor'awit! '^ ness, to bear fitness prjtyy Trepi TOV (pdJTOg, iva TTUVTcg TTKTTevaoxnv Si' avTOV.
^^

G^

men^^ thfough
but
jx^as sent

might believe. was not that Light,

him ^'^ness concerning the Ught, that 8 He Q OVK.TjV tKElVOg TO (pCJg,


2yf
,

all

might believe through him.


Trepl

dW
but
.^
.

IVU fiapTVpTjay

TOV

s^gt

ij^g

to bear

witne.ss of that Light. (buirOC, 9 r/fat was the true Ught." Light, which lighteth

9 VV
.

everymanth-tcometh

^ aVOpuilTOV ipXOflSVOV
,

Wm

that he might witness concernine the ^ / , / O tO <pwg TO oXtjUcVOV (fXtJTtQej. TzaVTCt true 'the night tial vrhich lightens evarr
tjjg

lig^t,

.^

Eig
into
,

TOV
the
~

KOffflOV.
world.
> i

tn lU tV
i ,'

Tlf)

into the world. 10 He mar was in the world, and the" world was made Kai O by him, and the world and the
, <

coming
/

In

'the
<

KOOfllf) JJV, wof Id he was,


/
, ,

KOff^Og
world
1 1

knew him

not.

11

He

came unto his own, OVK.tyVlt). and his own received knew not. him not. 12 But as rt -ic\

>

OL through

aVTOV
hiti

11

Hg
To
?

>

Ta.iOLa r]\vtv, KUl Ol.lOtOl his own he came, and his own

>t

t\a

tyeviTO, Kttl O KOCTflog ttVTOV came into being, and the world him

.f
"?

, aVTOV ov.Tro^sAa-

,<

many

as received him, to tliera gave he power

POV
I"

12

''

OCIOl.Ot

n'^oit "tAapOJ/"
received

aVTOV tClOKEV aVTOig tE,Ovaiav


him
he gave
to

'

him

-,v
them
<

received not

but as

many
"

as

auth6rity
npo<ricvirrj~

^ [alj'Ovx'Tes icaij evAoyouvres TrA ; * Slol navTOS LA. koI ev\oyovi'Tei T. (TavTf; avrov T. '' KoTa AovKav TrA ; To Kara tLovicav evayyeKiov KOLTW. 5 'A/utrJK Q[LjTTrA. ' ^ e>'. & ayiov E ; Euayye'Aioi' Kara 'lajaciTjv ('liodvrjv Tr) OLTrAtV ; Kara. liitdvinrjv T. ' earw is tXi That which was iu him was hfe)'LTr. yeyovei/ iv (read one [thing]. " luidvris Tr --. ' e\afiav Tr.

efo) [L]TTr[A].

Trpbs LTTrA.

Ktti

ave4>epeT0 is toi/ oiipavov

T.-

I.

JOHN.
yEvtodai,
toIq
TricTtvovaiv
alg

181

the sons of to bvoiia io becometo tli>mthrtt God, even niauie believe on to those that to be, believe on l^i^ name wore born, 13 avTOv- 13 01 ovK t? a'lfioTwv ov3k Ik OiXiJuarog aapKoi; ovdk not which of blood, nor of. nor the will of the flesh, will of lieoh nor of who not of bloods 'his nor of the will of man, iic OeXrj/jiaTog'di'Spdg dXX iK Oeov iyevv))&i]<Tav. but of God. were born. will of man but of God of 14 Kat 6 \6yog aapK tysvero, Kal iatciji'wasv iv y)fuv, tabernacled among us, and became, And the Word flesh Kal iOEaadixkOa Tr)V.S6^av:avTOV, SoKav wg [.lovoyevovg napd a gloyy as of au only-begotten with his glory, (and we discerned 14 And the Word Wivs Trarpog, -n-Xrjprig xp(7"^C ^at aXrjOdag. 15 'lwdvvrig'\fj.ap-vpei made tiesh, and dwelt witnesses John truth. afaHier, of grace and full among us, (and we beov elirov, held his glory, tiio irepi avTOv, Kal KSKpayev, Mywv, Olrog riv glory as of the only

Beov r'fxvct children of Cod

concr:-ning

him,

and

cried,

saying,

This

wa.")

he of

'O vTTiaw' fiov ipx"l^Vog, comes, He. who after me


TrpCJTog fxQV ?Vbefore

i.j.nrpo(r9iv fxov -preccdonpe ^of *me

whom I said, ykvovew on


'has,

for

bo^'olten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. 15 Joliu bare witness of him,

received, and gr.ice for truth through Jesus through Moses was given the grace and the grace. 17 For the law Xpi(T~ov lykvETO. 18 Qiov ovSeig eu>paKSv^ 7r(&7rore' /o^^jiovo- was given by Moses, ouly- but grace and truth Christ came. 'God 'no -one ^has ''seen aJTauj' time the came by Jesus Clxri.-)t. yEvi'ig 'juog," 6 wv dg tov koXttov tov Tvarpog, EKelvog 1^7]- 18 JSIo man hath seep he de- God at any time the begotlen who is in the bosom of tlie Father, Son,
; ; ;

^KaV' tK TQV.Tv\r]pu)fiaTog.avT'ov i)}xi~ig and cried, say in;,'. This was he of whom I ^ve his fulness And of spake. Ho that cometU 'Ko.vTtg i\dj3oniv, Kai x^piv dvri xapiroj," 17 on .b vofxog aftPr mp is preferred before me for he was For the law grace. all received, and grac, upon before me. 10 And of d\r}9eia 5id 'hjcrov his fulucss have all v/e i) x^pig koi ^id ^Mw(T6wg' id69r), if
16.

mc

he was.

'

y)<Taro.

dared

[him].

19 Kai avrt] And this


<oi

Iffriv
Is

r)

fiaprvpia tov 'loiavvov," which


witness
of John,

the

ore dTTsareiXav^ when ^sent

'lou^aiot

'the

Vews

i^ 'lEpoaoXvfiwv from Jerusalora


2i/

hpEig Kal
priests

and

^Asvifag,"
Levites,

'iva that

ipion'jcfwcnv they might ask

avTov,
him,

Tig

el',

20 Kai
And

-begotten Son, is in the bo^om of the Father, he hath declared him. 19 And this is the record ct John, when the Jews sent prie.sts and LeVites

only

Thou who

from Jerusalem

art thou?

<jj[io\6yiiGSv Kal ovK.ijpvrjeaTO, Kal w/jioXoyijcrev, and he coniesscil and denied not, confessed,

"On

^ovk
',

e//it

^Not ''am

ivw" 6 xpicrrog;
,

'l

the

il CTu'; art thou ?

21 Kat j/pwrijirav avTov, ^Tt oiv 'HXiag they asked him. What Christ.. And they asked him, Elias What then? then? Art thou Elias? "Kai", Xsyet, OvK.dpi' 'O' Trpo^Tjnjg i 'dv ; Kal Andhesaith, lain nut. Art that prophe{ And he .says,. I am not. The prophet art thou ? And Andthouanswered, No.? he
.
.

to ask him, Who art thou? 20 And he confessed, and denied not; but confessed, I am not the Christ. 21 And

^-

d-TTEicniOq, Ov.' ho answered,- Xo.

2i

^EIttov"

^ovi'^^

avrt{j,.Tig
ijfidg'

el]
ri

-'iva

dnb-

They' said' therefore to him,

Who art thou ? that


Xkyeig
:

KpiOiv

cwjxev

Tolg
"E^r/,

Trkixxpaffiv
sent

we may give an Tripl answer to them that


thyvclf?23Ho

22 Then said tliey unto au him. Who art thou ? that


VVhat. Baye(,b

answer we may.gire to those who

us

what

ceCivTOv
thyself?

23

'Eyw
I

derness, Make straight EvdvvaTe rrjv oSbv Kvp'iov' elirev 'Htratag 6 Trpo- the way of the Lord, Make strai^hS the way of [the] Lord, as said Esaias the pro- as said the prophet Esaioi. 24 And thoy 'ot" frjTijg. 24 dTreaTaX^i'svoi r}<fav ^tapi- which were sent were Ik phet. the And those who Jiad been sent I'hari'^ccs. were from among the Phari- of 25 And they asked him, aaiojv. 25 Kal I'lpojTTfaav avrbv Kal '^elirov'^ avrqi, Ti oSv and Baid unto him, ee'ea. And they asked him and said to him, Why tlien Why baptizest thoa then, if thou he not (SaTTTi^iig, ei av ovK.el 6 ^picrrof, ^ovT-e" '"HAiat">" ^ovts^ that Christ, nor Elias, baptizest thou, if thou arc not the Christ, Elias, nor nor neither that prox^hct?

He

said,

^wi'j) [am] a voice

^oiovTog
crying

sayest thou Hbput;, sent us. t.b'ouof said, 1 iv Ipriixt}),

Ty

am tlie voice

of

in

the wilderness, one crying in the wil-

KaQwg

Kai

twv

'laidtTjs Tr.
Tr.
*

<3od
eijULi

'

LTTrA.
ical T.
e

r P OTl for GLTTrA. <? Moji/tre'ujs LTTr.\W. 6 (rearf [the]) tr. "Ceo? '' -(- Trpo; crtrbi/ to hinj LTrA. " AeveiVas tTta. 'Itadvov Tv. eyw oufc y Tt ovv', 'HKeiaq el ; T ri our ov 'HAia? el; Tr crv ovv rC ; 'HXc'a9 el A.
>

LTT.A.

el-n-av LTTrA. oui/ L. ovSe LTliA. f'HAecasT.

ot (jgacZ [those wlioj) TTrA.

<

tlnav

'

'^^^^^
26

IQANNH2.
=^

1-

John

an|wered
:
.

^ irpo(pr]rrjQ
prophet?

;,
^^

26

'

tizt'"with''wft'er

but '^e

kiTiKpiOr] avTOiQ 6 s'lcjdvvTfg" ^Answered Hhem ^^^^^


^

Xlywv,
B&jiag,

'Eyttf
I.

Jhcre standeth one a-

^aTTTi^U) kv vSuTl'

,i.

baptize iSt'^' 27 heit"fs^ after me ovK-oWare' 27 ^aVtOC SOTtv" '6" OTTlffO) U.OV ipXQUiVOC. ^^OQ preferred before me ^ ^now not -who he it is" after me -cornea, who whose shoe s latchet T _ , , , am not worthy to un- 'iflTTpoaBtV flOV ytyOVEV" OV "tytU." OVK eifll.A d^tOQ^'lva loose. 28 These things ^precedence 'of *me 'has, of whom ^not 'am worthy that I were done in Beth_ -, ^

Vn"vv

ll^WV 'tVrJJ/cev" jUffOf.Mi" with water; but in [the] midst of you stands [one]

OV ijUSlf whom ye

who coming

; '

_^

abara beyond Jordan, Avauj aVTOV TOV IfXaVTa TOV VTTOCrjfiaTOQ. where Johjo was bap- I should loose of him the thong of the sandal.
jBethabara

,-,,
took place

_,^,

28 TaVTa
These

tV

thing-s in

PB/j0a^apa" iyevsro Tripav tov 'lopSdvov, oirov


across

the ^

Jordan,

where 'was

'qv i '''lu)dv~ 'John

baptizing.

Jo^n

^th J^etS

ing unto saith.Kehold the

com^ him, and

^9
f

T?) STTavOlOV fiXsTTEl 6 'iwaVV/Jc" -"sees 'John ^^ ''^ morrow


,
.

TOV

'lr,<TOVV Jesus
of God,
x
/-.

BpXOfXfVOV
coming

of God, which taketh away the sin of the

Lamb ttOOC aVTOV, Kal XsyH, *


'

'"
^-j^j/

'

'''''

^'^"'

&&yi,

t> v u Behold ^.v the

'Ide

duVOC TOV
i.

9sOV, 6
j

world.

30 This
a

is

he

duapTiaV
^'"^
.
,

me'cZeth

f^an

^^^

,TOV KOOflOV. ^^^^ ^"'""l,

t Lamb 30 O^tOQ

. who m takes aw.iy


,

aiOuJV "

IffTlV
it is

^TTipi"

OV

lyilt
I

.^^e^
,

concerning

whom

which is preferred be- cIttqv, 'Orriau} jxov ipxiTOL dvijp, og tiiTrpoaOsv flOV ykyovEv, fore me: for he was After said, me comes a man, who "precedence 'of *me 'haa, before me. St And I ,t . < ^ ,< , , , knew -him not: but OTL TTpiorOQ fXOV i]V. 31 (Crtyw OVK-^OflV avTOV' d\\ iva that he should be made because before knew not And I me he was. him; but that
,

-,

'

manifest

to

Israel,

therefore
bajiliziiig

am

come
,,5,

,,
(paViQW^J^
he might be manifested
Tti>

\apar]\, Cia.TOVTO
to Israel,
'

with water,

therefore
'

32Aiid John bare. recor.i.s^uying, isawthe spirit descending from heaven like a dove, and
it

voa-Ti fjciTn (^o)v. water baptizing.

ta n TlAUuV came
'

iyiO
I
,1

>,. EV 'r^"
-With
'
'

on Kui 31 rr ffiapTvpriGev
And
~

"

r'f

I(x)avvr]Q" Aeywj',-

"/-.

Ort
,

abode

upon him.
I

TBUea/xai
-

/^<

TO TTv^vfiu Karapaiuov "wffei


'

>

'bor$ 'witness ' /d ~

'John
>u

Baying,
\

irspiorepav
a dove
'

t<^

tb,

Ov-

33 And I knew him not: but he that sent mo to baptize with Water, the same said

have beheld the


>

Spirit'
'
''

descending
'

as
>
'

pClVOV, Kai and ven,

t^dVBV it

"

abode upon
A* aie

:TCs^)t^sce^heSpU
irit

'^V

TTs/^^ac
sent

descending, and re- he who

tizeth with the

^amcU^he" which blp! Holy


the Son of God.
"'

OV

"iSyQ

>\\ 00 UVTOV. CO KayuJ OVK.yCElV OVTOV him. And I knew not him but l^cnrHK^v EV vSaTi, EKelvoe ixoi tlirtv, 'Erp' with water, he tome said. to baptize Upon TO TTVEVfXa Kara(3a7vOV /cat ^EVOV. ett'
'
'

ETT

out of hea>

'

aW

whom
{''"'' ""^'

thoU shalt see th6


OSJ'O^' "^

Spirit

descending

and

abiding

on

S^rLe^tc^oV^at
this
is

^^"^
^^ '*

f^aTTTi^V
"^"^
baptizes

Ey
with [the]

TTVEVfiari
^Spirit

dyy.
'Uoly.

34 Kayco kwpaKa,
And
.

have seen,

Kal fiEnapTvpr]Ka on otroQ Ecrrif 6 vwg and have borne witness that this is the Son

tov'Geov.
of God.

^0" ''Iwawjj'g," /cat tV ei(TTr]KH 35 Ag.iin the ner 'John, again was ^standing On the morrow and 'of day after John stood, ~ ^ ~ 'V ^ nr> oa and two of his disci- Twv.fxam)TU)v.avTOv cvo. du Kai ijj.p\E^jaq T(i) Itjaov irepiTraple-; 36 and looking 'two. And looking at Jesus 'his ''disciples \valk. ~ ^ ~ ^ -_ _-. upou Jesus as he walkx.^ O aflVOQ TOVVEOV". 37 'Kat" J/ZCOl^ffai/ Ic ed, he saith. Behold TOVVTl, AEyEl, of God the Larab of God And ''heard ing, he says, Behold the Lamb

35 Ty ETTavpiov ttoKiv
,

>

'

'

<

,,;

pies

and they followed Je-

hoan^ h\mspeak" ^UVTOV ^him

01

dvo jxaOyjTaV^
'disciples

XaXovVTOQy Kdl
speaking,

rjKoXovOtjaaV
followed

T(^

'the '-two

Oapdpa K BrjOavia Bethany GLTTfAW. < vnip ltti-a. (read te sees) GLXxrAW.
;

^ ' (XT^Kei TtrA. Se but TTrA. avTos (rTti/ G[L]TTrA. ' S'looarr)? Tr. [6] TrA. " P Bij" -t- eyoj rT[Tr]A. eyu) [L]TTrA. '6s i/xTrpocrOev /aov Yeyoi/ei/ G[L]TTrA. ' 'loidvr)^ Tr. > ^- o 'l(odvirti<: 1 -f O LTTr[A].

"

r<Z

lttiTa].

"

LTrA.

y
j

-|-

(cal T.

* oi

fo alpoiip jr)v aixapTtav 6uo ixa6r)Tai. avroii T.

TOV Koa/xov-]

who

m OLTTrA'w.
siii

'

lakes

away

the

of the world l.

I.

JO
38
(7rpa(pB}Q ^cV-^ o'lrjaovg, "Jesus, ^HiiTiug 'turned 'but,

N".

183

'

'Jr](Tov. Jesus.

39 Then Jesus Koi Oeacrcifievog avTOvg BUS. turned, aud saw them beheld them and following, and saith
;

unto them, What sefk ye ? They said unto him, Rabbi, (which is aiiTtp, "-'PafSfSi,'' o Xkyerai ^kpurjvivofit^'ov^^ SidacFKaXe, ttov to sa.y, being interpreted. Master,) where Teacher, where being interpreted to liirj, which is to say Rabbi, dwelle.st thou ? 30 He 40 A'tyii avrolg, 'Epx^^rde Kal si'cfre." ''^HX0oj/" saith unto them, Come /j).'E(C; They went and see. They came and see. abidestthou? He says to them, '. Come.
O'l.Si a!{o\ov6ovvTag, \tyei avroig, 39 Tt ^?;re7r What seek ye? And they following, says, to them,

'{Zttov" said

^fcai

'';5oj/"

and
'that.

saw

ttow jUfi'ff. where he abides

Kai iraQ
;

and

with

avT<^ tftHvav him they abode

tKtivjjV

deKUTT]. ojg ["The] "'hour 'now was about [the] tenth.


'^i"

wpa

Tjv

41
-

6 a5i\<pdg "^ifnovog YlkvQov ilg sk


"the "'brother
''of

twv Svo twv CLKOvaavTiuv


the

and saw where he TTjvrijj.Bpai' dwelt, and abode witli him that day for it "day was about the teuth ^Hv'" 'AvSpiag hour. 40 One of the two which heard John 'Was 'Ajidrew speak, and lollowcfd
:

him, was Andrew, Si-

^Simou
John,

^Peter

one of

two

who

heard

mon
41

brother Simon, saith unto him, have found the oiirog 7rpu)Tog'^ tov ddi\<pvv tovaciov JH/xiuvay Kal Xeyei Jlcssias, which is, be" Simon, ing iut^preted, the and says 'he "first 'brother' ''his 'own Clirist. 42 And he avvqj, Evpi)Kaf.itv tov /(6(T(T(av, o tariv uf9spiu7]V(vniii(vov brought him to Jesus.' to him, Wa have found the which is beibg interpreted Messias, Aud when Jesus be.

Trapd
from

"'iwai^j-'oi',"
.

[this]

Kal dKokov9i]aavT<ov avTip. 42 EvpicTKd own and ^Finds 'followed him. and

He

Peter's brother. fir-t findeth his

We

^6'
the

^pioToc;' Christ.

43
.-

''/cat"

yyaysv
he led

avrbv
l)ini"'

Trpog
to

rdv 'hjuovv.
Jesus.

And

held hicu, hesaid, Thou art Simon the son of

i/i/3Afi^nr(,-/^t"

And looking

at

avT(fi 6 'h}<rovg Jesus him

elTrsv,
said,'

Hv
Thou

el ^Ificov 6 art Simon the

v'log

son

thou shalt ba called Cephas, which is by interpretation, stone. 43 The day fol:

Jona

"'Iwi'a'" Gv K\i)Q)]arj Ki^cpag, o tpjxip'aveTai of Jonas; thou shall be called Cephas, which is interpreted

UtTpog.
Stone.

lowing Jesus would go forth into Galilee, and


findeth
Ph^iip.

and

44 Ty
*

iTTavpioy On the morrow


and

'i]Q't\')](J(.v

^6'h)aovg^\ l^iKQnv
'Jesus

slg
into

"desired

to go forth

t)]v saith unto him, Follow me.

rciXiXniuV Kal evpidKei ^iXnnrov koI XsyEi avr<^^, 'AkoXovQei


Galilee,

he finds
'Philip

Philip

anci

says

to him,

Follow
Ttjg the

yuot.

45 ^Hv.dt u'PiXnnrog cnrb


>Jow"was
and
Peter.

'BijOcaiSd,
Bethsaida,

Ik
of

TroXswg
city
44 Now Philip was of Bothsaida, the city of

me.
of Auilrcw
K'li

from
Eufu'd/cft "Finds
,

'Avcoiov Kal risrpov.


'

46

fpiXnnrog Tdv'Na9aj'a))X
'Philip

and Peter._ Kal 45 Philip findeth Nathanael, and and snys to him, [Him] whom '"wrote ^of > in 'Moses the law and unto him, We saith, haVe 0/ TTpocpriTai, vp}]Kapiv, 'lijcrovv ^rov" v'lov TOv'\wGi)(p tov found him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, we lia^ve. found, Jesus the son .of Joseph who

Hathanael

Andrew

Xiyti ahrtp,

"Oj/

typaiptv "Mwcr/Jg" iv to)

v6f.i(^

the prophets, did write,

d-rrb
[is]

yNfl^apfr."
Nazareth.

47 "Kat" dir^v avTi^ 'NaOayarjX,


*

Nathanacl said unto <PiXt7nrog, him. Can there any good thing come out 'Philip, of Nazareth? Philip "Epxnv Kal 'iSe. 48 EJdev ^o^^'lrjijovg Tdv'i>!a9ava))Xipx''>nevov saith unto him, Come aud see. 47Josussaw Come aud see. Nathanael "Saw 'Jesus coming Nathanael coming to TrpogaiiTOVjKalXEyii Trfpi avTOV, "iSe dXi]9u)g '^^'lapdijX- him, and saith of him, lo him, and says concerning him, Behold truly an Israel- Behold an Israelite iudee'd, in whom is no

from

And

"said

^to ''him

'Natlianael,"^

'E/c Out of

Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. 46 And

^NaZ^apfr" ^vvarai ri
Nazareth can

eh'ai any good thing he?

dyaOov

','

Asysi aiiTi^
"Says
''to

"him

iTr,g,"
ite,

iv

<fi

cuXog
giiile

ovK.'tariv.
is

49 Akyu avr(^ 'Na9avaT]X,


"Says
^to

in ti-hom
jti

not.

"him

'Nathanacl,

48 'Nathanael saithunto him. Whence


guile
!

UoBev
.Whence

yivwcFKftg;
thou
?

me knowest
T.
''

'A7reKpi9r} ^'^o^^'hjffovg Kal "Answered 'Jesus and

drnv
said

knowest thou me? JeavT(^), sus answered aud said to him. unto him, Before that
LTiA. S o^ecrOe }'& ' elSav LTTrA. fie
'
'

<^

6e

shall sec TTrA. OLTTi-AW.

elrrav LTTrA. ^ ri\9av TTr A..


-^-

^'Pap^etT.
>

^ fj.eOepixrfvevofJt.ei'Oi'

oui'

therefore
'

[LjTl'rA.
<>

>^

" 'Iwdvov Tr. P npcoTOv LTrA. 6 GLTTrAW.; [6eJ and L. ' M Ka'i [LJrTiA. < 'loidvov of John LTr Se and GTTrAW. 'loodvuov TA. 6 Mwiicrijs ^ 4- o 'Iijcrous Jesus (finds) LTfr^w. 'lijo-oCs {read he desired) GLTTr'AW. ' Toz/ LT[Tr]. V Na^ape'e EGW. ^ Kal T. + 6 LTrA. ^ L'rrA'.v. a " 'IcrparjXei-njs TTr. il* LIT. AW. 6 GLTTrAW. *

'^

184
fhilip
called
thee,
,

I i2

ANNH

S.

1,

II

jj^^ ^q^
*h"t
(Tf.
*^''^'

jj-

49 N.ithauii'el answered
Babbt*'thou''a.rt the Son of God thou art the King of Israel, 50 Jesus ans\vered and said unto him, Because I said unto thee, I saw thee under the fig tree,
;

t^^^tKeJ.lT'wth&l ^^^'"^ (Uoi'


-^

"^^'^'^

(!?i'\nnrov (piDinjcai, tvra vtto ti)v avKr]V. ^called, [thou] being under the fig-tree, '^^"'P

50

^'^'^

'ATTEKpiOq^ "Answered

N9araj)\
'Nathanael
ffV
'fZ-

'/Cai

XlySl" eauTi^,^' '''Pa/3j8i.|


'

and
6
..

says

to him.

Eabbi,
'iffpajyX.
of IsriiuL

^y
jj^
,

51 AneiCpiOr)
-Answered
,

el 6 VIOQ a^t the Son -n

TOU BeOVf
of God,
_>
,

/3a(JlXi)(,'"

TOU

thou
-

art the
,

King
<(

lT]<TOVg
'Jesus ~

KOI elTTiV avT(^,

Ozi tllTOV OOl, "EtJoV

believest thou? thou Shalt seegreater things

<T

VirOKClTlO
under
,

fr]Q
the
>

than these, al And ha p ^ Tr ^OXySL." salthuntohim. Verily, O'Z Koi verily, I say unto you, thou shalt sec. And Hereafter ye shall sec > i < ' < > i CITT MpTl O'spBaUe TOV OVpavOV aViifjyora, Kai TOVQ heaven open, and the angels of God ascendHenceforth ye shall see the heaven opened, aud the /-v~ n ' ing and descending ~ ,3 o upon the Son of man. y^Mvg TOV Uwv avapaivovrag Kai KarapaivoVTaq iiri of God gels ascending and descending on
, , ' ,
i

thee

and said to him, Because I said to thee, I saw " / , / > (TVKYjQ, TTKTTeVHg ] flEl^UJ TOVTWV fig-tree, believest thou? Greater things than these ~ . ^ > < ^ / ^ Ayl avrt(), AjU/)v aflljv Aya> VfXlV, he says to him. Verily , Terily I say to you,
< >

>

ii

/-i

ay
>

<

an l^^ rov
the
,

II.

And the third day v'lOV TOV avOpWTTOV.


gon

there was a marriage in Cana of G.alilee and the mother of JeSUR was there: 2 and

^ Kai JJ
t/<

toth Jesus was

and

his the marriage.

called, disciples, to

Tr)g I

_..., aAlKaiaQ'
,<>,
of Galilee,

"ry And on the

of man. ~
<

^
/<if'

^11^'

Ty Tpiry"
'third
>

yafXOQ
- >,

tytVTO
,

v,-

~ii

S.V

}i.av<f.'\

"day

a marriage took place

And

~ ^ t KUI 7]V >/ fi1}Tr]p TOV \l)(JOV IK1. and'was'fhe -mol-hur ^of Jesus there.
>

Cana -i\'/-i>-.
in
eKArjfftJ.Cf
,

they wanted ItjaOVQ wine,-the mother of Kai Jesas Eaith 'unto him, ''also'Jesus They have no w'inc. n ' 4.Iesu3saithuntoher, ^V(rTipt](jaVTOQ being deficient Woman, what have I
<

when

>'<

KUI 01 fiam]TaiXWTOV and his disciples


OIVOV^^ \tyH 1) fll}Tl]p of wine 'says 'the ^mother
ii

ri

i>~
'

>

tlQ
to

TOV yafXOV.
the
~
>

And^was 'invited f _ 3 Kai

marriage.
<
,

And
>
.

>'

'

'

TOV

~ i IrjffOV

TTpOQ ttVTOV,
to

^of

Vesus

him,

hour ifn'^oJ'VI/cZ'e' 5 His mother saithunsoev'lVh^Taith^nto'


you, do it. 6

"Olvov ovK.lxovaiv:^
"Wine
<^0'''

4 'Aiy avT-g^b 'inaovg,


"Says
^to 'her
'Jesus,

they have not.

ifiol What to me

Ti

Kai and

7<'vai

And there

to thee,

woman?
servants.

i]Kn y.wpa.fiov. not yot is come mine hour.

ouTTW

5 Aiyei
^Says

tjMi'irrjp.aiTOV 'his "mother

w^rpots
after the

of ^''^stdnl'' of the purifying of the

^"'^ dicucovoig,
' ^^^

manner

Xtyy "O.Ti cLV vfuv, TToiriTaTe. 6 ^Haav Whatever lie.may say to you, do. "There ^were

Jews, containing two


or three firkins apiece. 7 Jfesus saith unto

^^
.

^^^i
,

^v^piai
,
,

*'^" there -"water-vessels

,,

"

13^4^ -"of 'stone

Xi0ivai"

'i^
1

'(cf
..

mvai"
'

KUTU

TOV KttQapun.

'six

istanding

, according i ^t to the

{ thp brim. 8 And he u^ 3^^ ^^jj^^ 'Jesus, Fill the water-vessels with water, ^aith unto them. Draw ^ , >. i out now, and bear unto Kai tytfiiaav avTug Ewg dv(i). 8 Kai Xsyei aiiTOiq, 'Avthe governor of the ^^^ they fiUed thqm unto [the] brim. A.nd he says to them. Draw _ And they bare feast. _ ^ ^_ it. 9 When the ruler TMI<XJUT(.VVV Kai (ptpETi. T({> ap\lTplK\lV(^. "Kai" IjViyKaV. of the feast had tasted quj hq^ and carry to the master of the feast. And they carried [it]. the water that was . ... ^> ,/

piajiov Twi/ 'lovCaiwv^, \uipovaai civa ^iSTp7]j-ng 6vo r) Tptigt '^'^^'^' ^holding *^^ 'each metreta: two or three. potrwith wIter^An^d^<=^'''"^ ^* they filled them up to J Xtyei avTolg 6 'Irjaovg, rsfiiaare Tag vSpiag voaTog.

"^

-"^

'

>

made
(but

wine, and knew_


it

(iJg.Ci

lyivaaro O
, ,

apxiTplKAlVOg
,

TO VCUJp
water

ol,l>OV

yeyevl]'that -had
,

not whence
the
,

wasi

servants . , .p. >/^ which diow the water UiVOV, Kac OVK.yoei TTOOtV tCTTlV Ol.Ot CLCIKOVOI yCSlCaV 01 knew ;) the govarnor hjecome, and knew not whence it is, (but the servants knew who of the feast called the ,/ ., apXlTp^KKjiVOg 10 and T]VTAr]KOTSg TO VCwp' (pUlVEi TOV VV/XiplOV bridegroom, 8aii-h unto him. Every the w^ter,) had drawn "calls 'the 'trid'egroom 'the "master ^of 'the ^f east jnan- at the beginning \i t avapitJTTog irpwTov tov koKov olvov doth 3et< forth good 10 i^<^i \iysi avT<{t, and says to him. Every man first the wine; and when men good wine,

But when "had Itas ted

'the "master =of 'the ^f east the

,5.,-,,

*wine

>"t.j ~> ir\'\\''~-rt~"n Hag

>-,/

.-.
-

"^ f e -f avTcp 'him fl,]TTrA. K Kai XeVfl [L]TTrA. avTW LTTrA. 'Pafi^ei T. m '' ' oi/nj GLTTrAW. ^' + otl that LTTrA. 6 ^acriKtVi tl L , /SacrtAevs el TTrA. ' " l^ava ELTTr. P 0l^'0^ OVK ei\ov, OTt crvptTeXeudr) apTL LTTrA. TpiTTf r/jtiepa TrA. rfi 6 olvo^ Toil yd/iov. elra wine they had not, for the wine of the marriage feast was finished. ' + Kai and '(Jesus) [lJtja. * Kif)i.v<u Iheii T. 1 oTi'o? OVK ea-Tiv wiiie there is not t. oi 6e and they (carried) ttfa. ' Kci/xefai placed aj'ttr 'Iotiauuc ttta. iSfiiai, LiirA. ,
.

II.

J'OHN.
and

185
.

sets on,

when tbcy may have drunk


the

freely

then

the

inferior

^^ ^^^^^

-^^^^^ ]j.gpt jj^^

(TV

TirnpmUQ rbv.KaXbv olvOV


hast kept

SU^Q dpri.

thou
yr?r"
jcrtt

good

wine until now.

11 ta^r/JV inoiimv f^Tj,^' beginning"^ 'did


This
miracles did Jesus in

<rf}tiuujv 'beginning 'of Hhe 'signs

apxw rwv

o'lvfrovg Iv
Jesus

i<pavkpwGiv riiiv.So^av.avTOVmanifested
'his 'disciples.

of m Cana ^^^^^ ^^^ j^^j^ ^^;^^._ Kui iniaTZvaav Eig avrbv pies bcUeved on him.
(xalilee,
.

-Kav^'

rfjg

raXCKalag,

STifelted^forth

Ms

and

his erlory

and

^believed

*on

'him

oX.}iaQqTaLavTOV,

12 Mera tovto
Aftfer

KaTsfS?]
he went

elg ^Ka7rfpvao?'^/i,"
to

avTog Kai
he

j)

this

down

Capernaum,

and and
ig After this to

pLj'iTTjp.avrov Kai oi.d5X(/)oi ^avroV^ Kai oi.jia9nTai.avrbv, Kal


his

mother

and

'brethren

'his

and

his disciples,"

tKH inHvav ov TToAXde


there they abode not

Vl^^paedays.

13 Kal tyyvg

ijv

to -rracxa

many

rwv
of the

'lovhaii^v, ;cm av't^r] slg Jews, and?went 'up'to

And near was the passorer ^^^^ to Capcrflaum, 'UpoaoXv^ia d'l7](yovQ. 14 Kai ^^-j^jS^br.'t'hrTn^and
'Jerusalem^
'Jcsus.^
-^''|

^snt

his disciples: and'they

rovg TTioXovvrag (36ag Kai yrpo^ara Kai continued there not sheep oien and sold '> Jie found in the temple those who ^e'tv^pSToTcr was at irwKJTEodc. Kai tvvc KSpuariffrag KaOnutvovg' 15 Kai ttoit]- Uand, and Jesus went sitting; mo^Cy-changers Wes; and the -^, ^^--f J^oC/TfhTtlmpla ^ tK row those that sold oiea car (bpAyEXXiov Ik avoivioDV Trdvrag t^^j3cAev 'he 'droTe ^out from tho and sheep and doves, made cords aU a scourge of '"**^ ^^"^ changers of ~ ,-, r,' \ ^ o lepOV, Ta.TS TTpopara Kai TOVg poag. Kai TOJP KOAAVptXTTWV money sitting 15 and
etpev
iv

rw Upai

-,
'

'~
>'

scourge ot small cords, Tpairtc,ag aviarpt^Jiv. I o icat he drove them all out tt,txiv And of the temple, and the overthrew. tables fee poured out the and thev coin ~ sheep, and the oxen * 4 ^ ~ , N T Toig Tag irepiffrepag ttuXovchv, eIttev, Apaze Tavra and poured out the Take these things ch-inger.;' money, and be said, 'sold to those who 'the ^doves ' > overthrew thet:ibles; \ -n T ^ t ( iVTEVUeV /jl1].7r0lSir,T0V oIkOV TOV.TraTpog.JJlOV OiKOV tfl- le and said unto them ahouscofmer- that sold doves, Taka hence; of my father house 'make not the ,/ ' ~ these, things hence: -1 >T-i n "S>>'i n ye- make not my Father's KOptOV. 17 E/lvr;(Ty;j(Taj/.*<j'V Ol.fiai)r]Tai.a.VT0V OTI 'his 'ilisciplos that , writ- house anhbuseofmerchandiso. And ^remembered

temple, both th'. ,,

...'I, '^TO KBpfia^'


y \

sheep

.1 Kai rag

and" the

oxen:

and of the

money-changers when he had made a


(

'V

-in

'

'

ypafifisvov ioT'iv,
ten
it is,

'O The

l^Xog Tod.oiKov.aov
zeal

of thine house

^KaTtipaykv^'' has eaten 'up

fxe.

f^^^^l^' reLfmbered
that
it

'me.

was written,

18 'A7rSKpier]aav
'Answered
arifxeiov
sign.
"o"

oiv
ijiiiv

ol

'UvSaloi Kai
'Jews

therefore 'the

^dirov'' avT,^, and said to him,


ttoieIc;

Ti hatw-en^'me'"'up What jg xhcn' answered the


est thou

deiKVveig
shewest thou
said

oti

TavTO

19

^'A-jreKpiOi]

tons that these things thou doest?


to them,
^

'Answered
'ip"
in

^fm'^AVhpt signshc'^" unto us see''VYgj"'''^'

'lr](Tovg Kai 'Jesus and

diTEV avrolg, AvaOTS Tov.vabv.TovTov, Kai


Destroy
"^lid
this temple,
.

j?^, *^^*

Tpimv iffi'tgaig
three

iyepS>
'i^

dvrov. 20 ^EIttov"
up
it.

ovv

aafwerelTand said unoi'IovcaHoi, to them. Destroy this


^
^

and

days

I will raise

^Tff(TaprtKOVra" Kai Forty and

six
,

^ayf /'wm^-ai?e i*t^p ITEmV^t^KoBop.i'ldlf O.Vabg.OiTOg, Kai 20 Then said the Jowa, and Forty and six years this temple, years was building

'therefore 'the

'Jews,

av tv Tpicnv
thou in
/rept
N

three

7)p.spaig iyepug wilt rai.se up days


~
~
,

avTov
it?
,

',

21 EKdvog.oi tX^yav
But he
spoke
.

TOO vaov Tov.ffiojiaTog.avTov.

concerning the
Ul} raised

temple

'

SK up from among

VEKpwV tp.vq6Vt)aaV
[the] dead

~>'/i

of his body.

^remembered

'^'^^ temple la '''^ building sndwiitthoa rear it up in thjve <iays ? 21 But he spake -^^ .' T 22 ore ovv vy^p- of the temple oi his When therefore he was body. 22 When therufore he was risen from Ol-fiaUljrai.aVTOV oti the dead, his disciples that remembered that he 'his -disciples
,

^^

"\

'

./-,v.~t'

^
*

avTOv [L]Tr[Aj.

Tore [L]T[TrA].
c TO.

Karai^ayiTai will eat

up

a Ka(j)apvaoviJ. LTTrAW. ' Kava ELTTr. ttji' LTTrA. , ^ Bi and [lIttia. Kcpfiara the co^ns TrA. + [Kai] and l. ' [ei/J Tr. '' g slnav LTTiA. 6 LTTrAW. OLTT: AW.
3" '^

^ Teo-crepaKOJ'Ta TTrA,

'

oiKO&oiJ.yj&Yi T.

'

^^^
I
^'^^^

QA NN H
*
'"<^''

r.
believed

n, HI.
the
scripture

lieved

the

scripture,

'^^

"*''

^'^''^

*"<
,

and the

and the word which Xoyqj "w" 6 'IwCTOWC. 'elTTSV ^ oi.i.o had oa,.u. Jesus iuu said. \ } ^Qj.j which 9, ^had Spoken 'Jesus.
'
.

-;

23

Now

w
,

^"^ 'Qf-5<

f)v

iv

in Jera^^iT^at^Ihe paasover, in the feast

But when he was in


\'"'':'^

'IspocroXviiwic, Jerusalem

iv Tl^ TTauxa,
at

PJ/"

Ty
the
his

the

passover,

at

kopry, TToXXol STriffrevaav elg To.ovoua.avfov, OeojpouvTBc


TCL (Trjfieia (1 STTOlH. 24 gign, which he was doing.
,
, ,,

fcTme^'wherthly
saw the miracles which
he did 24 But Jesus did not commit himself unto thorn, because he knew all man, 2o and needed not that any should testify of man for he knew what was in man.
:

*r''

T^f
,

"^
,

aVTOC.Sf
^

,^^"'^-f',
'o"
>
/

beUingTravroQ,
all
,

avTOv

"^tavTOv' avToT^,
himself

,
,

cia

?.>>', TO.avTOv.yn'wcjKHv
his
*
,

But ^himself

'Jr]ffOVQ OVK.tTTIffrevev 'Jesus did not trust

25 Kal
and avdpU}man
'

to them, because, of
i

knowing
-

[men],
'tOv'^

OTl
that

OV XpEiaV flX^V iva TIQ fiapTVprjan


='no

TTEpi

TTOV avroQ.yap tyivoiCKiv


for he

,,,.
''need

'ho -had that

any should
ri

't>->/-.' r)v sv apypiOTrqj.


r(f>

testify concerning

knew
a

what was
of

in

man.
Nioodemus

^Hv.06

avQpbJTTQQ K tCjv

(i>apiaai(.ov, 'NtKoSrjjiog
Pharisees,

But there was

man

the

ovofia 'name

ruler, of the Jews: ~ ^ ^ ' ri fs. 2 the same came to Avt)ag oioa(TKa\og' ovoig yap ^ravra to. arffieXa cvvfirar Jesus by night, and hast come for no one these a teacher, signs is able said uuto him, Rabbi, ~ ^ ,, c> i n OV TTOlEig iaV.jJ.t} y ueog fKT aVTOV. S ATTEKpiUt] we know that thou art TtOlUV d a teacher come from to do which thou doost uukss ^be 'God with him. "Answered God for no man can _<ii'x ~ ~ > , >< /, ri AjX^V n/MiJV ASyU) ffOl, eaV-fllj o" h]iJOVg Kai ElTTSV aVT(ft, do these mir.acles tbat thou diiest, except God said Verily verily 'Jesus and to him, I say to thee. Unless be with him. 3 Jesus _. \ n~ " o 'J' '^'-s^> o fEVl^J}Uy aVlxJtfSV, OV.0VVa.Tai lOSCV njV jiaGlKHaV TOV answered and said un1"'C anew, ho cannot to hiui. Verily, verily, anyone be born see the kingdom
>.

dvT<^, apx*^v Tciv'Iovdaiwv 2 oirog 7]\9sv Trpog Wbv 'h]Govv^^ Jews ho came to | Jesus " ''^''' ^ "^^ III There was a '^"' man of the Pharisees, vVKtOg, Kal elTTeV auT({), '"P/3/3l," o'lSafiET on CtTTO OeoV tXr)named Nicodemus, a by night, and -said to him, R.abbi,' we know that from God thoa
> \ \

,.

-,,

,t</n,
\

,,

>t

>

>i

'

i man 'be born he cannot see the king-

^S!

^^oD.
of God.

4 Ayt TTpOQ aVTOV


''Says

^to

*him
'old

^6" NtKO^J/jMOC, 'Nicodemus,

Hw^
How
f('c

6vvaTai dvcan
the

derausa?tifunto^im; How can a man be


c.n"heTnterthelecond time into his mother's womb, and be born?

^pwTOC yivvrfBnvaL ysp(ov


^^^
^^ boyn

wi/j
'being
?

fxi)

SvvaTai
can he

rr/v icoiXiav

into

womb
d'AirB'
"An-

ri'ig-firjTpdg.avrov SEVTSpov ilaEXOelv Kal yevvrjOfjvai; a second time enter and' be born? of his mother
ii^p[0j^

^6" 'I'/jfTOVg, .'Ajll)v a/{?)v Xeyw (TOl, Tig ySVVTjOy iai>,f.iri Verily verily I say to thee, Unless anyone be born 'Jesus, tUj TerUy l^Ba^'\into swered thee, Except a man |^ vdaTog kal TTVtvfxaTog ov.dvvaTai eiVeXOf a' Big Trjv (iauiktiav

oAhe Spil itTe^cannot


IS

'"^^'^^

^^^

* ^^'^''

^^ cannot
ha.s

enter
tfC

into tho

kingdom
flesh
is
,

enterintothekingdom ^tOV 0eoU." of God. 6 That which '^f Qod.


born of the
;

6 TO
1

^yEySWr}flSVOv"
been boril
11

flesh is

That which
>

of
~

vfjg (TapKOg the flesh


/

cdp^ kartV'
~
,

and that wKich KUl tK TOV TTVEVfiarog Trvtv/xu tOTlV, TO "ysyevvrJl-ieVOV is horn of the Spirit is of the Spirit has been born spirit is. ^nd that wffloh Bpirit. 7 Marvel not , .v , > that I said unto thee, 7 fllJ-UaVfiaffyg OTl fJlTOV (TOl, A8t W|l/af yBV}n]6)IVai Ye n^ustbebnrn again. Do not wonder that I said to thee, It is needful for you to bo born 8 The wind bloweth _ , ^,, ^ n where it listeth, and aVUjUeV. O TO TTVSVfia OTTOV VEAEl TTVEl, Kttl TljV.^Mt^jV.aVrOV thou he.arest the sound The wind -where 'it *wills 'blow.n, and i^souud anew. thereof, but canst not ~ " /, '/1 r T^ >\->ii H <ii aKOVHg, 'aAA " ovK.Oioag ttoUeV fpxETUL Kar TTOV vwayu' tell whence it Cometh, and whither it goeth: thou hearest, knowest not whence it comes and whore it goes: but
.lesh
, \
,
,

>

,!

>

60

is

every one that


of

is

born
9

the

Spirit.

OUrwg
"

r/

'

-.

<

tCfTlV
is

TTttg

yEyEWtJUiVOg IK TOV TTVEVjiaTOg. c\ AtTE9 k


has been born
pf
the
Spirit.

'

>

'

Nicodemus answered

thus

everyone that

-An-

"

avTOi' LTTrA.
TO. crrfixela
tilt;

aiiToh QLTTrAW. TOl? GLTTrA. LTr. LTTrA. TOV 'Pa^fiei. auTOC him GLTTrA W. 6 OLT[Ti a]W. 6 LTTrAW. y 6 LTTrA.
" 61*
->r
,

P \_h'\

L.

"

T.

Tr.

'

TUiV

6 LTTrA. " Svvarat ravTCk Ovpaviiv Of


<)

heavens.

T.

*>

yyevriiJ.ePov E.

"

dAAa

Xr.

if

or

li.

KpiOn TsiKuSniiOc Kai (iTriv avrw, YluJc Cvvarai "


i iwcred

ravra

IT,.-J 'jNicodrmus

'

J aud

said

-J

to him,

^,

.r How

cau

^i, these ^uthings

aOaii

10 'AwtKoiOyi
'

^6" 'liiaoVc
Mesus.
'
,

Kai
aud

dTvev avrw,
said
to him,
'

^Axswered
teacher
ClflilV verily

saui unto lum, cau those thiims Jesus nnswi li r) uutohim Su 1 o ""dsuidrii'i&tor ol j\it thou *i J>Thou art the ,.] ^-,.,, V,. ,.,,.. ,,,\. laci, anu Kijowor^i, iiol

jf.te' 1

7"'^
^,,,9

oe?

-1

Huw

10

SidciOKaKoc Tov 'lffpatj\, Kai


of Israel,
(701,
'6ti
.

ravra

ov.yivwGKnq',
knowestnotj

11

ap)v
'V^'"''?

these thiuys?

11

Vcii-

and these things

\kyiO
1

oicajjliV XaXoVj.iev, Kai

say to thee, That which

we know
,
'

ive speak,
, ,

O iwpdaud that which we


-^
,

thce^Wcipcairthia^ve do Icnow, aud tc^ti1y


*

,''

^"^

~.

KUjltV lxapTVpOVI.l('u' Kn't TIIV.fiaprVOiaVJIfJLUlV Of.ArtjWpaVErf. our witness. \-J If I have told you earthly our witness yc receive not. have seen we bear witness of and
;

r,

^'^'^

y^

liave hCtii receive, not


;

12
.

El

If
.,

ra.tTTl^Ha tlTrOV VIXIV, Kai OV.-KKjriViTE, TTMQ tav how if earthly things 1 said to you, and ye believe pot,
,

,.

SITTU)
1

things, and ye believu not, how sliall ye helievc, if tell you 1 "/ heavenly tliinn.'-?

say

lo Kai oi'Otig avaptpi]Kiv i-> And no man iir.ih asceVided upto lieavi-n, has'gone up Aud no one buthe that eanie (Iowa ~ ~ ., ^/ EIQ TOV OV^aVOV H.^xri O tK TOV OVpavOV Karapug, O VlOg frora heaven, ci< the heaven came down, the Sou Sou of man which is into the heaven except he who out of the ~ '" .i'l heaven. *. ~ 14 And as r\ Ti a fi\f TOV avvpioTTov o wv tv r<{) ovpaixjj' 14 /cai KuUujg 'Alwaz/c," ^oses lilted up tho Aud eveu as Hoses of man who is in the hcjaven. serpent in the wilderOVTlog VxpOjOriVai ca V\piO(JEV TOV 6(plV iv ry tpi]fl({J, ion 'o7man" b^^hfu'd
vyuir ra.tTTOvpavia 7riariv<T(Te ; to you heavenly things will ye believe?
V
, . ,

, ,,

t.

>

'

o'/3

>

<

'

'

~,

'

II

lilted

up
Son

the

serpent in the wilderness,

thus

to be lifted

up

it

behoves up:

15

that whoso-

Tuv
the

v'lov

TOV dyOpwTroV 15
of

man,
but

'iva ttciq 6 TTKJrevwv ^tlg on that everyone that believes

avrov"
him

ghouid'^'"uot'^ 'per'iil"

^uf have eternal

life.'

^/.a/.d-n-oXnTai, may not perish,


1 '

dX\'"

t'xy may have

K'^W
life
^1-

aliuviov.

10 ovrujg.ydp

WyOTTJJffev b Oedg tov ,,-. 'i, J ^loved the 'God i^


1

KOaUOV wart
world
11

that

For -so eternal. TOV.v'lbv^aVrOV^^ rbv UOVO- that whosoever be! ievt'th in him shou d not ^1 I.c. 11 his Son the only be- ^^,,.(^1,^ ^ut have ever-

thew"o'rid ul.thJglve his only b'cgoLt(U Son-

yEvfj
gotten

tSojKEVj'iva
he gave,

6 7ri(TTvujv a'g on that everyone who believes


eternal.

irdg

avrov
him
--uot

i.n).dTr6\i]rai, may not perish,

lasting

life. 17

For God

the world to
<-^le

ondc]i)^n

f\'w aXX'" ^uji)v but may have , life


irloV.
his

atwviov. 17 ov-ydpAnriareiXev 6 Otbg rov


For -sent
,

world; but

th.at

,,!,-,, ,11iva rbv ayrov"


Son
tig into

'God
,

KOa/XOV
world
.

Kpivy
,

rbv
, c
>

the
i

that he might judge tho

K0(yfX0V, world,
'

oX\
but

>

the world through him """t't be saved. 18 He

iva
,

aujUy
, ,
,

n-

that ^might 'be ^saved 'the

O Kua/XOg avrOV. -world through him.

a
1

^,

.he
is

thatboUevcth on him is not condemned: but that belicvelh not

18 O TnarnHiJV S.ig He th.at believes on


^
,

condemned already,

because he hath not


believed in the name of the only begotten

aVTOV OV.KpiVirar
him
is
,

O.Ct.
but
'ho that
,

,,,11

not judged
,

KeKpirai, lll)-TriaTf.VWV 1]0>] believes not already has been judged,

Sou of God.

I!*

And

on
UeoV.
of God.
rr ~

,,

^rj.Tn-riaTtvKEV tic ro
on
'

oi>of.ia^

rov {.lovoytvovg viov rov


Sou of the only begotten " '\ '\ u ~ a
^

~, this is

because he has not believed


-ti-\
'
'

the
'

namo

J' ly aVT1].0S tariV

And
'

this
,

is

KpiaiC, on ro (piog .tAriAvtfiV ng the judgment, that -the light has come into
'

7/

TOV
tl)e

Koai.iov, Kai
world,

and

" n rjyaTrrjaav OLavupwTroi -loved 'men


/
*
'

fuiWov
^rather

~\^

to
^the

(jKorog that doeth evil hateth "darkness the light, neither comhis

'

the coiuieuiiiatioD,thatiigiit iseonie into the world, and men loved <lai-kn^E rather than light, because their deeds were evil. 20 For every one

TO <pwg1) than the light;


that
tpCog,
light,

7}v.ydp "7rovr]pa avTUJV^^ Tu tpya.


forswore
does
'evil

20 Trdc.ydp
For everyone

their
/cat

works.

dVds*^ s\'.ouVd''be reproved. 21 But he


pth^o'^'the \l"ht Tilat
\^i^

6 (pavXa TTpdaawv
evil

/xicra ro (pwg, hates the light,

ovK.tpx^Tai Trpbg
comes not
to

to
the

and
j

deeds

may

'iva that

IXTJ-tXeyxOy

Ta.lpya.avrOV'

21 b.Si

TVOlwy Tt)v

rnani test,
f,''^*^

be that

may

not be exposed
to

his

works

but he that practises the

(jod

aXSjOnav ipx^Tai irpbg to


truth

comes

tho light,

(pwg, 'Iva that

(pavipwOy avroii rd may be manifested his

ipya oTt tv Oeip eariv-tipyaapiva. works that in God they have been wrought.
Tn 22 Mara
cic\
>

" ravra
'

After these things came

22 After these things fvo '"t n i]Kviv o iijaovg Kai 01 fiaaijrai.auTOv Big came Jcsus and his Jesus and his disciples into- disciples into the laud

''

''

~>

e S en avTOV LJ ev avrw ill Mcuiicrjj? LTTiAW. 6 GLTTiAW. ^ a\ka Tr. aiiTov {read the Hon) t. [tJiTrA. aTrokTjTaL '" " aiiTUiv TTOi'rjpo I.TXrA. Se but [LjT[TiJa. Son) T[TrAJ.

aW

'

him
1

avToxJ {read lht>

TTrA.

'

ju^

1 -SS ^

I i2

hi tar^r*d'1?h
aimi baptized

23

fe And

"?^ Jov3ainv.yi]v.
'"^

A N N K 2. Km tKei ddrpifSBT/
und
.thfertj

III.
fAsr

cwtojv koI i(3a7rthem


in

land of Judieaj

he stayed

with

nnd was bapih:uon,


nc;ir

to Salim, because there

"2>"?'
''0^^

And was

'also

'John

baptizing
,

riv Uti itul TraptyivovTO Kai M^'^hev^^came^^and Salim, because =waters 'many were theti *nd they nere coming and Vere baptized. 24 For John was not yet cast ifSmrri^ovro. 24 ovTTOj.yAp i]v BeS'X^'u.tvoc elc t))v (bvXdem'iv ...d. _K,>r notV^" -.s ^ ^casf '-^into nhe ^-^ison' irre^atoTcaqLlti^S ^-.^-f ^^P^ beiweensome of John's ^6'^ lwdl'V7]g^2i>'EyiptTi> ovV^i'jTriaiC tK TioV uaOllTMV

2dAa>,

on Uara TToWa

W?i?fntrnH<Vi^'i Jews about jjunfying, 26 And they came unto John, and said unto

'"J^,

^rosc
>

then a quclion [on the part, of


,

he

disciplci

.,

/^

'i

kim, Babbi, he that was with thee beyond ITpOQ Jordan, to wlioiu thou to
,

' loj'OfllWl'" TTfpi K0pi<TjUOl)' lojClVVOV l-lETd of John with [some] Jews about purification.
,

2G Kcd

^l]X9ov'^

TOV

,._
'

'

lioavvrjv" Krtt ^ii.TTOV John' ami said


.^

barest witne>s, behold, the same baptizeth,

ind

whom thou hast borne witness, him. 27 John answered o _ 'v and said, A man can paTTTtC^H, KUl TTUt'TtQ IpXnVTUI 'irpug ttVTOV. 27
all

men come

to

<TOV TTipai' TOV thee beyond the


.

,,

lopoavOV,
Jordan,
to
^

t
tj}

And tliey carae avT(fJ, " Poppi," OQ i)V UiTU to him, Eabbi, bo who was with _ ^ CV JUjua(jri'p?/K'af iCE ObTOg
.

<t^

nr,'

,,

bcliold
,
.

he
.^

ATTiKpiBlf)

receive nothing, except


it

baptizes,
ii

and

all
'

come

to

him.
'

-Answered

' be giveh him from ot ,T rv s ' J'^"*''^'/C '^' ffTTfV, Of CVVOTni heaven. 28 Yc your'John and said, 'Is^'able selves bear me witness"",

the' ChrTt?bu?tha"l am sent before him.


bricS'' is''^the'"'bridJ-.

tav.ni)
unless
it

y ciho^ivov
bo

avTt^j
to

fc*c

" '5" a o avVowTTOQ ^ XajJipaVtlV OVCtV 'a man to receive notliing TOV oupavov. 28 avToi.i'pHC

given

him from the

heaven.

Ye
Christ,

yourselves

^"^ H^pTVpUTi

OTl sItTOV, ""OvK.flfx'l 6Vw"

6 X"^OC,
tlie

ClW
but
the

OTl
that
bride

groom

but the friend

to me. bear witness- that 1 said,

-Am

'not

'I

whi*hst!!ndeth^and

Teareth hrm,rejoic^h preatly because of the (pr)V,


this mv'j'oy^ therefore is fulfilled. 30 He must increase, ^utl must decre.ise. 31 He that cometh from, a^
'

^TTftrrcrX/xij'OC iApi efXTTpoaOiV tKCtVOV. "sent 'I'-'am .before him. ,

2'J

O
that

^X'ttif

TyV VVjlKHl
and

He

has

VVlKpiOQ taTlV
"bridegroom
'is;

(piXoi; TOV VVpiplOV, but the friend of the bridegroom,


O.B't

i(7Tl]IC(ug

who

.mauds

aKOVWV aVTOV, X^P?'


],(;ar3

X^'P^'
*/")

^'"
^

^')''
tlie

^lOVl/V TOV VXijJL^lOV


voice
^

him,
,

with j j rejoices because of joy j

of the bridegroom. o . ^

OVTl)
^^is
,

oZiV
rli.

hove
that

is is

above

all

he

7/

n
.
^

X^^P^
'"joy ^ >\
.

'/

TTf 7rA/pwrai.
'

30 IKiivOV
=Hira
> '

dsi
'ifc-hehoves
>

of the earth i earthly, and speaketh

'my
~

is fulfilled.

he that cometh from heaven ~ ~ ~ , < 32 And TTCIVTOJV iCTTIJ'. O U)V iK T1]Q yr]C IK T1}Q yr]Q lOTlV, K(XI above aU. what he hath seen is, and is. He who is from the earth from the earth aU and heard, that he tesv .> . , - ., ' ^ .^ , , O K TOV OVpUVOV^ tpX^j^HVOQ ' tlTavu) tifieth and no man iK 'frjQ yiJQ'XaX^l' his receivcth te?ti- from the earth speaks. He who from the heaven ccTmes above
of the earth
:

is,.,,
,

>//-! ^ n uvioOfv tpxiivog tirClVM ai'^di'dv, efis.cttXaTTOvauai. 31 o He who from above conjcs, above to decrease. to increase, but me

,r\,~
,

..

t.

>

monv. 33Hethathath
received
hi.s

testimony
his
is

TTUVTMV tCnf,"
uU
-

na AZ 'KUr
>ii

hath
that

set

to

God

seal true.

is,

!M For he whrrc

God fiaprvpfl
testifies;

hath sent speaketh the he

s,' i7 KOl Tr]V.l.inpTVpiaV.aVTOV ovdiig Aaiipai'Bi. no one receives. and his testimony
' '

^^

IWOOKSV Kni O and what he has seen and


~

'

>

7]K0V(TV heard
'

'

>

^TOVTO"
this

ii

oo So o
'

He

that

'Xafi^v ai'TOV TTjV j-iaoTvpiav iaippaymv '6ti 6 Otig dX.i}9r)Q 5ve'thno^''thfs^rit =true God testimony has set to his seal that by measure unto him. has received his 34 ov.yAp aTTfJTTtiXev 6 Oeb^ tu prjiiara tov 9(ov thelon.^ud'hath gfv'^ *^''"words of God 'God the 'sent for he whom 'i^ en all thino-s into his
I

]icveth"*on''the"son speaks; hath everlasting life and he that believeth 7r(7r)o not the bon shall not y^^j^^^.f'
:

^<^'^^^'

OV.yap iK flhpOV SiCiomV ^6


for not

OfVQ^^

TO TTViVjua.
the
Spirit.

35 6
The

by measure
^^^

''gives

'God

dymrd TOV V/^^^^

viov,' Kal TTaVTU CiSojKiV iv Ty.Viipi.av^^^y and all things has given in^o "^ his hand.
/'c

Toii.

36
He

6
th.at

TrtffTEuwv
believes

rov vlov f ^Ei ^w>)v ai'wvjov


the

o.'-'Si"

on

Son

has

life

eternal

and he that

'Iwa.vrj<; Tr.

6 T[TrA].

' 'liudvyjv Tr. TrA. ^ irdcTwi' to-Tic T. ot u;id T.

'lovSai'ov a Jew GLTTrA'W. \'Iiadvov Tr. " 'Pa^Sei T. 'E-yio OVK elfju I-. etnav TrA. touto r. 6 0ebs (read he gives) A. (cai [lJtTi '

^]\9av
tr.-cii'W

>'

*>

[i,j'i'l.T.

ja.

Tir, IV.

J
Tip
v'i(p

o n

N.
i)
!

189

aTTStSajv
is

not suBject to Che Sou

ovK.u-^fTCCi shall not see

^w/'/v,
life,

aW
but

opyfj tqv Oeov '^^ ''^^ '^"*/'^'' "7?*^ o^^O'ia'liidethonhiia,^. the wrath of God

fikvei stt'
abides

arrov
liim.

on

'^C

o^v

tyvo)

^la'iptOQ^^

ort i'jKovffav
that
-'heard

o'l

^apKrcdot,
-Phari-ees',

Wlicu therefore ^knsw 'the

^Lord

'the

5rt 'hinovQ ttKhovoq, fiaOriTdg ttoih Kal iSaTrrl^si J) ^'Iwavjy ^^^^^ therefore Jesus more disciples makes and baptizes that than John the Lord knew how the 2 Ka'lTOiyi 'irtaOW avrbq OVK.iBf'nrTl^ev, rJJC"" Ot Pharisees had heard that Jeens made and / 1,1 u J J T ui3 ir, ihimself (altliough indeed Jesus was not baptiziug

dW
1J.

iiaOnTai.auTOV'
'^^his disciples),
_

a<bnicsv riiv 'lovSaiav, Kal he left _. Jud=ea, and ^

i'lQ

TTivTaXiXaiav.
Galilee.
/

'i^H.hi

avrbv
t

but. baptized more disciples a7r?i\9^v iraXiv V^"^" John, 2 cthou^h went away again J--,Jji--'f, ^^-J^^^^^^^^^^^ cLkp'x^EGQai Sid Tijg ^''^ left Judtea, and
toliass

into
f

And it was necessary for him

throuprh
>
,

^'^^^^^^.
Galilee.
|^ria.

^EauapeiaQ.
Samaria.
, /

o tpx^rai
X

eig iroAiv ttjq '^ai-iapeiag" Tie come* therefore to a city of Sam.aria


.

ovv

,\

AByocall-

f^'\', 4Andherauat

'"""*

needs go through Sa5


to

Then coma city of


is

fievrjv ed
,r
\

,^ ^2.VXap.
Sychar,

TrArjaiOV
near

rOV %wpiOU
the

iMarfp

T({).Vt<{).avTOV.
his son.

^,>,~ O yV.CS ^-.,


Now ^was
I ,

land

, SK(L
t-

tddJKSV "o" which ^gave


,

h.Mi

.'>

>

laKwp
'Jacob

0th
'^^

he

S.imaria,

which

call-

Tr/jy//

TOU
n'v

-T

laKlofj,
'Jacob's;
'

'o

Sychar, near to the Parcel of pround that

Jacob

g.aT6

to

his

O.OVV. il](TOVg KSKOTTiaKOjg tK rrjg OCOlTOpiag iKaas^erO OVrwg Jesus therefore, being wearied from the journey, sat thus . ~ ~ >' ) -11 n II tTTi T\] wpa r)v 'wtrfi" sicri]. 7 Epx^Tai yvvij Tntyij. at the fountain. [The] hour, was' about [the] sixth. Comes a womap
! 1 ' ,

Bo Joseph ,. ,

*there

fountain
' .

son Joseph. 6 Now Jacob's well was there. Jesus therefore, being "wearied with his .iourney, sat thus on tho
well: and it was about the sixth hour. 7 'Thera

tK
out of

"^ f^- II' avT\)]<yai vcutp. T>)Q 'l^apapetag


~

\^'

^. i.^T ^' AsyH nvry o lyaovg,


'Says
^to 'her
'Jesus,

Samaria
fioi

to

draw

water.

Cometh a woman of samaria to draw water: Jesus saith unto

Aoc
Give
r>;i/

V.jrr-"
to

8 oi.ydp.iJia9r)Ta\.avTov dirEXnUQ^iacti'
'for his disciples

me
city,

drink

had gone away

into

eig a'cFor^'hu" "disdp^ie^ were gone away unto


9''Thra^saUh"thT''wo^
'*'

TToXiv, 'iva

the
>/

rpotpdg dyopd<TU).<TLV. that provisions they might buy.


"^'SauapsTTig,^^ Tluig
,. 2o_ '^Scnnniriran
.

9 Asyei
-11.

'oiV
'

avTili

yvvri

i*v

woman the a'


1

IT Hrtiw

Ho ''him 'man of Sam.nria unto '' av 'lovSaXog wv Trap' iuov JV'^j ."' i'^'*" tfaou, bcing a Jew, Hit, 4 ^T fT ^1-hmi *n ^Javir ->V\mnnp "fi-nm '"rvio
^Says ''therefore
o,:
1

'

avrqi i*) living w.ater. u The saith unto ^Says ''to^him'the J^oman him, Sir, thou hast no1 ' \ I' tr yvvq," Kvpir., ovre avrArifia tX^Ld i^c^i '"o (pp^ap tariv thing to draw with, and the well is deep; woman, Sir, nothing to draw with thou hist, and the well ig whence . /!'. _'/3 T /3 \ ,/ J. 'V T from paUv -TroUev 'ovv' f^^'C to vCmp to c,ujv ; ic jxtj (Tv./xeii^cjv.el h.ast thou th.it then 12 livdeep; whence then hast thou tho "water 'living? Art thou greater i? water? 12 Art! _II, thou greater thau our //J. ,x5, TOV.irarpoQ.TIIiMV la/CWp, og tOl^KSV tIfllV to (fiptap, ICat avTOg father Jacob, which than our father Jacob, who gave well, us the and himself gave us the well, and drank thereof himself t4 aVTOV tTTllV, (cat Ol.VlOl.aVTOV Kat Ta.VpSfl^ara.aVTOV ; and his children, and of it drahk, and his sous and his cattle? his cuttle? 13 jcsus
icai

avrov,
him,
'

woman of forthe.Jews lost being 'to 'drink 'dost ask, a 'woman 'Samaritan? For ^no have no dealings with trvyxpi^vfai 'lovSaToi ^afiapsiraig.'^ 10 'ATfEKpiOl] 'lljaovg the Samaritans. lO Je^'""^ ""^ 'have 'intercourse 'Jews with Samaritans. "Answered 'Jesus ''u*" f unto ner. "vT^jl "''"i' Lr tnou knew^ Kat alTTEv avry, Et ySug r)v Sojpedv tov Oeov, koI irif^^tthegiftof God,and and said to her, If thou hadst known the gift of Go.1, .and who 'Y'^ '5,.** '^^'^^^''j'.'' '<> thee, Givemetodnnk; >, , , 1, * X thou wouidest have itrriv o Aeyojv aoi, Aog fioi "'mfiv," ffv av.7jri](rag it is that says to thee. Give me to drink, thou -wouidest have asked asked of him, and he would have given thee ,/<N / r, 1 1 . V^
"Tne7v"

fiimc,
i o
1

OV(Tng
r.

yVVaiKOg EauapeiTlSog'^ "


'

lo

J'hich am ^OV.ydp Samaria? 1 T^

^,

<

.,

eocoKiv.av aoi vcujp and ho would havegiven tothee'water


'

l,(jjv.

11
.

Atyn
1
'

'living.

II

'

.t~., ivi*-" f,ii*,


'ATTEKpiQr}
--o"

<~

j'

11/^'

1*

13

"Answered

hjcrovg Kal Elyrtv ah-y, Tldg 'Jesus and said to her, Everyone

6
th.at

irlv^v sk
drinks
of

Z^'"';:^r. ?^^osoovir drinketh of this wateif

e 'Iwdiijs Tr. f lafxapia^ T. h ov GL. T. e Stxap E. w? > Sa/iapiTt? T. mil/ TT-A. nlv L ; rrelv TTrA. ovii' T. " yvz/aiKO? Sa^ap'^iViSos (SajxapiTiSo? T) oucrr)? LTfrA, ^ P ov -yaP (A'-yxpaiKrat 'Iov6acoi 2aju.apeiVats T, Irj vvnj] A. ' -^ 6 GLTTrAW.
<
I

'Irjaov?

Jesus
k

flTrAW.

'

'

1^^
t'''"who"oevr drinl<ufh of the water that I shall give hira
ll"^'\.i

Q A N.N H
t^(ii///ffSt

2.

IV.
\4:'oq.c'.UV TTiy Ik TOV but whoever may Uriiik of the
"" Sl\l/r} fJ7)'
f.lt^

""OV-^'^f^TOQ-TOVTOV
this

water
Oi>

writ
doir^io

hirst

TTcXXlV' a^aiu
;

y^CTOQ
^''<''^

tyu)

the wrr^'thari ilTll give him shall be iu hlra a well of water


sprint;, iif,'upiiatoever15 The Iftstiiif? lite.

a\Xa TO
^^^^^
_

woman Haithuntohira,
Rivurac this water, that [ thirst pot, ueither come hitlior to IG Jesus saith draw. unto hfer, Go, call thy
Sir,

voaTOQ aWof-itfOv
o'f
,

o ^ owrjuj avTip ^j^^, water which I vvill (jive to hira .^\ v viUo^
.

'^'''.'jV

UVTlfi "ov.flf} ^*'" *" ";vi.

Tbv.aiCbva'
ever,
'

^^'^'^ 'thirst

for_

""'V".

yvi]iti-ca iV a(V(p 7r?jy?7 shall become in him a fountain

>

w^ter

EiQ surinKing up into

Z,jjr)v
life

r/

yVVi],

aiiot'iov. Menial.
_
,

15 Atyfi
^Says

'

>

i-jrpoQ
"to
<

avrbv
^him
i

.,

KvplE, OOq /XOl TOVTO TO VCbJO,


Sir,
ii

,. ,>

<n

i^^e
.

^womao,
,

vk)aoB avrktiv. lo AiyH avTij ^0 * Ij/aoyg," iJ,i]oe 'tpx^w/xai and come Qor come hero to dniw. '^Says ''to 'her 'Jesus, The woman , " ' \ nh J^ ~ii /i -n-r 1 vrayi., (pu)vr]0OV "TOv.nv6pa.tTov' Kai tKut tvuac. 17 Atteanswered and said I thy hu.siaand call and come have no husband. JeGo. here. 'An" ?' ^ Bus said nuto her, Thou >n d/-, yvvi] Km BiTTtv^, "Oi;/c.f ^w avcpa.'^ AsyEt aVTIJ T/ hast well ^aid, I have KpiOr] I have not a husband. ''Says ^to *her no husband: 18 for Bwered 'the -wom.an and said,
ii

'

give fl ' ?

me
i

this
\
~

water,

IVCt that
'

/JlTJ.OiyJa)

I
-

may

not thirst
~

-fnt'

,>ii't

hilshand, hither. 17

'

'

'

>

-i

,.

<-

'

ii

bands'^ranrhe'whom 'itlffOVQ,
thou now hast
is

KaXwQ
Well
.

^d^Uq,^^
didst thou say,

"Or. dvSpa

nit

'Jesus,

A VUV

husband

0VK.tX<^have not

18 TrivTE
^five

6afdst"'thou' *'trSy! 19 The woman' saith

7^9
foi"

flvSpctQ

Kul fffxeC, hxisbands thou hast had, and


aX,,0ic
truly
.,
x

OV 'tX^lQ OVK-tOTlV now he whom thou hast is not 19 Alyei


'Sitys

(TOV thy

ce?v1 *iZl fhou^n'a 20 Our faprophet. thers worshipped in this mountain; and ye Bay that in Jerusalem is tiie place where men

."''V rooTO
husband;, this

tp,,cac.-

avrv

thou hast spoken.


~ ' la i.i a prophet =art 'thou.
,
..

*to ^him 'the

jJJm),
-woman,

KliOlE,
.,.' '="'">

'

_
-I

OeojpuJ r-.
porcjive

OTl TTpOCbhrnC
that

(7V.

20

Ol.lTCirBOac.rj no) V /% Our i .S fathers

tV
in

^tOVTIDT!'^ Opl"
this
^

2"jesVsslth"nToher; Woman, believe me, the hour oorneth, when ye shall neither in this mountain, nor ynt at Jerusalem, worship the Father. 22 Ye worship vi; know not what: we know whiit wo wor-

TTpOCTeKVVIJlJaV KUl worshipped, and dioimcain


^dsl
is
/

VflELQ Xi.yTE OTl tV 'les.ny that in Jeye

potJoXvUOii: 1<TtIv O tStTOQ OTTOV the place where it is rusalem

TTpOaKWHV.^^ 21 AsyBl
^Says
,

^ aVTy

necessary to worship.

O llJffdVQ, "FvvaL, TTKTTEvaoV


'Je-.U8,
,

.>

f.lOl,

^tg 'her

Woman,
,,

believe

'

me,
,

OTE OTL tpx^TUl lOpa that io coming an hour when


^
,

.1

ODrg
neither

tV Tlfi.OpH.TOVT(il OVTE SV
in this

'

mountain

nor

iu

lEpO(To\vi.lOig Jerusalem
,

TrpO<TICUV>]<TiT shall yc worship

ship: for s.alvation is . ^ > ~ , ^ ,n . .^ l'2> Vf-ISig TTpOCFKVVElTB. OVK-OIOOTV yjfltlQ TtpOG' of the Jews. 23 But Ttf) iraTpi. the houi- coiooth, ami the Father. worworship we Ye what' ye know not : now is, wlien the true _ < / ^ . ci , i , t. OT,l 1) a(x)Tl]pLa tK tuJV iOVOaiWV iCTTlV, worshippers shall wor- KVVOVUiV O OlOnjUSV Jews is. ship tne Father in ship what we know ; for salvation of the "' ' > < ~ > ./ spirit anil in truth: for ; >\\>ii " \ n Kai VVV (TTIV, GTS Ot aM]HtVOl TTpOCtfp%rai Father seekoth the now ' is, true worwhen the is opming an hour and Cut Kurh to worsliip him.
, .
.

23 AA

Wpa

tiK^that wo'r.shiphim Kvv\]Tai TrQQ(!KVvr)(jovaiv Tifi the tf^ill worship must worship /nin in shippers
,

TrUTpi SV Trvtvi^tan
Father
'seeks

KCli

dXtjOsi^'
truth;

in

spirit

and

25''Thc'^w'l)M'inn*8'ni'th

KuLydp
for also

6 TTttTyp TOlOVTOVq l)l]TU TOVQ TrpotyKVVOVVTaQ aVTOV.


the

nnto him,

'innw

th:it

Father

''such-

who

worship

him.

r'oalird'^'rhii'st-^^hPU

^'^

ho is come he will tell uaii thitiL's 2'>/csus 7rj'''uart Kat saith niUO h<T, I that r* j and eplnt N)iat unto thee am /e.
,

KUl TOVQ 7rpO(TKliVOVVTaQ ^aVTOv'^ Ylvtvpia O BiOQ' worship him, God [is], and they that A spirit
aX>j9eia ^Sd Trporricvvdv-^^ ^ n ' must " worship. utruth
4^

iV
in
'/

25

Asysi: avTui 4.. ac. 6t,^ ij.L ^fe.ays *to 'him 'the

27

And

up. u this

cams

yvin),

018a OTi
I kno'w'that

"woman,
f X0{?

fitTffiag tpx^Tai, Messias is coming,


us

6 Xtyofxivoq xp^^^^T^t'

otuv
when
p
'Jjj'

who

is
"

called

Christ;

tKHvoQ dvayyeXsT
'he

r)fuv 7rdvra.

'26

AkyH avTy
''Says

"oomea
BUS,
'

be will
tlfii,

tell

^all things.

^to 'her

Je-

aovc, 'Eyw
f'-'

am

['he],

XaXwv 6 'who 'am ^speaking


" fiii^crei J.TTrA.

aoi,
*to ^thee.

27 Kal

tTri

rovTip
this

And upon

[ov

^lr\

Sii^jjaet

I'l

BUpx'-ofi.ai TA.
'

6
.

. ,

.h Suxrw awrcpl'L
lt[ti].v.
''

"

eyw
^

It.?

ep\OfjLai,

Tr

'lT|<rovs

(read He says)' tL]T[TrjA.


* clires T.

>

crov tov ai/Spa. a.

aVTiu

him

[l]a.

ai&pa OVK Ix"


^^

T.

TcS opei

TOVTy GLTTrAW.

B TTpocTKiircti' ^c LT'lrAW. '^ WirAW. OrVtov X.

l''vVa,L,.iri(rTeve fJiOi

IltoTeue

ju,0l,

yucai TTrA.

aAAd

7rpo<rKvvelv Sel T,

"

affaj/ra tIiA.

IV
Clime
his disciple*,

JOHN
and
wondered
that

19^
a with the

7lX0ov" oi.^ia9vra}.m''rov, Kai "Wavixaaav'

on ^Brd yvvaiKog ItiKlTVTtaTkYd woman, with


woman
:

yet

L\a\Hhe was speaking


;

ovSElg fxkvro^ elTrev,


no one "however _ said,

f, KrireiQ ; .What seekest thou ? or

Ti

Ti

Xa- Z^.Z^tt^^'tor^^y hy speakcst


t^ij^est
.

thou with her ?

ixzT avriic her? thou- with


~ig

_
into l^^i'^;i'^^'^j^^
city,

*Let
T/7J'

Hhen

'her

Werpot

'the

"woman and wont away

\l

TToXiv, Kai Xkyii'Tolc dvOpioTTOig, Ln,^ city, 'and sa/r toth'e


eItTEV UOl TTCLVTa
told
;

20 AtDrf,
.Come,
/.tljri
:

I'oerE dvOpLOsee ^ - a man

and salth to the --.^^^^C^ome, seo^^^


tliat

TTOV OC
whothe

Po(Ta"

t7rop]aa'
I did

me

all

things whatsoever

^perchance Hhis

Oi'TOg tariV things Hs ^'q


,

over

did:

Then^T.ey t^!S out

6 VptOTOt'
Christ!
j(^o'VTO

30 1'E?)/\0OV

tK Trig TVoXi.UJQ, Kai ^OVV^^ city, and They went forth therefore out of the

-tip-

of the city,

and came

came unto him.

Trpog avrounto him.


'-Ev.^St"

31

r<^
the

HSra^V
(bays.
^ea?.

l^pwrwv

'

avroV
'him

o'l

fXaOllTqi,
-disciples,

X^-''3I In the meaij while


say-

But

in

meantime =were \asking

'the

^^^

sayiug.

Master,

yovrec,

''P/!3/3(,"

32'O.Oi
But he

L-

^'

Rabb7.'
t]v wu'ieh

eIttev avrolg, said to them.

'Eyw
/

j3pu>aiv '^'/^s But' he said

^^Wat

^ea^tha^ '^^00^

ivio (bayfXv

vueXcouK.o'iSare.

hie/toLt
pies

V
.

33"EXEyov ^ofv"
^

know
M)'/
,

not.

oi uaOri- not of. 33 Therefore ^Said-.^^erefore 'the ^H-i- Baid^t^hejisc^p.e^s one

Tui Trpog dXXtjXovg,


to

34
,

unto them. My meat IS to do tiie will of him. that sent me, and to finish his work. 3oSay ' t not ye, There are yet iXl}ua four months, and (/len work. his me, and should fiuLsh sent will of him who Cometh harvest ? be ^_ ,, /I 3o 0('X VfXEig XiySTE. Ofl ETI yTET(Ktflt]VOV iOTlV Kai O Vtpl<riJ.og liold, I say unto you Lift up your eyes, ami and the harvest it is that yet f out mouths 'say, -iSoi, ^ye look on the fields for , 'B'A' '-.'T-i' ''j/i\ tpX^Tai; ICOV, XsyuJ VfXlV., hnapaTE TOVg.O(pVa\j.lOVg.VHWl> Kai they are white already your eyes aud to harvest. 36 And he Lift up comes ? Behold, I say to you, ^

one another,

Tig "Anvone
,

i]vtyKEv
'did bring
3

(payelv y man brought him ougAt avTip to eat ? 34 J.sus sa_ith him [anything] to eat ?
./
'

Ayi ai'Tolg 6 Itjaoug,


"Says,
,

Eaov pp(t>na tCTiv.iva ^ttoiw to that I should do the 'is meat 'Jesus. My no -them \ TTSj-irpavrog jXE, Kai TtKElwaut aVTOV to tpyOV, TOV
^

~||

>

,~,
'

.,

'

'

ii

>

<

>

.>~
^

<

QEaaaaQE Tag X^P^^Qt OTI XevKUI


see

f\

'

/-

'

'

'

SiaiV
they are

Trpog {JEpiGjXOV
'to
harvest

f " ^

^ydl]-

\[

that reapcth receiveth wages, and gathereth


I

the

lields,

for

white

already,

fruit unto

lie

eternal:

36
1

"/caiil

OEpiKwv fiKjOov Xa^iiSdvEi, Kai avvdyEi Kupirbv


reaps

And he that
Eig

a reward
that

'

receives,

aud

gathers

fruit

^I'fand he'tLafrl^^: eth may rejoice to-

Wiv
life

alwviov 'iva^Kai'
eternal.
,

anEipwv
sows

ofioi
'together

xajPV
^may
''rejoice
'-o"

unto

both he that

fslhatsayL'^gwutone aoweth and another

Kai
fiivog,

6
OTl That

OEoi^WV.
^reaps.

37 tV.ydp TOVTip
For in
EffTlV
'it ^is

Xoyog iariv
is

a\?}true,

'aud^he^that

this

the sayiug

[^'ap

that'

whereon

dXXog
^one

6 (nrElpUJV,

Kai

who

sows,

dXXog. 6 QEpii^dJV. reaps. and another who


v/.tE'ig

yp bestowed no l.ibour: other men laboured,


their Ta'bour".'^

38

o tyoj 'aTTSoreiAa" vfxdg OEpi^Eiv ovx sent you to reap on which ''not
vf.iElg Eig

KEKOTriaKUTE'
"have laboured
;

'ye

dXXoi KEKoitiaKaGiv, Kai


others

tov.kottov.cwtwv EimXiiXvtheir labour

have laboured.

nnH

ye

into

have eu-

6a te.
tered.

39 rwv
of the

'Ek.Se Trjg.TtoXEojg.fKEivijg ttoXXoi tTriffTEvaav Eig on juaiiy believedBut out of that city

avTOV "
him
fJ-aptes-

..,,..,

^2.up.apElT0)V, Samaritans.

Ota

TOV KoyOV
the

T)ig
of the

because of

word

yVVaiKog woman

39 And many of the Samaritans of that ciiy believed on him for the saying of the

woman, which

testi-

'

fi\6d.v TTr.

o eflauju-afof

'-^ ovi/OLTTrAW. " / Terpa^Tji'o.s OLTTrAW.


'

Were wondering GLxxrAW.


but
[

a which

St"

L]TTrA.
''

/caiJlilAl.

Q aTr[Aj.

'

-q&r)

TTOujiTai LTrA. oJc W. 'Pa^(3eiT. (nad already be that reaps) t. _ (cal uL^i'^^'i'tA. Sa/xaJHTWi/ T. a.ni<jfa\Ka havo sent T.
,
'

T.

[tal]

and

L.

'

192
fitd, tl at

QANN H
fioi
told

2.

IV.

He told me all TVpOVfflJQ ever I did. 40 So when the S-ainaritans tifying,

"Ort

il.Ttkv

He

me

^otra" lirolrfaa all things whai,soever I did.

TTcivra

40

'12

When

were come unto him, ovv 7)\9ov Trpot,' ai'Tov o'l ^"^afiapelrai,^^ r/puiTiov avrov they besought him to him the Sauiaritans, they asked him that lie would tarry therefore came with tliem and he ixfivai Trap avTolQ' Kui tfiSLvev LksI di'O rjfjiepaQ. '41 kcu two days. dbode there to abide with them, and lie abode there two days. A ud 4 1 Aud many more believed because of ^i3 TToWip.TrXeiovg trritrrevqav Sid' rov.Xoyov.ovrov' 42 ry.re own word 42-and said many more believed because of his word and lo the unto the woman, Now
:

'

believe, not because \ot thy saying: for we have heard hiin

we

yvvaiKi i'Xeyov, ''"On" ovksti

Sid

woman
believe,

they said.

No

longer because of

ttjv at)v thy

XaXidv
saj'iug

ttict-

ourselves, aud know that this is indeed the Cluribt, the Saviour of

T^ioi-if-V

avToi.ydf) dKyjKoansv, Kal o'lSajnev tin for ourselves have heard, and we kuow that
'6

w ovrog iariv
this
is

the world.

aXjjOw^ 6 aurijp tov kogjxov,


truly
the Saviour of the
tyorld,

^^piardg."
Christ.

the

after two 'departed days lie thence, and went into 43


Galilee.
,

Now

43 Mra-^ rdq. Svo


But
0j/"
after

the

rjfxipag t^rjXOev IkhQev, ^ical aTr/yXtwo days he wxjnt forth thenoo, went and
'<;" 'l?/c7oiic;
'

44 For Jesus

eig T7]v
into

VaXiXdiav. 44 avrbg.ydp
Galilee;
" for " 'himself

IfiapTiipr]
tes titled.

OTL 7rpo(p7]Ti]g i7' Ty.iSi<ji. rij-iijv TvarpiSl oi'/c.t'xet. in his own ai.v. that a prophet his own country honour has not. co\i) trj'. 45 Then when he was come iuto Ga"""Ors" oiv i]XBv ('g TT^vVaXiXaiav sSt^nm-o avriiv lilee, the Galileaus 45 When therefore became into Galilee 'received 'him received him, having seen all the things that rdXiXaloL, ecjpaicoreg tToiijnev tu "le01 "ii" he did at Jerusalem at -Galileans, all things having seen whiol; he did in Jethe feast: for vth'ey. Hho also wont "nto the tv lopry' KaLavroLydp i]\Bov itg TtjV poa,oXvjj.oig t?) feast. went during the the rusalem feast, for they also to
lionbur

himself testified, that a prophet hath no

away

JesuS

Tzdma

eoprr]v.
feast.

Aln^UXOsv oiv b'li]<rovg TrdXtv P ('(; tuv Kai'd Trig Cana 'Came ^therefore 'Josus again to came Tig i]v Rgaiu into Cana of TdXiXalag, ottov tTroiijcrev to vSiop olvov. '^Koi whero he made the water of Galilee, wine. Aud And there was a certain Galilee, where ho made the water wine. Aud (iaaiXucog, oh 6 tiibg t'laOsvei Iv "Kmrepvaovfi.'^ 47 ovrog there was a certain noHo whose son Was sick courtier, in Capernaum. bleman, whosii son was
4({

So Jeau3

sick at Capernaum. 'Irjcoug ' t'ikel OKOvaag Ik Tijg'lovdaiag ttg njv TaXi47 When he heard that GaliJesus had come out of into. Judaja Jesus was come out of having heard that Judaea into Galilee, ho Xaiav, aTrriXOsv 'Trpog avrov, Kal I'jpwra ^avrov^' iva Karawent unto him, aud went that he would to him, asked him and besought him that he leo, Would come down, ical id(Ti]Tat avrov rbvvioy' yfieXXev.ydp dTroQ)>r](SKHv. (3y and heal his sou for comedown and to die. heal his toti for he was about he was at the point of death. 48 Then said 48 diTEv o{)v 6 'IriGovg irpog aurov, 'Edi/.fu) cnjuela koI Jesus unto him. Ex"Said -therefore him. signs aud 'Jesus to Unless cept ye see signs aud wonders, ye will not TSpara 'idi]TS TnardnyriTe.. 49 Aayei Trpog avrbv b ov.fii) 4y The uo- wonders ye see in no wise will ye believe.. believe. ^him 'the ^Says 'to blem.ansailh unto him, Sir, tome down eve my fSaaiXiKogj Kvpie, KaTd(ii]9i irpiv diroQai'Civ To.TraiS'tov.fiov. 50 Jesus child die. Sir, comedown before 'my "little ^child. ''courtier. '*dies Baith uuto him, Go 'Kai" b.v'iog.aov ty. thy way thy son liv- 50 Atyu avT(p b 'hjaovg, Uopevov eth. And the man beAnd lives. 'Jesus, -Says ^to 'him thy son Go, lieved the word that " 'Irjaovgy Jesus had spoken uuto k7ri(TTV(jv b dvBpfjJTTog Tip Xoyq) ^^I" direv avri^ 'Jesus, him, and lie went his 'the ''man the word 'believed which -said ^to ''hira

on

way. 51 And as lie was now going down, 'his Kal iTToptvETO. 51
servants met him, and
'-

i^Sj^-oi

and

wcnc away.
''

Euc already

avrov. Kara^aivovTog ol.SovXoi.^av-' his bondmen as he was going down


'

zeal aTr/jASei/ 6 Sajnapirat T. [^OTt.^ U o ;:^pta-T6j LTTrA. a which TTrA. " 6 GLTTrAW. 6 'Itjo-oO? (read he '" tus T. " ocra whatsoever lTfa. I'Hi/ ^e t. p -f 6 'Itjo-ou? Jesus w. Ka'PapfaovfJU i.lTrAW came gltti aw. aVTOV * 01' LItrA ' avTOV [LjTTcA. KM l.LjT[TrjA. + 6 LTTrA W.

Il]tt^ a.

'

''

(read the boudraeiOiT.

'

IV,

'

J
^

O H

N.
"AtyoiTEC,"

say.n-,

193

rou" ^^drrnvrricTav^^ avTM,


"l'^t

htm,

^Kol and

aTrnyyeiXaj/"
reported,
^

"On
hour

told /i''m, Bnyinjr, iTny

q^j^ed be of them the

b.-n-aAQyaov^^

'Cy.
lives.

52

''EitvB^to

oiv

'^Trap'

ahrojv rt)v
them
.
-

u)pav^^

i^o^r "''jn

he begau

Thy

child

He

inquired therefore
'^kui

from

the

snid'unto'himTester^
'^'^^
J''."^''
'^''

Iv
la

'

f/

KOHii/OTtpor'
^better

which

tn'xBi'. 'he %'ot.


.

tlirni'^^
,

avnp,

"On
53
'

^^^fc;"
Y.-tr-.l-iy

^^^

seventh,
}^^*-

And

they said to him,


N
.

hioav
tat'thel'-'hour

tpCn[iy\v
'seventh
.

.3^.

)mvd..

a<pi]KiV
left
-

aVTOV
him
II

irvpfTtiC

Myino

'Knew the fever." which .losas said unto ~ " ' ' ' tlCStvy TIJ lopa iV y Slinv him, Thy son iivcth *therefuie'lhe=fa;.hcr that [it that hour in which "said and himself believed, '^" ^'''^ Wholc hOUSe. ~ ' ' ^ >r ,r"r^ V T<avT(() ii]<7ovq, t Orr u.vioq.ffov Qy. Kai eTriaTeimev avroq 5i This is attain the Ho'hiia 'Jesus, Thy son lives. And he ^believed 'himself second miracle that Jesus did, when h'3 , -. ^ Kai If.OtlCia.avTOV oKr). 04 TODTO " TTOAIV CEVr^pOV nrj/.tEtOV was come out of Jiida.\a into Galilee. and his ^house 'whole. This again a second sign

}'^Z 53 So tlie father knew that il ivas at the same hour, in the

l^'^'^l

OVV

O Tranjp

<

,f

on

fi

'tv" was] at
'

'

II

'

>

>

^<>'

.~j/%

-!,/
(f

iTroir]<jv did
,X(X('ai'.
lilee.

6 'Irjnovg,
Jesus,

tXQwv

r^ig

'lovSaiag eig ti)v TaJudaea


into

having come out of

Ga-

5
.'J

Mfrd ravra
~
>

l^u
'\

'

toprr)

rwv

'lovdaicjv,
Jews,
.
.

icai
.,

aifsfii^
N
'

''o"

After these things was a feaat of the

and ^went ^up

li](Tovg sig
'Jesus
to
ry

<T

lepoauAvna.
Jerusalem.
-

'

" 5., c Effnv.os Z

iv

roic lenoffoAv/wig was


Jerusalem

v. After this there


a
:

feast

of

the

ITTl ry at the

)v- rrpopanKy ICO\Vfipi]i)pa,


^ /o'/i

And

there
i<
';/

is

7riAeyO/Ul'/j"
[is]
'

t\
In

in

ii'i-i*"'
in

EljpCUan
Hebrew
'

Jews and Jesus weut upto Jerusalem. 2 Now


there is at Jerusalem by the sheep market a pool, which is called in

shecpgata
II

a pool,
_
1

which
<

called
'

"'isi/ffcroa," Bethesda,

mT> a^-^'.

_'

ttevte
five
,

aroag txourya.
porches
having.

o 3 ev javraig KortKEiro
the-e

were lying

fhe Hebrew tongue Bethesda, having five

,r\7,Qog
a 'multitude
'^ripuiv,

":to\{j''

ru.v

koQEvovvn^v,
were
sick,

rvi>\u.v,
blind,

'great

of those

who TOV

x''^^<S^, rgttt muVitudVS lame, impotent folk, of blind,


l'ng*for'^the'^movi^''of

"EKdEXOIXlVOJV T7]V

iSSarog

K(V>J(T(1/.

4 OyyeAoC

awaiting the ^of ^th *water 'moving. 'An 'angel tlio water 4 For aa IcaTa.KaipoV, KaTEJ3aiVEV iv ry lio\vilf3r]9p^, rat ETUa^fertarn^eagra^into from time to time 'for descended in the pool, and agi- ^j^g pp^i g^Qj troubled pairaEvrd vdion' 6 ovv Trpuiroc EuBag ueto. rnv rapaynv trte svator: whosoever
withered,'

yap

1.1 tatod

-^ {\ ^ .1. r He the water. rr who therefore ^= the first entered attcr il agitation Tou vdciTog, vjitjg EyivETO, '^(}).dfiTrore' -icarEixErn uotrijfxaTi.^^
1

1.

j.1.

'^

'

.!!

'

tnen

first

after

troubliu"-

water

of stepped

tho tho
in

of the '

water,

'

"well

'became,

whatever

=he ^was *held ^by


**

'disease.

Zt^ t'^ \ 7whatsoever disease S he

5 And a ccr5^Hi'.0 Ttg dvOpujirog ekeI '^rpiaicovraoKTOj" 'eti) t'xwv iv liad. was there, BuC' was 'ascertain =man Hhirty -eight ther'e *ycare 'being in ^fi^J^*^^ which had an infirmity ~ ~ )t> ry daQEVEiq,^. 6 TOVTOV IOoJV O Iriaovg KaraKEifXEVOP, Kai thirty and cightyears. lying, infirmity. ^Him "seeing 'Jesus and 6 When Jesus saw him he, and knew that ho , had. been now a longyVOVg on TTOAVV yOJ] XPOVOV -.EXEI, AEyEl avn^), OtAEig knowing that a long "already Hime he has been, says to him, Dosirest thou ti9 m that case, hi saith unto him. Wilt _ , ^ ~ A -.r wvpiE, av- thou be made whole? vyiiig yEVEtjUai; 1 airEKpwt] avrtjj o aamvjjv, well, to become? "Answered ^him 'the "infirm ['m.an]. Sir, a 7 Tho impotent man answered him, Sii-, I II " n~ t/3 ' \ vptOTTOV OVK.tX<>i, iVa Orav to VOtOp ^paWy' have no man, when the rapax^y man I ha vo not, th.at when 'has *been ^agitated 'the "water he may put water is troubled, to r r,, X v^ put me into the pool: /D A EV.tp.dE Epxopai iVW aWog npO but v/hile I am comfJE Eig T>]V tCOAVfxprjUpaV me into the pool but while "am 'coming 'I another before ing, another steppeth
/
1

<

,.-.
,
, , >r

,..

'

'

'

II

:-

11

>

'

>

..

~ Efiov
me
>

/3' Karapaivei.
descends.

o*' o Atyti

avT({) o h](jovg, "Says Ho*hira 'Jesus,

>~<>T

T-,
'

Ey(joai,"
Arise,

II

w apov down before me. ^ r bus saith unto

8 Je-

him, take up Kise, take up thy bed,

** ' kai fiyyeiXoLv T y VTrqi'Trjcrav LTTrA. [f<il o.TTTjyyetAai'] TrA. Ae'yoi'Tes T. ; '^ avTOV (read that his child lives) LTTrA. tt/i/ iopiLV irap avTOiV LTTrA. elirov oiu theref i" ex^ei LTTrAW. fire they said TTfA. g iv T[Xr]. ^'Ott LTTrA. Se now (this) + i " <^ Br)9^a0d Bethr) the (feast) T. TrfA]. 6 LTTrA W. TO Aeyo/jter'Oi' T. o Zatha T. TToAv [LJTXrA. sfcSexo/JieVajf' to eid of verse 4 [G]TTrA. P [(cupt'ovj ' TpiaKOVTa koi ' + avof [the] Lord L. olLS-rfnOTOVV L. Kat [L]Tr) o/ctw GLTTrAW. { TQv his (infirmity) [L]TTrA. ^ jSaAjj GLTirAW. " h [Kttl] and L. 'Eyeipe LTTrAw,
<=

'

'i

19-i
*ndwfiiic.

AN NHS.
Km
9 Kai ^foBkoc"
And
h.s

V.
ly'n'fTO
i,n,nedinLc,y ^Uccn.nc^

9Anaim-

rfm:!fe.'hole"uS
took up his bed, and walked: and oa the samo day wa- tht sabbath. 10 The Jtws therefore said uiuo hiid that was cured, It is the sabbath day it is not la .vf 111 for thco to carry Ihi/ bed.
11

7r0(7rari. ^ov.''(cpa/3/3arof".(Tou, ^v.llaud thyboi. _


^

vymr
.^^

6
,

dvOplOTTOQ,
..^^

>^ai
ftd

luni'
t..k ,.

-UV.^KpdB^^nTOV^'.aVTOV,

Kni
ud

,_^
^

TTEoif Trartf
'

V/j'.Of
iin.! it
,

-i%

aapparoP'kv tKEivy ry

t-)

ii'.>.-

~i,

b...l.

tij.if.nq,.

/^^ 10 EAfyov

was sabUitU -on day. that 'Saul ,. , ' ,, ^ ^ \.,'o/o ICiUOaiOt TSUfp(nrfVI.Ul'tf),2,ufjfiarOVf<TTlV' Tif) had been hualod, Sabbalh -Jews to hioi who it is, therc fore 'the
^^.^i^ud
:

OVV
.

01
,

' j\ ^ x o 3 n <i i i ! a upai TOl' ^K^app<lT07'"'\ 11 " ATrtKptOq ^OIlK.t!ii(rTI OOl bed. lie ahswuri'd it is not lawliil for Iheo to take up tho whole, the samo said . ^ , ~ , ~^. t... t. , TTODICJag JH Vyil], tKSlVOg flOl (7r?J', A/JOV TOV unto me, TaU.: up thy aUTOlCi bod, aud IvaliC. l:i Then mo well, )io to uio said. Take up tlieiu, tie Svfio mado , asked they liira. What , , ,^3 t /n -to, '11 r man is that whieh said ^KpapjiaTov^^cov Kai TnpnraTH. 12 HpiuTrjany '^ovv' aVTOV, walk. Tlioy asked 'thereforb Miim, nnto thee. Take up thy bed and , i , thy bed, and walk? , p n '/jo ApOV ri "tOV ^KpapiiaTOV' 13 And ho that was PlQ taTlV O aVVptJTTOg O etTTtOV (TOl, who said to tlioe. Take up man tho '^boJ is healed wist not who Who
,
,

'

He

He auswered thorn, that mado lue

'

<

>

<

'

conTCyed*' himself a*^ way, a muilitudo be-

o'"*'

'

'thy

7rpt7r/(r( walk? aud

13

'()-()

'I'aQf.ic"
l)ccn lioalod

ovK.ydH rig lariv


know npt who
Ti')Tr<{}.

But he who had

it is,

in tho t>|mpie,^.T.nd^said^unto

H^^Aaenva^d findeth him


wliole':

^esus o.ydp.'lrjuovg
for Jesus

k'^ii'ivaev, iix-Xov ovrog tv ry had uiuve.l away, a erowd being in tho

14 IMfrd
'

phice.

After
to him,
-yflni'iv
j 'wor
;o

Tavra
these things
"j^..

et>p'i(7icei

al'Tuv o'li\<rovg tv ri^ ifptp.


'him
'Je^us
in

Km
and

tl-mv avrifj,
said

made

sin 110

-liuds

tho

Iciiuplo,

more, lost a \vorso th n? come unto thee. dcpirled 15 The

mm

{jyinr

Behold,

, ,

uriKiTi Aiidnravi., ytyot'Cic' ' ,i^, ' j t''sm, ^no-'moro well thou hast be.ome,: y
1 .

iva
i . that

/ Hot
.

lu)

aud told thiJews tint


{!;d"m;doTm;i
IG

Kri
'yi\^y"

(Tot"

yj'//rat.

15
__

'"'ATri/Af^fi'

whoK

^0"^thinffHo->the^^

aj'^oioTTOf Ki 'ai'i/yWont away the man and l.M


i>
'

Ami

therefore did

theJewsperseeuteJcto^__ souijlit us, and


slay hiwi, beoanse he had done llicscthinijs on the sabbatii day.
17
,^^,[1

rjng 'lovoiiioig OTi


^,,y

vyirj.

16 Kdt
And

,.,
,

j^.^^^

^,,.^t

'liifTovg j,u3
,^.

CUl
, ,

TOOTO tVU'lKOV "roV IqcTOVV


thi.s

i,>i.
-

ioTiv 6 TToirjaag avriiv it is who mado hiir.


'

,,

bec.anso of

^per.

oeutnd
11

01 *Jo8Ue 'tho
'

lovva'oi,
'Jews,
-

But

Ji'sut

answer-

ed

them,

worketh ISThcrcfore paTl^. 1 work.


the

Fatlier hitherto, and

My

^icai
j^,,j

kC,r)TOVV
jiought

aUTOV
him
>

_
to kill, - u

<

>

aTTOKTtlVai,".
>

trtoiEi tv fft'/ibecause tha^o things ho did on a ^'ab-

OTI

Tciura
'

, 17
,

--

>t

t>.0-

IrjCTOU^
,

a-KiKpiVaXO
answered ,y
.

UUTOig,
them.
'

<^
O.TTiirtip.^lOU

, \ ~ , t i o i 10 /Hut TOVTO "Oliv" cause he not only had EMC.apTl tpyaC,irai., KCiyuJ tpyaC,OIJ.ai. broken the ftabbath, until now work. Bi'cuuse of this works, aud.I therefore ~ but said also tliat (joil ' ,v' ^.. > ^ ~ 'r was his Fatlier, mak- f.l.aWov kC,t}TOVV aVTOV 01 iOVilaiOl aTTOKTEIVlU, OTI On^dt'OV ''to ^kill, ^him 'the 'Jews because not only inphimself equal with the raoro sought '\ God. ly Then answer' f3,} "? '^^ ' Kttl TTClTepa tCiOV tktytV TOV TO GappUTOV, tAi;V ed Jesus and said uuto but also l''ather 'h "own 'called sabbath, thom. Verily, Torily, X did he break tho
,1
;

Jews sour-rht tho more to kill him, be-

tnth.

But Josua

My

I'aiher

'

'

,.-.

aWU
to

>

'

ca'nrnotrng''o'Mn ^^^^v, Uov equal self, but what he sceth ''God,


what^thtngsslTever'he docth, these also do'o'^For ''the ^'rather lofetb the Son ond
'Jesus

kavTov
^hmiself

TTOiJiv T<p

Oe.p.
(iod.

10 7rrvri,Vro
'.Vu-wered

oh'

'making
to them.

-"thcroforo

'Iv^oig Koi "dTTSv^^'avTolg, 'A^u)i^ a////r Xtyw


and
said

!>nlv,
to you,

ov ci'vaTat
'is 'able

Verily

verily

way

^
'''''

'^'"^

'^

TTOtflV ii^' laVTOV Ol'/StV, from 'himself nothing, to do


doing:
for whatever

PtUv'-IXt)

jSAjTrp Tl anless anything he may see


-nroiy,

TOV Trarkpa TToinvvTa' d.yap.Wv^^ iKslvog


the

TavTCt

'^ai

Father

he

does,

these things also

"opoiiiug ttokl." 6 vi'og tho Sou in Uko manner- does.

20

6. yap TraTijp ^tXel For the F:ither loves

tov
tho

v'toVi Kai Son, and

'

btiii) L.:

K-pd^aTTOl' I-TTrAW. *> ^5 Se

evfle'tos

T.
^

<

+ taland
<=

who however
L[TrJvv
''

LTr.

ovf [l|i[
'l-qa-ovv
T.

[LlT[Tr]A.
i.

**

ja.

tov Kpafi^arov
S trot Ti i.LTTrAW.
ical efjJTOVi'
<>

trov

(I'fad

thy

<JOV
'h
-).

'itTrl.A..

Kpa^aTTOV
'

acrOei'toi/

W;is iniimteiit T.

pKal]
T.

and
"J

L.

eiTreV T.
>

o.TroKTeii'ai G[i.]TTrA.'"
f

01 'lovSaioi

rov

LlTrA.
"

'Irjo-ov? (reati

ho auswcicd)

'

auTOi'
T.

ou*- T.

i\eyev

av

[aJ'J Tr.

' TTOiei

6/AOiws T.

y
trdvTa deiicvvmv
all things

.TOH.K
shews
dei^ei
Troiei to him which -himself 'he' does

195
/.lei^ova
greater

avrcjj

9.

avrog

mi
;

tov-

and

thar*himl"i"'\ioe!'ir Hhnzi and he wiU shew him


fl'^"'^^^ .J'?'^^^

TOJV

'iva v/^telg ^Oavud^jjre." may wonder. ye "these *he ^will ^shew" 'him 'works, that

^avn^ tpyn,

21 w<nrsp
=Even ^as
tvlso

*'"^"

naarTel.

yap 6 irarnp
ll'iog

kyeipei

rove vsKpovc Kal ^woTrota, ovro) kuI 6


the

For a3th0 fnther raiseth ug tho


21

<Eor the ^Fathe? raises

up

dead

and

quickens.

thus

the

^;^^^;';_/J^'^^<l"J^^},^"|^^

^IxJOirOtH. Son whoiChewill quickens;


'

OVg BsXei

22 OvSi yap
.>,

6 irarfjO Kpivei for ttte Father judges


.,
.

OvSh'a, qnickcneth whom he


no one,
'

rtXXabut

Hjv Kciaiv Trdaav. osowkev


"judgment
,
,

'all

TlflixtpiV

TOV VIOV KaOwg


,

VK^t, has given to the Son, ^


r<f
y
'

c%n

23 iva itavng
that
I

"

rifltJJfflV
,
,

rOV Trarepa.

Ooav honour the Son .,eTen as they honour ths

AfXrjV honoureth not the Son honourcth not the Fa-^ I ther which hath sent , > ,1 ^ \ / O rOV.XoyOV.flOV aKOVUJV, KUI TTKTTtVlOV him. 24 Vcrily, verily, a[ir]V \i.y(i3 VfilV, OTL hears, and bcUcTcs I sjiy untcu you, Ho my word erily I say to you, that ho that '' , H ' that hearcth my word, ^ ' , .' V TTBH^/aVTl flSy tX^l l^wrjV aiixiVlOV, KOI etg KpiaiV OVK arU bolicvcth on him Tlfi eternal, a^d into judgment "not that sent me, huth me,, haa life sent him who
OV.rifKjl
I

TOV VIOV
Son
, ,

,,

..

TOV Tvarspa tov nSj^iypaVTa aVTOV. 24


Father

,1

Son: 23 that all men , urj.TljXWV should honour the Son, Father. He that honours not fen as they honour
I
,

all

*'*" ^?,'' ^^^ .'-'n ther juacreth no man, but hath comraittod all judfrmnnt iniro the
2!''^-

,,,-.,,.,
'

the Father.

He

that

the

honours not the

who

Bent

'

him.

Verily

'

'

'

ipX^Tai,
'comes,

dWd
but

fiTa(3'El3ijKev Has passed out of

row OavoTOV
death

elg
into

ti}v ^w/;v.
life,

shall" uot^ come into condemnation but ii


;

'ib'AjJirfV dfi-qv Vcrijy ;7erily

Xsyw vjmv;
I say

oti ipxi^rai wpa ical to you, that is coming an Hour and

vvv
now

ioTiv, triffe.^'2.^Ver;bVveis,

rily,

say unto you,

0T' Ol VKpol ^dKOVaOVTai*' Tijg tpwvrig TQV v'lOV tov BfOV, Kai l^l now'"is'^whcn'tho of God, and ^g^d shall' hear the shall hear Toicp of tho Son the T*henthfi dead
01 thoaa
tujrii/
life

dKovaavTeg
ha/ving heard

'^r/croi'rat."
ehaljlive.

'26 iocTTrep.ydp
For even as

6
the

7raT)}p Father

ix^i

has hear

^J=^. fn(|'^thcv"tht
sh.all livd,

M For
iifa

iv
in

eavTip,
himself,

ouTutg ^iSioKiv
ea

Kai

rip

v'ltp"

^w>)r
Ufe

tx^v ^ *^^
to havo

Father hivth

he gave

also tothe^

Son

g^ve

"to

iv

^aVTlO,
himself,

27 Kai l^OVaiaV eSoJKEV


_and.
^thority
^
'
'

m
,

gave

qvT<p ^tohim

vtog dv9pioTrov B<JTiv. 28 TTOieZv, Wonder not at. of man he la. to execute, because Son / Tt H (jjpa sv OTI epx^Tai y Travreg ot ev Toig fivrj/ieiotg those in the tombS all for ^3 "coming "lan^hour in which , , ,
'

on

KpiaiV have life Judgment fXl-itrto"cxecre also, benrj.9avp,dl!,ETe. tovto' judgment

^aV^
also

the Son to in himself

this,
,
>

<='i"'' ''^

man.
at this

'ukovshall
,
,

l Marvel not 28 '\J^ for the hour


:

'

aOVTai"
hear
,

Ttjg.^lOVriC.aVTOV ,
'

29

'

come forth they t hat ~\ <t. f>ii oi.'ct" Ta<pav\a have -done good, unto the resurrection of evil practifed ' to a resurrection of life, and those that good life; and- they that \-i , , / t ) nt\ TTpat.avTEC Eig avaaTaaiv Kpi^t^g. 6\jov ovvafiaityu) ttolhv have' done evil, unto " the resurrection *Am ^able 'l of to do did to a resmrectton of judgment.. ~ / > , r,, ^/ damnation; SO I can , t n\ Kaihog aKOvu) Kpivoj, Kai r) KpiGig rj ^f mine own self do air .SfiavTOV ^vosv "judgment T judge, and myself hothing; even as ' I hear nothing as I hbnr, I from

ayava

his voice, >

TTOiricravreg eig
,

avaoTaaiv
-

>/

Kai^ tKTropEVaOVTm, ot ra and shall come forth; those that

iseoming, in the which all that are in the graves shall hear his
voice,

.v~ c,iDr]g,

29

and
;

shall

>

",

>

<

ifll)

SlKala iariV
"just
-^is,

'my
will

OV:?iriTU) because I seek not

on

ek\r]fia
TrepL

Toi
of the

TTSi.t^avToi: jue

to 9s\l][ia Tb SUOV, dX\d to melT Is'^j^ltTbeiafife "will my, but the I seek not mine owu ^irarpog.''^ 31 'Edv .syw fiapTvpoi tt,'"rather*Xrt.'hath
'Father.
If
I

"who

-"senb

'uie

bear witnesB sent

nie.

31 If I

bear

inavTOv,ri.fiapTvpia.nov ovkIotiv dXriOrig.


myself,

concefrning

my

32 dXXog ZltZlis'^ofir'^l
Another 32
Inhere
is

witness

Is

not

true.

another

kariv 6 fxaprvpivv Trepl tfiov, Kai *oM" oti dXijQrjg tariv who bears vatuess concerning me, and I know that true is it is
T)

of ^me*'-^'^aud* l""know that the witness whicK

fia^Tvpia
witness

rjv

fiapTvpsl

mpi

lixov..

33

'Y/ttsie

a7r(Trd\-

the

..hich ho witnesses concerning

me.

Ye

tr^u^ "m Ye'^seut unto have joiy^ and he bare wit-

KaTf. TTpog ^'lojdvvr]v^^ Kai


sent

unto

John

fiSfiapTvprjKev Ty dXrjOsia' and he haa borne witness to the truth.


^

34

tytf}
"I

'>^* *'* *'^

truth.

flavfid^ere wnriiier T.

TTA. OOTiAW..

(tat (.TTrA.

6e and [L]T[Tr]A.
X.
''

aKovaovcTiv Itr.

' fT7<fov(rtv
^

Trarpds

LTTrA.
(reoti

^ K(u
of

riS

vl^

eS(i3Kf,v

him wlio

scut

ui c)

0i5aT

ye

know

'lu)Uini}V Tr.

196
3t

T
I receivo

Q A N N H
t*

S.
\aiij3iivuj,
;.

But

not
:

tostimony from

man

^^

qj,
.

'jrand ixvOpioTTOV
,-.i

TUV uapTvoiai'
'

XXd
. but
i
^

rrrfi.th.;r
^,_

but. I.hes<;tl,ii);f8li.cy,

^"*
7-^

i.

, "t

>

^'';^

/"'^"
ye,

-wiiivrss^
^ ^

'

rcccij^c,

timtje might be siivini.

Xsyuj 'iva vfxug


that

^ml'Vlhhirn^Ti''ht? nmi yo' v.nre willing Kaio^Bvog -Koi for a sca-on to roioice iburuing "and lu his lifrlit. 3b Bui I ;
'^
,

things I say

amOi^iTi. may be saved.

35

t/tsTj'ot,-

nv

6 Xj'iyi'Of 6
'lami.

Jle

-was the

(paivwv,
'shiuirg,
.,

vjXEiQ.oi and ye
,

i)9E\ti(TaTe were willing


.

"dyuWinfrOi'ivai^^
lo rejoice
,

>

liave

R.-eatcr
<A't/ of

wltne-.s
tlie

crpog WpClV iV TliJ.^lOTl.aVTOV.


f^,.

oB
.

,,

.>

.-

tyiO.Cl

f)(^(x)

T))v j-tapTVOiaV
the

than
Ihi'

John: for

woi-k-i

which

,,,,,,
'

an

hoflr in

Fal her hath given mo. ^/xilCw to finish, the ^amo greater works that I do, liear uiiuess of me, lliat TTOTtip tlio I'^ither hath sent "Father m;. 37 .Vnd the K.ather ,
. ,

TOV
,,1

,.,-,
^
,

his liglit.
,,
,

But
,.

have
<\

witness
n
<

IwaVVOV"
,

TCI.yap
for the
,

th.an John's
,

'iOlOKtV" (i tpyO, works which ^gavo


,

ff"f

UOt ^me
o
>

'the
'

IVU
that
1

rtMliOCFiO
shovild complete
.^
,

OVTU,
them,
i

aVTU.TU.fpya
the works themselves

..

<>

'a

^tyw
I
\

which
>
'

Hei:t

TTtpi IflOV OTl O hath TTOIW, /JLUpTVpei hath borne that the do, bear witness concerning uic me. Ye r,' ' h TTaTtjp, "aUTOQ^^ have ne.thcr heard his 37 KaC U -TTfp-faQ tflS. voite at any limei nor And the "who sent ''jue 'Father, himself
liiiiLsclf,

wI.k-Ij

nie,

TTrtD/p Father

tte

aTrBaTUAKiV.
has sent,
'

me
'

wjitness

of

'

>

11

>

yUf^rtprJ'|0/JtC)'

TTEpl

has borne witness concerningf


TTtUTTOre,"
OOTi.

y?^ h.a/e'^norhis abiding in you

word tj^OV.
:

OVTS
Neither

(pMWJV.avTOV ^aK^KOark
his voice

dSoQ
"form
abiding

for
^'lotr

me.
"'''^'OU 'his
^-^

havo ye heard at any time,

uor
riot

him"ye''V'liVve
3',l

Sear.:!',

the scrip-

kujpaKaTB.. have ye seen.

38

/CrtI

Tbv.\6yOV.aVTOV

OVK.'kX^'''^ ^/xl-l'OVTa

I'/U'^^'t" thirik'ycTiave^cterna! -si-'Ut for whom y<'"i life: .and th(-y are they ^^ which testify of me gjj I'jEpEJjvare" TCiQ ypcKboc, '' 40 And ye will not ,1; i, Ye search the scriptures, oo.'iie to me that ye
,

OTl

his word And OV aTri(TTl\EV iKHVOQ, TOVT((J


'he,

ye have
I'l-Ulg
3'e

OV.irt(TT:ViT.
believe not.

him
,

'

~ OTl vuEic SoksIte fv i, think for ye


j:

avTalc Kujnv
them
...,

,-i

life

might have

life

411 alt^i/iov fxciv,


liiit^l

Kcii

iKHvai
they

Eiaiv

a't

fiaprvpoudai
bear witness
(''
,

fnm7men^2

etw"'il

to have,

and

are they ^vhieh


TTpOt,"

Trepi concerning-

knowyou, thatyrh;ive ^ijoynot the love of God in you. 43 1 am come in


'

40

Kul

OV.OtXeTS tXOdv and ycarcunwilling tocomo


"

/IE,

^wrjV
life
$

txr}Ti.

my F.ather'sname,and 4,\ yo receive md not if


:

"

to
,

me, that

ye

may have,

A6%aV
Glory
"^

TTapil

anotlior shall come in his own name, hru ye will receive. 44 How
c:in

from
,

^,

i/juttf

OTl ^'tI/V
that

avQpM7rU>V OV-\ajJijiciVM 42 "'aXX " tyVWKa but I have known men I n;ceivo not . ^ ~ / n ayil7rr}V TOV BtOU OH/C.tX're tV taVT6(Q. ,43 tyu)
,
,

<

.^

>

'

yo beluive, receive honour

which
one of

yo
,^

'

the
~
T<{)
,

love
/

of
~

God ye have not


/

in yourselves.
>

I
i_'

,-

tXllAVua tV
have come
in

another, and sock not the honour that comelh


4.'i

the
,

OVOf.iaTl TOV.TraTpOC.jjlOV, Kai OD-Xa/L/pnj'f TE and ye receive not name of my Father,


,,
,

'

jU.'"

from God only?


J)o

tav

a\Mg

>

~ '

me;
11

tXO/J

tV

T({)

OVOfiaTl

~ ;^'
T(f>AOttflf
'

iKHl^OV

n "A(/l//(Ty.'i
n-\ /
I

not think that "n.ame 'his'^own, hixn ye will receivo. if another should come in ~ , 1 will accuse you to., '\\'-\ ^ mi f'jn uAAl).\ioV the Father: there is 44 TTUjg OVVUd^E-UliUQ TTlOTiVaai, COt,aV ''TTapU ^glory ''from 'one "another ovie tliiit accuselh you, to believe, How are ye able even iMoses, in wliom \ / ,/, -i, r> ' ^'r TTUpu TOV flOVOV ^VtOV yo trust. 4G For had Xrt/upaj'Orret"? KOL TljV 00i,av Tt]V only God the which [is] from and the glory ye helieved Moses, yo 'who ''receive,

n<'~
> >

>

ine"''for"irc*w'rotc^of mo. 47 But if ye beii'ow

OV.Z,r)THTi'<,

45

/Xl^.SoKUTe OTl
Tliink not

tyw
X

ye seek not?

that

lCaTr]yopi]<T(iJ will accuse

VfXWV TTpOQ TOV


you
to

the

my

6 KarT]yopu>v v^dv, ^Mwaz/e." elg ov shLu 'yrbel'ie'ie TTarfpa' lariv in whom Moses, accu-es you, Father there is [one] who words ? ^ iTTKTTfveTE.av i'lieig yiXiriKaTe. 46 s/.yap fcTrtffrevsre'MwCTy," Moses, ye would have believed For if ye believed have hopct". ye
-

kfioi'

TTEpLyup
for concerning

t/Koii

tKtlvog 'iypatl/iv.
he
^

47 tlM TOig sKeivov


But
if

me,

me

wrote.

his

ypafihaaiv
,

writiuga
<7f re

ov-7ri(yTeveT, ye believe not,

Trwg

TolgAiJ.olg.p)iiJMaiv

Trtcmiishall ye

how

my words

believe?
'

ayaWiaOrji'ai. c.l/TTrAW.
iyui

<^

fxei^oiv 'LTrA.
''

'

'luidvov Tr.
'

SiStoKeV ha.S giveil TTrA.

(read
-

ttoiu) I

VfAii/ jneVoi'Ttt

TTrA.

^ iv TTiuTTOTe aKijKoaxf LTTiAW. do) LTTrA. e/ceivos TfiA. >" aAAa r,TTrAW. " ovk ex^re rr^u aya-rrriv tov, epavvareTTvA.
^

" AriiJLij/ea-Of LTTrA. deov T. LTTrA ; Mwi)(Tjj VV.

P Trap' A.

"7

1 [0oi}] L.

'

Miovu^s LTTiAVV.

'

Mojiicret'

71.

JOHN._
tuvto.

197
^^^'
**^^

6 Mera
of Galilee

aTrqkQ^v 6 'Itjcovg irkpav Tqq Bakdaaijg ^^^


'Jesus

After these things 'wont ^away

over

the

sea

over the "sea'of GaH-

nig TaXiXaiag
TToXvg^
'great,

rijg TijSepidSog(of Tibenas),_ _^

'/cat

wicoXovflei" avr(p

and

'foUowed
.

'him

'a

oxXoc fe ""l^* '^ the sea of ^;^['"^,^,^j2^^A^^^^^^


=crowd
iTri

OTt

^twpwv"

bocauao they saw

^avTov'^ TO. a:jf>eTa signs of him the


,

sTroiet

lowed
thnt
^'^'"

hinij

because
""'Th''^^

-wbich

ho v/rought upon
'

^Y^Jit^dJd
were
? -f"^ Jesur,

TWV
those

affQsvOVVTdiV. 3 dvrjXOEV.Si

,, Kai BKH
and ihero

who

tig rb '8p6g *ii" 'liJ^OUf Jssus, And ^wcnt ^np 'into ^the "mcuutaia n tyyvg y/ca&)jr6" fiera rojv.jj,aUT}TuJV.avrovJ 4 iji' oe

diseased

,A
tj,

were

sick.

i~^T'v>'>>
end^'was

^ niouDtom,

went up and
with his
tho

sat

TO
~'

rraoxo.'

<
>

with
y
-^

copTrj
feast
/I
-v

twv lovoaiwv.
of tha
'
II

tr

his disciples f '

ir>' o eirapag
'

cvv
ttoKvc
\

T>' ^o It]-

*uear

itjero he sat disciples. 4

And

'the 'pasEOver, the

Jews.
'

^Having *lif ted 'up =then


'

passoTcr, a feast of the Jews, was nigh. 'Je- 5 When Jesus then
lilted up teeTOS, and saw a great company come unto him, he

aovg
BUS

Tcvsoij)va\[iovg,
[his]

kui aeaaafievog
and
having seen
^

/I

on

oxMg
crowd

>/

eyea,

that a great
.*.'\

saith unto Kiilip, TT'n Hoti&v whence shall we buy Whence bread,that these may ' Cat? 6 And this he '>< > T o "ayopao-o/AGi'" aprovg iva (payMGiv ovtol; o rpvro.oe eXeyev eaid to prove him: for shay wc buy J3r.t this he s..id lie himaelf knew what loaves that 'may 'eat 'these? TTZipd'Cujv avTov- avTog.ydp ySet ri (.fieXXsv tvouIv. 7 ^aT- aLworcd'^him'.^Two

tpX^rai
is
1,

Trpog
to
11

'

avTOi>,
him,

-v

'

\syii
.

TTpog
to

<

II

'^Toy^'
1

'Pi\nnroVf
Philip, rTT_~

coming
'

he says

>'

I'

'

I.

do. An- hundred pennyworth Stjvapiioy aproi oyK cit^'^f^oV^hcm'^fbat 'denarii Philjp, "For ^wo ''hundred 'loaves 'not every one of them may apKoiimv avToXg 'iva sKaorog ^ctyrwv" ^paxv.W Xdf5^. i^g^dis^J^^iea lidl-ew some little mivy receive. Simon Peter's brother' are sufficient for them that of them each 8 Asyet aury etg sk Twv-i-MOrjrCJv.avTOV, '.AvSpiag 6 d6eX(bog faith unto him, 9 There

trying

him,

for ho

inaw' what he was about to


AiaKotriujv

KpiOn" avrt^ Ewered him

" 4>lXi7CTrog,

Says

to

him one

of
^

his disciples,

Andrew
E^'tV"

the

brother

hlth

five

barTey l^aye^

^ifiujvog Herpov, of Simon Peter.


-loaves

'Eanv
'Is

7rai8dpiQ.v
'littlo

has Ave^ ^"o^t^'^^^i^yl'o'i^ ri 1<jtlv elg Joaus said. Make the 'what ''are for ^'^'^ *^* down.^ Now there was much grass ~ / , T ^M| ,'. ToaovTovg] 10 EZTTEV.'oe o h](TOvg,IloLr}(TaT TOvgavOpiOTrovg in the piaco. So the men sat down, in nnmso many?' And "said .'Jesuu, Mako the men "*' fl-oout five thou~ ~ ^^< f T > V n avaTreceiv, fjv.oe x^pTog iroAvg .tv r^j tott^. ^avs-KSffov" sand, ii And Jesus *'' t^^ loaves and to recline. Now ^was 'grass 'much in the place rsolined when ho had given " T ''\ '\ r, s 'II ovv 01 avdpeg tov apiVfxov ^djcrti" "rnvraiciiyxtXioi. 11 eXapjiv thanks, he aisti'ibuted 11 to the disciples, and therefore the mea, tho Eumber about five thousand. *Took ^
here,

W /a
;
'

aide,

''o"

tyii ttcVtb

?<* ^^"f^ ^^^^^ ^fishes?

who

doTovg KpiOivovg Kai dvo


'bar.ley

d^j/dnia'

dXXp. ravra
Uufc

and two .omaU

'fishes

^thesa

in
I

'

'

>

'

<

>

<

n,

''ot"

II

n Tovg aprcvg o lijaovg^ Kai ^evxapi(Tn](Tag


\

>

>

'

'and

*tlie

'loaves
oi.Cf.

"J^sus^

and having given thanks distributed

~ n fiam]raig,
disciples,

"J"

juayjjrai"
disciples

>ii

roig
to those

>

avascsijievoig
reclining";

and the

the disciples to them ~ ^ ' ?\ n dieotjicev^^ roie,that wtro set down; to the and likewise of the < ' \ fidhes as much as they ofioiMg.Kai v.ouid. 12 when they and in like manner wero filled, he said
II

k
of

TWV oipapiwv
'

oo-Ov

ijeeXov.

the

small fishes as

much

as they wished.

Xiyei
he says

Tolg.{iaQ7]ToXg.avTov,
to his disciples,

12 wg.oe hsTrXijteijaav "hcTup theliSgmcnts And v/ hen they were filled that remain, that no'LvvaydyETe. rd .irepiaasvaavTa l^^^^ ^uley^' glthered
tho
over ^aad

Gather together
be
lost.

Vbovo

</jem together,

and

fill-

nXdafiuTa,
'fragments,

'iva {ir^.Ti that nothing

aTroX^Tai.

13 llvvhyayov
KXaaadTOJV
jm of fragments
' 1

oiv

may
I

They gathered together therefore from \, the


J,

?he foirment^'oftha
five barky loaves, which remained over and above unto them that had eaten. 14 Then

Kai
and
.,1

iyeuiaav dujdEKa
en 1 failed

i._iK tyeivS

ji-i, hand-baskets

Kotpivovg

tfc

rwv

tt'svtb
five

upTwv
"ioaves

Tojv Kpi9ivu)V
'barley

d
"

PfTTEpiffcrfUffei'"

which were over and abovo to

ToTg those who

(3EJ3pijJ-

had

" riKoKovdei Se LTTrA. eOeupovv LTrA. ' rov<s o<J>0aA/xovs 6 'IijcroOs LTTrA W. y fKaOd^ero T. dn-OKptVeTai answers T. should we buy LTTrAW.
'
'

avrou GLTtrAW.

"^

jbv LTTrA.
-)-

6e and [L]TTrA.

Ti {read a

little) [L]Tr[A].
''

g iv (read aveirea-av LTTrA.

T.

6 LTTrA, ayopda-ionev avrwi/ lttia.

>

Tratfi.
'

little

boy) [L]TTr[A].
"> ovv.

i'

os

LTTrAW

tbs

tTia.
X.

eyxapLarrjaev /cai iSwKfv gave thanks P iirepiaa'evcrav LTTiA. Tal LTTrA.


"

and distributed

therefore (took) LTTrA.

toI<s ixaOtjTal^, 01 he txa&tf-

"

198
j,hoe

Q AN N H
*

2.
iSovrfC
o-

VI.
iTTolrirrfv 3> j ^had ..j done

men when. they

had seen the miracle


that Jf:sus did said This is Ot a truth that

ko(T<V.
.

14 o'l.ovv.dvOpwrroi

eaten.

Iq

'irjrjOVl^,'^
'''^''^''^'

.. _, u The men therefore v _i haTlDg B?en what iXiyOv/'Ori OITO^ ICTIV ci\r]9wq 6

(Tntieiov
f

SJgn

1TpO<prjTr\Q

come Into the wor"d.


15

"''!
_

^his
11

is

truly

'

the

prophet

who

When

Jesus there-

r^pT^^^j^Qg
i3

f,'^

they would'come and


t.ake

coming'

into the

^^j, ^(5(y^Q,, world.

Jq

'Ifj^oVQ OVV yUOVQ OTl fliXJesus thereforeknowtngth.it they

him by

force, to
'hft'o

XovGiv
are a^'"'*

dcpartcd^gpin
'*'''*

tpxf(Tdai [fai apTTCt^eiv avTov, 'iva TTOiTjauxjw 'atrov" Income and seize him, that they may make .him

mountain himsetf a- jSaaiXia, ^dviX'''PV^^'^^^ TraXtV BIQ TO


king,
witfwii

opog

aVTOQ flOVOQ.
alone.
.

w
it
>

igain

fo

the mountain himself

16 And when even Tvas nou; come, nis oisciples went down unto

16 'Qq.H
j^^ when
>

6\(/ia evening'
^

iyfvero KaT'if5r]aav oi.na9r]TaL(iVTov


became ^went

(Iri

Mown

T7JV VoXacrffaV,
the
,

-.

17 Kat hfifjaVTeQ

the sea, 17 and entered into a ship, and went over the sea tow.ard

\' ji-TTipav TTJQ a VaAaffm!)^


over
,
,

sea, ~

and having entered into the


ilC,

wi^

^KaTTSpvaOVfl."
Capernaum.
y
>

Big ^TO'' TtXoiOV Ifp^OVTO "ship they were going: ' > x >r

mi

'his "discipleB \ ~

to
'

II

^Kai OKOTia

f/orf

Capernaum.
them.

And

it

was now dark, and JeBUS was not come to


18 And the sea arose by reason of a great wind that blew. 19 So when they had

the
ii

'sai'
,

to
^ '/i

<

And
>.

dark
i,

already
,

tytyOVH," kai 'OVK SMjAvUei^TTpoQ auTOVg O


it
/^

. a

,,

>

i\

>

17](T0Vg,
'Jesus,
ti

10
>'\

r).T
\

had become,
/^

(to'd
/

*n4t

vaAaaao ClViUOV fXiyaXoV irViOVTOQ


/ '^ '
<
ii

''had '\

*come
-.*
'

^to
*

'them
?
'

and the
-irv

by a wind 'strong bjowlng sea Havtuff " rowed about five and _' n b I' d,' -ii n twenty or thirty fur- KOTSQ OVV WQ '^ffraCIOVQ" "eiKOfftTTfVTi" TJ rpiaKOVTU VftjpOVatV 'twcnty-tve 'or *furlongg ^thirty they see longs, they see JesYis rowed then about
'

"Cl^yElpiTO. wag agitated.

lU tATjAa-

rnd^nawingn'ighu'mo theshipr.aud they were


SnTo''thwn^iti's''i'fbe

rdv 'lijaovv TTtpiTTaTovvTf


Jesus

'

tTtl rijg

OaXdaarig, Kai iyyvQ tov


sea,

walking

9a

th

and
Bnt he
says
'

near

thi

^^"''ov
'^'''P

y/ro/ffvw
coming,
'

Koi

l^o^h^Hav.
r^.

20 O.U \ky(l avTolc,


to tfieni.
'

not

.-xfrnid.

21

Then

'and thay "^ere frightened.

h"'^'nl'^T'{hi'n'''J.'^^ hiui into the ship: and

'Er<^ (>i'
^

immediately the ship


'"^^'

''

Va'^i I

u^.(pof3ti<T9t. " ' jr r' fear not.

21 'neeXoV
They

^, ^ ^ .,,. wore Willing then to receive


.

OVV XaBelv avriv


.

him
land

TlT^ the'^'went"^ '

^'^ '"'* into the

^^OCOV, Kol
ship,

SvOswg ^TO ^XoldV y6Vro" and immediately the ship was


'

iTTl

hPjg yjjf"
the

'

at

sig

VTTTJyov. to which they were gnin^.


f)v

22ThodayfoUowing,

^2 Ty tTTavpiov
On
^^^'

^xXog

o JffTr]KdQ
stood

when the people which stood on the other side


there w.os none other boat there, save that

the

morrow

the crowd which

Trhpav rrlc 0ctthe other sloe of the


'

Xdaaijg,
^tKElvo

^tOWv" OTl TrXoidplOV having seen that ^small ''ship


fi'c

dXXo OVK
^other

fjV

f /Cl

El'./Z?)

'iv

'no

was there except one

IviBnaav

o'l.txadriTai.avTOV^^^

Kai

on

oil

23 aXXa. Of ^iiXBfv =caine (but other there came other boats '^ > ~ \ .. ^ r. < from Tiberias nigh un- "'7rA0(f/pia tK l'lj')(:piaC0g lyyvg TOlf TOTTOV OTTOV ttpayOV TOV to the place where they 'small Ships from Tiberias where they ute tho near place the did eat bread, after OVV (.UiV O that the Lord had apTOV, evxnpiOT7](ravTOg TOV KVpiOV 24 OTS given thanks:) 24 when bread, ^having ""given ^thanks 'the when thcrtf ore ''saw 'the Lord ;) the people therefore ./ , saw that Jesus was OxXog OTl \1]a0VQ OVK iOTlV tKH OVOt Ol.jJiMrjTai.avTOV, tVenot there, neither Ms ^crowd that Jesus ^not there nor 'is his disciples, they .i^discip!e.'<,they also took . ,t ,, t> a \ ~ >t/aVTOl Hg TU o "TrXoiU Kttl 1]X90V Hg ''KaTTEpshipping, and came to p^OaV "/cat CaperCapernaum, 'seeking ^.ntercd 'also "themselves into the ships and came to
disciples were gone aBay alone; 23 (howbeit

and that ^not that ihto-which entered his disciples, T-^J^lXli^ll f^f^ '^ cipteswereentered.aiid ^ that Jesus went not avvHrri'iXOiv TolQ.uaOrjTolg.avTOV 6 'Irjaovg eig rh ^TrXoiapiov," with his disciples into ' . =went 'with small ship, --his 'disciples 'Jesus iijto the the boat, but that his , ? 1,

aXXd
but

/xovoi oi.fiaQyjTai.avTOV airr}X9ov, alone his disciples went away,


,

,,_,,.

>

-^..'
.-,,
11

.,.-_,

/-,

,,_,.

>

<

's

'I'ljo-ous

(TiimJ) LTTrA.
'Itjotovs *

{read he bad done) TTrA. ' (fievyii escapes T.


1^

to (read a ship} TTr.^


them
"=

et? 761/ koct/xoi'

epxoufvos
''

'f.

'

a.ii-tbv\read

Kai^xipvaovn, LXTrAW.
y ov?ru>

KareAaPcv &e avToii? 17 a-Koria and darkness overtook 6ieyeipeT0 TiA. Trpb? avTov? T. a)(7"el I,.
'
'

T.
t.

not yet LTTrA.


LTTr.
ei/e'^rjcai oi

eyefero to rrAoioi' LTTrA. iiiaflrjToi avTOU GLTXrA.

tjji'

yijv T.

? ecSof

saw
''

ships

t..

jtAocoi/ ship GLTTi A. o TrAoidpia Small (cai O LTTrA W.

"' TtAoia '^ASoi' T. '^ but TTi[a]. shlDS LTTrA. P Ko'^api'aWM LTTrA'W.

ordfiia *" LTTrA.


6e

eKCU/o eis o
I

^ eiKOCrt TreVre

i ;

VI.
^

JO
"

HIT.
Kai

199
fypoiTfC

i-Gotiu

^nrovvTSc
seeking

rbv 'Iriaovv.
JCBUS.

25

ftvruv ffJesus 25Andwheii A.d havrng found him ^Tthelhor dde^'^f


tlie sea,

iripav

Trjr

OaXaaarjg,
sea,
I

eItTOV
,

avrt^, t'yajS/Si," TTOTE a>^


Rabbi,
_
'Jetius
,'

they said unto

Uie other side of the

they said to him,


'n

when
_
,

here
,

yeyovag;
hast thou como
>
V

26 AneKpiQl] auTolg O
?

>

Irjaovg Kal eZttEV, 'Afll)v


ajid

'?lv est thou i^-i.^'^To'iT" hither? 26 Jesua answered them and


said, Verily, Terily,
I

s^iy unto you. Ye seek .^ . ^r. me, not because ye saw eioere aijfieia, *" miracles, but beVerily signs, I say me, not because ye saw but ^ ^ ^n V n <^^"se ye did eat of the OTl Kpay^TE K TU/V aprwV Kai tXOpTaavriTf.. Zl tpya^taUE loaves, and were filled. because yc ato Work * 27 Labour not for the of the loaves and were satisfied. meat which perisheth, ' >-\-\ , \ n ~ Ut) TT/V ppM<7lV but for that meat TIIV ppwaiV T>]V aTr0AAVfiSV7]V, aAAa which eudureth uuto v food perishes, tot [for] the which but [for] the food / everlasting life, which y .% T7)V fitVOVtyaV EIQ ^ioriV aiWVlOV, r/V O Viog rOV avUpWTrOV the Son of mail shall give unto you: for him eternal, which tlie Son which abides uuto life of man ~ hath God the Father ~ .It r J J a ' 'v/xLV dujaEL'" rovTov.yup o Tranjp tafpaytaev o Oeoq. sealed. 23 Then said [even] God. to you will give for him tho Father sealed, tliey unto him, What

=Auswered

=them

said.

Verily

afii]v

Aeyw
,

^/

u/ziv, to you,
,

' V 4jjri7e Ye seek

jue,

oux
. ,

>

o"
.

aW

>

'

,)

>

>

>

>

>

'

>

'

'

'

'

28 EZttov
They
Tc\

the work!)

Trpbgairov, Tt Vo60V)itj/," iVa ipya^w/i0a. Srg'^tw'orMworks that we may work of God ? 29 Jesus anhim, What do we, to tpya rovOeov; 29 'ATrEKpiOrj'd'-lrjfroig Kai eIttev airolg, S^'^TWs'^i/ 1 jfe work
cl'V
said therefore

of God?

^Answered

'Jesus

and

said

to them,

of God, that ye believe

Tovro

ov rb tpyov TOvOEov,"iva ^7ri(TTevai]rE^^ Etg s^ut.' 3o''niev^ ^sl'id is the work of God, that .ye should believe on him whom therefore unto him This avT(p, Ti oiv iroiEig J^"""* J''^" showest oiv KTTecrreiXei' EKElvog. 30 'Elwov They aid therefore to bim, What '-'then Moest may Eee,''"aud believe 'sent 'ho. thee ? what dost thou tpyai^y; ld(i)j.iEv icaimarEvcwfJievaoi} ri (TV GiipAlov^'iva may believe thee? what dost thou work? ^^'V. ?! ^^''-'f^'H^^ *thou 'sign, that wo may see and ""' dt mann.a in the ~ 81 o'i.'^arkpEgJmwv 'tb aavva i^ayov ev ry eprjf^t^, ..Ka0wg. 4esort; as it is written. Ho gave .them bread in thw wilderness, as Our fathers the manna ate from heaveu to eat. 1 5. ~ ^ , icTLV yEypajlf-lEVOV, AprOV EK TOV OvpaVOV tOUJKEV OVTOig 32 Then Jesus said unttrrtv
'

it is

Written,
TIT 00 EIttev 32
>

Bread out of tho

heaven
'

he gave
1
1
'

"them
'

(payEiv.

ovv
II

avroig
t
II

-.

,r

iTjnovg, A}n]v
'

cifirjv

Atyw
I say
,

'

to taem,Veril7, verily, ^ ^"y '"'*^ y"' Mo.se8 gave you not that

VflLV, Ov ^M<i}<T)]g" ^CECWKEV" toyou, 'Ko"t 'Moses 'has 'given

to eat. ~

/-

wm
<

-Said 'therefore *tc^thcm


~

Jtsus,

Verily
>

Tr">

VfllV

TOV .aprOV EK rOV OVpa- you


the

verily ~

yon

bread out oi the


>
'

o.7Tarr]p.fiov oiciojtv vfiiv tov aprov. ek tov ov~ which comcth down von; yqii tho but my Father .gives ^bread 'oUt ''of ^the ^hea- from heaveu, and givoth life unto tho world. ~ ~ \ >\ ' " ~ n ' 00 n ' > paVOV TOV aKrjUlVOV. 33 O.yap apTOg V tov UEOU EOTIV p 34 Then said they unto ven For the bread he Who him, Lord, evermore 'true. of God is

vov

aA\

i.v'vt

j.>5.

tread from heaven but my Father giveth tho true bread hca- from ho.aveu. 33 For the bread of God is he ,
'

'

'

'^

KarajSaivbyv
comes
ilotvn

Ik
oi'v

tov ovpavov, Kai Km)v SlSovq


the

T<p
to tho

K6(Ti.i(p.

fs

out of

bearen,

and

And Jesus'said unto


1

lifo

gives

world.

them.

am

the bread

34 BlTTcy
They
this broad.

?aid thorcforo

dprovToirov,
aprog
bread

irpbg avrov, Kypte, TravjOTS Sbg j'/pv rbv eth^o^me^hau nc^v'?; him, to Lord, always give to us hunger an<l he that ?5 EItvev ^d'^' aiTocg 6'I^(roi5ff, 'Ey(f. t>t o -'Said 'and 'to Hhem am the Q^id uuto you.^6%'Sf 'Jepus, I' That ye
;

SfhlsT
b^i

T^ig Z'^r^Q'
of lifo
:

6
he that

|)%OjUvog Trpoe ^/is"


.comos
to

cv.[j,ri

^TTEivday''^

mo

in no wise

Kai

TrLffZeviOV El^ EUe


boliovcs

cad ho that

on mo

OV.arj in no v/iso

'^Sfd/rjdT)^

may hunger, that the Father civeth TCWTTOTE^ 36 aX\' me shall come to me;
But
"<

^^^^f ^'"37'

Tn

may thirst
and
sjiall

at any time.

n that

oometh

eIttov vf.nv OTi Kai fuipaKars" I said toyoa that also yo have Been

"^ytte"

Kai ov.inaTEUETE.
believe not.
Jj^Et"

37 Trav
Alli

mo
EfXi

o diSwGLv
Ihat
-gives

jJLOi

b iraTtjp rrpbg
to

''ma 'the "Father

me

Kai tov Epxocome, and him that comes

* '

'FaP^cC
T.

T.
''

' oc'Scoo-ii'

vitXu

TTtOTCVTjTe TTrA.
; <i

ovv therefore t

6e [L]TrA.

f. " Muivo-^s LTTrAW.

gives to you
e/xe TirA.

iroitojuev

eStxiKSP wetwo-ei shall

shbuld,we do EOLXTrAw. > -f- 6 T. gave LTrA.

hunger

L.

6ii//Tjcri

shall thirst LTirA.

fxe [l]t.

200
came do\vn from heato do mine
(fhat

QA N NH 2

VI.

veu, not

ffK"

* ^^ ^'^^ "' '^^^ ''"^ ^ <"^^'^ "'^t. For I have come down , rOV OVOaVOV, OVY t^O Sttoiw" TO OiXnua TO lUOV, dWd

39

oFhim And

this

is

sent toe the Fa-

''"'"^^''^

hVayen,

not that

I should

do

Wu

W,

but

ro
*^

9i\)]IXa
will

TOV
him who

TTBU^l^aVTOC
.^

llE.

^ent

m^tharo^aU

_ of

^ sent

L.^

39 rOlTO-^i
And
this

icTlV
i.

TO
th^
1

which he hath given OkXtJ/Jia


thtiig,but"houirrai3e up a^ain at the last day. 40 And 'this is the will of him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and beuevcth on him, may have everand I lasting- life will raise him up at 41 The the last day Jep's then murmui-ed because he at him, said, I km the bread which came don-n from
it
:

^i"
jJLOl,

TTEjU'i/zaVrOf jUf ''TTarp'OC," Vj/M TTOV O StOuJKfV of the -fieut "me 'Father; that [of] all that he has given

TOV

Vho
,

me,
^

I
,

fir}Xnro\'fCU) i% should not lose [any] of


, ,

aVTOV, fiXXd
It,

hut
i,^/;,
>

dvaaTr)<Jt) should raise up


.

aVTO
it
i

'iv"
in

Ty tCTXaTy
the
/
i

lljXEpS},'.

40
.

TOVTOrCf}^ tOTlV TO

z^'-,

last
,

day.
..

And
.

this

is
-,
,

the
.

(}i\r]fia will of
,
,

^TOV

him who
,

,.

k
sees

TTifXT^aVTOQ /iE^ '^'^


Bent
>

"^(^-Q
'

O VEUipUJV

TOV VIOV KUl


the

TTKJTtVttJV
believes
^
i

me,
>

that everyone
> >

who

Son
/

and
,

> / y i,wr)v f'C ciVTOV, txy him, should have life on

<

auoviov, KOI avaanjao)


eternal;
'-n
'

>

avTov
^him
^
>i

<

'"iyu"
'J

and

'^will ^raisc

'up
<

>

'

<

'

'^V i-'^X^'^V at the last

W^9^'
day.

*!

at

v EyOyyV^OV

OVV
6

01

lovoaiOi TTEpi
Jews
SK
about

\rere

murmuring
o
the

therefore the

saTd^Tsnotthi^'je^C a^TOv,
the" sou

OTi

dTTSv, 'Eyio
I

iii.u

uftTOQ

KaTalBdc;

row

of

Joseph,

1".

because he said,

am

bread which came

down out of the


Je.sus

thirwe'lmow'?"howiS OVpaVOV.
it

42

KUl

tXeypV,
saying.

''0vx"-0t>T6gJ(TTLV 'l7](J0VQ 6 v'log


Is

then that he saith

heaven.

And were

not this

the "Son

heav'ln?43lr"usthe?f- 'i'^'"^^' fore answered .ind said of Joseph, of

/^ ^/^^'C whom we
he,

OtdafXEV TOV TTUTipa Kul TrjV ,X7]Tipa ; know the father and the mother?
Out of the
heaven
I have

unto

them,

Murmur ^rwC ^oiv" XiyeL%IlT0Q,^^":OTl EK TOV OVpaVOV


how
therefore says

44 N^ma^n'^^can coiu^4 to me, except the Fa-

KaTafik(iT}Ka; come down ?

43

'ATTiicpiOt]

Murmur not uu^'^draw hinv 'ind"! will raise him up at 'yt^fr'" CtXXtjXcuV. 44 OvSbiQ SvVQTai kXQelv TTpOQ ^/i" fdv-fllj the last d.ay 45 It is vvith one another. No one is able to come to me unless tne prowritten < , , ' > / / >\ > phets. And they shall o TTOTifp o TTifiwag fiE tXKVoy avTOv, "xrai lyiji* avaoTtfaoi be all taught of God. the Father who seat me draw him, and will raise us I Every man therefore ~ , , ' i r " tv.at hath heard, and avTOv * Ty scTxary ?//Ltp^. 45 tOTiv yeypufifiivov tv toIq Trpohath learned of the him at the last day. It is written the in proFather, cometh unto , j ^ ^ tOOVTUl TTaVTEQ CLCaKTOl >TOV" BiOV. liac me. 48 Not that any (prjTaig, Kai man hath seen the Fa- phets, And they shaU be all taught of God. Everyone " ther, save he which is ~ _ < < > > t n n ' ovv" o aicovaag TTupa TOV TTUTpog Kci fimuv, tpxirai of God, he hath seen the Father. 47 Verily, therefore that has heard from the Father ana has learnt, comes ' verily, I say unto y*i, " ' a n n Tig fwpflK>'," El.fXT) 46 0^% OTl TOV TTUTlpa h O He that belicveth on T^POQ to me: not that "the 'Father 'anyone "ho s 'seen, except he who mo hath everlasting ' t life. 48 I am that " _ u An bread of life, 49 Your *^^ TTOpa TOV i)eoV, OVTOQ tiOpUKEV TOV '^TTaTSpa." 47 afi1]V from has seen God, he the Father. Verily Fathers did eat manna is

"^ow" ^o" 'h^ffovg Kut alTTSv avTolg, "Answered ^therefore 'Jesus and said to tliem,

Mif.yoyyv^Ere

>

ii

>

,,

>

>

<

'

>

. ii

/<

'

>

'

>

''-/)to you.

'c

'

'

are'^'dtad.^'^^o^ThiMs ^A"?^' the bread which com- verily


1

>.6yw vulv,
I

TricTTEviov '^eig
believes

tjtlf "

iX^l ^tu?)v alujviov.


has
life

say

He that

on

me

eternal

v'en.thata^^ma,' ^^ h*^ '>' apTog

Tijg ^toijg.
of
life.

49 oLTraripig.vfiwv ttpayov
Your Fathers
ate

am

the

bread

^t6
the

fidvva iv Ty manna in the

iprj/xtf},"

Kal d'^iQavov
-and
died.

50 otTog
This

icTiv 6
is

desert,

the

apTog

6 tK Toii bread which out of

ovpavov KaTajSaivwy, iva


heaven

comee down,

th'at

Tig i? anyone of

avrov
it

eju.

T.

OLTTrAW

GLTTrAW. TOV naTpo'; fiov of Ovyl xr. p vvv now ttpa. " /aeTo. Tr. 1 ovv G[L]TTrAW. 6 TTr. oStos (read Ae'yet says he) [lJTfA. + 61/ in (the) OLTTrAW. ' " Kpiyui LtTrA. ' E|U. TrA. y toi) GLTTrAW GUI' " eju.e TTrW ^ eo^paKev Tt-i; LTTrAW ' fieoj' God T. GLTTrA. eis e/i^ T[Ti AJ.
''

iv (read at the) TrA.


^
"

'

aTTo

from LTTrA.
[t'vw] l.

*> 8 Troirjcru T. -yap for (this)

Jrarpos (read of him who sent)


'

nay father LTTrA.

"

-|-

in (the) lt.

"1

if

Tfj epTj/iO)

TO fxdvva. LTTrA..

VI.
<pdyy Kal
ixrj

'

JOHN.
ol
tjioi i
ei'/^i

201
^^j-', 'living,

airoOdvy.
die.
^

dprog o

may
K

eat

and

not

am

the 'bread

TOO ovpavov KcirajidQ' idv


tlio

out of

heaven

came down

if

rig <pdyy anyone shall have eaten of

thereof, cnu ,; 6 ^^* which ing broad which came 'Ik tovtov i*?^"" fr"^ heaven
this
this'"^rea'd"^'he'^"EhaU

ov tyw live for ever: nud iha ^i^aerai" eig.rbv.aiujva. Kai 6 dprog Ss and the bread also which I f or evei?', bread ho shall livo i^^'^y flesh wbMi''l Suxro)^ vvtp Trig rov will give for the Ufa SwcTio, Sjj_(jap^,uov iuTiv, ^r}V lyw *iU give for the =of nho o* the wor'd., 52 Tho which I will give, Is, my flesh Jows therefore strove y ~ '^^'^ -,, , T themselves, ovv 'irpog ai\M]Aovg oi -r lov- among Kuofiov (,wr]g," 62 Efiaxovro world 'life. Were contending therefdre with one another the Jews Eayiug, Hov/ can this .man give US' fea flcKh \ t ~ n Vt~ k t t ovvarai ^ovrog tjf.uv" oovvai tyjv to eat? ssThenJosua Aeyovreg, caioi, ^aid unto them, Vc:-ily, ''us How is able 'he ^to 'give saying, verily, I say unto you, ~ ~ ~ f'r. TnT T 'Jt 'a (jiayuv; 53 Elttet ovv avroig o*Iri(Tovg, Ajirjv Except ye oat the ifosh aapKa^ ot the Son of man, "Verily 'Jesus, ^Said ^therefore *to ''them [hls] to eat ? 'flesh Olid drink hla blood, / ./ (pajr)TB rrjv (rap/ca row viov j: have no life in jon. aiirjv Aya vjxiv^ eav.firj floah of the Son I i '.Vhoao cateth my I say to you, Unless ye shall nave eaten the verily f ~ ~ fiesb, and driakcth my T r> Triijre xurov to aij-ia, ovic.txiT c,m-ijv blood, hath eternal rov avvpuiTTOV' icai blood, ye hn,ve not lifo Bis of man and shall have drunk Hfe and I will raiso

Tovdprov

'

I,

<

'

Hug v

II

'

>

>,v/
'

<),
1

>

~,~

>

'

>

'",r>
drinks

iv iavTolg.
In
yourselves.

64
He
life

6
that

rpwywr
eats
eternal,

/xou Tr)v

adpKa, Kai nivwv juov


flesh,

my
'^'koI ty(i"

and

my
"

657OTm"eesiii3*moat indeed, and my blood


ihat' eatet?rmy cL^*!

rd

alfia, e'xei blood, has

?wr}v aiwviov,

dvacThcuo uvtov
will
r.aise

Ty

and

up
is

him
food,
/u.ou

in tho

and drinketh myblood)

i'jXdTy Vl^epr 55
last

i,.ydp.cTdpl,xov odXtiOulg' tUTiv 0poJ<yig, ical


.for

day;

my flesh
Tvoaig.
drink.
is

truly

and lag
Trjv
^

f^^^"" t? H^TiJ.
ivither hath sent

Th.ali-id.fxov my bloody
,

a\-?/0w;" truly
" ^'

kfytiv

56

rpwywj/
cats
-^

He that

^my
^

p^tiKir'^^ohe^fhatc'^'r eth mo, Iven Im shall

aapKU Kai n'lvwv


flesh

and

drlnka

jxov to alfia, kv kfioi usvet, icciyw tv avTip. my blood, mo abides, and I in him. in

Y^l^^
ven
:

f"^-

^^^

?;^"^

^^i'^J^^'To J^^,^
not as your fa'^'l'

67 KaOojg aTrkaTtCKkv ue 6
As
/

*mnt
< <

'mo
/

Z,CjV iraTrip, 'the "living ^Father,


,

Kciyw ^a>
and
I live
II

^id
because of
?
>

^'^"^^ <^"}

TOV
jhe
tflS.

TTCLTEpa' Kai
also

O
,

TpwyutV
oats

fie,

KUKElvog P^r/asrai"
ho also
,

Father, he ,/_-,_,,t(JTlVthat apTOg 58 otTOg

me,

Ct shall live bccause.of


'

V'

are dead: he that " eateth of this bread


live
^Ij^-ii

.'"'^"""i

foK. ever.

me.
.
'

This

is

TOV" O '*SK the bread which out of the


. '

-II

o OVpaVOV Katapag'
>

iieaven
'
II

came down,
>

^^ TheEO things said he in the synagogue, as he taught in Capcr-

/i ov Kavwgt<payov

oi
'the

TvaTtpag
^fathers
_
.

r"

II

>

'^v/xujv"

Not

as
c

"ata
,

-'of'you
.,

*ro fiavva," Kai manna, and the


,

'O airwa'

naum. eOManythersfore of

died:
>

when they
this, said,

his disciples, hr.d heard

VOV
h(j

O
that

TpWyuiV TOVTOV TOV apTOV %T;(Terai


eata
T

'

'

II

>

This

is

.an

Eig.TOV.aiUlva. hard saying; who can


forever.
vT/'
II

this

rr\ lavTa o9 m

bread
~ ? ?
'

shall livo
*

eiTrev tv avvaywyy^ oiSaoKOJV tv ^KaTrepvaovfi." ^is disciples murmurCapernaum. These things he said in [the] synagogue teaching in ed at it, he said unto n > ''* .. ~ T_., them, Doth this offend t\t\ OO lloAAOt ovv aK0V(raVTg tK T(t}V.Ua&r]T(t)V.aVTOV EITTOV, you? 62 What and if said, Many therefore 'having 'heard 'of "his ^disciples ye shall see tlie Son

hear it ?<il When Jcsua knew in himself that

TT\^>

i.~

2k\j;p6c iariv ^otTog oXoyog-'^ Tig SvvaTai avTOV aKOvsiPi ^fheroTe wa^Wore ? Hard w to hear ? 63 u is the spirit that is this word who it is able
.
;
..

61

EiS(jjg

St 6 'hjaovg tv tavTi^
"Jesus
in
himself,

'Knowing 'but

yoyyvt,ov(siv "murmur that


"This

on

Trepi
''conoernlnf

TOVTOV
"this

oi. fiaSrjTai.avTOv 'hia "disciples

eTttcv avroTg, said to them,


.

Tovto vjxdq OKdvdayou


of

'does "of-

\iZ,Ei

62 lav oiv Qewp^re tov vibv row dvQpoJTrov


If

dvaascend-

feud ?
ing up
f i.K

then ye should see tho


j)v

Son
\

man
it is

l3aiv6vTa oTTov

ro.TrpoTSpov
'

63 to
The

Trvevfid Igtiv
.

to
which
f<ui)?, 17
''

where he was Tou tp.ou aprov,

before?

Spirit

vdp^
oCtos

fjiov

i<Triv T.
1

f/jtrei of niy bread, he shall ^ r\v iyia Buxru) LTTrA.

live t.
'

e virep t>?s rov KotriJiOV

oi 'loufiouot irpbs

dAA^\ov9

l^-

^fJ-i^v

t.

P ^13<rei LTTrA.

ITrA

"" (cayw LTTrA. + [ev] L. ' f out of LTTrA. v;ix<0>' LTTrA. Hcuiiafivaovu. LTXrAW. * 6 AdyOS oJrO? LTTrA.

4y ftWToC his'

L..

"

TO fjidvva GTTi

" a\r}9ri'; (is)

true ltiva.
'

A.

f>jcret

"

202
quickenetW; the
flesh

QANN H
oap^ ovK
flerh
^

S.

VI,
oiidiV
Wothing
Ufe

VIL
iy(i>

Ztjoxoiovv,
'("i^^ens,

>'/

Cd8
unto
64

that If peak you, they are


^''''

the

u)<l)(\ei profits

TCL

'oftuaTa
"^

the

'^^'

i?'"'i'\'l'' But there

are some of you that heiieye not. For Jesus^ knew from the boginning

^XaXa}" VLiiv. TTViviia ioTiv Kui spirit "are and speak- to you,
*^
^

tit>r)

tOTiv.
are;
f
t

wWds which { 64 y^dW" i'laiv


but
i

,v

D^wi' Tivsg ot Of-TriiTrfvowfriv. some who believe not. ^^^ ^j

yofi.yap
,

there are ~
>

who

that o hjaoVQ TiVSQ flCTIV 01 fXll.TrKJTBV^'.WTEQ., (cat TIQ iCTlV O who believe not, and who ia- he who who they are who 'Jesus betray him. , ~ "^ nir a DO Kui f Afyfv, Ata.rouro eipiJKU VfLlV, 6s And he said, There- Trapaoojattjv avTov. foresaid I unto you, shall deliver up And he said, Therefore have I said to you, him. that no man can com.e ' . t / ii /i ~ t OeOo/XEVOV unto me, except it were 071 Ol/Oeif CVVaTai iKmiV TTpOQ ^flB" tav.flTf 13 unless it be griven unto him of my that no one is abfe to come to me given ~ u \. / . / Father. 66 From that ^^ )_ \\ "^ tK TOV.TrarpoQ-flOV.^' TToWoi c OD lifC TOVTOV time many of his dis- V7-(f> thiat From from my Father. [time] many ciples went back, and to him ~ wftlked nq raor^ with a ^ >' ~\ n o ~k aTDjAt/Ol' TU)V.[infit]TU)V.avrOV" Eig.Ta.OTTKTU), KUl OVKiTl )Ur hiin. 67 Then said Je 'of "his_'disciples back, and no more with BUS unto the twelve, *went ^away
they' .-^ere

,,_,
, ,

,,

,,

f^ for 'knew *from [*the]

,/..
.
<

(^PX^^

'^beginnins'

beiiered not, and

'

should

>

ii

>

>

,,

<

'

'

i'<

es'lhen^Shnlm'^Peter answered him. Lord,


eternal
69

avTov TrepUTTaTOVV.
him
^Also

67 dTTfv

oiv

'Irjaovg
'.Tesus

walked.*

^Said ^therefore

roilg 6u)diKa, to the twelve,

tho?hSt\t"w"ordfof M) Kal vuEiQ


life.

06Xre

And

'ye

'are ^wishing to go

iTrayetv : 08 'A7r,Kpi9,j away ? ^Answered

<=o^v"
'therefore

ai^rtii 'hiin
l<xi7}Q

tirat*'"thou"irT^thIt Christ the Son of the lining God. 70 Jesus

?'>'^' 'Simon
eternal
g;-t
^

UErpog, Kvpi,7rp6g riva airEXevcrontOa; pqfxara


"Peter,
,

Lord,

to

whom

shall

we go
Ka'l

words

of life

answered them. Have chosen you not I twelve and one of you

aldJvioV
qf,

iivui

'i\BlC' thou hast

69

Kai liutig TTETTKJTfVKauEV

spakeo/ Judas
riot the son of
*?''

Isca-

f^ ^J tl>at thou art the

j i, we have believed and ^piajog 6 VlOg^'WoV Qi.OV ^TOV

vij

lyvWKaatV ju' known and have i'


'AtTS-

Christ

the Son

of 'God 'the

t,{iJVTOg.^^ 7.0 -living.

An-

It
1^5

should betray him, beingoneofthetwelve.

was that g^ored


and

Simon: icpiQr) avTolg 6 'Ir}(Tovg,

Kai t^
of

them ,,, VjiiiiV


you
[son],

Jesus,

slg OiafjoXo^ tariV, one is ? a devil

^'o'l
twv
the

tyoi v/j-ag Tovg Su)5iKa t^tXe^d^jjv, ^Not ''I 'you the 'twelve 'did'choose,

OvK

71

EXfyEJ'.^f TOV lovSav But he spoke of Judas

.<>/

^i^iovoQ
Simon's
liver up,

^'IaKapiojTt]v" oi'Tog.ynp 'i'jfitXXsv" ^avrov irapa" Iscariote, for he was about him to de

^t^ovai," tig
''one

'wv" Ik
'being of

d(oS(Ka.
twelve.

7
ni

""Kai"

^^^ After thMfc things Jesus walked in \a'ia' i}Qt\iv iv Ty 'lovCaiq. ov ydo Galilee: for he would Judiea j *n(,t 'for "he Mid desire in not walk in Jewry, ,, ^ ^ J^ ))ecause Jews the tZ,i]TOVV aVTOV 01 loVOoXoi aTTOKTElvai. eonght to kill farm, s^g^g *gj.g)jijj ejjjni i^iie ^jjjws to kill.
.

^TrfprnrctTfi 6 'li]aovg ixstci ravra^^ iv 'Jesus after these thing;! in "was 'walking
to walk,

Ty TaXiGiili-

TTtpncaTtiv,

on
because
Y)

..,

Hj-'-Of
,

.,,, tyyvg
near
"TTOOg

2 Now the Jews feast of tabernacles was at

topTl)
fgast
,

,, TWV ,^-,i loVCanaV


of the
x
^

Now was
01>V

>/

aKrjVOTTTjyia.

3 fiTTOV
<

,,v avTOV
^him
<

the

hand
him,

therefore

3 His brethren said unto

Jews,
',

the

Depart hence, aud go into Judeea, that thy disciples also , < may see the 'works that thou doest. 4 For deea, which may see thy works that also thy disciples there is u6 man that ~ ~ y Kai C,r]rEi TTOlJ.I, TTOttig' Tl" 4 OVOBig.yap "iiV KpVTTTtf) doeth any thing in ecret, and he himself thou doest and seeks anything docs, for no one in secret ~ seeketh to be known iromg, <pavipwaov avTog" IV TTopprjaKf. eami. ft ravra openly. If thou do manifest these things, shew thy- himself Hn *public Ho 'be. If these things thou doest,
, , '
-^

Ol.a6eA(pOlMVTOV, MiraprjUl tVTtVVtV, KCll VTTayE itg T1]V lovhence, into Ju'his "brethren. Remove and go , ' " j f. on n a caiav, iva Kaioi.fiaHrjrai.aov^uswprfauxTiv^'Ta.ipya.aov
ii ii

,^

.,

'n n

tabernacles. y ~

'S;iid 'therefore
r\

no
'

"

j>?>v>
it-^T

i,

'

.><>

>

~j'

a AtXaXTjKo have spoken LTTrAW. ' t/me T. /xov (reed the Father) J iWd Trw. * + tK [L]Tr[A). -|- 0V' theiefore T. TbiV fiadtfTiov aiiTOV OTT^Afloi' LTTrA. LTTrA. f o aytos the holy [one] GLTTrA. e Toi; fobrTOS C LTTrA ^ OVVO LTTrA. '".'f* ' efjuW^v liti a. TrapaSiSovai. aiifov Kapiturov (read son of Simon Iscariote) LTTrA. '' fira ravra TrepteTrarst 6 ([6] Tr) 'Irjcroi/s LTTrA W. 1 ' Kai T. Civ LTrA. 'IrA. ' auTO it L. l ti ev Kpun-T(j) LIT; A. o Bfiopijffovaiv shall see TTrA. I" <rov to epya U
*> <*

'^

VII.

JOHN.
,^
.to
^

203
imffrsvoi'. ^^'t ^ .*^ ^^''1'?" & tor ueither did his 11., J fbeueTcd brctlii-eu belit-ve' id

ceavTov
tliyself
(.IC
X,'

ritt T.

KOtruto. Vi the world.

5 OuvLydo oLdSeXcboLavrov
Ti t For neither

'

,-,

-his ^brethren

CLVTOV.
uhun.
^

6 AsVEt

ou

^ Then Jesus ailToTc o'ItKTOVC, 'O (CnrtpoC 6 tube '"" siiid unto ihem, My s 36 X i't Tr -my time is therefore 4. 5*u Ho Hhem 'Jesus, ^Says^ 2^1. J^ime not yet come:
''Olij/"
'

TrdpsaTiv o.dt.Kaipbg ovfikTspog Travrork tanviroifiOQ. but yourjimeisaiw.'iy ^'y.our ^always ^s ready. is come, but -^timi^ not yet iannot hatr^ouTbut 7 ov-Svvarai 6 Koafiog fxiaHv Vfidg' Ifii-Se /jllcth, on tyw me it hntcth, becnuso 1 testify of it, tliat the but mo it hates, because 1 ^Is*unable 'the ^world to hate .you, woi'lcs thereof ,110 evil. /> , avrov, on xatpya avrov Trovrjpa tani'. 8 Go ye up unto this uapTvpu) Trepi
ovTVii)
^
^
_

^^

,
it,
. \
<

>~
II

bear witness concerning


,

vfiEig Ye,
,

avaptjTE eiC Tqi'.topTriv.'ravTrjP'"


go ye up
,
, .

I'T

that the
.

works
1

of it
'
<

evil

II

are.

feast: 1

go not up yet
not
feast; lor yet full

>

tyw ^ovkw
I
,
. ,
,

to
, 1

this feast.
/
,/
.

not yet
M

^ paiVh)

going up

said these words unto OVirU). them he abode slitl in not yet Galilee. 10 But when ' > ~ " ^ his brethren were, gone 17 > X / r\ eiTTWV "aurO<C"'t/it)'J' tV ry up, then wc-m he also TT&TTMfpwTai. y laVTa.^pt'' up unto the feast, not And these things having said to them he abode in has been fulfilled. oi>enly, but as it were i' ' ~ 7 ?< Ti ^ \ -in '/-I o ^ J avtjiijaav oi.acA(poi. avrov ^rore Kai in secret. 11 Then the laXiKaia. 10 ilg.ot then also Jews sought hioi at But when were gone up Galilee. his brethren
,

eiQ

rtjV-tOprrlV.TaVTlJV,
this feait, ~ rr< x^Mi

OTI
<

O ^Kaipog
^tirne

avaam

'

unto time

tliis

my

is

cd'me,

When

he had

O tjJOg"

to-

for

'my

II

'

'

'

>

^^

>

'

'

tv where'isherl2 And in there was much murOt olv 'lovSaioi ib'jrovv avrov iv ry eopry, ^e^-^eLn^^Shfm: KpvwTif. feast, Secret. The ''therefore 'Jews were seeking him at the for some said Ue is a Ka'i iXeyo'v, Uov UeXvog-, 12 Kai yoyyva^ibg "noXvg |a/."uthfdeo'c'imh 'much the people. 13 Rowond is he? And 'murmuring said, Where

avTog
he

went up to

avk(ii] elg rt)v the

toprijv,'^
feast,

ov

not

(pa^'ipSjg, openly,

a\X'"
but

''wt;"

as

hnv

TTSpi concerning

avrov
him

^f"
there was

Iv '^rO~ig among the

bx^Oig.'^
crowds.

o'l-f-dv

tXeyOV,
said,
.

l^eit

no

man

spake

Some

| the

Jews

irXavq. rbv said, 'he -is but others No but he deceives the Tnpi 13 Ovdiig (xevroi Kapp)]<yi(f. IXuXti avrav, oxKov. crowd. No one however publicly spok concerning him, did TOP (p6l3ov rwv 'lovSaiojv.
'Good
;
.

'On dyaOog icriV aWoi.^^f" iKiyov, Ob' aXXd


;

because of the

fear

of the

Jews
^b^^

'14
elg

"H^Jj-iJf

But now

rrjg ioprrjg fif.aovar]C dv'sfit] *of*the 'feast ['jt] "being ^the ''middle went up
^icai

'Itjcrovg Jesus

into the temple, and

rb hpov, Kai iSiSacrKtv. 15 was teaching:

XLyovreg,
saying.

Uaig

oirog
-

How

''this

"one
',b'^

i9avjiaKov'^ o\'lovoa\oi ui'a'st o'f'tho feJ.st^ and ^were*wondering 'the ''Jews sus wont up into Kw ypafifjlara olcEV, jxr), ^npaOiiKMc; IrAild theJew"f^. 'knows, not having learned ? 'veiled "letters sayiu". How
'Jes,us

16

'

k-TTtKoidi]^ avro~iQ
'^

'hjaovg Kai
and

Answered

"them
rov.

kuoweththi.^ man lete'iTrev, 'H.ifiij.Siddxr^ oi'K ?'^ Mytoachiug '"not said, learned Ifi Jcsiis

tanv
.il

tun,
mine,

dXXd
but

7rea\l/avr6g ue' 11 his who ^lent 'ae.^

idv
If

ng
anyone

9't\y rb swered them, and


desir'e

9kXr]}ia.avrov TTomi', yvuxjerai Trepi r^ig SiSaxrjg Trorepov whether his win to practise, he shall know concerning the teaching

^^y-

^
T

an-

.-aid,

ttShat s?ut
17

if

any

man

K from
.

Oeov iariV, f/ lyoj dn kuavrOV XaXw. IB speak. He from myself God it is, or I of myself. 18 Ho that . -" ~ ~ ?< .^. V V C,r]rujv ri)v speaketh of himself o.oe tavrov XaXCJVy T^v.cot,av-r>ivAOLav 4j7*i" but he that seeks the seeketh his own glory: himself seeks speaks, his own glory but he that seeketh _ ^, cot,av rov. TTEfiipavTog avrov, ovrog aKiprig tariv, Kai his glory that sent true is, and him, the same is true, glory of him that sent him,' he ~ and no unrighteous,. ~ -^ In, m "( aClKia. SV avr<j> OVK.tCrnV. ly ou 'Mwcri/f" "'dOUfKEV ncss is in him. 19 Did
^TOil''
,

'

n v ""fiV' io 6 d(p' trine, whether it b of that from God,or tyAe^Aerl -peak

~ ^

<

-,..,,
: ,
11

-v

II

U nrighteousness
'

TavTTiv {read the feast) LTTrA"w. ovk not gttia, Tore koL eU LTTrA. aVTOq he (abocje) ovtou ttoAv? LTrA avTOV ^V LTTrA. aAAa LTrA. olttiA. e iOavfia^ov ovv 64 and Gtw. TToAu? ox Aw the crowd 6 TTr. tov wete wondering therefare LTT;?rAW. + ovv therefore LXTrA'W.
ovv
T.
|

ii^

him

is not.

"Not

''Moses

has giveg
*

not Moses give you the


ai/rbs

T.

Se and GTTr.

'

'

''

'

" t'/xos /catpbs

'

T.

'

ttji'

iopTrjV,

avcp-r]

tos T.
^

<=

Trepl

rn'

Trept

<

.TO)

T.

'

''

t,

Mtovcnii LfTrAW.

n"

6$(0KeV

gave LTrA.

204
i

ISiANNHS.
j.,.
-i

yil.
',

law and j/e< none of yuLV TOV VOUOV, Kai OVCeiC S^ ViltOV TTOlH TOV VOUOV Tl " ' you keepeththe law? j 1 ^ o ' -.rrt you practises the no 6ne of law? Why ^^'"' '^^^ Why go ye about to y" *^<^ kiUmc? 20Thopeo- Zl]TtiTE CtTVOKTHVai ] 20 'A7rKpi0?J 6 O^XoC "/cai f/TTEV," ^Answered 'the -crowd and 'said, tokiU? Thcfu a"de^l ""^ ^ y^ ^^^^
'

^.v.

thce?_

who goeih about to kill Aciinoi'iov


21

TS

Jusus an-

Bwercci

and said unto

A demon
,

fX^tg' thou hast:


.

rig

who

ff ^;rt thee seeks


,>

aTTO/crelvai

21

'ATTEKpiOi]
"Ansv.-ered

tokiU?

22 Moses, there, ~ -. <ftr, fore eaye unto you WaVfia{,Te. 22 CIU.TOVTO" 1Mw(J(/ CiCiOKEV Vfxlv TlfV TViplcircunlcision; (not beTherefore has givRti you Ve wonder. Moses circumcause.it IS of Mose^, , > ~ / tt )v\j > , u > hut of the fathers;) TOjxrjv, oi;% OTi eK zov 'm.(oaeu)g tartv, tK t(jjv Trartpwv' and ye on the sabbath cision, not' that of Moses it is. 'but of the fathers, day.circumcise a man. . > " n u r> n ' en > 23 6t TTBpiTO/xrjV 23 If a man on the KUl ^SV" Capfiarq) TTipiTtflVtTi. avUpWTtOV. sabbath day receive and on sabbath -ye circumcise a man. If 'circumcision circumcision, that the % n ' " < ' o' ^ /i > fir].KvBy o vo,iOQ^ law of Moses should Aa/t^pavEi avupiOTTOQ tv aaiipaT(j) iva not be broken are yo deceives' 'a ^man that may not be broken the law on. sabbath, t angry at me, because X -t,, ' ^ " " n ~ "> > ~ OTL OAOV avuptJTTOV Vyir) iTTOniaa havemadcamauevery M^^C^Wf," i^lOl XOAarE 'sound I made whit whole on the of Moses, with me are ye .angry because entirely ^a ^man
Tel.
,, ,,

them, I have done one o" 'J?/(TOU KOI sIttEV aVTOlQ,' Ev work, and ye all marij^jgjjg One ^^^ g^j^j to them,

_^

tpyoV
work

tlTolrjaa, Kai TCClVTeg


I did

and

-all

<

aW

>

'

<

'

'

<

'

oo

ii

sabbath day ? 24 Judge Oi3 ' not according to the t*' CTafifdarq)' sabbath,? app^ra'nce, but judge on

e>A 24

oxpiv, kut fiii.Kpiver Judge not according to sight,

'

>(
ofjV

>\\i >s> aXXa t^v SiKciiav


but
righteous

zl^TheTsailTsomrof Kp'^^'J^ VpiVarE." judge. them of Jerusalem, Is judgment


ireeVtokuil''M'BuT
lo,
'^'"l^t.Tiliv,''^

25 "EXiJOV
"Said

TlVtQ IK

TWV

^'Ifp0(70''of

"therefore 'some "of 'those

=Jeru-

Ovx-OVTOQ.iaTiv ov
Is not this

KvrovaLV cnroKTHvai:
they seek
to,

26

kcu
and

he spoakcth boldly'

salom.
'^^'
^'

he

whom

kill?

nnto^'^hi'm"'^ Do'^th^

TTappTjcTt^
publicly

XaXd,
he speaks,

rulers

know
? '^

indeed

Kul ovSiv ahd nothing


01

avTt^ to him
*rule

Xiyovaiv.
they
that
s.ay.

f.n]TroTa

Chrl'rt 27 II Vbe'ft we'^' know this^maii

^^V^'^S
'Truly

tyvioaav
'ha-ve "^recognized
]

Hhose

^ho

dpXOVTC) OTI

Oi'TOg
this

ioTiv
is

whence

heis:

but when ^dAj/Qwg" O XP'^'^TOC


^.^^^^
.
.

27

..

ClXXo. TOVTOl) OlSafliV TToOiV iffTLV

knon^thwheilcXfs'! 28 Then cried Jesus in


the temple as taught, s.aymg,
botii

^^'

"i;^^^*?

^^^

.^^'^ '"'

^^'^^
yiV(i)aKl.

^-^;'''^

,^' ''

he

Yo

'Jesus and saying, and I am not come of . w^ ^ > ,ri myself, but he that Kojut oican Ktti oioare TToOev eif.u' Kai air tfiavrov ovk sent me is true, whom Both me ye know, and ye know whence lam: and of mvself -'not ' yo know not. 29 But ,.,,^ ^ ,,,., -. >n /i tX7]XvUa, aX\ tlTTlV aXr)filVO OV Vflttg I know him: for lam O TTiflipug fXS, from him, .and he hath Ms "true -have come, but 'he ''who 'sent me, whom ye sent me. 30 Then they > '^ ' ^ rv 5>>ii ZV lyiO.Ce" QICU aVTOV, OTI TTUp aVTOU tljJl, sought to take him: OVK.OiCaTE' but no man laid hands know not. know But I him, him lain, because from on him, because his ~ / r a' ' > on >T<y' OVV ai'TOV TTIUhour was notyetcome. KaKilVog /i "a7r(Trl/\J'." oU iijC,l]TOVV 31 And many of the sent. They were seeking therefore him and he "me to ^ ti people believed onhim, ^ > ? * ' y > . /o > TtjV X^^P'^f OTL OVTTU) and said, When Christ '^^^ Kai OXWiig ITTtpaXiV tTT aVTOV upon him [his] )aid hand, because not yet Cometh, will he do t.ake, but no one
, , , >
>

know me, and ye 28 EK'prt^fV OVV tV know wheuce I am: 'Cried' therefore 'in

6. ^f-XptffTOf But the Christ,

yfpxtjrui,^' wheneTerhe may come,


,

vvav

OvSiig

Uplf) the "temple ''teaching


Tlfi

no one I,!..^, ,, , ,, OlduCKUtV O lr](JOVg Kai X^ywv,'


.
.

knows

TTuOev taTlV. whcuce heis.

<

>

>

>

>

>

;i

>

>

'

*>

trsUtcfthislt?, ^^'A'^e" ri.^pa.alTOV. 31 ^UoXXoiM


had come
his hour.

U
of

rov ox^ov liHarEvthe

But many
'^"Ori"
_.

crowd

believed

ffav"

dg avTOV, Kai tXiyov,


.on

a
The

him,

and

said,

xP'^'^'^^g Christ,

orav

tXSy

when becomes,

^lATjTi"

TrXiiova
*more

<jr)fitia ^rovrwv" ttoiticu "signs "than 'these 'will ''he 'do

Siv oirog which this [man]

P Oavixa^ire 5io touto. {read ye wonder therefore.) s ' M<iili<jeuis LTTrAW. _ Mloiia^S l.TTi-.-iW. [^j,] l^ aAYjSws GLTTi AW. y ipXiTai. a a7r'cr-'aA(cjei' has sent T. ^ 'E/c Tou o;(Aov 6e Se but CLTTrAW, < ^ -_'Oti Ll'TrA. iroAAoi 6e eTriVrevcrai' Lk. tov oxAou T."' (j,Sj TToAAoi eTriVrevcrav LTiA tlTrA. r0VT(v{nV.d WV tbtVU [tlieSCj 'Whlvl'l) LH: AW. o

Kai ilmv ltttA.


;

OLTrW
*

6ia TOUTO,

6 XTrA
1'

-f 6 T,

'

6t. heconi'isE.

" /cpti/eT

LTrA.
;

"

'lpo<ToAv/ixeiTtt)i' T.

''

VII
'

JO H
:

N.

205
murmuring

'tTTOijjcrsv"

32*H(C(Wffav
srr J 'Heard
^

ji/o did?
TTEoi

ot 4>apiffatoi rov liu ^ ^Pharisees of .V, 'the ixst the

oyXov yoyyvKoi^roc '


J crowd
^

^? V^f \,'i}'^.^^''l X hanseea heard that

the people raurmur<jd

avTOV

Tavra'
'tho.se -thiug3,
<
,
,

''c6licerning
J

"him

,,

Kai d7rk(jreiXav ^oi f^apiaaloi icai such thiugs concern^Pharisees ^and i^^f"""' 5"''- ' and ''sent 'the J nsees ana tne chief
,

01

apxi^psTi^

VTTTjoiTag,^'
officers.
1,
,

*the 'chief "pl-iesta . 1T

7rtacrwT(v avrov. that they might take him.

iva

33
n>

eZttev priests sent ^'^'^^^ -'Said


<

officeis to

QVV

"UVToIq"

IrjCFOVg,
'Jesus,
,
,

En
Yet
,
I

'fllKpUl>

XPC^'OV" /JsO

VflUlV

therefore "to
,
, ,

Hhem
,

little
,

Eifii,
I
,

Kai VTrayu) rrpoQ rov m/jiipavTa fie. am, and bim who I go to sent me
I

34

time with c ^rjrrjaeTe V


'
I

you
/xe

"^'^ r T^'^'^ said Jesus uuti them, "ict a little wlile ami '"''^ yo".. "*" ' "' I

kuu
'

<

Ye

will seek

me ano

L.

.'

OVX-^vpi]<je.Tir

n-T OO hllTOV
Said

shall nc^t find [me],


,

Kai OirOV and where


01

EtfXl
''am

tyw
'l
\

OVV

T-r-iT <'t'5-~ lOVCaiOl npOQ eavrovg, YlOV 'ovTOQ


<

~ J y/ 'N n ~ /I Vfieig av.OUVacrve SAtleiV, ye aro unable '^o come,


.

go unto him <hat sent mo. 34 Ye shall seek ^^' ""'^ shall not find '"* where I """^ am, thither ye cannot
eoraa. 35 Then said the Jcw.s amoHH themselves, Whither will he go, that we shall i^ot find him? will ha

'

USAABC
'is

/^ N

41

about

TTOpeveCTtlai 0Tl"^llfieiQ" 0VX.EVp1]a0fie.V to go that we shall not find

^therefore 'the ' " n

111

''Jews ' ~

among
II

themselves,
'

"Where
>

''he
' >

'

avrov,
him?
to go,

'

fl^ eig go unto the dispersed


to

among
iiev

the

Gentiles,

tt'iv

diacTTTopdv
dispersion

rwv
among the

EWr'jvwv
'

the
teach
iZ7ri',

Greeks

ju\>>ti is he about

iropevsaOai,

Kai ufes ?'36\vimt manand


of saying
is

this

SiddffKSiv

rovQ"E\XT]vag; 36 rig iariv "oirog oXoyoc"' ov' the Greeks ? What is this word which
fit,

s^'^k

me, mid shaii^not

ZrjTTjaErk

besaid.
iilxkXg

Ye will .seek ov-^vvaaOe tX0s~v


are unable
to

Kai ovx-^vpijcere^' Kai "Ottov me, and shall not find [me]; ar 1 Where
come
?

etfil

fiiul lae: and where I tytu g^g';"-*"" ^^ =?"*

''am

'I

ye

37

'E/.^e

ry iaxaryrifikp^ ry fiiydXy
the
'

And in
>T

last'

-"day
II

'the

-great
'T-i

of the

Ttjg eopTrjg EiarrjKti i ast stood


^ <dif^,
'
'

Irjtyovg,
Jesus,

/cat

n" V "tKrpa^ev"
'

Xsyojv,
saying.

'

Eav
If

'

rig

spxtcrQuj
let

and

cried,

anyoi'c thirat,
B/iky

him come
said

37 In the l&st day, that great c/a;/ of the feast, Jesus stood and

^irp6g_
to
r)

fiV^

Kai nivkroi'
dtink.

38
He

6
that

Tnarivuiv tig
believes

me and

Ka9u}g eittev man'thirst.^'lc/ hhu


.

on

me,'

as

come unto me,; and

ypafri, iroTafioi
rivers,

Ik
out of

rfjg.KoiXiag.avTov
his belly

the scripture,

pEvaovmv vSarog uMln^J;%^tho


shall flow

of -water

KwPTog. SQTovTO.St
'living.

But
'to "receive

this

eIttev mpl roi TrvEVfiarog ov lf//fXhe said concerning the Spirit which 'were 39

"
''

scripture hath said, out


of 'iiving''wa'le7 (^But this .spake ha

Xov"
'about

Xa/AJSavEiv

oi
'those
',

^iciarEvovTEg^^ Eig
"believing
''on

aurov ovTru.ydp
*hlm
;

i}v

for not yet

was

TTVEvaa
Cthe]
^Spirio
_

^iiyiov^^ 'Holy.

on
because

'6" 'Iticrovg
Jesus
_^

"^ovSsTruj^^ tSoEdtydn. not yet -'^^ ^'^or.aoi.

^g "'tlia^t^b'uev''^''^'' hinf should^ receive ^'"' H'7 -Ghost "''

^^^V^t' !'eZs
""'
yet
^^''"y ^
",!'^"

\^ll

40 "TToAXot
Many
s

OVV

kK

rov oj^Xou" dKOvtravTEg ^rbv Xoyot'"

glorified.)
P<-'^Plo

iXEyOl',
said,

^-

OvTOg tariV
Thia
is
<

-/I

therefore out of the

aXl]9(xig O TrpO(pl]TI]g. truly the prophet.


K'/

'\n~<'

crowd

havin- heard
'
'

the
\

word
said, t .

"

41 AXXoi"- tXEyOV,
Others
,
r

fP thurclore, wh^ n they heard this saying, said,

^^

truth this
41
is

VDTOg tOTlV O XpK^TOg.

^T'

the Christ. This Christ. is the ''Others 'and said, 'Then =out ^of ^"' ^"^^ said, Shall Christ -come out of ' I jc^ .} rqg I aXiAaiag o xptcroc tpx^rai; 42 "^oiixi". >/ ypa^)] eIttev, Galileo? 42 Hath not 'Galileo ^the 'Christ 'comes? 'Not '"the "scripture "said, tlio scripture .said, > That Christ eonioth of I' ~ _ ' ~ p a' /o r r n\ EK rov (TTrepfiaTog ^Aafiid," Kai airo B)]BAee/u. rtjg KWjxitg the seedof Uavid, and that out of the seed of David, and fropn Bethlehem the village out of the town of

AXXoi"

\ N

11

^ll
*=0

tXEyOV, MtJ yap


! \

piophet.
said, This

is the Others

EK

~Ti\\'

on

'

'

II

'

>

>

oTTov

hv -Aaf3iS:
'David,
T.

where -was
f

the

xp^'yrog ipx^rai Clirist comes?

;"

43

T^x^afia

otv &lv
in

^,'d''w?^ri3"so"'iha

division therefore

was

.i

division

among

Kai ot $apicraioi vnrfpdras l.TrAW ; vnrjpeTa'; oi pviepei?. ical oi *apicratoi T. ^ + fxe iu'e LA. ^J.e\^!kt XP'''"' /"^"P'"' LTTrA.' " oStos t. eKpa^eu v. ripLw (read evprj. we shall find) T. 6 \6yo? ovto? ltti'a. P rrpo? fie T. 1 ij/ixeAAoi/ T. TTitrfeuo-ai'Te? having believed LTr\. ^".i- a-yiow ' ' LT[TrA]. " oi)7ra> LTiA. eK TOv + SeSof/LdfOf given L. 6 LTTrAW. oxAou oil/ [soixie] o^t of the crowd therefore ltti a. y tmv Aoywc tovtojv tfiese words ( toi;'^ oi they ltia. Tu>v W) LTTrAW. = ' + [oTiJ A. _ j^ [g^.j and L. ^e r. ovx i.Tia. t^ Ip^erat AavXS (ivf ; AavelS LTTr;.. ? e/g'j^ero ev r<? OX'^V LTirA. 6 xpi-'^Tot LTrA.
jrotet
^

does

e oi ixp\iepfi^

l"

avrots OLTTrAW.

'

''

"J

''

-i

206
the p'eople because of

Q A N N H
Cl because of

S.

VII, Vlll.
i'lOcXoV iK
'of

^^ OvA'W
^^^

iykvETo"
occuried

avrov. 44 TlVlC-Vi
him.

aVTOJV
'(heiu

them would

liavo ta-

crowd

But some "desired


iir'

kcu him; but uo


46'Then cameThe

mau mdaat avTou,


offil

dW
''^\
;

ovcdg

^tTTtiSaXiP'^
^'^f

aurliv TaQ\iii>nc.
^'"'"' (COl
'''^"'^^

'.^'^'^

^'>'

/ ;
,

/
,

cers to the chief priests

aQd

came to the chiet priests aud Phariunto them, , , c Why have ye not oatovg' KQl tlTTOV avTOlQ tfCfll'OI, 'Aari" 0VK.7)ydyf.Ti. UVTOV, brought him ? 46 The sees, and -said ^to "them 'they, Wby did ye not bring him ? olhcers answered, Nc,. , " '\ -n ^ , ^.r' Tcr man spake likethis 4o ATTEKpiy/JcraV Ol' VTrrjpiTaif OvCiTTOTE "Ol^rwf t\a\t}(Tf.v" man. 47 Then answer^Answered 'the '-'officers, Never thus spoke ed them the Pharisees, ^ , , t /i n .<h >'. -rv r, Are ye also deceived ? avUptOTTOg 'wQ oi)TOg "^ u avUpioTTog." 47 ATTiKpiurjaav '^ovv
they
s.id
,

Pharisees;

and

45 j'A^OV

01 VTTrjpSTai therefore the officers

o5j/

irpOQ TOVQ opXiepitQ


,
.

4>api-

'

>

i,

'

i,

48 Have any of tlie rulers or of the Pharisees believed onhim? 49 BuV this people who knoweth not the law arecurseil. SO Nicode-

man
>

as
n
.

this

man.
,,
. .

''An.owered

^thercfor&
;

^avToig" 01 fpapiaaioi, mt) Kat


'them
'''^Q

j,

'the
,

"Pharisees

*K TdUV ap\OVrn)V
*of
',

,,
49

vung
'ys

Tn7r\avt)aU(
,

4o
iK
of

An

'

/aj

"also"

mus'saith unto thorn,

"Any ^one

^the

'rulers

iTTiaTSVffiV Etg 'has believed on


this crowd,

,.

"have been deceived?


t]

,.,,'^ aVTOV,
him,
or

TW)>
the

by''night"bd?igom*of 'i'apiacuujv -Pharisees? Doth our law them,)


.'jI

PttXX'"

b.oxXog.oliTog

But

6 tiij.yivwcFKwy which know.s not

tuv
tlio

'^iiriKardpcfToi^' Eiaiv. 60 Aiyfl i^lKOCrjfiOg TTpOg auTovg, l"htlr"iim"and'kaow ^'"^0*' "Sayff ^3.'", accursed are. 'Kicodcmus to them. whathedoeth?52Thi^y r^ answered and said iXQojV ^iWKTOg^ TTpOg aVTOV," ' Eig WV IK OVtCjV, 61 M?J uuto him, Art thou i, u. T i.w. T^v ^ to him, -"oue 'being of themselves,) by night also of Galilee 'Search Oie "ho came aud look for out of o voaog.i'ifiCjv Kpti'tt Tov dv9pu)Trov, idi'-iuT^ aKovcrij "Trap' mau, unless it hare heard from ^Our Haw 'does judge the
,
-i
i
:

ovvu house,

phctsr^Aud" every man went uuto his avTov


himself

7rp6rf)OJ',"
first,

Kflt

yi*^

ri

TTOia;
?

52

and known what he docs

'\^TnKpiBi](jav They answered


el
;

Kai and

"{Zttov" aifTip, M>) Kai


said

av

ek frjg

FaXiKaiag
'Galilee

^ipevt^rjaov"
Search

to him,

^Also "thou *of

'art?

Kai

^^poibijrtjg tK rtjg FaXiXaiag^' Galilee a prophet out of and look, *hat


'ide,

on

^ovK.tyiiyiprai.^
has not arisen.

53 "Kat
And
unTo^^thc^'^mounrof
Olives.

iiroptudr) "went

tKaarog
'eadh

tig
to

tov-oIkovmiitov.
his house, 2'

Aud

early

'lllffOVgM fTTOpevdv ^IQ TO opOQ TU>V tXaiWV of Olives. went to the mount But Jesus
^

OpBpOvJf
at

And

dawn

iamf L^nTnto
temple
people

and

the all the

'^"'^f, again

7rapy6i/ro sig TO ttpov, Kai Trdg o Xabg y/px^ro came he came into the temple, and all the people

npbg
to

came unto him; ^ tiuieht them Ami


thcRcribes and Pharisees brought unto him B woman takeu in a;

auToV
bini
;

Kadiffag tSiSaorKtv avTovg. 3 dyovait^ St ''Bring 'and and haviilg sal down he w.as teaching them.

Kai

01
'"tha

ypauituTtig Kai "^


^^ii^es
^

'aud Hhe 'Pharisees


^ ,

duitery and when KaTtiXrififiti'7]v, they had .set her in the having been taken, and having set her in [the] midst, they s.ay midst. 4 they say unto ^ ^ ^ >' ' \ /i n him. Master, thi^ wo- avTlp, /^LOafTKaXt, CtVrr] >/ yVVlJ KavtlXtjipihl "t7raVTO(piOp(i)'' man was takc.i in a- to him, this was taken Teacher, woman in the very act duitery, in the very -' ~ ' e s> A '^Mi<;<7// act. 5 Now Moses in 6 tl>.C( TIjJ V0^({1 cat flOlXtVOjuLtVtJ. rJI.HV tVtTUXaTO the law commanded committing adultery. Now in the law Moses commanded us UK, that such should ' y rf\/io\-/-i'ii s \iUopo\ti(ruav" ov Xsytig^ ovv ri be stoned: but what Tag TOiovTag taycst thou ? 6 This to be stoned thou therefore what sayest thou ? such .i they said, tempting /- ~ , ?"\ y t^tUffiV KaTt]' him, that they might O ToVTO.Ct tXfyOV TTHpnC^OVTtg aVTOV IVa tempting have to accuse him. But this they said him that they might have to ac, ' . v '
i . '

^apiaaloi TTpog avTuv yvvalKU tv uoiYtia him to a woman in a.tullcry Kai OTyjaavTtg avTijV iv fitcij), 4 Xtyovaiv
ol
i

,'

>

>

'

'

ii

'.

'

'

eAdArjac^ oi/Tios LTTiA. ' ^- tus OVTOS. 6 a.vdpio [avroi?] Tr. P aAAa jLTTrAW. ovv ta. *> ina.pa.Toi LTTrA. ' ' ' -|- Trponpov 6 kKQiov vvkto^ Trpb? avTQv T. vvktos I-Tr.A. " jrpwTOi/ Trap' auroi) LTTrA. ' "" etTrai' LTTrA. formerly LXrA.* epavrijcroi' TTrA. Kai iiro-^ ' oiiK tyeiperai does not arise LTTrA. "^ y (K T^s FaAtAaia; npo<f>riTr)i LTA. ^ Alfia^eiC tO en avTOipiiipio W. pfvOr] .... afJidpTave (viii. 11) [G]LTTrA. MwV(7)js W. + Trepl auT^s concerning ber_w. w, MtoiiO
^

e^aKev LTTi

A.

'

jros l[Ti a].

AilA.ec

Ata ti LTrAW. speaks T.

I*

"^

<=

VIII.
yopEXv avTQv.
cuse

JOHN.
him.
ti'c

207
'^ax-TxiXf^ finger "with [his]

6 ve.'lTjaovQ icaTM.Kvxl'ag, _ But Jesus having stooped down,

r0

"

^^^^^^ 'f^'^

gu-r^r

wui"" to wrote ou tlie


so

iypa(pev
wrote

n)v

on

yr]V. the ground.

7 wc.O

ipiorioi'TeQ But as they continued asking

eTTifievov

avrov,
him,

f^,""^'^,/,^"* Hot"^'iyl^^.a

they' coutiuued

dvaKV\pag
having
^
lifted ^
^

elmv
,

ttooq avrovt;, 'O dvaudpTifroQ


to
,
'

up himself he said
'tho
,

them,
^
f

Xlie
i

^U>V TTpMTOQ TOV \i9oV


you
having
.

tTc'

Clvry
hcr
,

^first
,

"'stono

'at
,

fjoXtrtJ. 'let -him -'cast.


~

v- asking him, he lifted unless one among "P,'"^'''f'"Y, \ unto txiem, He tliat is 8 KUI TTCiXiV without siu among

,/

Kctrto.Kvtl'ag
<

typa(pev eig rr/v yijv.


I

r>'

st;00pcd down he wroto having heard, on the ground. ~ f , >\ yy T n>KaiVTTO Tlig avveiorjaeiog SAEyXOjUevoi, S4>7PX<"'''0 '^'f KUff tig,
'
<

ot-os But they

f'

And agaiu aKovaavrtg,


'

'

conscience being convicted, went- out one by one, ~ ^ " n ' api^ajliVOl (ITTO TU>V TT-pEapirrepiOV ewg rutV taxariuV Kat beginning from ths elder ones until the last; and ~ ' >, t 1 ~ ,\,' ,/j f Kari\l<pUt] fJ-OVOg O It^aovg, Kai y yVVI] ev flSff({) 'taToxra, was left* alone Jesus, and the woman in [the] midst standing. anil

by

tho

y"' ^^^ ^'. S"^^' ^i^' a Stone at ner. H Ana again he stooped down, ^"^ wrote on tha g' ound. 9 And thuy wliich heard .2(, being convicted by fAeirOT/m
conscience, went out one by one, beginning at the eldest, ereii unto

'

'

>

<

11

the

last
left

was

and Jesu.s nUme, and the


:

woman standing iu the

.10 dvaKV^pag-oe o 'l>](rnvg, icai 'fiijdiva Qtaadjiivog, ^ad'^HftLd uphlmscif! And 'ho viug -^lifted *up ^himself 'Jesus, 'seeing and ^no ^one and saw none but the 7r\7)v rng yvvcuKog, elTrev avry, s'H yvviu" ivov dmv t^dpoi ^e'Toman,whtrrare but the wom.in, said to her. Woman, where arc those those tliino accusera? oi.KaTt]yopoL(Tov, OvStig ae KctTSKpivEy; 11 'H.Sk tlTrev, cd\hecrTi''sh^*kaid' thine accusers, "no 'one ^thea 'did 'condemn? said, And she jj m^j. Lord. Ami Oi'dsig, Kvpie. BtTrEt'.dt aurn b'ltiaovc, OuSi iyw (je Kara.- Jesus said unto her, Neitheidol condemn Tw. A J2 J ii *t.^ IT x> .>, Lt 4i.i. ij Noouo, Sir. And -"said 'to *her 'Jesus, Keither -"I *thee 'do ^jj^.g. J, ^^^ siu no
.

'

<3-

...

Kpivd}'

TTopevov Kai
:

fiijiciri

dfidpravEj^
sin.

more,

^condemn

go,

and no more

12 IlaXiv
i/xi

ovv
Toil
of the
II

Again therefore

^o'lqcrovg avToig iXdXrjaiv," Xsywr, 'Eyw spoke, Jesus, to them I f sayiug,


Koafiov'
\;iorld
;

TO
the

(puig
light
'

o
bo that >\\>

dKoXovduJv'
follows

't/jioV^

am
L

"TrepiTTarrjffEi"

n Id
1

shall TIT

12 Then spake Josds again unto them, sayy ~ to .d)wg Ttjg 4u>/jg. iug, i am the light of fet the world: he that folbut shall have the light of the life. *'.:. T not . iLLirOV ovv aVT^) Ot 9apiaaiOl, ZjV inpl aiav u lowethin me shall but walk darkness -Pha,ris(;e3, 'Said 'therefore 'to 'him 'the Thou concerning thys shall have the ligfit of

me

tv
in

'

tij

'

okotk},

aXX

"y

J.

in ~

^ov.fxri no wise

walk

the

darkness,

^v^

**

fiapTvpugbearest witness
;

rj.fiapTvp'iaMov ovK.tariv dXr]9i]g.


thy witness
is

.14 'A-rnKf
^Apcw<>r

'h,

'uereforJ^aW^unto
jiim 'I'hou hearest re-

not

true.

hiaoi'Q Kui eIttev avTolg,


'Jesus
a'nd

Kdv
Even
if

said

to them.

sytj fiapTvpui ir'Epi ifiavrov, record*^ i^^^ot^'truc^ bear witness concerning myself, I 14 .iBuii answered and
.

dXT]9iig
true

iUTiv ')).fiapTvpia.fiov,i
is

on

my

witness,

becavise

olSa ttoOev i}XOov kuI I know whence I came and


"'(cai"

^^'^^

TTOV virdyoj' vua^-J^j" ovicoi'^are 7r606v ipxoyuac whither know not whence 1 come I go: but ye

irov

h*i"beir rt^^ni f niyself i/et m\ rocord is true: 'for I

inrdyu).
I go.
, ,

15 VatZg
Ye

KUTU
icptvoj
. . ,

fllV
.

adpKa
flesh
/
<

ovOiva.
no one.
,

n 16
f,

Ktti

lav
if

;acoordingto the ' ^> >V

Ko'iVSTS' [udge,
,

oe

Byw,
'

r/

Kpicrig

7}

and whither 2^2^y^2her"lgo-"'but OV Kpivui ye cannot tell whence judge I oome, and whither I I ^"' 15^6 Oiidge after ,v n' the qesh i judge ha s/j.}] '^aXrjOrjg'i
tyu>
, ^
;

judge, my judgmert OTl fl'lUOg OVK.EIfyll, aKK tyio Kav O TTEfXU/ag flS 7ra~ is true: for I am not tffTlV' bccausf :-.;v"e I am not, but and the ^wtio 'sent ''mo is, I '>Fa- alone, but I and the ' Father that '" sent ms. ' / ~ , 1 / u t Kai kV Tli>VOI.U(t ot T((J 'JflSTSpti) PySypaTTTat," VTI 17 It isalsoivrittenin Tr}p. law, that the ther. And in "1h' 'a!?o 'your it has been written, that your
.

And

'judge "also

'l,

'judgment
1

my
,

,xN.

true

P'H"'

'^

"*-"*^ ^"^"^ '*

"

n
n

>

11

cvo avUpwwiov
of

>

'

<

'

r/

futprvpia aXyjuiji
wituo^^
true

'\

n'

'

icrriv.
is.

lo tyw
I

-1

'

'

Eifii

two

mefi

tit

testimony of two men o is true. 13 i .am one aiji[ouolwho that bear witness of
' <

/bioi

^ avrois cAdAijcrei' o ([6] Tr) 'lyjcroC? LTTrA. B 'H yvioj W. outri bei:)g W. ' 7rCjii.jrar>}077 shonlil walk I.TTrAW. "' jj or Gi'irAW, ' LTr, Bl but T.
,

" aKridivri

LTTrA.

"

jraTJjp

(read

liC

whO

sent

me)

T.'

P yeypajU.fjteVot' iin\v it is

written

i.

208
v/itnessof me.

QAN N H
mybclf,

2.

Vlir.

l9Then

be;irs

witness concerning
/^

nnd ^bears 'witness 'concurnine "me 'the

whero^'l^thTFathl?? p/^'/'e
Jesug
answered,

^ar^p.
'AirtKQiQri

19 'FAtyov
-^b''

oiv
OvTE
Neither

avr<^,
to him,
ffif

Ye

^lio ''sent

=me ^Father.
;

They said therefore


'\r)(J0VQ,
'Jesu^,

Tloh iariv 6 Where is


ovTf rov
nor

mv'Fath''er''Tf vf'had kuoftrn me, ye should

'^"?P-<^ou
t-^y

Father

'^swered

me

o'iSaTi ye know

have known

my

Fa-

TTatipa.fXOV'

d tflt

7}S'(lfi,

Kui T6v.TraTfpa.flOV

'iJ^ElTe

dv."

xhese words spoke Jesus in the treasury, ^ "^""J'> and no man laid hands , 5, / , ~ ~ , , . , < on him for his hour ClCaaKUIV SV T({i leptp' Kol OvSeIq STTiaatV aVTOV, OTl OVTTUt was not yet come. teaching in tho temple; and no one took him. for not yet
. ,
, ; _

wo^rdK sp'ake Jesul^^n trea!,i.ry, tha? ,he taught ID the terople:

y Father. If me yebad known, also 20 TavTa TCLphaaTa tXaXnaEv

my

Father

ye would haveknowu.

''"i

'Ivaovc^^ kv Tip ya^ocbvXaKioj,

t\r)\v6ei rj.wpa.avTov. tad come his hour.

21
KOf!

El-jrev
"'Said

oiv
therefore

iraXiv
''.again

avTolg
to

^them
your

*<^^'lri(rovg." 'Jesus,

'Eyw
1
.

inrayo),
go an-ay,

^rjr?7(TeT fie, icai

Iv Ty.afiapTiq,.VfiCjv cnroOavCiaOc
sin

ottov
where
, ,

and ye wiU seek me, and in


21

ye will die

ly^ vTrdyoj Vfis7g oySvvaaOe. e\9s~iv. 22 'EXeyov o{)v oi r ^ 1 ' again unto them, I go C ,, . *c fj -..u / are unable ye^ to come. ^ So ..^"'^ Hherefore 'the my way, and ye shall , ^ seek me, and Shall die 'lovSoiOl, MrfTl CLTrOKTevei faVTOV, OTl Xtyst, "OttOJ' hyto VTzdyij} ^'Jews, Will ho kill himself, that he .says, Where 1 go 't"-J"'' cannot come. 1 go, ye ^'^L7^''^" , 22 Then said the Jews, VflHQ 0V.Cl/Va(T9e tXOtlv; 23 Koi "d'TTEV^' avTolc, 'YfJelg SIC Will he -kiU himself? are unable to come? And he satd to them". yg Ye from because he saith, whi^ , ^ u ther I go, ye cannot TWV.KarU) SOTS, tyuj K TOJV.aVUJ Elfll' VLIHC iK ^TOV KOOflOV " come. nS And he said are,from above beneath I am:. Ye of 'world
^

Then

said Jesus

i//ii
'

)i>>>
f.y(0

./.

,,
24

Untothem,Yeflrefrom , beneath ; I am from TOVTOV^' above ye are of this 'this


:

ii>i
(TT,
are,

OVK.SIfJLl

>>^^SK
not
of
.

TOV.KOaflOV.TOVTOV.
this world:
t -

-/

a.,..

world; I am not of this ^ ~ ' .. ^ n n OVV VfXlV OTl aTTOilai'iKTUe tV TaiQ.afiapTiniQ.VflUjV h.UV.yupi world. 24 I said therefore unto you, that ye therefore to you th.at ye will die in your sins for if
.

t-fi
/

am

,
-

EITTOV
1 said

shall die in your sius: for if ye believe no* that I am Ae, ye shall

".i

>

'

aTToVaytiaVf. kV firi-TTKTTevarfTl OTl tyit) tlfU, ye believe not am [he], ye will die that I iu

>

'

TOIQ afXapTllUQ
-'sins
;

25WnsafdtheyunTo V'5'.him WTio art thou? 'your.

25 'EXsyo)/
''o"

avTcji, ^v^Tig They said therefore to him, ^Thoii'wbo

oiv

^Kal^ drr^v
Apd
-said

-"art?!

Altogothijr that which also ^ Jesus,' I -say I said unto you ^to *them from the beginning. 26 TToXXd 6 KCll Koh'SlV oXX' iVO) TTeOl ". VflMV _<V " 26 I have many things ... ^ and to judge; MJiuy things I have concerning you to say but he -who to say and to judge of you: but he that sent dXr)9r]g scTTiv, Kc'iyu) cl -IJKOVtjaTrap' avTOV, ravra

td.Xi:"^:^aZ

^^'ro~iQ

ir^crovg,

'T,)v.dpxnv

o.rt

Kai

XaXu,

that

v^ih'. to you.

XoXdv
.

,^^j
from

V^t.

trsfi\pag f^e
^^"^

to^ Uie "\vorld ufose things which I have heard ot^him. 27 They

^^

*''"

'^'

""'' ^ 'Whitt

heard

him,

these things

OVV '^auToig'' o .lt}(Tuvg, fxpioiXeytV. 28 EZttEV Father. 23 Theii said i^ spol-g of agaid Hherofore 'to Hhem 'Jesus, Wheu ye sh.all have Jesus unto them, when < / n ,, . ye have lifted up the atjTE TOV VIOV TOD avijQu)7C0V, TOTE yVlvqeath OTL tyW tlfll' Son of man, then shall lifted up the Son then ye shall know that am [ho], of man, I ye know that I am //e, .,.,> ~ > > '\> '^-^ , /i KUUojg tClOat,tV flE O and /i'( I do nothing- KUl OTT tfiaVTOV TTOllO OVOSV, of myself, but as my and from af but -"taught nothing, *me myself I do Father hath taught > / ~ ^ n h I o TaVTU XaXio. ctr\ -rrifiipag fxi, fier me, 1 speak these TraTrjp.^fiov," 2f) And he who sent things. 29 And he that me, with these things I speak. 'my 'Father, / Bent me is with me * r syw TU th Father hath not Sf^OV ^aTlV OVKM&ljKiV flS flOVOV "o TTOrr/p," *me 'alone 'the '-'Father, because I the things ^left 'not left me alone; for I do isj me

understood not that ha spake to them of the

^Xsyw" eig TOP KOffflOV. 27 OvK.lyVitXjaV .^^^^jj^ ^j^ They knew not j ^ '
^ ,

TTflTSOa ailUHQ that the Fathir to them


OTl
_

TOP

<

"

>

Otuv
,

..v

-j^,

aX\a

>

ii

KM

'

:,

.^*

'ii"._>^ OM

' av jJSeire LTTrA. o "IvjO'OV'S (read he spoke) GLTTrAW. " eAeye;' ltTta. " tovtov roii KOaixov ltha. {read he said) lttfaw. _ AdAuj LTTrA. ^OV (read the OVTOIJ LTTi A. ^ [6] Tr. LTTrA W. = Fiithor) L'fTi.,^, 6 Tran'ip (read he left not) LTTrA.
<1

o OLTTrAW.
'Irjo-ovt
<cal

__ 6

'

VIII.

JOHN.
to

209
always
5as ''he 'spoke

apiaxa avrqj ttoiw


pleasing

him

do

Trat'TOTS. always.

30 Taiira
*Tho6e ^things

aurovXaXovvTOQ

TroWol iTTiCTtvaav many believed Bl'EXfyfr oiv


'Said

ig
011

avrov.

these thiug-s that please him. 30 A3 ho spiike these words, many believed on him.

him.

6'lrjaovg TrpoQ Toi/c TTfTTicTTevKOTag avrui


'Jesus
to

"therefore
iifxiiQ

the

"who ^had "believed 'on "him


Xoy(/j
'^word

'lov^aiovq, 'Eav
'Jews,
If

ye

iieivrjTe abide

Iv
in

np

r(p tfi(p, akriBioQ


'my,
truly
1)

fiaQrjrol ixov tcrk'


''disciples

32 Kai yvoxrsaOs
And
vficig. you.

Trjv aKj]Q(.Lav, Kal


the
truth,

'my ye

are.

ye shall

know

and the
31

Tlien said Jesna

aXifdua sXevOe^pwav.
ti-uth

33

'

shall set free

ATrSKpiBricrav ''aiTtp," ^Trkpfja to those Jews which believed on him. If yo him, They answered ^Seed
disciples indeed; 32 and ye shall know the truth, and tile truth shall make yon free. 33 They

'Alipaa(.i iofxsv, Kai

'Abraham's we

are,

TrunroTE' Trwg SeSov\iVKni.isv ovdsvi how and to anyone have been under bondage never
;

continue in lltcn are ye

my word, my

(Jit.

to

at
^thou

X'syeig,
'sayest,

"Ore tXevOepoi
Free

no one) yiviju^crQE ; ye .shall become

34
?

'ATrsKpiOt] ''Answered

avTolg
'them

answered him.

We

be

*o" 'Irjaovg,
'Jesus,

'Afiriv Verily

Tt]v ajiapriav
sin
ov.j.i'svf.1

a bondman

seed, and ttoiwv Abraham's in bondage were never verily I say to you, that everyone that practises to any man how sayshall be SovXoc iariv rrjg cifiapria^. 36 u.Se SoiXog est thou. Ye 34 Jcnns made free ?

afxr)v

Xsyoi

vfuv,

on

Trug

Is

of sin.
f.ikvEi

Now

Iv ry oIkk^ Eig.Tov.alojva' 6 v'lbg


in
tlie

the bondman answered them, Verily, dg.TOV.aiMVU. verily, I say uutoyou,


for ever.
'ta-

abides not

house

for ever

the Son

abides

36 iav
e(T0e. shall be.

oiv

v'log

vfxdg iXtvOspioay,
'you
'shall -set free,

bvrwg tXevOepoi
really free

li therefore the

Son

ye

37 ol^a on
I

airkpfia 'A/3()aju tars' 'Abiaham's ye are know that "seed

dXXd
;

dTTOKTHvai,

on

Xoyog 6

t/^iog

to kill, because "word Abraham's seed but ^0 ye seek to 'kill me, beo" iwpaKja napd n^.Trarpi.^fiov^'' XnXu)' Kai vfitig o^v and ye therefore what cause my word hath -what I have seen with my Father speak no pl.ace in yoii. 38 I ttapaKan''^ napd: 'r<p.7rar/ot.i<juu)v" Troteire. 39 'ATrtKpiOijauv speak that which I have seen with my FaThey answered with your father do. ye have seen ther: and ye do that Kai "elTTOv" avT(^, '0,.7raTy)p.iip.u)V 'Afipad/x kanv. A'tyti avrolg which ye have seen ^'iays 'to 'them with your father. 'Abraham "is. said to him, 'Our "Father and 39 Tbey answered and '6" 'Irjffoyt'j E' rtKva roi) 'AjSpad/Li ""rjre," rd tpya tov Afipad^ said unto him, Abraof Abr.aham ham is our father. ofiAbraham ye were, the works '^Jesfls, If children Jesus saith unto them, i7rot(rf."av" 40 vvv.dt Z^lTf^iT^ A'^ dwoKrelvai, dvOpwirov og If ye were Abraham's a man who children, ye would do but now to kill, ye seek me ye would do
;

shall make you free, tv vjxiv. 38 'tyw ye shall be f n.e indued. 37 I know that ye are 1 'my has no entrance in you.

but

^Tjrsirs ye seek

pe me

commitWTiosoever teth sin is the servant 35 And the of sin. servant abideth not in the Ijouse for ever:6uj the Son abideth ever. 36 If the Sou t herofora

oi-X^pi^

'

rr/v dXrjOtLav
the
truth

to

vfiiv XeXdXrjKU, i]v you has spoken, which


ovK.STrqirjatv.
'

yKovaa trapd rov Oeov'


I

heard

from

God

the works of Abraham. 40 But now ye seek to


kill

me, a
told

man

that

TOVTO
this

'AfSpaCLfi

Abraham

did not.

41 v/xeTc noielre rd ipya rou the works do Ye

TraTpog.vfiwv.
of your father.
yE-^evi'TjfieOa.'^

"not father. Then said they to him, We be not born ^oiv^^ we fornication Father we have, 'Said "therefore of God. one 'have been born ; have one Father, even avrolg *6" '\i]aovg, Et 6 Btig ' irarrip vfjiCJv i]y, riyaTrdT^.av God. 42 Jesus said If God 'Jesus, Father of you were, ye would havel^ved unto them, If God to^them
of

"Elirov^ ^ovv" avrqi, They said therefore to him.

'Huug We

you the which I have heard of God: this did ik Ttopvtiag '^ov not Abraham. 41 Ye do the deeds of your
hath
truth,

fdrnication

tva Tvartpa txofisv, rbv Qiou,. 42

EZttei."

tfxt'

me,

TOvQtov i^]XOov Kat ?/kW ovSLydp God came forth and am come for neither ifiavrov iXr]Xv9a, dXX' tKeivog (it. dir'taTHXtv. 43 ^Biari^^ -me 'sent. hTivc I come, but he Why my>elf
tyuj.ydp
for I

tK

from

forth and came from God neiTr)v ther came I of myself,

air' of

were your Father.- ye would love me for I


: ;

proceeded

but be sent me. 43

Why

S ixov {read LTTr ; eyu> a A. 1^1 ir , father ' tou iTp.rpo<: the a ijicoucraTt what ye have heard LTTrA. the Jatlier) LTTrA. "" ecrre ye are GLTTrA. " ilTtavt. '[ojT,. " e'rrai/ LTTrV. av OTTrA. I.TTiA OVK iyevyrjdiou.tt' Were not boru LXrA 6 LfTrJ. J oiv OLXXrA. t oiv LTTrA. * + 6 toe I. .,* S" Ti' LTrA.
'

Trpb?

avTOV to
I"

him

I.TIiA.
''

'

l[Ti'J.

a u

iyi> tyiu

"*

210

G A N N H

2.

vrii.
ort ov.ovi'a<r9E ciKovBn' Because ye are unable to hear

truth, ye believe me 46 Which of you not. me of sin? And if I say the truth, n-hy do ye not believe me? 47"He that is of

^word 'my. Ye of [the] father devil aro, lusts of your fathecy^ will do. He Ka'i rag imOvniag rov.Trarpog.vfJwv eAe-e vroidv. tKilvog was a raurderer from and the lusts of your father ye desire to do. He the begitunius, and abode not in the truth, dvOpMTroKTOvog 7)v dir' becausi' there is uo was from [the] beginning, and in the begi: a murderer truth 'not truth in him. W>)cn be speaketh a lie, he 'i(TTi]Kiv br.i oiiKA'aTtv d\r)9sia iv avri^. orav AaXy speakcth of his owu: 'h.as stood, because tHere i not truth in him. ^^Tieucver he may apeak for ho in a lir.r, and the IK Twi'.tciioi' \a\e1' on xpevirnjg iarlv Hal 6 father of it, 45 And TO xpivoog, because I tell you the falsehood, from hi'* o^^n be spe.aka for a liar be is", and the

do ye not understand my speech ? tven be- \a\inv rifv lu.'qv ov.yivdjrrKBTE? ; "speech 'my do ye not know cause ye canoot hear my word. 44 Ye are of \6yov Toviuoi/. 44 tijUEig i/c" youa- father the devil,

tov

TrarpoQ

and the

Tpii the

Sial36Xov iark^

Trarrip
father
'

avrov.

46 tyw
'I

convinceth

of

it.

tijv 5J ot,i 'and ^because the

d\i)9(tav
truth
/'f

Xtyio^,
speak,

ov
'not

maTiviTi

1.101.

46

Tig J^ vp,wv iXkyx^i

'ye -do believe me.

WTiich of

you. convinces me

TTfpi djAapTiag; coniej'niug sin?

heareth God's word.s ye therefore hear therii not, because ye are not of God. 48 Then answered the Jews, and said unto him. Say we not well that thou art a Samaritan; and hast a devil ? 49 Jesus answered. I have not a devil; but 1 honour my Father, and ye do dishonour me. 50 And I seek not mine own glory: there is one that seokoth and judtfth. 51 Verily, verily, 1 say unto you,
:

God

elJSe" a\ri9eiav \fyu), "c^iari" irndg ou.TrtoTfi'frf fxoi; nhy But if truth 'ye 'do ^not believe me? I speak,

47
He

6
that

wv
is

iic

Tov

9ioi)

Ta
the

pr]i.iaTa

tov 9iov cikovh'


of

Sid.TOVTO uyusTg
therefore

of

God

words

God

hears

yc

ovK.aKOVSTe,
hear not,
''oijv"
o'l

ort

Ik

tov

9f.ov

because of

God
saiti

oiiK.ioTk. ye are not.

48

'

A7nKp'i9i)aav
Answei-ed
lijuelg
'^we

'\ovhaioi Kal Jews and therefore the

'^eIttov" avrifj,

Ov

KaXutg Xiyo/xiV'
'well
s'x^'t'
\

to him, 'Not

'say

OTL 'Sa^apEiTjjt;" f^ ci'i < ^aifioviov 'art 'thou, and a demon that a Samaritan
Irjeoug, 'Eyui ^aifioviov ovkJ'^oj, have not a demon 'Jesus, I
;

'-9

AniKpiOr]
^Auswered

hast?

dXXd
but
I

ri/zw Tbv.TraT'tpa.f.iov, honour my Father,


Ti)i'.d6^av.iJ.ov' my glory

If a man keep my saying, he shall never see death. 52 Then said

Kai vfielg drifidZiTi pe.


and
j'ffrtr
thei-e is

60 kyw.dt
But
I

ye

'dishonour

me.
judges.

ov.Kt]TU) seek not

the

Jews unto him,


.

o
he

Kow we know

Zr]Twv Kai Kpivu)V.


seeks

61

th.at

who

man keep my saying, he bhall aig-Tm'.anova. 52 ^Eittov" ^oi'v^^ avTifi o'l lovSaioi, Nj;v never "taste of death. "Said 'therefore *to "him 'the ^Jows, for ever. Now 03 Art thou greater 'A-fipadp, d7rk9avev /cat oi than our father Abra- kyvwKafiev oti daipoviov t'xEicwe know that a demon thou hast. Abraham died and the ham, which is dead ? and the prophets are diad whom makcst Trpo<pf)Tai, Kai av Xtyug, 'Edv rig tov.Xu.ov.jxov Trjprjtry, and thou sayest, If anyone "njy 'word prophets, 'keep, thou thyself ? 54 Jesus answered. If I honour ov.pr/ ^yEvaerai" 9avdT0V sig.TOV.alwva. 53 fi^ av fisi^^uiv myself, my honour is of death for ever. ^Thou 'greater nothing: it is my Fa- in no wise shall he taste ther that honoureth me of whom ye say, el TOv.Trarpdg.i'ipMiy 'kfipadfi, oTTig d7rs9avev; Kai oi TrpoAbraham, who than our father died? and the prothat he is your God: 'art 55 yet ye have not Tiva (TEovtov '"o'li" Trotfic; 54 'A-n-(Kpi9r) <pf)Tai dTrE9avov known him but I whom 'thyself ^thou 'makest ? died ^Answered phets know
aayest, If a
:

Abraham is dead, and Tig the prophets; and thou anyone


thon hast a devil.

and

dfnijv dfxr/v Xiyio i'lulv, Verily verily I say to you,

kdv
.If

TOV ^Xoyoi' tov


'word

iuov'' Ti]pr)<nj,

9dvaTov
death

ov.fir/
in

9eu)pr)ay
ehall he see

^my

'keep,

no wise

him and
:

if

'lr](T0vg, 'Etiv

eyw
I

''cio^rt^w"
glorify

ip-avTOv, ij.So^a.fiov ovSkv (<jtiv'


myseli,
fis,

Vesua,
t(TTLV
it is

If

my glory
ov

nothing

is

6.TraTi]p.pov

So^ct^wv
glorifies

my
'your

Father
he

who

me, [of]

whom

vfielq XkyfTE, oti ye say, that

Oeog ^vpuiv" tcmv, 66 Kai


God
is.

And

ye have not

ovK.lyvwKaTE avrov-, known him,

tyw.c? but I

ol8a know

"
f

Sia Ti LTrA. elvav T.

TToiei?

oi)K T. y + [vju.ii'] to thee t. TOV the GLTTrA. 6e butQLTTrA. ^ 2a/oiapi'n)S T. ilirav LTTrA. efxav Adyov I.TTrA. otv OLTTtA. ^ yevarfTai should he taste GLTTrA W. K OVJ' LTTrA. <TV (read * Sofdcrto shall glorify LTTrA. makest thou) glttfa. tiuwi/ our TTrkw.
*>

<^

'

'

Vlll, IX.

J
ti'"
if

X.
laouai oixoioc
luhallba
h>s
?'?'"''''_
''''7'

211

avTov
I

""koi

s'ttw
I

on
that

him;

and

saj

ovK.olca I know uot

avrov,
hjni,

J nHP'""

hke

liar like
I

uuto you: but

"vfAuiv," \ JOM.

xlitvar-qga liar..

a\\'"
But

olda avrov, him, I know

Kcti

TOv.Xoyov.nvrnv
_^

kuow him, and keep

and

word

faUw'Xaham
' il

uol yot fifty yearn old, and haKtthoua</en , OVmO <XfC, Abr.iham? 58 Jenoa Oi Lfty years [old] not vet art thou, said uuto them, Ycrily, him, Jews the' to verily, I say unto you, ~ ~ ' 1. . V '-r, T^; r'li'i Kai AppaaflimpaKai^; 08 Y.nrtV avroig '0" 17](T0VQ, A/JI/V Before Abraham tyas, I am. -"Jesirs, Verily 59 Then took ^Said =to 'thorn and Abraliam hast thou seen ? Ihcy up btones to cast > n c(-v''ii (tfir/V \tjUi VjXlV, TTpiV AppaUfJ, yeVi(TOia tyOJ tifll. OV at bim: but Jesus hid 1 say ^o you, Beforo Abrah:ini ' was am. I TheJ took up himself, and went out verily ~ / ., / " of the tcraplo, eoing $>> \ .,, 3 '\ ,3 OVV AvJovQ iva iJcAiomv nr avrov Irjaovg.ot tKpvprj, throiit;h, the mil.'it of but Jesus- hid himself, them, aud so pas.^ed him; theri;foro irtoues that, tiny might cast at

joiceJ to sw my day: H^n" Tr)pijj.66'Al5oaaiiu.7raTrip.vuuJvyiya\\ia(faTO iva in that he f^hould see exulted Abraham your Father I keep. gvV 67 Th said Tb' Jew unto hioj, Thou Ti'iv I'lUipnv rfiv iur}V Kai dSiv kuI t')^('ipri. 57 ^E?7^ov'' ovv

nndhosaw and ix-ioiced. ^' JoVCaloi TTpOQ avrov, IleVT1]K0VTa tri]


dftT

,,,__,
'dw,
'

Said

therefore

ft.

-,

>

'

,,..#

t^

i>o

<

'

<

Hpav

^id tK Tvij itpov, ^Sit'KOoJV iliiX(-!(v through going and went forth out of the temple,
Kai KOI TvapijyEV l^'TloC."
and
'p;is>ed
''(u

fikaov

avrwv

^'

the midst of them,

'thus.

;rapay(jji> el^iv (ivBpojTTO}' rvfJjXov ffc yveTr}Q 2 Ktii imnd from birth. And And ua-smg on h^ saw a man .j . ., t-v Ana as Jf-ms ' , nrt' H ripiunjnav avrbv oi.ua6t]raLavTov \tyo1'r((;, ^ Fappi," t'k; passed by, he saw a

9 K(

..

'

asked

I
I

-him
T

ril.ui{jr'iv,

ovroQ,
this

r]

oi.yoveig.avrov, iva rv(p\og


hi.f iialrents,
.,

'his disciples ~
.

s.-iyiiip,
,

liabbi,
.

^ho f^" "^'?.'? .t;''^H''l from birth. 2 And f\~ his disciples asked yivvr]dy
;
.

:Hned,
,

avrov
'his;

,,.-,,,iva'Jesus, Neither uaK ipavepujuy


J

ATrfK-pif/j "AnswKr.rl

./>.), "0
'

[man] or
~

that
>.

blind

he should be born? him,


.,

..

\i]ao\'<2,

Onre ovrog
ri

i/finpri-v this [man] sinned


'

ovre
nor
~

oi
t

yoveig
"parents
>

but

4v,i

<ii

^ipA

'Me
.1
.

'it
-

idjg iij.itpa lariv whilg day it is


;

avrt^i. of God in him. that .should be manifested the works ' ~ ? ~ J ' V i\ w ipya^eaunt ra tpya 3i rov 7nfx\pm"rog ^fAS the works of liim who mo ''behoves to work sent ,t / y ' V >j J' n

ru.

tpya rov Ueov iv

"

'

'I

II

saving. Master, did sin, this man, or his parents, that he was born blind? 3 Je^"^ answered. Neither hath this man sinned, nor hie parent^ii but that the works of God should be made maui-

who

fest in hiip.

must

/"

p\;rat ru^, on ovoag ^comcs 'night, when no oi^e


'

./

ovvarai
is

able

work the works of tpyai^eckjai- iiim that sent mo, to work. while it is day the
' :

b Ornv iv
ra

KOCfXip While in the world I


r'(^

W,

may

(piog it/ll rov be, [the] light I am of the

Koafipv.
world.

6 Taii- man'^oan'work^'TAs Those long as I am in. the


tK
of
of"tife' woHd.^'e'whe^u he had thus spoken he tho ff^o""^.

eIttwv, 'iirrvaiv things having said, he spat on

xM"'''
[the]

tTroh^aev ground, and made

'

m]Xdv
clay

Tov Ttrvffuarog, Kai in'i\piutv^ rov tttjXov tTrirovg


\he
of the
.~>rttle,

6<p9aX'[j.ovg
eyes

^^^ on

and

applied

./ho

clay

to

the
wa.sh
I

yrov rv^Aov""
>

7 Kai
-'

direv avrifj, "Yirayi, ^vi\paO^ eig ri^v edthoeyes


'

blind [man]. And he said to him, Go, n n KoXv/jprjOpav rov SiXwajit, o epf^irivevEfai,
'
t\
t

in
I

the
'

airEaraXatvog.
Sent.
'

>

HewenthlswaytjjereawriKUiV -ovv Kai SVliparO, Kai i]\uev pXeirWV. O Oi , ovv Hcwqnt therefore and washed; .and came seeing. The 'theref 0. fore, apd washed^ aud '. '^"^^ seeing. 8 The ~ , .\ /i o yfir(/vsg Kai oi Ueiopovvteg avrov ro Trporspov on ^rv<pXog" neighbours therefore, 'ijiigiibours aud fHbse who ^^ they which before saw him before that blind liad seen him that ho r -. ~ r\ /I t]v. o KaUijpevog Kai rrpofrairujv; was blind, said, is not tXeyc)^i^,Ovx ovrog i(Triv hewas, .said, ''Not -'this 'is this ho that sat aud he who was sitting and begging?
-

pool ~\ /I

of Si loam, which

is

'1

'J

-1

interpreted, A DN '

^^','J unto him, Qo, wash in the pool pf Siloam,(which ishy


.

spittl^and'he^anointof the blind


,?,,

'^"?

5".

^<

interpretation.

Sent.)

.'

>

<

>

'

<'

II

'

>

'

<

'

<

-^

y-AXXot ^XEyov, "On oWog tanv


Some
said,

'"Ho

'it 'is

ciXXoi.hn,^] but others,


P eiSjj T.
oitil.TTi

^"Ori" oyzotog SifL:'l?he,'sla;y: ''Like H6 is like him iwtM


:

Kai' LTTr.

n vfjilv LTi
'

aA\a I.TTrA*.
y

1 "Elirav T.
" 17/^01?
'

'

.... ovTox; GLTTiA.

'Pa;3/3ei' T.

auToO on him Lrir^. GI.TT. A\)-. "_- ie but i\eyov [Ovxtj aAA'j L.
_ _

tou tv^\ov
'

"

6
T)

TTr..

SieKBotV
-ij/ua?

AW.

US TTr.
Said,

[l'Iiti a.

[i/ii/'at] l.

^ Trpia-aiTTjs

[l.JTTrA.

iK^yov, Ovxi, oAA' (a\\a

US T. ,a beggar No, but TTrA'J

"

212
fore said they uuto him, How were thiue eyes opened? 11 He

QANN H
tt
,'

2.
->

IX.

KMd.lamAe lOThere- avru)


^i,-

^""^

n. ^'^,'^\
l<JTiv.
n'

'Ek^voq'^ t\fyev,

"On

tyil)

/'"

'

oyts? 'An. raaTth?it i^talkd J^ ' sus made chiy, and an- EKpiOr] SKEHvOQ ''(Cai cZtTEI/," 'Al/QowTTOg ' XevoufvoC 'inoroVC ointcd raiao eyes, and g^.,.e^ 1,,^ ^^^^ g^^^j ^j^ called JcsU6 said unto me, Oro to , , > > ^ , > n \ the pool of- Siloam, TnjAOV.iTTOnjaEV KOI iTrS^^pKTEJ/ flOV TOVt; OfdoXflOV^y Kui elTTCV and wash: and I went clay niado and applied to' mino eyes, and said ad w:ished, and I re' ,. ~ i n ceived siffht. 12 Thea fXOi,^' ITTaye SIQ 'rrjV KOAVHpr](jfjaV TOV^ ZlXlUUfl Kqi Vl\pat. said they unto him, tome, Go - io the pool of Siloam and wash; "Where IS lie? He said,' . n ' ' / t ir ml^M| ifinoi^r io\ I ti aTreWiov'^CElKaLviiyaixevog avtpXixpa. 12 "Elxov'' Povj'" iiinoniiut. 'having ^gone 'and and washed They said thcrgldrj 1 receired sight.
v < / y
t

awr/p, ITdit;* fdi^e^^x^'/*^"!'" ^""ow" therefore to him, How were opened thine

quv

nm [he]. Thoy Bftid oto^yaAuot: 'Att,

tlui. "

10 'K\syov ^fv

H
>

,-,

>

->

^\ \

'

<

'

'

oiTc^,' IToii
to him,

iariv tKElvog
is

Atyei,

OiiK.olSa.
I

Where

ho?

He

says,

know

not.

^ ;.,'? 4u iM uthe Pharisees him that afoKtimo was blind. 14 And it was the

.13 "Ayovcjiv avTOU Trpog tovc, ^api(Jctiovg, tov ttote They bring "him 'to 'the ^Pharisees, who once [was] rvcpXov, "14 rjv.de oafijiaTov lore" tov ttijXuv tnohjaev q blind.. Now it was ,. sabbath when Hhe "clay ''mado
'

.^

IrjaoVQ Kal
'Jesus

(Xt'((fit,av
'

aVTOV TOVC
his
,

>

0(j)9a\i-iovg.
.

15 TraXiv
<

ovv

>

Babbath .dnr when ~ , ?> o\ t Jesus made the clay, 7lpU>TU)V aVTOV Kttl 01 <Papi(TaiOt TTVjg aJ'fpAy'. O.Ct ElTTiV and opened his eyes. asked him also tlie Phari'^ecs hov/ he recwivod sight. And he BBid 15 Then again the rha-; , % /% ,, tt \ ',i KUl IVlrisous mIso asked him avTOlQ, IIj/AOV tTnU))KEV ^kTTl' TOVg.O(pVa\ji.OVg.HOV^' huw he had received to them, and X Clay mine eyes, he put on. his^ight. He said uu, ' i. .^ ,3n / /-."r^x OVV SK Twv <Papiaai(nv Tivtg, to them, He put clay \paij.r)v,Kai pAsTTU}. ^ib. LKsyov upon mine eyes, and X washed, and Tharlgees 'some, Said therefore 'of HheI see. >" washed, and <lo see. ,, < - n ~ n 'i ' 3 j /^ OuTug UV&pUJTTOg OVK.taTlV TTapa TOUpeOV,'' OTl TO aaiipUTOV. IG Then fore said some from God, for the sabbath of tho Pharisees, This This man is not ' man is not of God, be-. ' ^>. OV.TTjpSl. A\A0liAeyOV,l\tJg0VVaTaiavtipW7T0gafJ.apT(iJAOg cause he keepeth not How a man said. can ^ 'a sinner sabbath day. he 4oes not keep. Others tlie
,
,

-and

opened

eyes.
,

Again therefore

'

'

>

>

<

>

.,

>

~\>''\
signs

xr^f'
,

-a

'

aman^thaUs^a^Mnncr TOiaVTU ar]fXfla TTOlEiv.


do such miracles?

Kai CTXtV^a
And
agiviu,

And

such
say

do?

)7V ,lv avrQlQ. a divisioa was amotjg them.

17 AtThey

amongXm' ifThey yOV^lv'


say unto tho blind man What sayest ajiaiu. thou or him, that he hatli opened thiue eyes? }Ie said He is

Tqi TV^X^ to tho blind [man]


,

TviXlV, 'Su

TT^pi Tl" XkyHg tti'TOV, ^Tliou 'what '.sayest concerning him,

JJ^j

"/Voi^v" ,' ^
he opened
^^^^-

^'

thine

...

aOV TOVC OCbBaXuOVC r -? "T


..

'O.Ot

eyes?

,^

Anu
>

eItTEV, j he 'said,
i,
,

"OtI TTpO*

A pro*
a

'

(pyjTtjg
P'^^'

iaTlV.
'

18 OvK.STritTTEVaaV
*Did "not

OVV

01. 'lo^lOolOL
-Jew.-j

Je'^s did not believe


coiicir.iing him, that he had been blind, and rceeived his sight, until

"^believe ^therefore 'the

TTEpl concerninjf

aVTOV, OTI ^TV<pX6g


jj,

jV"

"^^l

dj'/3\fl//tV
received sight.
'

tUjg.OTOV t(piOVT)aaV

they called the pahis


sight.

TOVg
the
,

j^at

'blind
,

rcntsofhiin that hadreceived

yOVElQ aVTOV parents of him

'he -was _ ~

and
,

until
, i

they called
.

n TOV dvafSXtXpaVTOg' who had received sighti

19 And they asked avTOVQ XtyOVTEg, OvTOg kXTTlV. O.Vlog.VJUUJV^i OV V/JeIc X^ETS Ihem, saying. Is this them ^Thii) your son, say saying, 'is of whom yo your .-^ou, wlio ye say ' ^ ,^ > ' r o\ w .-k-v . n TTiOQ OVV ' apTi pXiTTELl: zQ ATTEKpiUr)w;is born blind? how OTI TV(bXog tyEVVif}V1] \ tlieu dotluhe now see? that blind he was born ? how then now doeshese(^? 'Answered 2l>ni-^ parents answer> ' iKt r '/-ved tliem and said, We ffCLV ^auTOig" Ol.yOVEig.nVTOV Kai ^EtTTOV," OlCOflEV OTI OVTOQ know that tliis is our 'them 'his 'parents aii4 said," 'We know tliat thjs -' ><.- Hon, and that he was t/ t .a >n c\t boru blind: 21 but by EOriV O.Vlog.ri^UJi^, KUl OTI TVfXog EyEVVrj^T]' 21 TTtOC.VE-VVi' our son, and that what means he now ii blind he was Born; .; liut hovif' ^ow
, '
'

,,.,.,

'

19 KOI And
,

l)p(xJTl)aaV lliey asked


..

-.,^,.
.

..

.-

ii

"^

>

..<<:

^' -(- ovv then [i,]t[a]. ' rivewx^rja-dv LTTrA._. aoi k' Kaiytirtv. i the man that is called) TTr[A']. -I- on TTr'. foy (read GoJ.o iji-j OVV therefore LTTrA. + [(caij and Tr, loam) OLTJiA. elnav LTTrA,^ > ovl; l.TTrAj ' /xov enl tov? O^SoAjuovI OLTTrAW. iv 77 i7/x'pa in which dayJXTTrA. , Ouk e<TTiV oCtob *' Traod 6eoi> & dv^/iwiros LTTrArr ^ + OVV tuercloio LTTrAW. " Ti crv TrA^ ^I'f'wfeV Tr^ iji' Tv/.Ao? TTrA!. avrpij [LjTTri., .i.yl'BXinfC'apfi WTrA, '-+ OVV therefore LI. " tinny ri'rA.

6e

however
'

L.

[i>JTTrA.

-I-

6 (read
o'

''

'

<>

<

IX.
(HXknei ovK.o'l^nfiev, ri wc know not, or hcspcs
intitc "^
,

.JO H

N. to^q o^QaXixovg
eyes
or^^^'jifT

213
hath^i
"ncci

we
he

ovK.o'iSantv know not ;^


,
'

''rtt';roc

It
who
he
^

rig

yiwi^ev
opened
of
..

avrov
his
'*

ii^iiciav.tvH,
is ftge,

aurdv fowrnffare," " "


2u^-him
1

'ask,

at'iTi'^

TTffji

'ai'irof;"

XXj7C7(.
shall speuk.

22 Tai'ra
^
/

cono.-rninf?

himself
__.

jJttoj' Thet,e things said


,

oi

yora^
'

his eyes, w'c know not: he is of age; ask, him: he shall spciik for hini^^jf 22 These Kwrfir spake his pments liei,

'^
_

avrov,
.

uri
because
01

f^OJ^OVVTO TOVg
they feared
I.
,

lovSaiovg'
Jews
;

'Ills,

'

Tsuen'TO
togetlier
,
'

.If. lovoaJoi,
Jews,
,

the
/

iva tav
if

tJie

that
,

ric anyone
,

avrov
him

,,...,
.
,

had agreed ""^ P*""^" ^''^., confess that he was Christ, he oj.io\oyi]rry should b. put out synagopiie. t'' should confess [to be the] i ,

i'l^tj.ydp. for already

Vronts ^""^' lor the Jews had 5 Jews: I'^^f/^'''' aVVt- agreed already, that if

J^pKTT"!/,

aTTOCVVaywyOQ
II

ytvr)Tai.

XO Otn
'

rOVrOOiyOVHC
"parents
c\d
<-t^ a

-23

Tlierefore said his parents. He is of age;


'isk
?'''"

aVTOV
'his

Christ, put out of the synagogue he should be. > - f T "/- \ ' " 'ftTTOl'," tjKlKiai' ^X^l<

On

avruv StpionjaaTf"
'hira
II

>>

Because of this
!4
'ask.
.V

him.

24

Then

a-

L(p(0-

said,

VI](Tav
called

OVV

TV,!,.. ofTOV "tK.CeVTSpoV


is
.
,

He

.nge,

They
>

therefore

a second time

the

u ^ T avUpiOTrOV' Og r]V TV<^AOg, Km who was blind, and man

called thrv the that was blind, and said unto him, Give God the-praise: we know that this msm is a sinner, .25 He

man

'ffTTOV'
said

aVT({), to him,

Aog CO^av
Give
glory

Tt{> ifeifJ'

ll/ieig
;

OlvaflEV

on
that

'o

to

God

we

know

avVpu)- whether ho be a /man ner or wo, I know


thing
,

sin-

not:

TTog
/cm

oirog"
'this

cifiaprioXog

iariv.
is.

25

a sinner
If

'ATreKpiOt] oiv tKslvog hat, ^Answered 'therefore 'he blind,-

I w'he'reas whereas

know, was I 'was


I

now

see.

tJxiv,' E( ai.iaproj\6g iariv ovK.o'idnsaid.


u,i'

and
'blind

a sinner

he

is

knaw

not.

olSa, on Mnra^ain?'wha7did One [thing^ I know, that ho to thee? how open-

h>

TVipXdg

apri 'being now

iSXtTTiv.
I see.

26 ElirovJSt" avrr^ -TraAfv,"


And
they said to

Ti'

him

again,

What
He

f,';:,!,';'a"lh^m.?ha"e
\,X)\A

you alrendy and

ttwq yvoiUv oov tTToiriaiv aoi\ did he tothee? how opened he thine.
Ko'iBn nvToJc, twered them,
I

rovg IxpOaXjiOvg;
eyes?

27 'kin-

^ort'wiid'^yc'hr''a7T an- apujn ? will ye also be

EIttov vixiv iihi.'Kai ovK.y'tKovaars'


told
/ur)

yau alrcady,-and
'also

ye

diil

not liear

ri vraXtv why again


to M

Ws

disciples

as

Then

^^-^^

Thou
;,

art his dis^'"^

9f\E- aKovHv; doye wish to hear? "

Kai vfiHg.OiXire ai'TOV jAaQriTai yii'iaQai;


'do/ye wish ^
'

^ip'e

his

disciples 1

become?

28
.

"

know

'EXo(^c)p7;<Tai'

"oCv" avrov. Kai


and

^iiTrai','^
said,

him, ..._ 'Mojanog" iKdvoV rov


'railed 'at 'therefore
'
11

They

Sri '^d uadrfrrig^^ Tliou art 'Misciple


'

doses' disciples. 29 We that God spak-e unto Moses: rw/o?- this

?'"*

Mow,

we know not

>

riiuetg.ct

'his
'.

fxiv

on
that

-mtoay^ XiXaKi^Ktv oHtog'


to Moses

but we -11

of Mosea
N \

tcfiei' /jaOiirai. disciples. are


'

29

ti/Jilg
1

otcaWe' know
I'^

r r

'\

'

rovrovct
but this [man]
-

^-

from whenc3 he is. so The man answered "'' <^^'^^ ""'o (hem, Why herein la a mar-

he is, and yel he h.ath " . , l/l QA o T TTOaev tcnv. o() ATrfKplUr) O ai'VpwTrog KUt HTTEV avroig, Kv opened mine eyes, 'Answered 'the 'man whence he is. .and said to them, 'In 31 Now we know thac God heareth not siu ^ T. , nn '/-I 'Uav/xa&to}' lani', on vfieig- ovK.oicare voUev ners: but if any man yap rovrifj is, that 'indeed this a wonderful thing know not whence be a -svoishipper of ye God, and- rlocth his ' J" '../I \ nt "f tJ'ii " lanv, Kai ^aTf<f)i,fv" fiov rovg o<p\jaXfiovg. 6\ oioafxiv.^ct on win him ne heaicth. mine he ifl, and he opened eyes. But we know that 32 Since the isorld he< ,
,

'has ^spoken 'O

'God;

ovK.oicafHv veilous thing, that ye we know not know not from whence

'

I,

'

>

'

>

'

ti-

'

II

<

ir* -'A'H 'afiaprWAWV O UHjg" OVK.aKOver

\*.

'

'

'^\'>' aW tav
but
If

sinners

God

does not hear

y pan was it not heard r\ n rig VEOaipr^g y, ^hat a-:y man opened anyone God-fearing bf, the eyes of one that
^

Kal rb and the


'it

9iXr]fia
will

avrov
of

Troty,
do,

tovtov ciKOVd.
him
he hears.

32

him

tK.rov.alaivog ^^^ ^'^


^Ever

J^".^ not of

God,, he could do no',^?e"red

OVK.^KOVaQn,
yty^vrtm'fvov.

on
33

'm'Oltiv'
'opened

ng
'anyone [the]

b^BaXntvg
eyes

rVtpXoV
of [one] 'blind
rj-

and ^safd un?o


alto-

'was ^not heard that

him Thou wast

'having 'been 'bom.

ti yfi f)v If 'not /"were


'

ovrog
'this

Trapa

['man] from

6tov ovk God

he

Svvaro
oonld
"*

'TTOiilv ov^kv. do nothing.

34 AfrsKpiB^aav
Th^y answered

Kai ^sZttov" airtf), 'Ev and said to him. In

f fliTav LTTrA. ' eavTOu TTr. LTTrA. ^ Koi dwev oJto9 6 avOptuiro^ I,. LTTiA'w. > 4- oi 5t (rrarf'But theyovi/ jro An- LTTrA. railed) Tr. P iXTvav T. o\>v GLTTpAW 1 \i.aQt)Ti]<; ei LTTrA. Ma)i;<Teaj? LTTi AW. Miovo-et LTTrA; Muivtrp * ' tovtw yap TTrA. -|- to the (wonderful thillt)'TTr. " ^voif eV LTTr. ^vewf eV Tr. eXTtav LTTrA. y 6 9ebs a/aapruAwi^ JCTrA.6e but LTTrA,

avrov

kftiuTtfaare, avTO<i.(- oLvtos TTr,\) -qkiKLav ej^ei

S 67rpa>T7)<7"aT T.
'

top avOpwiroi^ eV SevTe'pov LTT/ therefore (they said) LtTi A. "'


"^

A.

'

214
gether born in sinB, Bnd dost thou teach s? And thcv cAst him cut.. 35 Jesna heard

IQANNHil.
auanriaic r r
=>

IX, X.
(ri< a.v.

oi'

tyewnQric oXoc, Kai '


wftst
.
. i borp

cuoOKfic uuac:
i.

Kai
j And
.

^'''^

'"""
hin.

l i. wholly,

i^siSaXoV ilVTOV l^W.


they cast
out.

35

j and 'thou 'HKOVaiV ^6"

'teachest

'

nsi*.

InOOVC OTl lUl^nXov


'Jesus

outrnnlwh^-i'l'ehad foundhiui.hesnidunXT him, Dost tViou boIieve

^HcRrd

that
Sli

thuy cast

aVTOV t^W
j^j^^
,

on
3f.

the

Son of
18

^^^^
^

KUi iVpWV ^^^ having found


~

aVTOV
him

sl'TTiV 'aVT(f,'* said to bim,

TTiaTfXiftq
'btlievcst
t
'

God?
and

He answered

iic;
^j,
,

8f>id,

Who

TOV
tijg

VWV
ggn
,

TOV QiOV
of

An

'

;''

36
/

<

he,

Lord.thftt I mipht be-

God

ATTSKpiOrj fKfh'OQ 'Kai ftTTiV," 'TlQ ''Answered 'he and said, Who

/-!>-

'Thou

Jt-suB said

lifevconhim? And ICTTIV, KVpit, iva TTKJTiVCHi} tlQ aVTOl^\ 37 tii7C(.V f'Ct'~ailTlft unto hira, jg he, And 'said ''to "him Lord, that ] may believe on him? Tliou hast both Been ,, IrjiroVQ, Kaj IwpnKaQ avTOV, Kai O KaAwl' fllTU GOV him, and it is he that with thee. talketh with ihoo 'Jesus, 'Both 'thou 'hast seen him, and he who speiiks 3H And ho said, Lord, ^ ' ^n <^ ^- Kai TTpOCJiKVVr}Thelicve. Andhcwor- tKHVOQ ttJTlV. OO O.df t<pr)i lliariVlx), KVpil ' eliipped him. 39 And lie 'is. And he said, I belieTo, Lord: and he worshipiied Jfi..iiii saul. For iudg~ ~ ,. t ,,r; >t -n' o9 KUI ilTTil' O Ir/CTOVg, ElQ Kfil/irt (yu> itC TUV n.ciit I am come into <^fV avT<{). into And ^eaid 'Jesus, For judgment him. I this worM, that they

,,,,_,,,,
,,.,..^

_,^,,,
,

,,

>

>

^^o't''

am? that ""they


see

KOO^OVTOVrOV ilWoV,
this
*''

wliich

might

'be

world

came,

'iva o't fir^.^VlTTOVTiQ {iVlTTwaiV, Kttl might see, that they that sec not and

romf''of''thePharite'i wliich were with him


i'nld

they that

(SX'ivovT^Q rv(fKoi .yki'wvrai. blind might become. see

40

''Kai" ^KOi'Tav

k rwv
'of 'the

And
tliT
v.ith
;

"heard

untrhim''^e''we
41

^CCpida'iWV
'Pharisees
'''"^"
fii"!

Wavra''
'"these "things

01
'those

KvT^Q
^who 'were
'are
?

blind also?

J'esus

ai-Toi," Kui 'him, and


Said
^ to

hithey

1?- "biiMi'^^^shouM
have no'"in f bu^t no* We see; therefoso your sin remainye say.

o.vTip, to him,

M/j

(cai

///Kfic

TVfpXoi tofitv
"blind

4l' EZirsj/

avroiQ o
them
_

^Also

"we
r]Ti,

'\^a0VQ, Et TV(fKoi
j^^^^^^

j^

^^^^^

OVK.a.V.dx(.T(. ^^ ^^^^ ^^ vioviXd not have


>] ""oifv" the 'therefore
;

afiapTiaV
sin
;

VVvM
but

\'l-

now

ytT(.,"OTi (iX'tTTOfi^v
say

afiapria hfiwv
'sin

fi'ivn,

We see,

of you remains.

10
X. Verily, eerily, I

'A/jr^v Vfrily

ajxriv
verily,

Xsytj v^\v,
I

fii^MaEpxofin'og Sia riig


enters not in

say

to you. lie that

by

the

IXrcth

n"ot

by 'the
sheep-

^'^PC f'V rr,v


door
to

avX^v Twv Trpofidrwv, aXXa dvafiaivujv aXfold


of the

door into the

the

sheep,

but

mpunts up

else-

8ome''othcr"n?ry\he ><ax6eiv, iKtlvog KXfTTrr/f iffTiv Kai XyarijQ' a thief and atobljer; is he same is a thief and a where,

o.Si dffspenbut he that

did rfjg ruterothin'bTthedooJ X^t^^^OQ lers in by the is the Khcphcrd of the


')^rt''r

BvpuQ
door

iroifiipj

wrtv rwv
is

Trpofiariov.
sheep.

TOVTt{>

shepherd

of the

To hyn
hear,

o Tirtb'a'nd h.s the sheep hear voice and he caiieth


:

^
*''*'^

Ovpio^og dvoiyH, Kai Ta Trpoftara Tiig.tpi^vfjg.avTOV aKovii,


door-keeper
opens,

and the

eheep

his voice

^a/'
"""^

Ta.Uia
his

ivime^'^and^

liRiTot^

own
^,,g^

'irpofSara "/caXel" sheep he calls

kut' ovofxa, icai and name, by

t^uyei
leads =out

avrd.
'them.,

tiiomout. 4 And when he putteth forth his own sheep, he gopth before them, and the Bhcep follow him for
1

"icai"

oTav

^^^
^

rd.'iSia PTrpojSara" his own sheep

TropSViraf Kui TO TTpOjSara aVT({} dKoXovUH,


he goes
,

,,,
,

(KJSdXy

IfiirpoaOiv

avrwv
them
.

before he puts ,,, forth^^f OTl


follow,
i

they

know

his voice.

and
,

5 And a stranger will ^^^7 J'^^ foliov., but will flee from hinl: for they know not the voice of strangers, 6 This parable spake

TYfV .(pwVTJV.aVTOV.
his voice.

the ,-

sheep

5
,

a\Xorpi({J.Cf But a felranger

,f
,

<-

him

because
'

OlCnOlV thev know

OV.fJLT)

'*aKoXovOl]0UjaiV,
they should follow, .^^

n'

in
,

no wise
,

oXAa
but
the
.

(ptv^ovToi air
will
flee

auTOV
him,

OTl

Jesus unto them but they un.lerstood not what things they were wh rh he spake nnto
:

T/jv ^iDV7iv.
voice.
.>

'/^n^' D lavTTiv
This
.

from

because they
allegory

Tt)v TTapoifiiav Hir,tv


.

-t
a

ovK.oidaaiv TWV aXXorpuov know not of strang-r*

avTOiQ
,

,*..,~

Irjaovg,
'Jesus,

'spoke '=to 'them

thetu.

tKe.lVOl.0t VVK.eyl'iOffaV Tiva knew not what but they

rT

r]V
it

tXaMl aVTOLQ.

>\

-%

was which he spoke to them.

6 t(Ti].
Ka'i

'

'

and GTTrAW.
P

avTOV oi'T LTTrA.


TTt A.
it

d ivOpiuTTov of jnaii t. TfTrA]. Kai tlirfv l[a]. ^ ' e Se and LTTrA.: Kai TTrA. TavTa T. juer' " ([xjiVil he calls LTTiA. eirrav T. Ka oOi' [L]TTrA.
a{/T<j)

''

'

'

TTavra all
ir.

(Tlis

own)

LTTrA.

".

aKOAovdijaOVO-iv will they follow LlTrAW.

'

might be

X.
7 EIttev

J
odv

N.

215

7 Then said Jesus ^ira'Xiv aiiroig" o'lnrrovg, 'Ajjtjv a/^^v Xe-yw nnto them again. VeVerily verily I say rily, verily, I say unto 'Jesus, 'to 'them ''Said 'therefore ''again oaoi you, I am the door of iifiiv, ^ori'^ tyut eifii 7) Ovpa riov TrpojSdrtjJV. 8 Travreg the sheep. 8 All, that whoever over came before mo All sheeii. am the door of the that I 'to you,

"npo

before

me avTu)v rd
>

'

are thieves and robbers but the sheep did not hear them. 9 I am the door by tyu) f/jui r) Qvpa' dt' (/.lov kiv rig Trpu/f3ara. anyone me if any maa enter if am tho door: by me I "them Hho "sheep. in, he shall be saved, elciXOy awBriairai, Kal aiasXevasrai Kai ti,{\ev(TeTai, Kai and shall go in and and out, and find pasture. shall go in and- ' shall go but, enter in he shall be saved, and

tjjov 7/X0ov" (cXfTTrat elaiv ical

Xyarai' dXX' oyK.tjKOVtrav


robbers;

came

thieves

are

and

but

'did 'not 'hear

10

The

thief

cometh

leXttpy not.but lor to steal, and ei.fti] 'iva except that he may 8"t*al to kill, and to destroy: I am conie that they t^'^o'tv, might have life, and Kal Qvcy Kal cnroXtay' iyw fjXOov 'iva l^wrjv came that life they might have, that they might have I and may kill and may destroy it more abundantly. Kal Trspi&aov txioaiv. 11 'Eyw eifii u Trotfit/v 6 KaXog' 6 11 I am the good shep'good. The herd the good shepand abundaJitly might have [it]. I am the "shepherd herd giveth his life for Troiu7]v OKaXog Tt]v.\pvxvv.crvTOV TiOtjcfiv VTrep toiv TrpofSci- the sheep. 12 But he his life lays down for' the sheep: that is an hireling, "shepherd 'good and not the shepherd, TTOt/jrjV, 06 OVK whose pwn the sheep TWV. 12 6.jUl(T0fa>7-6C-''(5," Kai OVK-WV but the hired servant, and who is not [the] shepherd, whose 'not are not, seeth the wolf coming, and leavfith *6t(Tiv" rd TrpojSaTa iSia, 0atupi tov Xvkov tpx^f^^^ov, Kal the sheep, and fleethi wolf *are 'the 'sheep sees the comiug, and and the wolf catcheth 'own, them, and scattereth ddilj/fftv rd TrpofSara Kal Kal 6 Xvkoq dpTrdZet avrd the sheep. 13 The Hireleaves sheep, seizes the and flees and the wolf them ling fleeth, because he

VQfiqv Evprjati. 10 6 KXiTrrrig ovicJpxfTaL


shall find.

pasture

The

thief

comes not

'

^eiyW
;

Kal aKopTTtZ^H ^rd npofiardi and scatters the sheep.


,

13 o.dk fiiaSwrog Now the kired servant


Trtpt

0')yft"
flees

on
because

js

an hire li D g and careth not for the sheep. 14 I am the good shep,

fiKjOuiTog lariv, Kal and a hired servant he is,

ov.fiiXu.avT<^
is

rCJv 7rpo(SdT<t)V.
sheep.

not himself concerned about the

herd, and sheep, and of mine.

know my
15

am known
As the

14 iyw
I

ti^i 6

am

TTOifirfv 6 KaXug' the "shepherd 'good


;

Kal yti/wCT/cw rd and I know those that


tfiwv.'^

e/xd,
[are] mine,

Father knoweth me, even so know I the Father and I lay down
:

Kal ^yivoxTKOfiai
and
fiE

vno
of

am known
6
Trarijp,
'the ^Father,

tuiv / those that

16 KaOwg yn'waku my
As
'knows
16

[are] mine.
rd'i'

"me
I lay
li

Kayai yivwaKio know I also


-the

Trarepa'
Father
;

the

Kal rriv.ypvx'h'^-fiov and my life


X*^
I have,
'

for the sheep. other sheep I have, which are not of this fold them als^ I mu.st bring, and they
life

And

Tidtjlxi

VTTip Tojv TrpojSdrwv.


for
sheep.

16 Kal dXXa vpofiaTa


And
;

down

other

sheep

voice; shall hear and there shall be one fold, and one shepTherefore herd. 17

my

Set" doth ray Father love "behoves me, because 1 lay down my life, that 1 might dyayfli^, Kal .Tiig.<piovrjc.juLov dicovaovcriv' Kal ^yevijasTai^^ fxia take it .again. 18 No they will hear and there shall be one man taketh it from to bring, and my voice me, but I lay ii down 17 Sid.rovTO '^o Trariyp fie^^ dyair^, of myself. I have TTOifivrf, Eig iroifiiyy. flock, one shepherd. On this account the Father me loves, power to lay it down, and I have power ^o iyw riOrjfii Triv.\l/vxW-f^ov> '*' TrdXir XdfSio avrrjv. ^ake it again. This because I lay down my life, that again I inay talce 'it. commandment have I received of my Father. 18 ovSeig aipei avrrjv dir' t/j-ov, dXX' iyw Ti9rijj,i avrjjv air' 19 There was a division Nb one takes it from me, bat I lay down it of therefore again among the Jew^ for tbesa i^ovrriav Otlvai

ovK.tariv
are not

Ik
of

riig.avXijg.ravTtjg'
this fold

KdKSivd *u

which

those also

^me

'it

on

ifiaVTOV
myself.

t^^w Authority I have

avTTjv,
it,

Kal

i^ovaiav f^w.
authority
I

tO'

lay do|fn

and

have

TrdXiv
again

Xa^uv avrrjv
to take
it.

ravrrfv rrjv
This
'

tXajSov Trapd tvroXriv commandment I received from


TrdXiv iykvEro
again
there was

TOv.Trarpog.jiov.

19

'S.xiofia

''oiii/"

my

Father.
,'

A division therefore

iv rolq among the

* rjASov 7rp6 avTOis T ; avTois A. on [L]Tr[A]. " eariv LTTrA. Se but T[Tr]. J to, irpopaTa, ([to. TrpojSara] A) 6 hi p.{.aQ(OT0^ (^evyeL [L]TTrA. ' yLVuxTKoyuii' /xe tA ffxci those that (aig] * Sei jxe LiirA. miiic know me i/iTrA. ^ yei'^o-ovTai, xrA. " fit 6 jraTTjp lttiV <l oiv LXTrA.
' avToi? na\iv -L e^ov OLTrA ; jrpb

TroAii/

e/oiov T.

'

'

216
sayings. 20 And. many
said,

Q AN N H

2.

X
;

'loy^aioLQ SlA rOVcXayoVQ.TOVTOVC- 20 tXfyOV *^f" ^ " ^v ' . _,j ^ ' i, ^ Jews on account of these woi-ds; =said 'but a deTil, and is mad; why hear ye him? ttoWoi ^ aVTU>i>, AaiflOVlOV t^ft KOI fiaiVETUL' Tl aijrOV them," A demon he has and is mad -why ""^^y him * are noTthe wirdrof him that hath a devil. aKOVSTS ; 21" AWoi tXeyOV, TaVTU TO. prjjXaTa OVK.'iaTLV
of them

He hath

"'^

of the

bUnd"

^ ^^

^^^'"

'"

Others

said,
fiT^

These

sayings

are not

[those]

daifiovi^oi-isvov of one possessed by a demon.-

daiuoviov Sivarai
''A

rvcpXwv
of [the] blind [the]

^demon

Ms able

6^9a\fxovg ^dvoiyHv"
eyes
*

to open

22, 'Eyli'fro.^f rd And took place the

^iyKaivia'^
(cat

iv

^toiq'''

'l^po(y6\vjloiQ,
Jerusalem,

feast of dedication at

^Kai^y

XHfiwv 7}V
winter
(TToq,
it

23

TrEpiEiraTU ^n^^'IrjaovQ iv
'Jesus
in

np

and

was.

And -was ^walking


of Solomon.

hpti) the temple

ivTy
in 82

'rov 2oXo/zwj'-oe."

24 lKVK\u}&av
"Encircled

oiy
'therefore

avTOV
"^him

the

porch
^j^
'

And

it

was at
23
in

qI

'lovdoioi,
_,

Jerusalem the feast of ^^^ the dedication, and it

Kai iXsyov avT<p,

"Ewf
Until
,

j^

to him.
, .

TTore Tiiv-.tLvTqv.-liixCjv our soul when'


,

was

winter.

And
,
,

a'lpfilQ
>
t

Jesus wiJked

temple

porch. 24 25 AlTEICpiOr] "aVTOlQ" "o" IriaoVQ, EiTTOV VfllV, KUl ptJCigi, the Jews round dbout iy_ voii, and ^Answered Hliem 'Jcsu5, I told him, and said unto ~ / ~ ., , , , , a syw ttojw tv ti^ ovofxaTL tov irarpoQ him, How long dost ov.TirrreveTS. TU tpya thou make us to ye believe not. name of "'Father The works which I in the do _ _ ~ doubt ? If thou be the .^ , ^^ o'n>mi V/jltig raVTU fiapTVpH OV TTfpi ijXOV ZK> aA\ Clirist, tell us plain- jUOU, ye 'not ly. 26 Jesus answered .'my, but these bear witness concerning me them, I told you, and ' ' ' ~ ^ , ~ . n iD ' a a ' TrKTTd'ETV Poi.yop".i(Tr tK TixtV SUIOV, '*Kauwg TrpOJiaTMV ye believed not: the :s 'believe, my, V orks that I do ii) my for ye are not 'sheep of -. * -y ^ Father's name, they //> r*'-.ll SIttOV U/Lttl/." Z7 TU TTpopaTU TU Sf^ia Tr]q.(pU)V)]Q.HOV ^UKOVSl, bear witness" of me. hear, I said to you ''gheep 'my my voice 26 But ye believe not,
'

Solomons Then came

the boldest thou in suspense?


-n

O ;^pt(Trog< ""flTT* (TV teU Christ, . If thou art the ~ > > tit l <
ii
i

,,,,,
us
-

)//UV Trap'

plain,

<

>

>

ii

'

TMV

<

i,

xj*^,

mrsbeep*^ ^^""said Kayio yivdj(TK(x) avrd' know them, unto you. *27 My sheep and'I

Kai ctKokovdovaiv
and
they follow
Ktti

knowLm,'and'^they "'''^^'OJ^'^'^WjUt give follow me 28 and I ,eteriial:

ayroTf'" them
;

OV-flV and in no wise

28 Kayoj ^t,wriv life and I me aiToXMVTai EJQ.TOV


fiot,
.

shall they perish

for'

^iT
iihall

life"-

*an^ thev
any man

never perish nei-

'^'''^^^> .'^"' o{r^.n!p7ra(Tei ever, and 'shall 'not 'seize

aVTO. tK rfJQ.Xflpng-[iOV. "anyono them ont of my h.and.


TIQ

29

ther

ah.all 'n-aTT]p}jJ,Ov'^ ''OQ^^ Sf^MK&V {.lOL '"flEl^WV TTavTWv" i(XTiV Kai. My Father who has given [them] to me greater th.an all is, and hand 29'Vy Fath^ which pave them me, oi'SetQ Svvdrai apTra^str IK Trjg X^'^P^^ rou.TTarpo^.^jitou." IS greater than all ^^.j^ ^^ g^j^e out of the hand of my Father, ^^^ ^^^ ^ and no man is able ^'^ \ < , pluck rtem out of my 30 iVW (cat 6 TTaT^p SV tCTjUEr. '31 Ej3d(TTa<TaV >'oi5i^" TrdXlV Father's hand. ,30 I ^jjj jj^g pother one 'Took up \ are. 'thercfone 'again and ?(/ Fatner are one. \ n'~ -n 31 Then the Jews took Atpov^ Xi9a(r(i)(nv> avTov. oc lovoaioi ivo. 32 uTreKpiOri up stones again to 'stones 'the 'Jews that they might stone hiin. ''Answered
;
,

>

,,5,^1,
>_

>

'

>

stone him. 32 Jesus answered them, Many

aVTOtg O Irjaovg, UoKAa 'KuXa- tpya" tOtl^a VfXlV tK TOV good works have I 'them 'Jesus, Many good works I shewed you from ehewed you from my > ~ ~ " k f 1 >,^ /i v Cia TTOIOV aVTWV loyov "AlUaC.tTE flS Father for which of iraTpogrp.OV' those works do ye my Father because of which 'of, 'them 'work do ye stone me? " ^ ... ~ Btoneme? 33 The Jews -,~ ., .r, .,,.,_, >, ,.\ answered him, saying, QO ATrtKpim]<TaV avTlf) 01 lOHOatOl: ^A^yOfreg,!' Tlepi KnXQV For a good work we 'Answered *him 'the 'Jews, saying, For a good
, 11 >

.^x

\ \

<

</

"^

<

'

'

'

11

',

<

f avoZ^ai to have opened TTrA. ovv then t< '' e evKaivia t. neat tois t. ' SoA.o^wj'OS OLTAW " eirrbi/ T. " TTrA. TOV 2oAo/icoi/o Tr. ou[6] Tr. ; o aAAa I/TTrAtv. P on OVK- TTr. ' aKOVovat-V 1 Toi? T.^ KaOui^ tlirov Vfjuv [L]TTr[A]. SiSiuixi. aurois ^wiji' aluiviov TTrA. ' [arc] hearing TTrA. /aou (read The Father) t. ' 6 what (he has g^yen) TTrA. " iravTiov fiel^ov VTrA. fjLov {read the Father) T[TrJA. " c;xe. Aifldg'eTe /iov (''earf' the lather) [L]T[rijA. Kifiya Kojia,' LT, ovi? T[Tr]. -^ \eyovfei LTTrAW. TTrA.
. '

''

>

'

X, XI.
ipyov Ov!KlBuZ,Olxlv
[Work
<Tf,

O H

N.
ICal

217
ort
stonrthccnot; butfor
"

aWa
but
,

we do not stone
''a.

tbec,

Trepi for

/3Xa(T0>J^(OC,
bbisphemy,

and. because

cau% t)vJ tljou


a
'^''

\'''

I3

av
,thou
rf.ii

dvQpojTroQ u)v Troa'ig (JsavTuvOaov. 34: 'ATHKpiOr] avrolg ^man thyself 'beinff makcst God. ^Answered ^them
.,

,
>

man, mnkest. thyself answer^i"'li_"^'* '''^^V^


'hpm, Is It not writtim in your law, I
said, Yearet-'orts? 35If "'^ callfd, them 'gods,

O"

lr](TOV(;,
'Jesus,

OviC.tCrTll' yf.ypcij.ljXtl'JfV Is it not written


'

tV
in
T

T({).VVI.ttft.VfJLU)V, ^

Eyw
T
.

your law,

/ 1

't7ra,
said,

II

n wot

t(Trf;
?
,

o- -r.' Jo ti iKUvovq

'

eIttsj'

n
-v

'

V(ov^, irpoq nvg


to
.

'

.,

o
,

"uto

whom

the word

Aoyoq -TOlPVeoV tytV^TO,


word
t>r>

=gods 'ye ''arc ~ ,, ~ ,


of

If
,,

them
, ,

he called gods,
.,

whom

the *

^"^ came, and the

n~ Kai OV.OVVaraL AvU)IVai


(and
'cannot
> .

jy

ypatpiy
''scripture,)
'

God
-

came,
.

*be=broken 'the

do OV
fot him]

"

whom the
'

O Trartip tiyiamv Kai aTrtCTElkiV HQ TOV KlxjflOV, sent into the world, Thou hlasphcmest; beFather sanctified and sent into the world,
<=r\

<

cannot be broken; 36 fay ye of him, whom the Father hath sanctified, and
scripture

VjlilQ.KsyiTE, do y say,

OtL

j-i\a(y(p))jmQ,

/0^

on

'

eItTOV,
I said,

ixn'

\lO "rov" 6eOV


Son
of

i>

-II

Ai

cause

I said, I

am

the

Thou blasphcmest, because

.Sou of God? 37 If I God do not the wruks of

el^i ; 37 ei ov.ttoiw ra tpya Tov.Trarpog.iuov, lam? the works If I do not of my Father, not- '38 eiSe iroiw, K^IV tuol flll.'irttJTevrjre,"

firj.TrtdTeveTS believe not


TO~ig the

not.

38

I5ut'"'/f''^r

thouph ye believe not


believe, that the

St

me
believe,

but

if

I do,

even

if

me

6>yOtC thatyfmryknow^au^^
works
[is]

ye believe not,

''7r((TriTa7-e,"

Kai ^Triarevarjrs^^ 'on iv Lfiol that fe may perceive and may believe that in me
.

iW
I

yjw&

"

Fa-

him. '39\heref ore they soug-ht .again to


c^'ed'^'out "^of ''thei'

the

6' Trarrjp, Father,

Kayuj tv
and
in

"'avnpJ^
him.

39 'EZ))tovu
They sought

""oiv*
therefore

7raXtv"
again

hami,
t"''Y

avTov TTiaaac Kai

TTOAAOt rfKOoV irpog avrOV, Kai lAEyOV, Ort P IwaWJJc" /JtV man were trye. 42 And many came to him, and said, John indeed ^'^'^^ believed on hinx there. ~ ^. , t (TTjftEtov tTToiijcTev ovotv TravTa.ct oaa eiTrev ^Iwavvtjg^^
,

him to take, and thwe" John at fi?-t cnrijXQev ttciXiv irkpav tov 'lopSavov, eig rbv tottov cnrotj yv ^p^'Z'*!; and there he again deputed beyond the Jordan, to, the place where was resorted unfoM.^an5 P'lojavi/jjg" TO TTpwrov BaTTTi^wi'' Kai if m(i/v" ikh. 41 Kai ^'^''l' "^"Ji" '^'^ " "'John first baptizing and he abode there. And rrl%' i'"*' ''',' ''^'^S^
.,

Ik .rijg.x^ipdg.avTwv, and he went forth^ out of their hand

tUi^Qtv

40 Kai

40 .and went ^.Ryi ^^^yond

)/...
;

that John spake ot this

'

'

.(

"sign

'did,

^no

but
true

all

whatsoever \aid

'John

TTfpi concerning
there on

TOVTOV,
this

d\i]9ri f/v.
were.
<

42.

Kai "iTziarEvaay iroWoi


And
"believed

[man],

'many

Kl Elg aVTOV.^^ him.

11 ^Hv.S'e Now there was


I,

ng
a certain [man]

aaQEvCJv Ad^apog
sick,

Lazarus
~
,

cltto of

BTjOaviag,
Bethany.

tK Tifg KWfirig
of
!..

'

Mapiag
of

the town of Mary and /t, Kai EKfia^aija her sister Martha. 2 (it ^'"^ "'"' Mary which. the Lord with ointment and wiped anomtedtheLordwith / ~ A ^, . T ,^ X v TOvg.TTodag.avTOV raig.Upn^tv.avTrjg, rig o acEAcpog AaZ,apog ointment, .and wiped ^^ f'^'^' ^^it* h^r hair, his feet with her hair, whose brother Lazarus >' whose brother Lazarus" i/\ ' <>^^ r \ n \ r)<JVEVEL. 6 aitEaTtlKaV OVV ai aceAtpai irpog avTOV XsyOV- was sick.) 3 Therefore was sick. 'Sent 'therefore 'the ^sisters to him, say- fiis sisters sent unto him, saying, Lord, bc>/ >v !>''! ~ > J \ n A I K/ (piAEtg aauEfEi. 4 AKOvaag.de o Irjaovg hold, he whom ti.on vpie,ice OV , ing, lovest is sick. 4 Whan Lord, lo, he whom thou lovest is sick. But ''having ^heard 'Jesus ." w Jesus heard thai, hq ,T >\\ _/T /I tlTrev, AvTt] rj acrutvEta ovK.Eanv Tcpog UavaTOU, VTr^p said. This sickne.is is
'

Of 'Mrtpia" r; aAen/^acra 'and Mary who anointed


,
5,

the village tn*


II

Mary
'

Kai and

n MapOag
'

r.

Martha
'

Tfjg.dcE\(prig.avri]g. her sister


'
,

2 nt

J^v

^was

-vt ^ , -Now a certain ^^- kt '""" '^'is sick, named Lazarus, of Bethany,

'

>A

tov Kvptov
>

ftppt{>
.

<

'

>

>

--

'

>

'

'

'

aW
but

said.

This
glory.

sickness

is

not

unto

death,

for

not

unto death, but

Tijg the

SoKm ToiQEov,
of God,

'Iva that

SoKaaep may be glorified


f
'

viog

the Son

tov Oeov ^t' J^at^lhe^'lo'rof o'ok of God by might be glbrtfied

"_

**

[o] Tr.

-J-

OTt that LTTrA.


^

elnov
T.

L.

JTio-TeveT* T.'
^

manvsTi

LTTr.

yti/oia-icrjTe

may
P

eyeVera tov 6eov (inow LTTrA.

T.
""
'

tov
i

T.

tcS iraTpt

Father LTTrA.
eiTi<TTiivaa.y eis

[oyv] TrA.

. TTd\Lv

'I(>jan7^ Tr.

1 efj.evev L.

airbv eKel LTTrA.

he 'noWoi.

ttjs T.

'

^iapiafi Tr.

218
thcrrty.
5

Q A N

1^

H S
Ka'i

Xr.

Now Jesus
hi.d

avT)\c.

Zt
6 WiiP.n
Btiu'iti

vLTCl^l
Lii>

" ^^
rOTi
^j^
,

5'Hya7ra
'^"^"-^

heard avrT]Q

Kal
^""^
(JLtV

TOvAaZapOV. 6
Lazarus.^

y
Si
^

o'lnrrovc ry)v "MapOav


'^^'^\
log

^ha
ojiv

and

Tnv u^eXmriv '<Zr


that

TjKOVafV QTl doQivtif


he
is Bick,

Bi'ck.trrbodelwodnya
the aame place

When

therefore he hoard

where

lie

was

Then

efter that eaith he to


/.isdiecipiea,

TOTTip Svo YlfitpaQ. IjV tfXZlVtV 6V <{f indeed he remained in which "he ''was 'place two days.
_
^
,

TElTUTa
Then
.

Ayiofxiv eiQ TTjv lovoo.iav fiETO. TovTO A,yfi TOtQ fiaUtjTaii;, again, Judffia into Let ui [jo into ^ftsr thio ho eays to the disciples, Judea 8 //ts disciples say un/^ . ~ , q . , >y' a r-r. OO'W 01, fiaUr^Tai, ^ Vajipi, vvv tc,i)to him; Master, the TTaAlV. O AtyOVGlV avT<p Jens of lato sought again. Rahbi, "Say jur.t now "wcra *to 'him 'the 'disciplca, < '\ ' to stone thee; and efo, ,. ^ ~ > ~ \ /i '
,

Letusgo

aS AlUaCai, oatUiOUtbitheraKaiil? 6 Jesus answered, Are 'aeeking 'theo 'tostone there not twelve hou/s ,-v > v'li t ^n
in
lie

TOW
9

'

01

lovdaiOl,
"Jews,
'

Hhs
-

Kai and
'
;

TTaXlV VTTayEiQ
again
'

iKEl ; goest thou thither?


>

the day?

If any

ATT^Kpivr]
"Ansv/ered
;

'o

Irjaovg,
'Jesus,

r\>t OOxi owOeica

'

^eiaiv
^ars *there
>

uypar
hours

ii

ruaa walk In tho day,


stunibleth not, becausa he seeth the light of this world. 10 But

t>.

'Not

rilJ-^pag

^v
If

>/

day?
or<

Tig TTtpt^iraTy walk anyono


of this warld

~i~<<
"twelve
Tij

rijg

in the
,

tv
in

riy.ipci.,

ov.TrpccTKOTrm,
he stumbles not,

thoi

.day,

ifi^hrhe^Btumbleth!

Tb

fwQ rov.Koa^ov.TOVTOV
light

/3XI/rahe eees
;

10

idvM
but
if

becauso there is no" because the light^in him. ^u These


'

Tig anyone

TyepiTTary Er ry vvKTi, TrpoaKOTTTei, OTi TO (puiQ ovxJariv tv ia not walk he 6tumble3, because tho light in in tho night, aftefthat lie saith unto thorn, Ow- friend avT<fi. 11 TavTa dwEv, kui [itTCt TOVTO AfyEi avTolg, Aa.~ and after this he r.aya to them, ^^-^^ things he said Lamay a- ^'I '^o'^^that I
j

wake him out


ho

of sleep,
Bleep"

i'apoc o.<bi\oc.yiawv
^^^'^^

liUKoiiniTai'
lifte

dXXd

^iI''Lor" he

our friend

faU^ 'asleep
oiv^
'therefore

but

nopf.vou.ai iva that I go

i.%I

may
\

well. 'shall' do 13 Ilowbeit Jesus spake ct Ins death: but they

vTTvitTu) ^^^-^^
^

avTOV. 12 EZwcu'
^^^
^g^j^

^oLa0?jrat".'^ai/rou,"
his disciples,
> i

Kvpu,
Lord, 7r6pl of

thought that he had spoken of taking of


X?st!n9lfl6p.
14

(
jf

Then

eaid Jesus unto them is plainly, Lazaras doAd. 15 And I ^m fflad for your .sakes

rOV.Om'aTOV.aVTUV tKEUOl.Cf tC0,av


his death,

au)dy}(jETcu. icKoiixj]Tai he has fallen asleep he will gel well. _ , ! ^^


,

13
-v.

^^

<

'Eipi)Ku.di o But -had =spoken


y
..
.

lr)aovg
'Jesus ~

but ihey
a 14
,
'

OTi TTEpi TJjg KOl[Xr](T!jjg thought that of rest the


ji

TOV VTTVOV XtyEi.


,

that I was not there, of sleep be speaks. ,, to the Intent ye may ,,y nevertheiesa Trapp^aiq,, Aac,apog believe him. Lazarus let us go unto plainly
;

>'n airwavEV
died.
.

TOTE Then

OVV''

ElTTEV
"said
>

therefore
t r

aVTOlQ Ho *them
' >

.-

IJJCTOVff

15

,,..<^*

'Jesus

(cai

And

IS Then said Thomas, which is called Didymus, unto hia fellow-

/ o > ~. Tri(JTEV<JT}TE, OTi OVK.7lfl7]V >fCl* there. in order that ye may believe, that I was not t/

iVa

^f''"S> I rejoice on your account, e'^^ll " . a


X"'!^<"

^a\K"
But

_ ajiOjlEV TTpOQ let us f o to


rotg
to the

go"t&
with him.

we' may "die itvTOV.


him.

16 EIttev
"Said

oiv

Oiofidg, 6 XtyofiEvcg
called
ical "also
t'lixElg.

'therefore Thomas,

AiSvfiog, Didymus,

^(yvi.inaQr]TaXg,^^
fellow-disciples.

"AyiofxEv
Let ^go

'us,

'iva that

d-TroOavwuEv we may dla

fXET

with

avToii.
him.

17 K'EXOwj/"
17

oCv

(xovTa IV Tip ^vripi({). .lo nv.oi ";" BTjfavia came, he found that hj/dspag "Bethany he had fain in the Nov/ "was already having been in the tomb. (Jays grave four days al- , ^ > ~ ?' \ ' 1 <t r ISJ wg OTTO aTaOHiJV OiKnTTlVTE i o 'KOI ready. 18 Now Beth- Eyyvg TWV lEpoaoKvflWV, and about ^oE" "furlongs "fifteen, any was nigh unto near to Jerusalem, Jeru-salem, about fif> ~ ^ n '^ \ '/i , mi mi 't r ' m
,
>

Then when Jesus

^Having 'como "therefore


,

6 'lr]aovg ^ E^'pEv 'Jesus found


.,
,

avTOV
him
t j.
i,

TS^ffapag
four
<ii

7/0/j

'

teeu
in

furlongs

off:

TToKKov^

IK

Tlov
tho

Jovoanov tXrfAvUEiaav
Jews
'Iva that

>

and many of the

many

of
(Cat

had come

Trpog unto

'"Tag

TTEpi

tMosB

around
TTEpi

anrM?ry,''to*'c^mfo''rt thi'm cunc'erijing their

MdpOav
Martha

"Mapiav,"
Mary,
.

TrapapvemiovTai qvTag
they might console
y
=

and

them
'

concerning
^

"
LT'j
I

AW.

[aiiTOv] (read his disciples) L. avTtS to him lt.

' "PajSjSei T.

>

[oi /xaSrjTal] a.

avTov (read the disciples) LT


ll''liK6ef
'

6 GLTTrAW.

SipaC elcnv

him TrA. and L. fi&r) iiixepai TrA {nad had come to Martha) LTrA.
aiiTo! to > -I- \ai
'
<*

[ovi'3 L.

'

aAAa LTTiA.
i}5r)

T.

(rvvixaOr^Toii T.
rj

ca.me h.
* TJjf

1.

jroAAol St ITTrA.

Mopid^

LXXrA.

XI.
TOV.nds\'<pov.avTwvJ

JOHN.
20 i).o7'V.Map9a
ejg J'ixov(tev oti Martha therefore when she heard that
I'd"
:

21!)

brother. 2d Then Martha, as soon as she thoir brother. heard that Jesus was 'ivaovQ ^px^rai, i/TTJJvrjjtrev avT<o' Mapia.Sh tv t<i> o'lKif) tKn- coming, went nnd ni.t him .but Mnry s.it butTilary in the house was slUl * in the house. him; met gesua is coming, Trpog 't6v\^ 'hjaovi'^, KvpiE, ft 21 Then said Mfirtha 'Jncfro. 21 elirsv.ovv V/" unto Jesus, Lord, if .Tcsus, Lord, if Martha to aiicmg. 'Then said then

MapOa

i)g

wde, ^6.a5sX(p6g.fiov ovK.av.kreOvijKHJ^ 22 'aXXd"

my
died.

hadst boeu here, brother had not


22

thou hadst been here,

Kai
even

vvv
now

oZ?a I know

my brother oaa on
tliat

had not died

av-aWiiarj
asls

rov Oeuv,
of

whatsoever thou m.iyest

God,

that oven now, wliatfoever thou wilt ask 'will ^gWe of God, God will give it thee. 23 Jesus saith

but

But

kinw,

SwaEi

<Toi 6 9^6q. *thec 'God.

23 Alyft avry
Says
to her

6 'Ir/ffoi'f ,
Jesus,

'

Avaarqutrni

6 6.cb\<P6q unto
''brother

her.

Thy

.bro-

ther shall ri^^e again. 21 Marthft saith unto Ol^a ort ai>a(jTii<y(.Tai iv ry him, I know that he avTt^ " <Tou. 24 I know that he will rise again in the shall rise again in the Martha, 'thy. Says to him resurrection at the avry 6 'Irjaovg, last day. 25 Jesus dvaardaei ev ry iaxury -qukpq.. 25 'Jesus, ;Said ^to ''her said unto her, I am resurrection in the Irvst day the resurrection, and Tricrrfuwv ei'f jU, the life he that be6 'Eyci Eifxi t) avdaraaiQ Kai t) ^ior}. on me, lievcth in mo, though I am the resurrection and the life: he that b^iieves^ he weredead, yet shall 6 Z,wv koI TTKjrevuJv he live; 26 and whosoKav cLTroOdvy ^rjcriTai' 26 (cai Trag belioves and everyone who lives and though he die he shall live ever liveth and beligveth shall never drroddvy Eig.TOv.alCjx^a. iriaTiimg tovto\ die. in me tig i/xs, oii-fn) Helievest thuu Bclievest thou this ? for ever. shall die on me, in no wiso this 3 27 She saith un-

^Will ^rise "again

AsyH

MapOa,

Klmv

27 Ajyei avrt^, Nat,


She says to him.
Yea,

Kvpis' Lord
of God,

tyw
I

TrsTriffrfvicn have believed

<rv el that thou art

on

6
the

to him, Yea, Lord I believe; that thou art


:

the

Chi-ist.

the Son of

Xpion'if,
Christ,

6
the

vlog
Son

Tov Oeov,
tiirovaa

etg
into

top
the

kog^ov
world

who

ip^^o/xfi'og. comes.

God,

which

should

28 Kai "ra>~ra"
And

divi'iKQiv,

these things having said she went away,

Kai i(piov)]atv ^Mnrpi'crv" way, and and called Mary The


teacher
is

como into the world. 28 And when she had so said, she went her
called Mary hersister secretly, say-

triv.ddtX(pi]v.avTfjg
her sister

ing, The Master is como, and calleth for thee. 29 As soon as tanv Kai (piovei as. 29 'EKeivrj '^ ujg . yKovcrev HyfipeTUi^^ Ta)(v she heard that, she quickly,' and rises up quickly arose come and calls thee. She when she heard came unto liim. 30 Now Kai '-"ipxsTai^^ irphg avrov. 30 ov.Trw.^i i\r]\vOei 6 'Irftjoiig Jesus was not yet come Into the town, him. Now not yet had ^corae 'Jesas and cornea to but was iu tliat place Big TTiv KMixrjv, ip' ^ tv np roKifj ottov inrrjvrrjaev aimp where Martha met 31 The Jews ^hini him. iuto the village, but was ^met in the place where then which were with t; Map0a. 31 o'l.ovv.'lovSaloi o'l avreg fiET avrrig ev ry oIkio. her in the house, and house comforted her, when 'Martha, The Jews therefore who were with her in tlie they saw Mary, that Kai TrapafiuOovfievoi avrqv, iSovreg rrjv ^Mapiaj/" on raxtcjg she rose up hastily and consoling and her, having seen th:it quickly Mary wentout, followed her, saying, She goeth undviarri Kai ^^rjXQsv, rjKoXovOrjffav avry, ^Xiyovreg," to" the grave to ween she rose up and went out. followed saying, her, 32 Then when there, Ma,r}' virdyu Eig TO fivr]fiiov"iva KXavay tKEi. 32 'H.o^v.^Maptft" Jesus was come where was, and saw She is going to the tomb that she may weep there. Mary therefore him, she fell down at (jj'g i]\9v oirov 7]v ''o" 'Irjaovg, idovaa avrov t7recrv 'ft'c his feet, saying nnto him, Ldrd, if thou when she came where ^was 'Jesus, seeing him, fell ,at hiulat been here, my TO'vg.TTohag.avTOV,''^ Xiyovaa awry, Kvpie, el wSe brother had not died. rig

^XdOpa," ^eiTTOvaa," "0 SiSdffKaXog irdpEccrctly,

saying,

dW

"On

his feet,

saying

to hitn.

Lord,

if

thou hadst been here


u>g ,el5ev therefore when he saw

33 When Jc^u^ there-" fore saw her werping,

ovK.dvydTrsOavsv
^h.ad 'not ^died

uov^^ 6 ddeXcpog.

33 Irjaovg
Jesus

ovv

"

>. apTwv (read [their] brother) xTrA. p 6 GLTTrAW. < dAAa OVK av cLTT^Qavev (ereOuriKei a) 6 a,Se\(^6s jnoti LTTrA.
,

<)

'

gl.'
"

and

toi/ r[T'-].

[fcJxrrA.
-i-

" Toiiro this TTtA. MaotaM l.TTrA. y KdOpa - JJPX^TO came TrA. riyepOf] rose up LTrA.
>

L.
<*

'
-I-

ilnacra
eVl

Tr.

6e

+ i? LTTi A, (she)Tr[A],
LT1J.A.

ffiol'avTe?

thinking TTtA.
GTTrA'W.
'^

B
.

Mapia/u. TTrA.

l*

yet LTr[A].

Mapia/U

LTTiA.

ovToG

ety (ffpos

TTrX)

TOVS

JroiSas

/lOV a-jridavey TTrA.

'

220
and
the
Jews,
also
wcc-pinL'v 'vhieh came ivilh licT, )ie groaned in th<: spirit, .ind was

QANN H
'

2.

XI.
<yvv(\Q6vTac
^

avTriv '
,

K\aiovaav,
.

Kai
anil
,

Tovc
^^

^^'"^

weeping-,

the

=viho -came *with

..,

nvrn 'lovcaiovc ... .^5, ^. ^


,,
.

-her

'Jews
himself,

KXaiovraQy.
weepincr.

h'(.jiiHiJ.!)<jaTO

r(p TTvev/iari,
inspirit,
',

Kai Irapa^eu iav-av.


and
troubled
aoT<{J,
to him.

Where 'Lve
ccc.
3r,
3.J

''ye ^

he 'groomed

hira? Tfiey said unto

Jam, Lord, come and


Jc-.us

34
^^

kCU dlTiV,

wept.

^^^
fp-^ov

Then saidtiie Jews, liehold how ho loved him! a7 And some of

g^j^, ^, ^

TiOHKaTf. ai'TOV >Yhcre have yc hiid him


;

Uov

AtyOVCTlV
They say
^
,

KvoiE,
Lord,

Kttl ice.

35 EociKpv(7ev
=Wept
.

u
>

liiaoug.
'Jesus.
'

3G iXeyov
rr,
>

ovv
1^

oi

gome
,

and
^

see.

'Said .nhercfore 'the

k(piMt avTov, lovcaioi, los 37 Tivt.ce i4 aiyriov Behold how he loved =Jews, him But some of them the _ ^ ^ ^ > , n t have caused ELtTOV, OviC.llCVVnTO" OVTOQ O aVOtl^aQ TOVQ- OfOOAflOl'S J)lind, even this man said, that 'this {'man] who Was not ^ahle opened' thrf eyes should not have died? ~ ~ ," TrOUjtJai' IVa Kai OVTOQ fDIXlTTOUaVI^ 38 Jesus therefore a^ TOV TV(pAOV., 'gain groaning in hira- Cfthe blind [man], to have caused that also this one should :fiot iiave'dieu ! ~ ' self Cometh to the 00 't '\ ! t lr}(TOVg OVV TTaAlV m ,D ""ijJ.ppijXOJpf.VOq' tV aaVT({i tp)(iTni grave. It wns a cave, 3o therefore again and a stone lay upon Jesus groaning in himself comes

ihem
ed

said.

Could not
of

^ TTwi;

r.m

?><

this

man, which openeyes

tlie

>'

>

>

,^~

.<r

,>/>/

>

'

it;

39 Jc.ius said.

'''^ j-lVrij-IHOV. ye away the stone. ^'Q tomb. Martha, the sister of to the

Take

<

"

yi'.CS

?'

'\ ' (TTrtjKaiOV, Kttl


a cave,

^ 'iT

>'

'

'

'

\lVOt; iTTiKflTQ
A'syzi

tTT

Kow

it

was

and a stone was lying

upn

s/iuh lint him,Lo?d; by tliis time ho stink-

^^^^V'*

39 Ajya
^Says

"o'i '\r)<yovQ,

"AparE

rov Xidov.
stone.

avnp

'Jesus,

Take away tho

^Says 'to -'him

"^^v ''n9vr]K6rog'^ MapOn, Kvpis, ydn o^a'' ^^^M'H ri(w^o''urd^^^.*.^o Je "Martha, Lord, already he stinks, sussaith unto her Said ^^^^ '^sister 'of him 'who '."has "died, I not unto thee, that, ^gT-^Q^Q^QP ^yjjp aVTV ^ 1^., if thou wouldest be., L ^ Iff-j-iy. 40 AyJ 31 41 "^ 6'I}]aOVC, OvK.ihvOV s.-^ ,ac ' it c -j four 'days 'Jesus, 'for -"Says =to "her Said t not I ''it 'is. lieve,.thou shouldcst see the glory of God? P0.//E1'' <jqi^ Jj^i l^y TrirjTeiKTyg, rjjv do^au TOO Beov

; ?

waythest^ne/rom?^c ^?ace where the dead


"I vil% up his eyes, and lifted said, y.athcr, I thank
thec that thou hast hcara me. -42 And I knew that thou hearest me' always: but because of the people which stand by I said it, that tliey may belicve that thou h.ast sentiiie. 43 And when ho thus had spoken,

to thee, th.at

if

thou shouldest believe, thou shalt see the


'

glory

of

God

41 ''HpaV
^

.OVV

TOV XiOoV
TOVi;
,,

^Ot)

'

rjV

Q TeQviJKOJQ
^de.id

They took away therefore the stone


'O.St'\,](JOVg I'lptV

where 'was 'the


eyes

Kil/Jieror." naid.

6(p6a\uOVQ

CtVU),
..'^
>

KQl (IttEV, Ylctsaid,


<>-

^^3
.

j^^^g
,

jjffgj r^js]

upwards, and

Fa

Tip,
ther,
,

tIKOVCTaQ jJOVevXapiCTTOJ (TOl OTl 'l thank thee that thou hcardest me
'

42 tJiOXi
and
.

IjOilV 0~l Knew that

'i

,
'

TTaVT-OTE. J-lOV

OKOVSiQ'
;

aWa
>\-v
<

t-

Oia
.

TOV OX^OV TOV


tho

>

TTfplstand'

always
.

'

^ SCTTCHTCt

but on account of me thou hearest iva TTiMrlVaujaiV OTt UlTOV


_
/ ,/

crowd
/

who
'

CV

jU

aTTifmiAac;.

around
jc> tr
^

I said [it], that

they might believe that thoii


'

Tayra fiTTOJv, ipiovy Lazarus, come 4.3 Kat 44 And he tliat he cried, And these things h.aAnug said, with a ^voice 'loud La' ' was dead came forth, v ; ~ "y a a rfr mi '^'-^/| ,fl s,J D TfBvrjKOjg, dedBi.nvog bound hand and foot i^api, divpo ttw. 44'Kaj" i^qXOev And came forth he. who had been dead, bound -witlij-Tajcclothesinnd zarus, come forth.
voice, forth.
'

he cried with a loud'

>

,-

didst send, me ' '\' ' fisyaAij sKpavyaaEv, Aa-

about'^w'ith'^a'napki^'! Jesus snith unto them,


"^^^
^^^

^ovg TCodaQ Kat


feet

rof xe7pc
hands

KHpiaiQ,
Asyfi
^Says

Kai

i).oxpig.avTOV
his face

and

with grave clothes, and

hfm^go.^""'

(TovSapt(}> TrepifSiSsTO. with a handkerchief bound about.'

avTolg o
'to

'Jrjfrovg,
'Jesus,

Avaare
Loose

"them

ai'TOV Kai d(p&E him and let

VTrdysiv.
go.

[hira]

-45 IToXXoi OiV /C rwV 'lovSaiu>1> Ol iXBSvTf.g Vrpog TTJV 45 Then many of the jews which came to .who came Jews to Jl.any^ therefore of the Marr, and had seen ,,_ ' , n o lr)(Tovg," tTTiaTevaay Mapiav.m Kai ^ftaffafisvoi r"ii iTronTTFV w' 'r 'a" the things which Jesus 'Je.sus, believed what 'did believed on him. Mary and saw did.
'

II

'

'

went'thc^r ways to
Phiirisecs,

tl'ie

f'.C

avTov.
him;

46

and

told

on

Tivig.dt I? avTuiv cnrfjXOov TTpug TOVg went the them to but some of
" 6 L[Tr]. oC ^f 6

^apl'
.Phari-

eSvi'aro LTTrA.
^

"^

ent^pt/xovfievos T.
1
'

".

TeTeAfVTij/coTOs LTTrAW.

p oipr)

thou shouldcst see LrirAW.

tc9'>)ku>s KcCtjievo^
'

GTT: A. + avTOV him T[Tr]A. {read he did) glttiaw.

Mapid/i LTTrA.

O TrA.

GLTXrA. "

O 'Ir)C3i)t

/co

XI.
aa'iovq
yoi/
Ka'i

JOHN.
"fiVov" ahroic ^a" irrorqatv 'o 'Irjanvg. 47 trfi'/jya.hem' what MiU^ 'J,:.us, aad luld G'^ch^red
_

221
*^"'
"^^J^*'

th'i'psJef;;';-;^'^^

'^V^/^i^.i^y^^V'

OVl/

01
iliO

a/iXUpEli'
chicl
.'

Kill OL <i>apL(TCUOl

aVviSpLOV, Kai iXiyOV,


a council,

thoicioiv

i>i"ie-t^
.

auJ the
_

Pharisees

and
sigus

said,
'

prietta and the PhnHSG*-^acaunc)l andsaid, What do we? tor thm

nimtbUs alone, all men 48 tdv ci(pu)i.iiv avrbv ovtioq, iravTiQ Triaret'covaiv eiq avrov' win tebeve on him: ""'' ^^^ Roman, shall will believe we lot alone him thus. aM ou him, If come and take aw.ay > apovmv Ifiuov Kai rov TOTCOV both our place and naKftl tXtvaoVTUl 01 Puil^niOl Kai ^''"^-^">1 <J'"3 of aiiil Romans and will takeaway from us both the place will coiuc the
, ,
,

Tt TTOIOllfiV; OTl oirog 6 dvQpwTTOg TToWcl many this man What for do wc ?
,

'^arjUtla
,

TTOIJI."
does.
,

man

docth

mauy mi*,'?
''^"^

I'!'''?^.u^

*^ ^^

,,,
,

,
At"

,!
.y
.

...
'

'*''

.,,,

Ktti

TO tVUOQ.

4U

^rv

and the nation.


ijJV

-,. n,-, TOV.lViaVTOV.kKHVOV,


of that year,
r/i
'
.

hi^.Ci.TlQ it, aDTioV, them, Cut a certain one of


1

Ka(M0af,
Caiaphas,
I

,r

EfTTEK
said

OtTOU;,
to them,

,_.-.
Ye
I-

fXilQ

tbem,;mmfc/Caianhas, apT^lfpei;^ being the high priest th^t same year, said high priest uuto them. Ye know OVKOlCaTS nothing at all, .W n.or
.

,..
"

being
^'

know
II

OVOfV, OO OtiOf
nothing,

'y \ Iif n u "OtaAOyi^Effye"

nor
/I aTToHnfry
'

consider
'
<

j' * avi.irpipei '^tl/j.iv" that it is profitable for ns


"

Ort

iva elg man


that

one

ui'Upwno(;

"

man
d7roA7/rfTt. ghouUi perish.
.*p8l)f
pries';

should die

iiTrtp for

too Aaov, Kui


the
people,

'

"

fxii

"/I o\ov to lUvog


'

"\

consider that it is txpedieut forus, that one should die for the people, and that tha whole nation perish
not.
ai

and .not 'whole 'the nation he not

of himself

Andthisspake but
:

dl

ToUToM
But
this

dp'
from

eavroi
himself

OVkMiTEV, ClWd dpX'


he said not,
but
^i'

high

yea^r^iclfrophesildthat Jesus should die for


for 'hatSat^ion"only' but that au'o he .should

WJ/ TOV.tViaVTOV.tKi'lVOV, '^Trpee^j'/rEfcrTf J/'l on being of that, year, propfics^ied that


('nro9in)(TKtiv ,inrtp
to die

jUeWev"
VTrtp
for

''was 'about

^o"'l))(jovQ
'Jesus

tov iQvovq, 52
the

ku'l

oux
riot

for

nation

and
of God

jjj^t

the'^chi'i'Set!*'of"God were scattered a-

Tov
the

'iOi'ovg i-iovov, nation only,

dW'.'iva Kal
but

to. tikvu that also the children

TOvOeov
&ir'

to.

ditdKop-

who have beeh took

that ^ da^^ f^'^T ^th"^


co^n,e'l'^toeeth*er

iri^n'iva
Tl]g lia'tpag

cvvaydyi>

fig

'iv.
,

53

tKeivTjg
that

oiv
therefore
him.

fortoput himtodeath.
^^j^g^^Q^^^^^^'^'^p^fy the Jews but ^f^nt thence unto > country near to tho wilderness, into a city
;

Bcattercd abroad he mightgaLherj,ogether into one.

From

^(JV)'ElSov\tV(TaVTo"
they took counsel together

iva
that
,,

aTTOKTiivcjaiV
they might kiU
,

avTOV. among

May

54

_ "

.,

lljaovg
Jesus

oiv"
therefore

'ouK
no

tTl''

rcappi^aiq.
publicly

'

irtpttirdTH
walked

lovCaioiQ,
Jews,
tprjfjiov, desert,

longer
.

>\\..-\/i n aWa aTrriXOev tKtWev


but

iv ToXg among the


>

'

f*"'^'' there

Ephraim, and contmued with

went away

thence

Trjv x'^P^'" into the country


eig

^yy^Q T^g
near
the

his disciples.

tig
to

'E<ppain Xeyofievrjv '^phraim* 'called

noXiv,
'a ''city,

^CiSTpi/iiv'' and there he stayed

KdKsl

fierd Tix)v.iJ.aBi]T.wv}avTOV. with ^his disciples.

65 Wv.Sk iyyvg to
Now
,
.

Trdaxa
^

tCjv
__ ,

'lovdaiwv,
^Jews,
,

Ka'i
_

^was 'near
,

'the 'passover 'of 'the "^


,

and

TTOAAOt

Hg
to

ItpOiJoXvfXa
Jerusalem
,

many
,

ayVl(Tb}(yiV taVTOVg. 56 tOlTOVV OVV tov IrjCrOVV, Kai sought they for Jesus, spake among they might purify themselves. They were seeking therefore Jesus, and ^*^ themselves, as thpy ^ , _, ^ '\\ -A ~ 'A m tAEyOJ'" stood in the temple, flET aAAljKwv iv T(p isp(f) iaTTJKUTSg, T/ OOKil were saying among one another in the temple standing. What -?oes itseem What think ye, tjhat he
II

Trig X^f"^^ "^P^ '"'^^ out of the country before the ,y/ T
,

tK

.55 And the Jews' dvkfSrjrrav passorer was nigh at hand and many went went up out of tho country up , Trdaxa, iva to Jerusalem before
:

,,

passover, -that
,

passover, to purify themsolvds. 5b Then


'["^

v/xiv,
n .Kai"
>ii

OTl
'
'

..

,,-.

ov-i^u)
-

lAuy
> '

r,

Ug djv
tho
~
,v

>

<

eopTTjv;
feast? n'
\
'

57
II

r<^

AeiiioKeiaav.oi

.-

T.

to you, that in no wise he

wiUcorae to

Nowiiadgiven
"

01 apxi^ptig Kai Ol 9api<rai0l ^iVT0Xt]V, both the chief priests and the a command, Pharisees

iva tav
that
if

'

'

rig anyone ment,


,

^'^ come to tho feast? .w Now both the chief priests and the Pharisees had given a command"'ill

that. If

any

man

yvt^
should
'

nov tdTiv
vvhere
J

/.

know

he

is

p.r}vvay, he should shew


'
<

ottwc
[it],

that

Triaaujcnv avTOv. they might take him.

he were, he should shew iV, that they might take him.


^

knew where

eijrai' T.

'

vixlf for

you

o TTrA.
'

L.

6 LTTrA.

* JTOtet (rt}fx.eLa

LTTrAW.

Aoyt^eaOe ltTi-aW.
f
'

? e/BovAc (Jai/TO
k Iju.fti'ei'

they took counsel LTTr.

Tr,v

ei/ToAa.?

commands

* riixeWev LTTrAW. 6 OVl' 'Irjcrovs TrA. ai/ToO (rearf the diSCiples) TTrA. " tifkyai/ T. TTrA.

jrpo<|JTevcrei'

LTTrAV/.

6 Ol.TTiA.W.
OUKCTl GLITr

"

Kal LTTrAW

222
XII. Then Jesus six days before the passover uame to Bethany, wliere Lazarus was which had been dead, whom he raised from the deiid. 2 There they made- him a supper
;

Q ANN H
rrpo

r.
'i^

XII.
'/|((Epa>v

12

'0.o{>v.'lt]aovg
Jesus therefore

rov
the

wanxa
pussover

i]\9ev eig

J'before 'six

"days

came

to

BriOauiav,
Bethany,

onov yv
where
[the]

A/i^apog
Lazarus

^6

waa

who

Ik

veKpuiv'i.
dead.

tTroirjcrav

ov i'lynpiv had died, whom lie raised oil' avT<f Shttvov tKH,
tsBdjkmq,"
a supper there^
rjv '

And

Martha

served':

from among
r/

They made therefore him

but Luzarua was one Kai


of them that sat at the table with him. 3 Then took Wary a pound of ointment of spike-

MdpOa
Martha

Sujkoj'Ei'
served,

o.Sf.Ad^apog tlq
but Lazarus

rwi'

^cuvavare-

and

one was of those

him. nard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Je- vdpSov TTKJTiicfig TToXvTijjiov, i)\ei\psvTOvg 7r6dag''Toi)^''Ir]aov, sus, and wiped his feet of n4rd 'ptire of great price, anointed the feet of Jesus, with her huir and the tj.Si oi'/cta hou>e was filled with Kal i?,f.p.a^iv TOig.Opl^iv.avTFfg Tovg.TroSag.avrov' the odour of the oint- and wiped his feet with her hair and the houae ment. 4 TJiensaith one 7rX?;pwt)jj /c rrjg banqq tov fivpov. 4 Xf-yfi ^'ovt'" "fi'c; ik ol: his disciples, Judus was tilled with the odour of the ointment. Says therefore one of Iscariot, Simon's son, which should betray 'lovSag, '^i^wvog 'loKapuorijg," 6 him, 5 Why was not Twv.ua0i]TU)v.aiiTOv, his disciples, Judas, Simon's [son] Iscariote, who this ointment sold for
:

KELfi'tvwv'^ cliuiug with

avT(^.

3'H.o?ij'.'Mapta" XcifBoutra Xirpav /xvpov Mary therefore having taken a pound of ointment

Why 'thit to deliver up. "ointment 'not he cared for the poor ; tirpdOr) TpLaKoaiojv di]vapiu}V, Kcii iSoO)] TTTw^olg ; 6 EIttev but because he was a and' given to [the] poor? denarii, ^he ^said thief, and had the bag, 'was sold for three hundred and b.arewhat was put Si TOVTO, ovx oTi Trepi Tu)v Trr-wxwi' tuiXsi'.avTifj, dXA' oti therein. ,7 Then said 'but this, he was caring, ^ but becauso not that for the pour Jesus, Led her alone
:

tliree hundred pence, and gi'^en to the poor ? 6 This he said, not that

fiiWwv

aiiTOV was about him

TrapaSiSovai, 5 ^^cari' tovto rb fxvpov

ovk

against the day of my /cXtTTTjjg yv, Kal to yXwaaoKOfiov ^elx^v, Kt" tu f^aWofitva burying hath she kept and what Was put into had, a thief he was, and the bag this. 8 For the poor always ye have with ovv 6 'lijaovg, "Atbeg avTt/v " tig ifid(jTaZ,f.v. 7 flTTiv you but me ye have 'Jesus, Let "alone carried. ^Said Hhereforo 'her: [it] for not always. TOv.evrapiatTiuov.fiov ^TtTiip-yKEv" dvTO. S tovq r?/v iifispa ha> she kept day of my burial the "the it:
;

TTT<j>\ovg

yap irdvTOTi i\iTB


'for

fi(.9'

always

ye have with

eavTJjv., you.

int. Si ov but me uot

TrdvroTS
always

iXers.
ye have.
9

Much

people of the

Jews therefore knew that he was there; and they Came not for JeU6 sake only, but that

9 "Eyvw
'Knew
iaTiv,
he
is
;

oJiv '

o^Xog TroXvg
^great

tK tCjv
*of

'lovSaiuJv
"Jews

on
but

skei

'therefore 'a 'crowd

'the

that there

they might see Lazarus also, whom he had


raised from the dead. 10 But the chief priests

Kai fjXOov, ov Sid tov 'hjaovv Jesus and thiy came, not because of

fiovov,
only,

dXX' iva
that

consulted that they might put Lfizarus also II bLtausa to death that by reasor, of him many of the Jews
;

vEKpuiv. ov fjy.eipEv tK dead. also Lazarus they might see whom he raised from atnong [thf] 10 tl3ovX8vaavTO.St ol dpxupt^g h'a Kal rov Ad^apov arro-

Kal TOV

Ad^apov

iSwaiv

But 'took 'counsel

'the 'chief -'priests that

also

Lazarus

ther

KTEtvwaiv,
might
kill,

11

on
because

ttoXXoi
n^any
'by

Si
're.-.son

^avTOv
*of

went away, add


lieved on Jesua.

be-

liim
Jesus.

virfj-yov "were "going '"away

Twv 'lovSaiwv
'of 'the

Kal

'^Jcws

irricrTevov and were believing

dg tov
otl

'1)](Touv.

day much people that were


12 Oii the next

come to the feast, when


ihcy heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem, 13 took branches
of palm trees, and went forth to meet him, and

12 Ty.tTravpjLOv iixXog rroXvg 6 iXOwv On the morrow a -crowd 'great who came
aKOVcravTig oti
(5ov Td fiata

fig
to

rr/v
the
.

iopTrfv,
feast,

ipx^fai having heard that "is 'commg

'"6"

'lycrovg tig 'ItpoaoXvfia,


'Jesus

13 iXa~
took

into

Jerusalem,

tCjv (poiviKwv Kal tE>)X9ov sig vrrdvTrjaiv ^avTifi," him, branches of the palms and went out to meet

P '+ e/c of 1 -I- 6 ( o Te6tn)Kuii [L]T[TrA]. 6 T)'I>}(rov9 Jesus (raised) LrfrAW. ' avaKetixevitiV cruv GhTTr AW. ^ Mapto/u. Tr. " [toOJ Tr. (those) TA. " 6e but (sayS) T. * lovSas 6 IcT/capitoTTj? el<; e/c (- eK Tr) ti1)v iJ.a0r]Tttii' axirov TTrA ' ixuiv Ata tL LTrA. having TTrA. " -I- o the T>)prjcnj she may jieep LTTrAW. -f Iva. ttiftt LTTrA'w. *. ovTwi' them w. (crowd) T. 6 GLTTrAW.
'

3"

'^

''

Xir
Kai ^(Kpa^ov,"

JOHN.
i'Qaavvd, ivXoynixivuQ
o

223

tpxofievoQ tv ed if iSkIdk of fs^I [is] he who comes blessed in [the] end)- were crying, Hosaima, jj^^j comcth in the 6t '^"^* the Lord ovouari Kvpiov, ^ 6 BaaiXtuc tov 'lapaitX', 14 lii/pu/v .r*v IT J >*t 3TT 4i J J 14 And Jesus, when he 'Havmg'foand 'and ^^^ foat^ a young of Israel. name of[thB]Lord, the kiub' 6 'IrjcTfJDf ovaptov iKaOiatv tir' avro, KaQwQ itjriv yeypdix- ass, sat thereon as it ^"tsat^ as^ _itis. Jesu5 a young ass upon it, ^^'f gX"^*! uBvov, 15 M>).0o/3ou, ^Qvya-np" StwV t^oii, b.j3aaCKi!)i;.aov hold, thy King cometh,
'

I-

tan,.*

Fear not,

daughter
1 <

of Sion

behold,
/^

n comes. .
1

spX^Tai, Ka9r]fiEvoQ
sitting
r,

n>

i-rri

TrCjkov
a colt ~
,

ovov
of ah ass.
.

16 ravra
'

on
, ,

IjVOXjav 'Ol.fXaUr}Tai.aVTOV
knew
,TT,

~
first,

rO.TrpUJrov,
at the
I'

^w aKA
but
-

'^These

16 These thmgsunde!"U5-MI "oe ovk stood not his disciptea ^things 'now 'not at the first; but when
>

thy king

BitUng on anase'scolt.

'his Miscipies
,
) <

"o"

these things unto hiqi. 17 The people therefore that was with htm Bore witness thereforo when he Called l/ozawritten, and these things they, did to him. n 1 _ ' ruB out of hia gravo, , < 'v !, ' . , _ o ox^og fier avrov,"ore roi^ Aac,apov ifwvijcrev k and raised him. from he called out of the dead, bare record. whoa Lazarua the crowd that was with him, V ' < > " > ~ 18 For this cause the . 1 Q ;f ,', , veKpuJV. IS dia tie rov nvr)HHOV,Kaiyyeipevavrov people also met him, tomb, and raised him from among [the] dead. On account of for that they hoard the

Itjctovq Jesus
/

tote
then
.

yeypanntva, kui

-,, ,.,T_i ravra tTroit]aav avrtp. 17 ifiaprvpH


that these things wore
of
/
'

A ifivrjaUrjffav they remembered

on

ravra

glorified, '^'^"^ '"'^ '" y a ore tOOe,aaar} then remembered they when was glorified that these things were ~ written of him, and T avri^ that they had done r}v nr
'
'
'

hiVn

ov'

wv

11

rovro
this

o/cai" VTTr]vrr]0iv met also

aijup 6 ox^oq, on HiKovatv'' rovro 'this him the crowd, because it heard

^rrlc'le.''M) ''C' Phi! risees therefore said a-

avTov.imroir)Kivai to
'oi -his

^having 'done

arj/xelov. sign.-

19

oi

oiv

<l>api(Trtioi ittTrov"

The ^therefore

'Pharisees
"iSs,
lo,

said

Trpog

Eavrovg,OeojpBlr'6n ovk
themselves,

among
fiiriau) after

Doyeseo that

oj(ptXeiri ovSkv; ya gain nothing?

6 Koafiog the world


the

^"ve^ye'^^ow^ve' pre-vail nothing? V-hold, is gone after

world

avroii aTrrjXdtvis gone. him


'

20 ^Huav.Ss
And

'nveg "EXXTjvet;"
Greeks

twv avafiaivovnov iva


those

there were certain

among

coming up

that

*7rpo(T/cvW/(rai(T(v" they might worship

iv ry
in

iopry'
feast
;

21

ovroi
these

oiv
therefore

irpo'ariKQov

the

came

20

And

there

were

4>tX.V7r<^,
to Philip,

rv

and
Sir,

who was from


saying,

BrjOijdiSa. Bethsaida

Tng TaXiXaiag,
of Galileo,
'Irjffoiiv

mi
^

np^^nov

and they asked worship

llZ'lbJtt^tZZ
at the feaat:

avTov Xkyovrtg, Kvpie, OaXofiiv rbv


him we
^

i^slv.
Ho^^see.

22 "Eox^'(^omes

desire

^Jesus

rai
Kai and

'

fPiXiinrog
^Philip

Kai Xsygi r<p 'AvSpttf


and
""

tells

'Andrew,
Jesus.

^iXiTTTTOc
Philip'
,

Xeyovaiv
teU
I

r<i 'iriffov.
/
<

Kpivaro'^
iwered
;^

avT j7q Xeyujv,


them
~
,

>

EXr}Xv9ev

^Kai TrdXiv" 'Avdptag and again, _ An-frow I'Zli^^'Z' JeZ". 23 o.BL'Inaovg ^drrs- 2ii Philip cometh and But Jesus an- ^^^}''^^ ^^"'''^ f^.^ gain Andrew and Phi ^ lip teii Jesus. 23 And aipa iva So^aa9y
It
<

therefore ^'^r^ Ph^T which was of BethsaiTa Galilee, and desired f

s:iying,
f.
'

Viog rov avUpojTrov.


the Son
/

o4'< 24 Ojxrjv
,

^Has -"come 'the ''hour that should be <~ !i N'


>
y

of
,
',

man.
,

answered them, glorified *^**?^ say'^' The hour is a/xriv Xsyu) v/xiv, sav.fiij o come, that the Son of Verily verily Unless the ^<^}^ should be gloriI say to you.

unto you, Except corn of wheat falj in/ ^' ^ %~ to the ground and die, ri ' a(pXXtOV it abideth alone: but flSVei' eai'.Cf aTroUavy, TTOXvV Kap-jrOV <pepBl. 20 O abides ; but if it should die, much fruit it bears. He that loves if it die, it bringeth X / forth much fruit. 25 He ~ / , ~ o TT}v.\l/vxvv-avrov. 'a-rroXeffec avri]v, Kai fttatov rrjv that loveth his life his life shall lose shall lose it and he it, and he that hates / ./ ^ \ ' y that hateth his life in r^vxnv avrov ev r(i>.KO0nqj.rovT<{) eig 4w??v auoviov jpvXa^H thisworid shall keep it 'his in thisworid ''lifo to life eternal shall keep unto life eternal. 26 If
I say

KOKKog rov (TirovnecTwv


grain
, \ 1

eig rijv
the

,_,,,,
yi]V airouavy, ground should die,
< '

avrog [xovog
it

fied.

24 Verily, verily,

of wheat falling into

alone

ft

11

<

'

>

<

,~)

~/

>y,

'

^
"

they heard GLTTrAW. KpouKvirqa-ovai.v they shall worship LTrA. ' + 6 " 4- Kai and LTXrA. (XTroKpii'CToi answers ixr.
Tr.

[L]TTrA. Kai
fie

ixpavya^ov lttta.
'

B [Keyovre^] saying h. avToiJ oi fi.a9r\Ta\ T.

o TTrAW..
TtA.
'

koI

and

TTrA.
"

'

6vy6.Tt\p

oTt becau.se

ltttAW. EGLTW.
LTTrA.

P rJKOvaai'

1 elrcav TVr.

'''EA.Arji'es Tti^e^

l^jxerai

(Andrew) come^ lttta*

y dTroAAvei loses XTr.

224

QAN N
i

If 2.
aico\ov6f.ir(iJi . r ,i lot him follow
.
;

xrr.
yai
nnri
i.i/
if
i

any man serve me, let aOrriV.' " k&V tuoi "^tOKOfw riC," iUol ' ' him follow me; and . .^ a '(.erre , 'anyone, me If 'rae wherel am, there shall __Vtalso my servant be if OTTOU Eiui fvu/ IKel Koi 6 ^trtKOl'OC 6 tUOC
^
:

CvKFrrerho'ioi;^

^^>>-<=

;--

^I

there

aW^

^BcrvaiU

'idTaf shaU bo.

''^-(/("

Aud
-

-jt;

/ioi SittKovy,

Tij.ir)<TH

avTov

iraTr]p.
*Eutlier.

anyone

me

serve,

*will

"honour

'him Hhe

27 fivv Now
oioauv
gave
/uf

r).\pvxr}-f^ov my loul

TErapaKrai,
hfc)

Kal

ri

nnio;
8h;ill
1

Ilnref),
father,

been troublod,

and whut

s.iy?

fK Tqg.wpag.ravrriQ.^ me from thishour.


this hour.
.

AWdt

did

tovto i)\Oov
this
1

But on account of
S6K(I(T0V
glorify

came
i

tr!ub?e7; 'ind^wha! '? to shall 1 eay ? Father,

TTJV.^()aV.TaVTr]V.

28 XlaTtp,
Father,

CnV
tby

t6

VVflfirt.
natiio.

hour butforthTs cause heaven, nnil nt,Min 'JJoth 'Iglorifi.il came 1 unto this hour. Therefore came a voice out of 2a.Fath,.r, glorifj- thy 6 ^icTTlLg" 29 '0.'oflv".OYXoC ''Kl(i aKOV(yUC '^o^flCTw. name. Then came there .,, , r-.-. ir-i t j t- i. i i the [tho-e) u'nl Therefore ^\ crowd which stood r.i heard a voiic from heaven', wiH glorify [it]. have both j'\fy^ (ipovrip'.yiyovh'ai. sa.v!"ff, I dXXot tkiyov, ' kyyiXoc ai'rtjj others tuid, Thunder tlure haH been An angel "-"d. to him
,

^i^^GiV.OVV JplOVr) SK TOV OvpaVOV, Kai

iV(')'Corj((

Knl TToXlV
]

florif\ i/auain people iherifore, thai

^The

"XiXaXr^icev.
h.a.
.,

stood by and heard i(. said tliat it thundered* other^ ^aid, Ap ongcl

30

^pyfecD
,

ATTiKpiOl] "Answered
,

'<!>"

'irjOOVg Kcd dlTEV,


'Jcsua
said,'

Ov
31
<

Si
of

lui

iavrt)
jjjjg
, ^

T]

0(i(j.';"

yiyoviv,
has coinc,
,

and >^<T.rf~ aWa vfihg.


ci

Not because

mo

Kpakelulum. 30Jesu uusiieied and said,


Th)sv(,ae came not btjcause of me, but for

voice
,
,

but because
. 1/J'V
,
.,

of you.

vvv Kpimq Now judL-iiient

tCTlV
jg

TOV.KOCfflori.rnVTUV'
of this world
;

O
the

ai)-)(UJV

, ^ TOV.KOfJUOV.TOVTOlT

Dovi

pnnco

of this world

world

prime
earth,

the ]udgiuint of this liow shall the of this world be


:

fKr/3X?)0J7(Tfroi out: shall be caat


in
'

ca.-,tout. be lilted

32AndI,ifI Tag up from the will draw all

t^W 32 ^ lAKVtTUt'*^pog
>

KuyiJ tClV audi If


-

V\1/w9Cj
I
-i-

iK-TriQ

y/jt'i

TfV^all

bo lifted up from the


J

IflClVTOV.
myself.

dj
a
'

r.r.

f \ OITO. Of IMyfV,
thi.'t

canh,

ai^jXaiViUV
signifi'iiig

'will
-

'draw

to

But
>

he said,
'

;/K/Miutome. 33 This T^Oll^ Kaid, he signifying by what what dfath- he should \

i\

VaVUTlp 17/JAAfV
death
'tt

^\
>

aTroUvi](TKElV.
to die.

oa
'

o4

ho was about
^
'

aTTiKpiUtj ^Answered
,
,

Vl

h "

aVTt^
*hini
,

die.

34

The

people an-

(^X^og,

swercd him,

We

have

'the 'crowd,

Huiig ^iKovaafitv IK Tov vo^ov Wo out of tho law heard


.

ori

o XPKyrog
tlirist

that the

thaTcbrist abide,h'?o; M^'^^'


ever:

and bow sayest abides


'''^^

^iQ-Tov.alwva, Kai TrJif 'ei> Xfyeic," "Or, t^a l^ojOTivm that iiiust bo lifted up forever, and how 'thou 'sayest,
;

rap "t be Hf tedup*? who Is this Sou of man? 35 Then Jesus said un-

^^^ dvOpwTTOV ; TIC tfftiv ovTog 6 v'lug TOU dvOowTTOv Who is this of man? Sou '^^ jf man ? ^ 35 EJjrt}/ oiv aVTOlg 6 'l/JTOVft 'Eti ^IKpOV \p6vOV TO
"'^"^
^Said ^therefore *t& 'them
'Jeu8.

while
vou.

is

0j)p ^ufff iruwr" ioTlV. TTiOlTrUTliTf. 'fwc" TO 0WC ^Yf^e, V "va wh.le the Ughl yc\ave, tl 'walk """ ""_"" "" "'"- J'e "ave, that '" ^"_" LW'%;^^u'"n' """ "'"' Ton _ is. darkness come upon yon for he that walk- nr) icai 7r(.pnrar.(ov tu o ry OKOTia v/xdg Knra\df3g' eth in darkness knowwalks "you 'may overtake. And he who in '^uot 'darkness the

the liuht with ght \Valk while ye

Yet

^i

little

while

the

Mt Uh
, ^

eth not wluthcr he go-

'

eth. 86 While ye have light, believe in the light, that ye may be

,/,

darkness
,

aKOTiq. OVK.olStV TTOV I'TTUyH, knows not where he goes.


,

Si) 'tujg"

TO
tho
/

tho children of light.Those things sp.ikeJedcpar-ted, and did hide him.self from them. 37 But though he had done so many BUS,

TSVtTi
jjevo
,.

(ig
in

TO
the "'O

...., 0WC, iva


that
.sons
^

While

d)<og light

IX^^ff
ye
li.ne,
y

TTl'^-

be-

vioi
<

light,

and

ytvr\a(it. of light yo may become.

(fxoTog
\
^

'YavTa
Tlie.-e

'

,-

t\a\r](TSV
spoke

>ii>r

iTjaOVg,
Jesus,

mlraOles before thciii, yet they believed not on him 38, that tho saying of Exaias tho prophot might bo f ul:

Ol
,

...... \OaaVTa.Ct aVTOV


so

KOI and
'signs

n aiTtXfjwV
going away
,

r>

>>

IKpvfS)]

U,TT

> UVTixJV.
them.
.

thing*

was hid

from

. (TT]^l(ia

But [though]
.
.

many
.

be
>

TTfTTOlTJKOTOg lfl7rpn(TUEV .had dono before

UVTWV
thorn
|

ovK.tiriaTfvov tig avTOV,


they believed not

na 3o ivu

\oyog
word

'wt

Haaiov TOV
tho

irpopro-

on

him,

that tho

of Esaias

Ti 5iaxoi/j7

LTTrAW.
[ovi/]

hour) OLTr. LTfrAw.


'

aS

LTTrA.

6 LTlrA.

ovv

*> TavTrjt Kal GLTTrA. {continue the qtiestion to the word ; ' K 17 <l>u>vr) avrrf '' ia-rrjKiot L. jcail'. LTr. ' 6 TTrA. iv iiulv among you GLTXrA. ' Aeyeis <rv TTrA. thei-efore ta.

X1I,"XITI.
ipriTov
pliet

J
hv
Elnev,
'-which he said,

N".

225
iirirmvatv Ty
belieTud'
filled,

Tr\ripo>9/j,
Dilfrlit 1)0 fulfilled,

Kvpie,
Lord,

rig
ivho

which ho

spal;e,

aK07).r'ifiwv our report?

,Kni

l3paxi(^v arm and the

Kvpiov
of [thcj

dTnKaXt'xpQt] Lord to whom was it rcVoaled ?


rh'i

Lord, who h.iil^ believed our repo.-t ? and to whom hath the arm of the Lord been revealed ? 39 Therefore

not on TcaXiv Uttei' they couldthat heli-.vg, Aia.rovTo QUK.t)cl<ravro Tndri.iitiv, hec.-iuse Iv^aias said because again believe, On this acconnt tlicy could not said again, -10 He hath ^Haciiat:, 40 TirvcpXivKtv avrCov TOVQ^bfQoKnovQ kai "tt?- blinded their eyes, and has hardened their heart; and eyes their Esaias, He has blinded that they should not tpiq 6f- sec with tlicir eyca, nor f.n)ACM<7n' TTwpwK-f iV avTiov Tnv Kupdiav' 'Iva

31)

liiiclcrstand with their that they should not sco with the their heart, heart, and be convertry- KapSii^L Kai HTriaTp(i<pio<Tiv,^^ Kai ed, and I should heal OciXfiolg jcac Torjawan' and them." 41 These things and be converted, eyes and understand with tlie heart said Esaias, when he 41 Tavra elirfv ''Uffatac, '^ore^' eKsv saw his glory, and ^laffujfiai^ aiiTovQ. when he saw spake (it him. 42 NeverEsaias, These things said I should heal them.
hardfcti(*l
"

tliele.-,3

/.liVTOi rulers also mauy beAltliough indeed lieved on him; but because of the Pharisees Kai tK Tuiv dpxovT<t)v iroXXoi iiriaTivaav ei'c avroV they did not confess him, lest they .should believed him, even from among the on many rulers be put out of the synaaXXa diet tovq i>apifTaiovQ oi'X<''f'oX6yovv, 'iva fit] gogue 43 for "they that not loved the praise of men but on account of the tHey confessed not, Pharisees more hall the praise of

Ti)v.S('iE(tv.auTov, Kai iXaXi^qev Trept hi.- t'lory, concerning and spoke

avrov. 42 o/iwc
hiqj.

among

the chief

dTroavvdyM-yoi
out of

intt

y'lvwvrai. the synagogue tney might be


.

43

Ti)y('nv)](Tav yap for tliey loved <

Tr/y
the

co^av

Goil.

.lesus cried

and

Twi' dvDpwTrojv jAciXXov I'lTrsp t>]v So'^av tov Ofov. oiinen of God. more than glorj the
.Si 'But

tKpn^iv Kai (Imv,


cried

'O

/nirninov
believes

el,Q ifis,

and

said,

He

that

on

me,

glory said, He thatbelieveth on me, bel ieveth not on 'Jijerovg me, but on him that ^Jesus sentme. 45And hetha^ me sceth ov.TriarevH tig seethsent me. 4fi Iliira that am believes not on come a light into the

44

kfik, 'dA\''' slg

TOV

me,
Oiixtpfl beholds

but

on him who
sent

TTtfi-il/avra -//* me sent


'

45

o Oeujpwv Kai and he that beholds


(Ig
a light into

ij.ik,

ft'orld, tliat

whosoever

rue,

on me should not abide in darkness.


believelli

hear my words, and believe not, I judge him iXi]XvQa, 'iva trdg 6 TnaTfiiuiv eig t/us tv Ty CKOTiCf.. fii] not for I came not to judge the world, but to nava come, that everyone that believes on me in the darkness "not save the world, 48 Ho 47 Kai tdv Tig fiov c'lKovoy tS)V pi)iidTMV Kai juj) that rejeeteth me, and fieii'y> not my and 'not receiveth ^words 'may abi'le. ''thaAnd if anyone ''of '^me 'hear words, hath one that judgeth him: the word Kpivw 'TrirrTF.vfJtj,^' tyui ov.Kp'nxo avritv' oX'.ydp-ffXOov'ti'a 'bolicvo, do not judge him, for I came not that I might judge that I bavespokcn, the I same shall judge him ilOtToJv in the laet day, 49 For Tuv Koffftov, aXX' iva (tojijm toi' kocjiov. 48 o the world He that rejects I have not spoken of wurlii, but that I might save the my.self ; but the Father -Kpivovra which sent me, he gave Ti)V Kai i-itj.Xafilidvwv Td.pi]i.iaTd.iAOV, tx^i ifii: me a commandment, judges me and does not receive my words, has him who what I should say, and ai'Tov 6 Xoyog ov tXdXriaa, iKeivog Kpivti aiJTOV iv tij what I should .speak. hiui shall judge him in the 50 And I know that the word which that I spoke, his conaman<lment is dXX life,everlasting: whattffXrtry I'ljiepa. 49 'oti iyu) ti. kj.i,avTOV ouic.iXdXijaa' but soever I speak therespoke not, last day from myself for I fore, even as the Father o Trsjixpag fie TrarTjp, ' avTOC jxai h'ToXiji' ^tSioK^v^' ri said unto me, so I gave what speak. the ''who ~'sent *nie 'Father, hims-elf me commandment

TOV

TTtfixpavTCC

/u.

46 tyw ^wg
I

tov Koafiov
the

47

And
:

if

any man'

him who

me.

world

elTTtj

Kai

Ti

XaXrjaW
;

50

Kai,

I should say .and

what I^should speak

and

ol^a on j'l.ivToXri-avTOv know that his commandment.


tyti,"
'I,.

^o)^ aiwviog iariV


life
(>

otv

"AaXw

KaOiog tiptjKiv
as

fioi

eternal

is.

Wluit therefore "speak

has said

tome

Trarijp, ovTOjg
Father,
so

XaXw.
I speak.
XTil',

trie

Now before the


tlio

13

Now

Tlpi'.Sk Ttjg before the

top-Tig
fuast

tov
of the

irdaxa-,
passover,

(.iSiog

'lri(Toi>g

'oti

feast of

passovcr,

''knowing

'Jesus
P

that

when Jems knfiw that


I sliall heal LTTrA. ' fie'SiOKei' hllS

? en-ajpoio-ei'

hardened /fTjA,

1 OTI bcc.^LUse'GL'lTiA.

" a-Tpa<l>St&iv I.TXrA.


<|)vAdfrj

ia.a-0lJ.aL

giVeli

LTJrAW.

V iyti) AoiAd)

aAA.i LTTrA. LTTrA.

keep [them] LlTiAW,

226
hL''8CnTdrrn*out
of this w'orW* unto t"e Father, >in>viug l"veii

n A NN H

2.

XIII.

''^''" ''^'^'^'^"^^^"'^^'''''^'^ tK tov.koo^ov.tovfifTa(5g *^P" b^s come his hour that he should depart out of this world

^^y -n-poQ Tov iraHpa, dya7rr)aac tovq.i6iovq rovg iv Tiii Mh<,T. haying loved his ovrn which [were] in the * ^''^ thrworhl he^'Wed them unto the end. Koaati) UQ TtKoQ riyrnrtiasv avTOVQ. 2 Kai dtiTTvov "yfvo2 Ani supper heiD? ^..^^^^. ( [the] end he lov^d them. And supper takine
ended, the devil having

nowput

into the heiirt

^{rou,"
pi^^g
,

TOV
jije
,

_.^, SlUjioXoV
devil
,
ii

"'nK

7/0//
,

pipXiJKOTOg
h.iving put

,
"

r>

-,

ilg
into
,

Tt)v
the

KaufHaV
heart

of Jiidas,Ucariot,-.Sinion s son, to betray him; 3. Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he

already

>

lofOfl

of Judas,

^l/JLLJVOg I<JICapiUJTOV, IVO Simon's [son] Iscanote, that


i- 't

OVTOV
him

irapaSifi," he should daliver up,


^ -J" O eiOMQ
'knowing
<
\

^U

was come from God, and went to God; 4 he


rlsethfrom supper, and
garments and took a, towel, and girded him5 After that ho self.
laid

f'C
into [his]
r.
\
t

TOC
'

aside
;

his

" n lr](TOVg' OTl TZaVTU m""^CtClOKlV^ avr(fi O TTarifp 'Jesus 'that "all '"thing.s 'has ''given *hiiu *tho 'Father ,,. ^ ~ \' r\ 'v~\r\ tt,r)\UEV KCll TTpOQ TOV X^'P^f > Kai OTl aiTO hands, and that from God he Qame out and to
' ^

WOV

"^OV VTTayei, goes, God

a \K 4 tyHpETUl O
^
'

TO\l

~S' CEIITVOV
supper

he rises

from the

KUl TlUtJffn' and lays aside

-ji

TO
[his]

CJn^^anT'bWrc^to if^nriu, Kai


wa.sh the disciples' feet,

\a(3<l>v

\kvTiov SdKi^aiv tavTOV


he girded

5 dTa

fSdXhe

garments and having taken a towel'

himself:

afterwards

"'? '^(>^ VlTTTnpa, Kul i)plaTO VITTTHV TOVg TToBciQ th! \owirwherewith ^^ ^ ''^^'^P began to wash the feel he was girded 6 Then pours water into the washing-basin, and

unto him Lord dost "^ '" disciples, thou wash my feet? Su^^wapisvog.

pXrVdVe^e'^ai^h

^.-^^

M0'r->',

^^^^

and

to vripe

^ [them] with the

T.

^"^^j'^
towel

with which he wa

J.-. J"

Lfd

u"nto him!

WhSu

ei^-ded.
,

TTpOQ ^i/xujva tpx^rai Simon He comes therefore^ to

ovv

nirpov
Peter.

^Kni" and
J

do thou knowest not

\tyH avT(^
'"''>'"

*^iK-(VOg,"
'he,

KvpiE,
Lord,
flTTEJ'

OV

flOV

VITTTHQ TOVQ TTO^af


'dost

kpow hereof ter" 8Peti^

^o *him

^tliou =of

*me

wash
I

the

feet?
(TV

eaith unto him, Thou Shalt never wash

my feet. Jesus answered him, If I wash thee not, thou hast no part with me. 9.Simon Peter Baith unto him, Lord not my feet only, but
also

7 Air(.Kp'l9r] 'IrfOOVQ KUi 'Aiiswered' and 'Jesus


'

aVTlp,
to him, ~ ^

"O JyiO TTOtW


What
do
'Says
ii

OVK

4aid
,

chou 'not

oloag dpTi,
'knowest now,
, ,

jXiTU-TavTa. yvw(T>j.oe hereafter. but thou ahalt know


,

8 Aiyti
>

ai'Tifi
^lo''hira
>

nk'Pe>

TpOg,
ter,
,

rf

'

my

hands and

"TOVg-TrOCag.f.tOV'' Ov-fXtj VllptJQ my feet In no wise mayest thou wash

Hg.TVV.Utwvu.
for ever,
OI'K-.tx^tig thee, thou h.is: not
(T,

TOj/

head, lu Jesus saith to bim, He that is washed needeth ntit save

ATTCKpiBT)
'Answered

'

<

^auT(ft

'r

Ii^ad^ig,"
'Jesus,

.l-

ii

'r>

'

to>
is

wash
all.

his feet,

bub
:

f^ipog
part

flBT

-/->.' 9 AiyH tfXOV.


me.
.

'him

avT<p
'to

.-.r"
'bim

Eav.fXT) Unless

'i Vixj/O) I

"

wash
tt'

2.lfHx)V

lUTQQg, Kvpii,
'Peter,

't'

/it)

clean every whit and ye are clean, but not


11

with
'j

^Says

who
12.

For he knew TOvg.TTOcag.fiov jAovov, only, my feet should betray

Tag aWa KUl-> X'PC


>\\'
but
,-

'Simon

not >> ^ Kai Tqv Kt<pft\r]v.


\

Lord,

also

the

hands

and

the

hoad.

Ye'irVXftTlfcUan: 10
So after he

A^ya auTip
''Says

had
set
"'^"^ "^^"^

'to

*him
'

'o" 'iriaoig, 'Je ua.

'O He that

XeXov/xevog
has been laved

^ov
'not

xP^^av
need
clean

*"'/

ha"d''faken^hir'ga''r'^

^'x'"

ments

and

w.as

[other] than
(cat
. i

''^ovg the
,

TToSag"
feet

vi4/aa9aL,
to wash,
.

ciW
hut

saTiv KaOupoc
is

?r' .i!?''"'!.-''^* ye unto them, Know

oXoc' ,,=
,

what you?

have done to wno"j'

vuHg KaQopoi " ^ "


JQ
clean

i(jTi,
are,

'I'^u

dXA' ovyi TravTSg.- 11 ijSEi.ydp " " ' ,, but not all. For u knew he
,-,

i_'

13

Ye

call

me

j-^j,

TrapadtdovTa

avTOW
oiij'

Sid

tovto d7rev,^0v'){i wdvthis

him who was delivering up him:

on account of

he said,

'JJot

*aU

TBg KuOapoi iaTS. 12"0rf


'clean
'ye 'are.

ivt\l/Ei>

TOvc.irooag.avTwv,
their feet,

^Kai^

tXalSiv
taken

When therefore he had washed TaAi-idTiaMUTOv, "dvmreauti'"


his garments,

irdXiv,
again,

direv
he said
fxe
nie"

and

having reclined

avToig,
to Iheni,

rivdifTKETf. Ti TrgTroiA/ica vixiv ; Do ye know what I h:ive dojin to you?


"

13

Vj-ifig

(pwvdTt
rail

Ye

y iva irapa&oc avrov 'Iov6a9 2t/j.a)i'0 '[<ryn'O/xeVou TTi-. ' o 'Ijjctovs (read [JesusJ [Ljrii a. Kapi(oT>)9 TTrA ; 'loiiSa 2t/ii. '1<TK. iva TrapaSoi avroy L. " now e8u)K6v gave TTr. > fKeivos (read At'-yet he says) LT[Tr]A. Kai TTrA. ' S oij/c e;)(ei ^peiai' I.TTrA W. 6 T[tr]. 'Irjo-oOs aiiTW LTTrA. TOUS TToSas LTTrA. *' ^ ' /cat L. Tous TToSas T. OTl LTTrA. ti nr) except LTrA ; ^ T.
TjAflei/

"

was come

LTTrA.

'

" +

Kai LTTrA

a>'';rcrei'

reclined TTrA.

Xlir.
the

O H

N.
s'i/JlI

227
~
:

6 SlSdnKCtXog Kai 6 KVpiOg, Kai Ka\iug XeyBre,


Teacher
1

14

oiv

yap. Master and Lord and and well ye say, n ^am [*bo] 'for. amf and the Lord, Ti 1?1 then ^^r kydi tvixba VUUIV rovg TCnSaQ, 6 KVpi.og Kai 6 Lord and Master, have
washed ',.>,. your o<pei\(Te
i:

'

If therefore

feet,

'

the

Lord
<

oioaaKaXog, Kai
Teaclier,
,

v/j-slg

""AX aWrfKwv vittthv rovg

also
,

ye

ought
,, ,

of one another to wash


^
ti

the
1 '

lo viruceiyfia.yap tco)Ka
for an example
.

vfiiV,'

/-,'> iVa KaOujg tyuj


y

feet and the ^"shed your wash ye also ought to one / TroSag. another's feet, is For ^ ^^'^% given you an feet
;
'

gave
'
^ .

you,
.

that
X \eyw
/
.

as

Kai VflHg Troirjre. should do. also ye


.
fie.lC,(i)V

tn lb auilV

~ -

aiXJ/V

TOV.KliplOV.aurOV, OVOe airoarOKog


than his
lord,

,_,-,,,say
nor
-

Verily verily I

VfllV, to you,
-

^eater

Tog avTov.
Eim.
^ avra

,/'-,-. t
17

a messenger
..5.

ravra
^

If
"

these things ye
'

oicare, jiaKapioi tare eav TToniTe yedothem. is i speak know, not of you all: I know blessed are ye if ye do
,
.

,,,
.

y"- 1^ Verily, Terily, I say unto you, The servant is not greater ^Is "not 'a '^bondman than his lord; neither he that is sent greater , IXilC,WV rOV-T^S/XXpav- than he that seuthim. greater than he who sent 17 If ye know these things, happy are ye if ^ ,,

iiroirjcra vfiiv, did to you,

cxample.thatyeshould do as I h^v^ done to

OVK.tOTlV
.

OOVAog

T.

~,,
T^
ft

TO IS ou
Not

v^

TTSpi
of

ttuvtujv
'all

them.
I jhose,

w/xwj/ Xsyuj'you I speak.


ir\r,pio9y,

tyuj^
I

olSa
know'

'N

11

^ovg'^

whom may

whom I have chosen but that the scripture be fulfilled, He

i^B\E^d,ir,V

d\X
but

'lva\)

ypacpn

that the scripture might be fuffiUed,

Vet'
'with

tuov\\

TOvapTov
'bread

*me

HTriipiv" tjlt rnv.Trrkpvav.avTOv. lifted up against me his heel.

'O rptuyu,v L^'lTtrufteTup^h^ He that eats heel against me.


for?Tt comeHhat; when it is oome to pass,
^^mlie^ mx^^iXy^yoriIj, I say unto you He
^

19

From
rat,
to pass,

'aTr'.aprt" this time

Xsyw
I tell

vfxiv irpb rov.yEvecy^ni, 'iva you, before it comes 'i)ass, that


'

^orav ykvrjwhen
it

oome

TriOTfVCTJJT-e" OTI iyu ye may believe that I

d^l.

20 d^r)v
.

d/xrjv

Xlyw
1

am

[lie].

Verily verily

say

Vfllv, so!veri^|end''re^i'veTh to you, me; and hethatreceiv-

'O

\afij3dviu>v '"kdv^^-Tiva
v

Trs^xptj,
I shall send,

t^t XafifSavH'

oM
*"*<J
1".^

He

that

receives

whomsoever

me

t^,""^

receives;

t^*^**'^!!

wh'"*

tliftt

E/xf

XauBdvbJV, XauBdvei

rbv

Trkuxbavrd ue.
me.

21 Tavra
These things
testified

Jesus^hadlhiis said he '"'^ troubled iu spirit,


'"'4'^

me

receives, him who sent receives etTTWv '6" 'Irjaoijg STapqxQr] r<p Tzvtv^ari, saying Jesuf was troubled inspirit,'
'

^^^jl*'*'^^^^^^','"''^

Kai
and

efiapTvprjafv -unto vou, that one


?;?'5n,!'

of

Kai dw^i', AflTJV afxrjV AtytU vpXv, on eig Verily verily I say to you, that one and said,
'

>

..

' 5-

'

tt,

VflUIV TrapaOloaSl
,

fiE.

^ .,_. 22 EpASTTOv
"Looked
,

of

you

will deliver
'
.

up
'
.

'ovv"
..
,

II

etg

aWrjAovg
11

^^'^

oi fiavrjrai,

airopov-

J"*!?^-"?*' the disciples looked one on another, doubting of .whorn ha spa^e. 23 Now tlicre was leaning on Je!,u.i' ^^

Then

doubt- hcsom one of his discipies, whom Jesus lov,. ^ T , ?.. - o ~ Z6 IjV.^Ot" avaKdfievog tig^ riOV ed. 24 Simon Peter fltVOl TTf.pi TlVOg ASyH. therefore beckonqd to ing But there was reclining of whom he speaks. oiie him, that he should ask ~ ~ ~ ~ >i ' ~ '> .< It r, fiaUrjTwv.avTov sv Ti^ KoATTif) rov Irjaov, ov r/yaTra o IrjGovg' who it should be of of his disciples in the bosom of Jesus, whom "loved whom he spake. 2.^ He 'Jesus, ' then lying on Jesus' ' T vi' ctA n' h n' n 24 VSVEl ovv lltTpog ^'TTVUsffUai rig breast saith unto him, IllfHOV TOVTCf} Makes 'a *sigu 'therefore "to '"him ^Simon "Peter to ask who Lord, who is it? 26 Jo-

me.

'therefore *upori ^one 'another 'the ^disciples,


' '

>

'

it

ol Xkyu. 25 HTrnreautv" ^^f" /cij/of ETri ro rwhTmYshangivi. whom he speaki. ^Having "leaned 'and "he on the sop, when I have dipcrrWog rov -iDaoi, Xiya avr^, Kvpte, rigkariv; 26 'Atto- Tad dipped" thlso^p, he
ajr.eiij"

might be

Trepi of^

'

breast

of Jesus,

says

to him,

Lord,

who

is it ?

''An-

gave

v.

to

Judas

Is-

KpivETttJ
Kwera
morsel,

B'o"

'Irjaovg,
Jesus,''

'EKEivog ioriv

<^

iyw
I,

He

it is

to

whom

to '^iidxl^ag" having dipped the


^

zrA^d^'lS'^heToE

V'w/itov 'iTf-i^wffw."
shall give
[it].

^Kai

lyu/Sai^ag"

ro rpMfiiov
morsel
aftef
i..

And having

dipped the
'

SiSitJinp he gives [it]

tfO

""'laicapiwry.l' 'l4)vS(f ^iixtvj'og Judas, Simon's [souj Iscariote.

27 Kai pera to
And
'

\//w^iov,
morsel,

the
t

SiStoKa I have given t iw^fiKiv has lifted up T. av LTTrA. 6 TTrA. f"


,

-f [yap] for (I)


*

nVas

ttca.

-t-

fiov
JC

my

TrA.

OVv T[Tr]A.
; *>

ojrapTi t.

Trio-TevcnjTe (ihoTevrjre Tr)


'

6i but TTrA,
who

otov yivr^rai. TTrA. of (his) GLTTiA W.

* Kai Aryet avTu Eitts leaned back LTrA.


tliercfbre
si)
'II

tc's

Se TrA
"

i<mv and says

to him. Say ovv therefore t.

[i.]A'.

8 [6] Xr

give to him TTrA. xat lie takes and TirA.

ffxPaij/a^ l ; ^ai/o shall ''/Sai^a? o5>/ having dipped


'Iir/capiuJTOu

a.van<Tttiv having it is LTTrA. ' -^ o^v ovTiu<; thus T[Tr]AW. dip TxrA. xoi Saxria avri and
'
'

therefore TXrA. (read son of bimoa ievanote.) ttta.

'

jLa^jSaj-ti

228:.
Siit:ia

J Q
entered
into
.
'

ANNUS.
aamvaC.
Satan.
,

Xlll.
"XtyH
aiJTtfi "('" =Sajs -^therefore 'to hini -.i f s-> -r

^im

aiMto d(Kt, -do- qnkkly. a4 .Now no man at the


t.iblc

totB f.hriXOiV tlQtKUl'OV 6 Then siiid Jesus ^^entered, iuto' bim nun, Iniit tDou
i,

o5)'

ItjaOVg,
ij^^y^^
'

knew

tor

what

What
TWl'

intent he spake this unto him. 29 For some' 0/ Utum thouglit, because Judas had the ^b.ig, that Jesus had said un'o him, Buy those, things that we liave need of against the feast; or, that hte shouM give something tothepoor. SOHethen

TTOirjCOV thou doest, 4o


TTOlUlJ,
reeliuiog-

tyViO
'l^^,y^^,.

(tvaK(lj.liVU}V

,,?.
TTpOQ.Tl
..

TUXIOV.
qiwcUly.

28 lOVTO.Ot OVtilQ
But
.,

tOOKdW,
tlionght,
. .^

_,

j,f(jjj,jg

tlTTlV OUTtfi, whereiort he spoke to him

-.

^ 29

this

no one
,

TlVlC-jap,
forborne

cwTi^
*to
,

Triv\opTr]V
the.

'him \,

\' , , , . . t n- . 'r Atyei lOI'OUQ, Ori tTTEl TU y\U)C(TOKO}lOV tlX^V "O Jud.as, thai 'is\ayiug 'bad since Hhe *bag ' . Py" ; tyoiitv eif Ayopaffov iTjo-oi'f, xP^ia// what things, need [ofl we have for Buy 'Jesu?,
.,

feast;

1] rftlf TTrwX^'^'" poor or to the

"'^

wv ^

^^

^V*

\ o^ '^""
'^"

that something he shou'.d giVe.

Having

wenUm mediately oui!


and
it

was

night.

i3(hv received therefore the


vvS,. Dight.

oiv

TO

t/^W/ZIOK

hdvOQ
he

morsel

ijv.^i '^ivQstjg tUlXOsJ'" immediately went out; and it was

t^c^aaOt] Xfyfj '6" 'Irjoovg, Hvv i^7X9?v 31 "Ors Now has bien glorified 'Jesus, When he was gone opt .-nays tv avT({i. 32 's/ idoKdaOr) 6 v'lbg Tov dvOpdJTrov, kcu 6 9i6g
the Son,
Xlierefore, when he Was gone out, Jesus said, .Now 18 the Son of
31

of

man,

and
him,
-r^

God has been


also
.,,
,

glorified iu

him.

If

o QtoQ
_

sSo^dcOt]
="
,

tV avTip/ Koi
COt,a<JH
'

God has been

glorified in

QtOg God
,

0o|a(7t
shall glorify

aVTuV IV
him
,

in

in4^.;lori6od,aadGod ^laVTt^, him. Is L'.irificd himself,'

KM
and

iVVVQ

aVTOV.
him.
<

33

liKVia,
-

tTl

32, It

in him,
t'lorify

Gd be glorified God shall al.s-o'


himiuhiraself,

immediately shall glorify


~

Little chiidrun, yet


7

n'

and

shall

sttaightway ,^

{.llKpOV flit) a little while with


^
,

v /i VfXWV Vfll.t C,1]T1jaiTE fJt, KOI KClUwi: tlTTOU TOIQ I said to the as you lam. Ye will aeek me and,
;

,/_

glorify him. C3 Little, children, yet a little

loVCaiOlQ,

OtI OTTOV "UTTOyw SVW)


"go
'1,

,,

,,

.-

VfUIQ
yp

1 am with you. shall sect me: and Kai VfllV ASytU HsI saidunto the Jews, also to you I say

while

Ye

,../

Jews,

That where

apTl.
now.

dyaTTars dXXjjXoyr,-' .^comej^sfno^wi'say according as to you. 34 A new com- ye should love one another
;

'~ " "^ . r>j' \i 34 IVToKijV KUO^tjv CUWJ.U VfUV, iva to you, that I give A ^commandmdnt 'ntw KaOwg rjycnnjcavnaQ/h'aKaevfifiQ
I loved

? n '\ n ~ OII.Cl'Va(Ti)e tMtlV, to come^ are not able

you,

that

'also

'3\j

"ouThatVe^iovV'oDe dyaTTCLTE d.\\i]Kovg. another us I have should love one another.


;

35 iv

ToOr<{)

yvoxTOvrat TTcivTtq qti


shall

ifioi

iZ"
orlii:r

lov^'o'i^e^'an35

M"^??'
disciples

t<7TS,

By this tdv dydnr]v ixnrt


if

-know
^

'all

iv

dXXijXoig.
another.

that to m& 36 Asyei

By

this shall

ye are,

love

ye have

among one

'Says

avT(ii Hii-iutv TLirpoQ, KvpiB, TToi VTrdysig ; dTreKpiOt] ^nrr(ii where goest thou ? -'Answered />him Lord, yehaveloveonetoan- *''lii'^ 'Simon =Peter, other. 3G Simon Peter OV.OVVaaa'l jJLOl vvv dKoXov9)](yai' o" 'ir]crovg,"OTrOV^ VTrdyu) to follow, ^'^'"'^ thou art not able me no.w '''^'"'' 1^0 whiih"f goesT' th^u ? Je><us auswcred him, ^L'cTTfpOl'Jf- dKo\ovBi)(JH(37 AsySl avTtji "ti" IltrpOf flOl.'^ Whither -I f;p, thou but .afterwards thou sh.alt follow me. 'Peter, =Says =to *him canst not Uiiow ma > \ n n MOW; but thou Shalt Ki;o(, "otrtTi" oj''.ci/>'n/xai aoi 'aicoXov9t^&ai" apri; rr/v ipvxijv followmonftcrwards. -life now? to follow why ^ord, am J not able thee
vl\remv'discTDies'"if
> i

3/ retr&aia

untohim,

Lord, follow

a/XljV ' afir/V Afya> V7](7ilQ ; 88 Jesus Tt]V.XpVXV^-<^OV VTTtp tfJOV aaswuied him. Wilt - I'hy life me thou wilt lay down Verily verily I say for thou lay down thy lifo ' ,, . ' <' t n f ClXtlCTOjp '^fwV1]GH" SWC.OV 'aTrapvi]<Ty" flB CW.jU?/ ffOI, for my sake? Verily, verily,! s-ay unto thee, to thee, in no wise [the] until thou wilt deny me will crow cock
I , , .
, > ii

will for thys.-ike.

why cannot I UOV thee now? I )^y lay down my life

/%/

'

VTTip (TOV
for

9r)(J(U.

^n 38

a'

" ATrf/Cpit/tJ

'n

aury
=him

<

'n >^

'

lT)<TOVg,
'Jesus,

_,,/

,thee I will lay

,,,_

down.

"Answered

n,

7i,<>/

code shall not / crow, till thou hast de- '^P'Qnied me thrice. thrice.
" *! e^tjXOev uWs LTTrA. P -I- OVV there fo)-e 6 LTTrA. 6 T[Tr]A. 6 TTrA. " eyit ' avT<j> TTr. * [el 6 6ebs iSo^dcrOi) ev avT<u] LTrA. ELTTrA. 6 TTrA. * aKO^ov9i^<jct<; 6t vo-fepov LTTrA. > + eytb I fgo) T. clvtw b LTTrA. vndyia GLTTi avv. b Sia ri LTtA. * aTTOKpcferai answers LTTrAW. 1 ajco\ov0ely Tr. oGl.TTiAW. ' ofl^^7<r>7 LTTrA iftiutnijarj LTTrA.

The

'

"^

: ;

XIV.
14
also

JOHN.
M)-ropfl'(T(TC70a> vfjLwv your Let not be troubled
tjuf
ij
_

229
on

KapSia'
heart;
oWicf,

'TTiareviTe i!g
fe believe

'XlV. rbv Oenvy bean, beLet not your troubleil;


Om).
b<iii-ve in Goil. leli<;vc
a!-i> jii
Fiiili.:r's

yo

Kai f/f
on

TriaTEiETe. .2
belieye.

iv ry
lu

TOV.TraTpoc.fAov jtordi
of ruy Fulhei" ^ Tropfvofxni
1

inc.

Jji

uiy
.nro
if it'

me

the house,

-;ihnilBs

hnnsc
:

iniiiiy

maii^iims
1

TToXXat
'many

il(jiv' there aro

tiM.fir],
;

otherwise I

e'iTTOv.uv vfiiv would have told you;

po

iroi- wiTf not .w, i have told you. ro j[H'eprepare a place

wiiiilii

go to

fo)- yoxi.'

fiatjai TVTTOV vj-Civ. pare a place for yon

3 Kai iav iropivQu) ^Kai'


;

and

if

go

iroifxanto ^iy'iv 3 Aitd if I go aud for yon pure a jilace for pruj^ire and
J

roTTOj/," TTciKiv a placd, again


roi/"
self,

tpx^/tft
I anj coiuiug
i'//i

Ihtre ye may be also.' 4 And whilher 1 go yc know, and the way may be.' And where 1 yo know. 5 Thomas iiTrdyw o'ioare "'KaV' Tr/v 6S^i> "oMare." 5 Akyfi avri^i Qtufiac, saitli unto hini, Lord, "Says '^to ^him 'Thomas wo know not whither ye know go and the wny ye know

Kai ''7rapa\j7i//o/ia/" will recciTC and


i'fJ.i^C
-"ye

v}.icir

Trpoi^'iiiavto

you

lur-

pre-' you,' will come again, and roceivi: you nuto myself ; that will le I am,

'iva that

oTTov

tyt^y icai
'I
.

r/re.

koI ottov

Uyw"
.

whore

^ani

'also

thou goest

KvpiB, ovK.v'idai^iEv iroy 'v.TrayEiQ, Lord, wf know not where thou goest,

and how
way,
the

"koi" ttwc; '^SvvcifiiQa ri)v can we can we 6 Jesus nud how the
.

knov.- the way ? snith unto him,

o^ov
way
Kui
t'l

fi'tisrai ;"

know?
aXijOsia
truth'
^i'

6 Asyei auT(^ 'Suys Ho 'him


icai

"Jo"

'ij/aoDj,
'Je.sus,

'Ey(-'i
i

i'/ii

>}

odhq

am

the

truth,

und

tJie life:

^
ft

^wr
life.

and the
(-//);

and the

ovdEit; Ho one

am the way man cometh unto the Father, but by me. 7If tpx^Tai irpbg tov irarepa yc had known me, ye to comes tlie Father should have known my
/u,"

no

not known me, Fhilip? he that hath seen nic the Father vf^twy iif.u, sayest thou So^ong witu a time you ami, Shew us the Fa4iXt7r7r ; 6 fwoax-w^ if-d, twpaKtv tov irarkpa' 'Kai" TrtiJg ther ? 10 Bclieve.st thou Philip ? He that has seen me, has seen the -Father and how not that I am in the Father, and the Father in me? the words that (71) \kyHQ, ^iii,ov 7'iiu1v/t6v Trarepa; 10 ov.Triariveic 'thou 'sayest, Shew Father? Belicvest thou not that I speaJt unto you I us .the speak npt of myself iyuj tv T({) irarpi, Kai 6 7rar?}p iv tuoi iariv; rd prjfiara but the Father that I [am] in the Father, and the Father ^in 'me 'is? The words dwelleth in me, he doeth the works. 1 Beit ty<jj ^XaXoj" ij).uv, dir b.St tfiavTov ov.XaXCj' irarfip lieve me that I m in which I spoal: to you, -from myself 1 speak not but the Father the Father, and he Father in me: or else be.*o" iv ifioi i-iivwv ^ai'Tog Troia rd Tpya" '^. 11 TnartviTk fxai lieve me for the very who in me abides he Believe does the works. me works' sake. 12 Verily, verily, I say unto you, iyw 'iv np Trarpi, Kai 6 irariip iv ifxoi^' iti.li /.u], He that believcth on th.at I [am] in the Father, and the Father in me; but if not, me, the works that I do.shallhedoalsn; and did rd tpya avrd TriaTEVETS ^fiOiJ^ 12 'Ap,i)v djji'jv Xkyu) greater works than because of the "works themselves 'believe Verily verily I say me^ these sh.all he <lo; bcthe
Father,'

Father also; and from Toi'.TraTspa./xov lienceforth ye know my Father him, and have seen him. 8 Philip saith HyvwKHT.e.djr" ^Kai'^ ^aTr'.dpTC' yivwoKiri avrov, ko'i twpdunto him. Lord, sluw him, and henceforth have us the Father, and it je would have known yc Icnow and" sufp.ceth us. 9 Jesus ffre '^avTOV.^ S Ak^ei aiinp 4>iXnnrog, Kvpis, ^iV^ov ijpXv eaith unto him, Have I shew seen him. 'Philip, Lor.', us Suys ^to *him been so long time with Tov vaTspa, Kai dpKH t'lfjilv. 9 Atysi avTifi 6 'Irjffovg, you, and yet hast thou

but

by

ifiov. me.

^iyvioKeiTS

Kai

If

ye had

known me,

also

and

it suffices

us,

Says

'to ''him

'Jesus,

^ToaovTov j^povov"

/xiQ'

Kai

ovK.tyvMKCig /uf, hath seen and thou hast not known me, and how tlicn,
;

on

on

v/^ih',

to ypu.

6 KiartVMV uq ifik, rd tpya. a, iyil) TroiCJ, KaKilvog He that believes on me, the works which I do, also he 7roir](jn, Kai fisi^ova tovtidv KOir^au, on iyw irpoq rov
shall do,

ca\is6 I

go unto

my

Father. 13 And whatsoever ye shall 'ask in

^ind

greater

than these he shall do, because

to

TraripaJnov"

Tropevoiuai.
go.

my
'

Father

13 Kai And

'6.n.dv

a/Vj'jffjjrs

iv r<^
in

whatsoever ye
'

may

ask

> S -f- QTl for LXfrAW. (cat [LjfTrA. [iyioYL.

KaX L.

know we

the

way

i,T'rr.\!

i
y

6
Kflj-l

"V

olSaTe

TOTrov v/xlv TTrA.

'

[l,]j:TiA.

'

7rapaA^/x>//o/j.ai

LTTrA.
rjSeiTe

Kai LTr.
airapTi T. LTrA.
l.

P oi&afjiev rrjv o86v


t.
'

T.

TrA; yvtoaecrOe ye will


TO<T0VT(a Xp6v(o LT.

avTov does

/xoi T[Ti].

Ills

w.jrks TT a.
^

/xov (read

know

T.

'

iyvaiKare ifxi ye koi [L]TrA.

have

known me

S^v

"
> *

[ovt6"| I.TrA.
Troiei to.

LT[Tr].
=

Ae'yo) TTi a.

" [6]

epya
is e.

[avrov]

'nod

his

works;

iariv

the faiher> LTTrA.

230
d<f thaT' tbe** Father inay ba^elorifled In the

ANN HI.
7roir](TU), 'iva

Xir.
So^affOy
.

^vofiari.^iov,
.raj.n>aai,

TovTO
thia

6 TrarrtQ Iv ri^
In

-willl do,

that

may

be glorified the Father

tho

^v'
16 If

^*

i?

^^- ^^"^^

Swiri

Trtlf do "/ ye love me, keep

vi(^. Sop.

1^ idv
^<ij/

rt aiTrjariTi ^ iv Tip.dv6fiaTi.iJ.ov, my name, ^ If anything yej*sk in'

lyw
I

Troir)tjw.

wiU do

(it].

15
'

ajanaTt
'

US, ^'^
,

rdc iVToAdg

{^'AnriTlTpyU'e

^\

Father, and ho shall 16 Vai tyw." epo)Tr)<TU) Tov TTaTipct, Kai a\\ov TTapanXrjTCV g-lve you another Comand .inother Father, Paraclete jj^j,^ j will ask the fcrter, that he may. . , > < ~ > ' ' .^ n abide witli yoii for / OlO(JSl VjllV^ IVa jXfO VfiWV tl.TUV.aHoVa, 17 TO ''fliVg ever; 17 ei'en the Spirit he will give you, that he may remain nith you f or evtr, the whom the of truth ^ , j ? / > t -

^'7'

^-'^--'^

Tcic

iuac
'-^

'"rrfpnffare."

>-P-

'-,,,
Spirit ,
..
',

world cannot receive, 7rJ/i/ia Tijg aXfjOfiag,


because
hiln:

-_-..,,.-,
does not see
, ,

'

o KoofioQ ov.ovvaTai
world
i >

'

Kapuv,
receive,

ore
because
''

seeth him not, neither knoweth


it

but ye know him;


it

OV.VEMpu aVTO, OV0 yiVWOKi.l 'aVTO


him,
, < "

of truth, whom tho / , .. ~

cannot
'

<

l/ftg._0<" yiVWCr/CJTfi

mfMi
i

for he dwelleth with you, and shall be in 18 I will not you. leave you comfortless: I will' come to you. 19 Yet a little while, and the world seeth

nor
^
,

know
>

hiih
,
t

but ye

town
o
> >

,i

..

avTO, OTi Trap vfxiv


him,
< i^Atcfe

iievii,
abides,

for
>
.

with
'
.

you he

Kat,tv vfxiv "forai. lo ovK.a<pr)au> and in you shall be. I will not leave
^ >

_v

ii

'

op^cfi'o^e
orphans,
I

you

ipXOfiai irpoq Vfiag. am coming to you.

m 19

"

>

>

tTt

fxiKpov.
little

Yet a
see

Kai o while and the


oti- iyilt because I

Stbowu^i"iwl,ye Koafiog fiE ovK wunu uie no hall live alsd 20 At naU IITO also. Z'J AO world me iiu thftt day teshall know v~ kciI i)\i^~ic
Fathat r ara in ther, and ye in me, and

m"
longer luiigui

0fw|oa,
sees, Bcc
^^

vfxfTiQ.dE

BeutpuTe fiv

but ye In
that

me
t'luip^

my

''^

''^"'

WMftg P^rirTferOf " %?J(Tat7.


'ye

20 (V eKfivy Ty

'^yvuiaErrOe
shall

I've,

'also

shjiU live.

day
VfltlQ,

'know
and
I

and that my Father, 'je I [am] in meots, and keepoth them, he it is that lov- ^^ vuiv' tVwV TaC.ivToXac.UOV 21 O he that eth me: and Tr^i.i.'J: He that has my commandments y^loveih me shall be loj- ^
'

LuJmy

command- '^/C" OTI tyu


. '

tV r(p-7rarp>pV, Kai

iv ifi0i,'Kayil}
in

ye

me,
.

j*

KOI j nnd

TTtpUJV "
i keeps

aVTOC,
-u _ them,

ed of

my Father, and I ikeIvoc

^^ myself to him. 22 Judas saith j-ai virb T0V.naTp6q.U0V ^KoX Evw" dyaTTqcu) ailTOV, Kai ?tli'.tl^"jf'' hlip, and will love and .my Father; 1 by Lord, how iS it that / > thou wilt manifest iuchaviacj avT(p tf.tnvTov, 22 AiySL avTifJ lovoag, ovx thyseM unto us, and will manifest to him (not *3naa^, myself. ''Says Ho 'him not unto the world ? ' ^ , , ~ > > t / , / JIiKKhQ yiyOVEV OTI fffllV 23 Jesusanewtredand [(TKaptwrrjg, KvpiE, * Tl o saiduntohim, If amun tf,o tons thou art about Iscariote,) Lord, what has occurred that love me, he will keSp ~ / , no ' a 'fl t'u myworr1s:andmy Fa- tp(j)aviL,f.lV ffEaVTOV, KOI OVXt T<f> KOa fKf) ; XO ATTE/CptfTJ '(>" ther will love him, and 'Answered thyself, and not to the world? to m;inifest
manife'^B^t
_

dyanuiv UB, ayaTTrjOtjffio.Sk IcTTiv 6 dyaTTuiv [if shall be loved me, love^ me; but he that loves It is that

,~,-,
.

,~>/
'

we

will

conie

him, and make our abode with him. 24 Ho that loveth me oot keepeth not my sayIngs
:

and the

Tig ay7r^-/if, TOV.MyOV.}XOV my wopd love me, anyone _' _ r;p?/(7Et, (Cat o.TTarrjp.ftow ayaTTrjoii avTOV, Kaiirpog aVTOV to him him, and will love vford ho will keep, and my Father
IrjffOVg Kttl (ITTSV ^IVTtp,
'Jesus
.

unto

,,

..

,^

hav
If
,

..

>

'

and

said

to him>
/

'

>

>

>

mint
thar's

lut^'^thi' Fa-

which sent me.

i\iv(y6fi^9a, w'e will come,


fiE,

Kai

fwvriv

Trap
with

and an abode

avTif him

^Tzoirjaofitv.^y will make.

24
He

6' /ij) that "not


\

fS'uBtoy^oul'Cng ayairCjv
ye? pre.scnt with you.
'loves

T0vc.\6ycvg.^wv

oij.Trtpudoes not keep


;

Kai o \6yog /6v


and the

me,

my
not

words
but

word
/iS

whicn

wMd^
Gh.ift,

/s

tlT^

n'oiy
Fii-

cLKOvtTE
ye hear

ovK.ttJTiv
is

whom

theo- will

the send in

ifUic, mine,

dX\d TOV
of the

TTf /Kipavrog

TTaTpog.
'Father,

"who ^sent

"me
'

my 5 TavTU
aud

XfXffXT/Kra

vfuv Trap vfxiv


you

fihwV 26
abiding-,

you

"air
all

things,

These things I^ave said to you, with


^^J^
^^^-

o.Se but the

napdPara-

bring

things

your

remembrance,

to^Xriroc- rb Trvtvua to ayiov,


^^.^^
he
^^^

Triutbu

irarnp iv
in^

Tqi

^^^^^

6v6j.iaTi.fiov,

tKM'og Vfidg
-you

whom dtdd^n
"

-will 'send 'the "Father

Trdvra, Kai
and

^'^"'
will bring to -re-

my
S.+
aloiva
l>

name,

'will "teach all things,

ixe
77

lie

me [I.]t. may be
.'

''

-njprjo-eTe

with you
n

for

aiuil/a TrA.
^ijcTfTe

[avTo]'!,.
* --

ye will keep TTr, evecL; M*^ vfi-iiiv <" g^ but [r.lT[Tr]A.

fj '

eis

TTtA./

tK^n

<;Tf A]W.

VfXiU ([vixtli] L) yvbi<jcr6e LTrA. v * noni]<r6lJ.f0a LTTrA 6 GLTTrAW.

'' /teff' Vfituf ei! TOi/ Kayio LTTrA. rov aiwvti T ; jj /xfl' vfiiuy et? t6i/i " eo-TtV is LTrA. 0V(ce'Ti C.I.T; ' + Kdi ' Kayi) LTTrA W.
.

XIV,

XV
trfiaq

JOHN.
frhvra
all

231
a<pir,fii
I leave

fijn,<rH

dnov

ifuv.
to you.

27 Bipvvriv
Peace

nombrance'yoir
ifilv, with you
;

things which I said

^.^t^o'^^r It' P^TJ leave with you, my


^j^^ j ^jj^

Eipr]vr]v ^peace
=1

rftv kfitjv Bidojfii vfiiv I giv to you 'my

ov KaOi^g b
not
a3

KOfffiog ^^t^ll the world


^^^^^

the^^onV^Y=

gives,

'

'give^ to you.

^Let uot be troubled

yW

^EjXtarw.
let it f er.

2S tjKovaars on
Ye heard
Trpoc vaag.
to

tyu
I

dTrov
said

that

vfiiv, to you, ^I

bT."fra^d."'2l fe have ^ koI heard how i said unto 'Yirdyuj am goin|^ away and 7^.^
^

hekrt,

"nor

^^^"^'^^fj you

ipvoixai

H
If

TiyaTrdrk
ye loved
tho ~

lamcomiug
"eZtTOI',"
I said,

you.

ore If ye loved me, ye ixdpt]TB.av me, y* would h.nve rejoiced that ^o^ld rejoice^ because
ixe,

UopiVOUai I am going
,
.

irpbq
. to , ,, 29 fCat
>

rbv Traripa'
Father,

OTt
for
..

b.TraTrjpJ^flOV^^ my Father
.

ueiZiOV

flOV

1<7TIV.
'is.

Vl'V

UprjKa
I l^ave told
'

,29
II

is

Father; for greater

my Father
than
I
1.

And now

have

VJIIV irplV

ytr.S- told you before it come


it
>

"greater ^than *I

And now
,

you before
'

comes to to

aval, ll'CLOTaV pass, that when

TToAAa much
,
.

>^,..v, AaXrjaoj
II

It

shall

TTKTTevaijre. ytvrjrai have come to pass ye may believe.


n>

" on V dU'OVK tn

fiw
>

I will spchk
<

with

^y/iwi' you,

*T0VTOV" apXOJVf
^this
'ruler,

KUl
and

tV
in

with you: for the ' tpxt.Tai.yap o tov kixt/aov prince of this world for comes the ''of ''world cometh, and hath nothing in me. 31 But s' ot >\\' " CVCEV ol OAA IVC that the world may kfiOl OVK f^fl
~
.u
'

"

No ~> longer

pass, that, when it js to pass, ye might believe. 30 Hereafter! will not talk much

come

>

>i

'

me
dyarroi
I-Jove

he has nothing;

but

that

know

that I love the

Kuffjjog "may 'know 'the ^world


yv<fi

on
that

rbv
the

Tranpa, ^koV' KaOwg


Fat^ler,

and

as

*=i7'erf(Xar6"

jjioi

Trarrjp,
"Father,

^commanded

''me 'the

o'vrujg thus

ttoioj'
I do.

lyeiptaOe, dytjfisv ^ence!^'^^' Else up, let us go

mo* cora^ raandment, even -so I ^ ^**


ther'^gav"

tVT(v9iV.
hence.

15 Eyw
1

elfii

'/

a/iTTfXo^
'^vine

dXr]6iVT],
'true,

''_ yirwpyog tanv.


bn-li.ii\ilraau
is.

am

the

o^
2

Trav

Kkrina tv
in

\*

i,/my ^spov
fjuot
/i?;

Kai and

b.7raTr]p.[J0V 6 Father the


/

KapTrov,
fruit,

XV.
yin^,
is

Every branch
i:ai

me

.not

bearing

the

and my Father husbandman.

am

the true

a'ipei
h*- trikcs

avrdit;

irdv

to

Kapnbv
fruit

(plpov, KaOaipeL
bears,

away
more

and everyone that


<pkpy.
it

avrb ^hftlear^etHotfrSt
it

he cleanses

he taketh away

and

V/' that

^TrXeiom /capTror"
fruit

may

bear.

vfialg Already ye
nSr,

KaQapoi tare
clean
are

Er.h f nuThe puteth it, that it may tring forth more fruit, 3 Ivow ye are clean word the through ^^>'<^'^ I have spoken

^la

TOV XoyOV
'j word

t reason of the f..v by


KciyCo iv vtxiv. a.ull in ^u.

XtXdXnKa ^'^ viiiv. i.i,Ti, 1 which I have spoken to you.


O)'

4 usivaTS iv luoL '^r'"'?


'^.vj Abide
lu

mo,
d<}>'

Kadojg rb KXfjua ov.lvvaTai Kapyrbv Aepeiv


As
it

the

brauch

is

not able

fmit
so

* to

War

of

^,.%nri
abide

in

y^u
,

As
it

taVTOV
itself

sdv.fll) tV Efioi ^flsivT]Te." unless in me ye abide.

.))>f.

idv.fil^ unless

^fxdl'y" iv
abide
in

ry
the

d/XTriXq},
vine,

CVTUjg Ovdi
t

VueTg
ye

the branch cannot bear


fruit of itself except

5 tyw
I
tflOl,
7

>/)<^
Hflt
rj

neither [can]

dnireXbg, i/iEtf
Vine,

oilTOg ^epei branches: he that a^'deth in me, and I in branches. He that abides in me, and 1 in him, he be.irs him, the same bringeth ~ " / \ ' ^' n KOpirOV TTOXVV OTl X*^P'? iflOV OV CVVaaUe irOltlV OVpSV. forth much fruit: for "friiii 'much for apart from me ye are able to do nothing, without me ye can do man / 6 \ ~ '/3\ '/I ir "f 6 fUV-flT} Tig SfiHVy" SV e/XOl, ipXr)UT] tt,U) Wg to KXlJfXa, KUI nothing. inIf a he is me, abide not Unless anyone abide in me, he is cast out as the branch, and cast forth as a branch, and is withered; and yy n b'^ll ii,T]pavUr], Kai avvayovaiv "avTa" Kai ig ' rrvp paXXovmv, Kai men gather them, and and they gather them and into a fire Is dried up, cast, and cast them into the fire, r and- they are burfied. i7>' . I KaitTai. 7 tav llUVqTt tV eflOl, Kai Ta.pr)fiaTa.flOV tv V/XIV 7Ify^abideinriie,ftnd it is burned. If ye abide me, and in my word^ in ^ you my words abide in you.
KXiffiaTa.
.

,, SV .1/ flwaJV
^ ;

am

KayU) tV
>

the )(i

aVTtfi,

,1,
ye
t ^

TU more can

the vine no ye, except ye


;

farel the

'^^^'^'^ }^ *the vine, ye

^ ^ ^P^ ai-e the

T.

>

'

'

11

'

'

'

'

'

'

>','

>i~/D'\\ <it^

>

'

~-

* (read the Father) [L]TTrA: ouTTrAW. ovKtri glt. vixlv tov'tou {read cf the world) GLTTrAW. ivTo\rjv eSuiceV gave (me) comeliTov

jnov

vf.

>

[fcal] l.-'

jU.c'1/Tj

naandment
avrb
it X.

LTr.

^ KapTrov irKeiova I/TTtA. (fiie)

T.

' (bieiTjTe

UTTrA.

/Liei^j

LT^-

+'t6 the

XTrAW.

232

Q ANN H

S.

XV.

ye shall ask what ye fj(ivy, o.^'tcij/" >0Xjjrt ^alrrjaeaOe,^^ Kai yevrjcrtrai vfiXv. will, and it shall be an 1 it shall come to pass to you. whatever ye will ye shall ask, doneuntoTou. 8 Here- abide, in is bjy Father glori- Stv TOVTt}) iSo^aaOi} o.Trarr/jO.juov, iva KapTvov ttoXvv (pfpr]T(, Hed, that ye bear much 'much ye slioald bear, that ^fruit In this is glorified, my Father, shall ye be my
fruit; so
disciples. 9 As the Father hath loved me, so have I loved you: contimie ye in my love. iu If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love;'evn, as I have kept my Fa-

icai

and

"^yfT'//<TCT0f" jjttoi ju0/;rai. ye shall bvcome to ""me 'disciples.

KaOtjjg

rfydrnjatv
loved

/ue

TTarrjp,
Father,

Kayu) "rjyainjaa
I also

vfj-ag''^

me the ixsivare Iv Ty ciyairy ry if.ty.


As
abide
in ^love
'my.'

loved

you:

10 tdv Tag.tvToKdg.fiov
If

ther'?
11

commandments,
in his love.

my commandments

jufj'6(r tv Ty.aya.7ry.fibv' TrjprjarjTe, my love, ye keep, ye shall abide in

and abide

These things have I spoken unto you, that

KaOioQ ''iyw" Prdg ivroXag rov.7ra7-p6e"-''/iov" Tiri]pr}Ka, Kai ^ of my Father have kept, as I the commandments and
pfvoj avTov Iv ry ciyciTry.
'his
77

my

joy inight remain


tfiat

11 ravra
Kai
and

\t\d\i]Ka
I

vfilv, 'iva

in you, and joy might 12 This is

your abide
full.

'in

love.

These things

have spoken to you, that

he

my

com-

/y

Xpd
^joy

^ju^

tv Vjuiv
in
rj

"jxiivy,"

ij.xapd.vfiwv
your joy

TrK^pOiBy.

mandment, That ye love one another, as I have loved you. 13 Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay dowij his
his friends. life foV 14 Ye are tey friends,
if

'my
is

you

may

abide,

may

be

full.

12 avfri iarlv
This
,as
t'xet, 'iva has, that

t) Ifirj, 'iva ayairciTi aXKifKovg, LvToXrj 'commandment- 'my, that one another, yc love

KaOdjg r'lynTrrjaa vfxdg.


I ioved

13 fx^lKova ravrijg dydTrrjv


"'

you.

Greater

than this

love

oi'veig no ouo

ye

do whatsoever
yo\i.

^rig'^

Triv.\pvxvv.dvrov
his life
_

By
should
l.iy

I
15

command
Hepceforth I

one

down

vTr'sp tCjv ipiXtjjv for 'friends

uov iort tdv Troifjre avTov. ^14 vixtXg ^'offa^^ iyw you bot servants for are 'his. Ye 'friends my^ if ye practise whatsoever I J the servant knoweth not what his lord do- iVTsWofxai vfiiv. 15 ovkbti ^vficig Xfyw" SovXovg, 'on 6 SoU', eth: but I have called No longer you command you. I call bondmenj for the bondyou friends for all thinps that I have Xog ovk.oUev tl " ttouZ avrov 6 Kvpiog' v/xagSk e/'ptjxra my Father I man knows not what 'is 'doing 'his heard of 'master. But you I hiive called
0tXoi
;
'

call

have madeknownunto 16 Ye have not (piXovg, ort chosen me, but I have friends, for chosen you, and ordaiiied you, that ye piaa vjxTv, should go and bring known to. you.
you.
forth fruit, and that

Trdvra
all

&

i]KOva'a

napd
of

TOV.Trarpog.fiov
'

iyvw1

things which I heard


fiB
'"me'

my

Father
> I

made

16 ovx vuejg
^Not
'ye

i^eXk^aafjs, dX\' 'i-hose, but

tyw t^Xf^a/;y
chose

your fruit should re- i'l^dg, Kai WrjKa vfid^ 'iva vfxelg VTrdytjre Kai Kapirbv ^smain: that whatsoever should go and you that, ye fruit you, and appointed ye should ye shall ask of the Fa'iva 'o.Ti-civ alrtjaijTE rvv fitvy ther in my name, he p/re, Kai o.KapTrbg.vfxuJv may give it you. bear, and your fruit should abide that w;hateoever ye may ask the 17 These things I comdtp vfiiv. 17 TavTa IvtiXmand you, that ye love TTUTipa iv Ttp.6v6fiari.fiov my name he may give you. one another. 18 If the Father in These things T comworld hate you, ye know tjiat it hated me Xoftai VfMVf (Va dyaTraTe dXXijXovg. 18 Et 6 Kotjfiog vfxdg you, that ye love one another. If the world you. before )'( hated you. mand 19 If ye were of the 19 et bk fiEfxi(jr]KEv. world, the world would fxiaei, yivbXTKiTS 'oti efik TrpwTOv ^dfiHv that me before you it has hated. ye know .If of love his own: but be- hates,
;

cause ye are not of the row Koafxov i]iB, 6 Koafxog av.TO.'idiov.ltpiXsf 'oTi.Sk iK t,ov world, but I have chowould love its own world ye were, the world but because of the sen you out of the the world, therefore the Koafiov ovK.iaTS, dXX' tytl) l^sXs^dfitfv vfidg Ik tov KOfffiov, world haterth you. world ye are not, but I chose you oiit of the world, 20 Remember the word that I said unto you, Std TOVTO fiitJH Vfidg 6 Koafioc. 20 fivr]fiorv(Te rov The serv-tnt is not ^hates 'you 'the 'world. Kemember the greater than his lord. on account of this If they have persecut- Xoyou o5 tytjj elirov vfiiv, OvK.'iaTiv dovXog fiti^u)V rov ed me, they will also word which I said to you, ''Is *not 'a 'bondman greater persecute you; if they
" ;

Rvpiov.avTOV.
than his master.

si
If

kfxs

tSiw^av,

Kai vfidg

Siw^ovaiv
will persecute
j

ei
if

me

they persecuted, also

you they

^ Slv'l.

'

alTTq<Tti(rBe

ask ye LTTrAW.
also T.

"

yhnri<T9e

ye should become LTrk.


fnov T) tos fVTO\as TA. tis T. 'a what lttta
1

riyaini<Ta LTrA.

Kaytii I

(yead the Father) lta. " itpLac LTTrA. VfJiSlV

'^ may be
t.

P rovirai'phs LTTrA.

uov fiOV
-

v^tii?

XV, XVI.
rov.\6yov-Hov
lTljOi)(ynv,

JOHN.
Kai rbv vuet^oov
yours
rijpr'iuovffiv. they will keep.

233
21 aXXo ^^^^
But

my word tl.cyk.pt, also ravra Travra iroiiinovaiv


'thesc 'things
'all
,.

they will do

*yyuTi'" ^la Tb.ovojia.fiov. to you on account of my uaipe,


I

^^f^
"^i

"y

saying,

ButTl/thcsl
thr-y

things
sake,

win

do unthey that
'

OTi

ovK.oidaaii'

rov
who
/
,

<

^
II

7rtfX\pavra
scut
>

/(.

22

->

>

-s

/I

ei If I

ixri'.i]\Qov

Kai know
^'^^

bccaUKi! 7iot Uiiu

%/> tAaArjaa
spoken
>

tccanse they

know
..

not hiiu
-

mo.
,.

had not conic and ^^^


^^
no-\v"
' r

''"-

avrotc;,
to them,
,

aiiapriav
sin

ovkJeIxoV
th.jy
,

~
;

come

^ '*sp<)keii and
tiioy

*''''^-

vvv.oe
but
<

Trpofaffiv unto them,


.

bad

had not had


>

ovK.fj(ovaiv
they have not

TTfpt
for

Tiig.afjapriaQ.avTwv.
fjian,

r>r>

23

o
.

ti.i

fxiaioy,

^t jji,ad siAi )3irt now a pretest ''x^y '^'^''2 "o 41t.>k for ~ icai tholrfiin. 23 Hf that

Tov.7raTcpa.i.iov

^wy
>

'^Father

avTOLQ
*thcm

a
which

r.

ovCEiC-ciWog
no other
one,

>~

<

"hnto^!. .'\\

their sin. He that '^mo 'hates, 'also luitclji me hateth my FatbyraUo. 24If Uiad ' ' >\ ' y . / c^, , z-i ei ra tpya fii].tTroir}(ya tv not done -mong them If 'the "works "I -had 'not *done ^among |he .works which uono
7
/
11

^TreTToir^KEv," has done,

ajiapriav
sin

>

ovK.eixov.y

II

other
;

man

did,

thry

they had not had


t/tt

had not hiad sin; hut now. havo they both

vvv.dk Kai HopaKaffLV Kai


but now both fhiy have
Si.en

/.lei-iKTijKaaiv

Kai
both

and

havo hated

mC and

Kai rbvTrar'tpa, ^aud- my'^'^Fathfer. "Father 23 Bnt this' come h to


I

uov 25
.my.

X\' 'iva
But

TrXijpojOy 6 that might be fulfilled tho


'

\6yog b

^yEypafxi.ikvog tv ^ghtB^/fulfiuVthat word that has been written in is written in their law

Ti^.vofKp.avTW^^ "Oti ti.dar]adv


their law.

fxe

They hated

me

tujptciv. without cause.

26 "Orav^W' out*\^"aul.'"VBui
the
F.ather,

iKBy
13

b TrapaK\T)TOQ,
Ptiraclcte,
ti'iq

come the
TTveiifxa
Spirit

bv fyw whom I
b

7rf/i;^w i/ar rrapd. will send to you from


the

But when when the Comforter is rov irarpbg, ^'into^'yo'^ f >om"h9


Father
ci-cn the Spirit

rb
tho

aXriOfixtg,
of truth,

who from^

Trapd 'rov Trarpbg iKTropEVErai, ^lJ^"^i which


Father^

pro-

goes forth,

tKsh'Oc
bo

Trent uaoTVoiian iuov' wTuUVitnessconcennng L;^

27 Kui vuEic Se uap-

_3,^o
tare.
ye are.

=yo

therfhe shaTtestify of "^;, ?? "nd ye also

^e^ar ^S^^,'^-; tairbS'n


with pie from the beginning.

TVpilTe,
Vitnesa,

on

CL-k'

^dpXVQ

JHEt' ifXOV

because froci,[thd] beginning with

me

16 Tavra
the synagogues

XeXc'iXriKa vfxTv 'iva fit].'ffKavda\ta9r}Te. These things I have spol!;ea to you that ye may not be offended;
Vf-uig'

2 cnroOut
of

have

.spoken'^

'muo

you, that yeshould not

iTvvaywyovQ Ttontaovaiv
'they will put

dW tp^'^Tai
hut
is

you;

'iva ttclq conuug an hour that everyone

iopa

phau piu^you out of


the synagiigufs
-.

yea,

6
who

d-KOKTEivag
kills

i-fidg

"

bo^y

Xarpeiav
servioo

you

will think

irpoaip'tpEiv to render
they

r(p Oetf.
to

God

*Xsoe\^r'ki'ue'ti, you will think that he do-

Kai

7roi))(Tovaiv and these things they will do


'

ravra

''t'juTv''

on ovK.tyvwaav rbv
know not
.

rra- these''tWngs'wiii'th?y
Fa- do unto you, because
'ora-v

to

you because
u I have
T

the

ripa ovSk
.11-^

ther
,

nor

tuk. '^ me.


11

4 dXXd
-D

ravra- XtXdXriKa viuv,


11,

But these things


I

.!-

s.iu.

to you,

'iva 1, that
..

thoy h.ave

no't

known
nie.

when
.

^"'^ rather, nor 4 But these thing.s

have.

wpa^' r ir uvnuoVEvnre ^avrHv" _ the hoar ye may remember them may have come ./ v' vpiv' ravra.St ti, dp\Tig vfxiv

tX9n

'brt

iyd I
1

e'lnoi
said

X told you, that

when

thiu

[them]

may remember

the time shall come, ye that 'I.

ovk-sIttov,
I

'on

toidyouof them. And

to you.

But these
you

thiUtrs to

you from [the] beginning


I

did not >ay,

fisO' iipiiiv i'lfup'.

5 vvv-Si vndyu)
But ho'w
asks
,

with

Kai OVVftg end none

,,%,,,.,,fpiorq,
tt,

I wa.s.

go

rrp'tg to
.

rov
him who
,

rrs/xipavrd ue,
sent

because I^toyoi^ft thrieg'in""^&. 'eoause i was


rac,
tr

Vp,ii)V

of

you
,:^

Vltayeig ; pS, TToi me, Where goest thou ?

6 dXX
,

'on
,

'^"-hy- 5 But now I go my w.ay to hiMi that sent.mei and none of


y,''"

But because

ravra
these things

XeXaXr]Ka
I

v[Xiv
to

rf

Xvttj]
grief

rmrXijpwKEV
has
\
'

vpiLv
your
"

Tt)v because
sorrow
heart.
1

have said
.,,..,

KUpCiaV.
heart.
<

^.

_
/
, >
.

a\\ tyw
But
\

.1
I

you
,

filled

asketh me, ^'\_hither goest thou ? 6 But I have biid these things upto you,
h.Tih filled
7

rrjv
the

ahriUeiaV Afyoi W^lir,


truth
'

t<

your

avpcpspei
is

Nevertheless

vpiv iva tyw


lOr you that
>

i>

'

I
'\
'

yo" 'he truth; It isexpcilient for you ' '\ n '1 '\ \ r arrtKUu) tav.yap'^ pr^.a-jntWiO o TrapuKXt]- that i go away: for should go away -for if 1 550 not away the Paraclete if I g'^ not away, tbe
say
>
'

to you. It
/-I t

profitable

te'l

>

h Tog "ovK.tAevaerai"
11

will not
ei?

come

rrpog vfiagto you


;

>

?'

iav.ofbut if

TropevUu},
I go,

A~

Trtfiyio^
I will send

'I

Comforter

will

not

come unto you; but if I depart, I wiU ^end

V/iO? to

you

LTTrA.'

T<{) VOfJLiO

avTbiV

yey/SfejmjU.e'i'OS

aeir hour) LTrA

[aiiTiif] Tt.

b ^^ 7rotT}(7l' d,ld LTTrA. ^ i;^0(Tai' LTTrA tlxo<Tav LTTtA. "^ LTTrA. = -^ 5c T[TrA]. v^llv GLTTiAW. + avrHiV (read g + eyiii lIaJw. > ov /iij eA&j} in no wise should 'come iv.

231
unto when hb
liiiu

I
yoii.

Q A N

NH

2.

XVL

8 And. iK(7vog i'Kty^H rbv Koa/xov irpbg vfiag- 8 /cat tXOujv is coiue, he will convict the him to you. And having come he world will reprove the world rijrhtcof sin, and of Kpiaeiog. irepl Trspf -mpi SiKaioavvrjg Kai dfiapriag Kai 0<ness, aBil of judgconcerning sin and concerning righteousness and concerning judgment. nieut.: 9 of sin,beeau.-e th(;>' bplievc not on me; TTipi ov-TriaTtvovaiv tig t/ti" Trspi cifiapTiag jJLtv, 10 of righteousness, beConcerning sin, because they believe not 'on mo concerning' cause I go to my Father, ana ye see me no ^iKaioavvriQ Ss, ort Trpbg Tov.Trari-pa^pov'^ VTrayto, Knl ^ovk more; 11 of judgment, righteousness Father I go away, and because to ao bncHUse the prince of Kpiatwq, b apxojv tov tVt" QewpsiTB fie' 11 ireplSi this world is jndged. rj t have yet many longer ye behold ruler me and concerning judgment, because the things to say \iDtoyoi,' TToXXa ^"Ktyttir KeKpiTOi. 12 " but ye cannot bear KOGfiov-TOVTOV

avrbv
.

on

10

my

on

En

f^w

them now. la^Howbeit when he, the Spirit of


truth,
is

of this world
vfiiv,'^ to you,

has beep judged.

Yet many things


,

have

to say

come, he will

aXX
the

ov.SvvaaOe /Jaara^fiv

dprt.'

13 orav.St

guide yon into all truth: for he shall not Sfiak of himself; but whatsoever he shall shall he hear, that speak and he w ill shew you things to come,
:

but ye are not able to bear them now.

't\9y But when "may ^have ''come

iKeh'og, TO Trvtvfia
'he.

Tyg dXijOeiag,
'

bcrjyTjaH
he will guide

v/udg
you

"'ei'g

irdaav
all

Spirit

of truth,

int6

rrjv a\r)6eiav''
the

ov yap
*not

truth

XaXrjirfi dp' tavrov, for '^he 'will speak from himself,

dW

oara."av"
Vfxiv.

but whatsoever

14 He shall glorify me; for he shall receive of mine, and shall shew it UQto yon. 15 All things that the F.ather hat^ are mine;' therefore said I, that he shall take of mine, and shall shiw it untoyou. IB A little while, and

"aK0i;(T^" XaXiitJH, he may he.ar he Will speak

Kai
;

to

Ig^op^iva
coming

dvayyiXii

and the things

he will announce to you.

14 iKtivog fc/if io^duti, He me will glorify, yfXi vfiiv. 15 TrdvTa


nouncft to you.

on
for

Ik tov tpoj ^XrixpSTai," Kai dvayof mine he will receive, and will anocra

ti^

TraTtjp

ifid
^niine

Ictlv'
"are;

All things whatsoever

^has 'the "Father

y4 shall

not see me:


a
little

^id
becauseof

tovto
this

(Ittov,
I said,

and
while,
tile,

again,

IK Toi) tfiov ''Xr^i/zfrai," Kai dvaythat of mine he will receive, and will anOTi
'^ov^'.QtwpiiTB jxe, Kai irdXiv ye do not behold me and again
;

and ye shall see yfXEi because 1 go to the nounce Father. 17 Then said
his

I'lMV. to you.

Kai 16 MiKpbv A little [while] and

fmne of

disciples

saith unto us, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a ye little while, and shall see rae: and. Be-

among What is

fiiKpbv
a
little

themselves, this that he

[while]

Kai 6rp(.cr9s p.i, ^oTi and ye shall see me, because

iyw
I

'virdyu)

Ti'pbg
to

tov ttothe

go away

Fa-

TtpaJ'
ther.

17

ElTTOv
Said

ovv
T^)VT0
this

tK
o

Twv.jiaOrjTutv.avTOV
his disciples

npbg
to

therefore [some] of

oXX//Xdi'^,
one another,

Tt
'VThat
fie,

iffTiv
is

Xtyu

rifuv,
us,

which he says to fxiKpbv

MtKpbv Kai A little [while] and


Kai and

cause ther?

go to the Fa18

They

said
this

ov-OeiopsiTe
ye do not behold

Kai
and

naXiv
again
-rrpbg to

therefore,

What

is

that he saith,

while? we

little cannot tell

me

bxliiuOi pe ; a little [while] and ye shall see me?

Kai

"On
^TpiTO
^Thls

what he saith. 19 Now Because Jesus knew that they


were desirous to ask him, and said unto them. Do ye inquire

'tyw" VTvdyio I go away


ri

tov iraTtpa;
the

18 'EXfyov
They
[while]?

ofv,

Father

said therefore,

ioTtv"
"is

'what

o Xiyti, '"Tb" wh'ch be says, the


^ovv^'
'therefore

fxiKpov;
little

ovK.o'icapev
'We do not

know

among
that
I

yourselves of
s'aid,

Ti

XaXfl.
speaks.

19 *Eyvw
?Knew
flTTfi' said

^6" 'Ir/ffovg
'Jesus

little

what he
'to "ask,

i'fOeXov avTbv that they desired 'him ^jjrfTrf do ye inquire


fiCT

on

while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a ye little while, and f h.i see me? 20 Verily,
1

ipwT^v,

Kai
and

avTolg,

Uepi

tovtov
this

to th^m, Conceraing

amoup
;

dXXi]\ujv, OTi elTTov, MtKpbv Kai ov.OeiopelTf. fie, /cai venly, I s.ay unto you. A little [while] and ye do not behold me and That ye shall weep and one another, that I said, lanieut, but the world irdXiv fiiKpbv Kai uxl/eaOk fie; 20 dfi))v dfniivXtyw vfuvy shall rojoice: and ye a little [while] and ye shall see me ? Verily verily I say to you, agftin
1

KXavaeTe Kai 9pi]i'rjoeTe vfieig, b.Si Kt'xrpog ,xapi]aeTai' that "will 'weep 'and ^will ^lament but the worjd will rejoice; 'ye,

on

'

/u.6v

(.read

the Father) TTr[A].


;

''

ouKeVt Glt.

aKrjBiiav iraaav LTrA

hear
'

Ti

0UK6TI
;

; ixovei he no longer (do ye behold) lta

ev rrj a.\r)6eia ndtrrj T. p Ajj/ai/zeTai LTTrA. hear.s t.

dv LTTrA.

<i

'

vixlv Aeyeiv TTrA.

" eU

ri^v

aKOvffei

he shall

TT- A

VTrayw Ttpb? " eani' touto LXr.

on

toi/

KafxPavei. receives glttta'W. " ovk en Tr. on eyio virdyu) irp'o^ rov irarepa ; ' Trarepa g[l]'W. ' Ti eyiii (read iiirdyoi I go away) LlTrAW. to {read a little [whileji TrA. y o TXrA. ovv GTTi aw.

'

XVI.
but ye
will be grieved,
}

JOHN.
but

235
to

your grief

joy

shall be-

eerm. 21
come.

yvvr,

orav
when

r^Kry,
she gi ves birth,

X,VWxf.,
grief
has,

The woman

when t?X0.x. or. because is come igecause -her hour

i^j-ned into joy. 21 A sho^is^in

-mau

is

7l.i;>pa.avTrigher hour;

OTan.Se but when

yivviiay
she' brings forth

to
the

ttuiSIov,
child,
^^

^ovk
no

'in" ^^^ti longer

lYiveredTthe

^j^j^gj^gj.g^^^^^jgj.^^jj

Tr)v X^pa^^ joy she remembers the tribulation, on account of the

uvrfunvEVH

rfjg QXixpeujg',

ha

on
t-jat

tyEvinjOr] no more the anguish, has been born

^rnmto the world!

dvOllloTTOC ilc
at

TUV KOailOV.
world.
'

22

Kai VUSlg
-And
^

oiv

'Xi'-TTT/V

man

inro the

ye

therefor-^

grief

22 And ye now thereidej.d .fore have^sor^ro^^^^^

UtV

VVV' now
il

'"tVEre""

TraXlV.Bi
but again

cnboiiai
I will see
,
,

VUag,
you,
^
,

Kai-)(^aQri<JtTai

have;

and

1,

^shall -rejoice . ^ ,
.

Kapdia, Kai Yyv.xapav.v^wv ovciig ^aipti


'

a^ vfiwv. 26
you.
'
-

f,t,

il/XWV and your heart shall rejoice, and your joy 'your no man taketh from
<

''heart,
,
,

and
,

your joy
,
,
,

no one

tatces
>

from
r

kch you. 23 And in that Aud day ye shall ask me no'

hV tKElVy Ty
in.
.
,

IllitpC/-

that
,

day
.^

tflE of me

pVK

II

tp(0T1](JTe OVCSV. ye shall 5.sk nothing.


'

'

'

thing.

Verily, verily,

ff.

\ty(o
1
,

VjUiv,
to you.
,

^on
^

1,

^oaa.av"
whatsoever
t

f'

atr-qcrrjTe

rov
the
,

say
,

That
,

ye
'

V^IV. CaXTU OVOHUTl-llOV you. my name he wilj give


1

" asked nothing in my aA " 24 tuig.apn QVK yrrjaarf. OlfCtV name: ask, and ye shall
>

may

ask

Aj-iyV a/JUjV I say unto you, WhatVerily verUy soever ye shall ask the ~ Father in my name, 'tv n^ he will give n you. rranpa h in Father 24 Hitherto have ye
'

If

Hitherto
'

,yo asked
u

>

tv n{i.ui'ofian.fiOV
in

my name

iva y/.xapa.v/uwv t^iugs have I spoken airiiTt, Kai ^Ar]\pe(jUe, your JQy ask, and ye shall receive, that unto you in proverbs:
^"hen'i"sha?i'no more speak unto you in pr<.y",''p\a\"^y of ''tiifp"
^^jjgi-.

>

i\

'

"

'

''-.

nothing rpce've,

may

be

tliat full.

your joy 25 These

y 7r7rX,pw/ilj/Jj. 25 ravrcfi iv Trapoifxiaig XsXaXjyra vfuv allegories 1 have spoken to you,; maybe full.' These things in ^a\X' ipxeruL wpa ore 'ovk tn" tv napdiixiaig XaXZ/erw

'

is

coming an hour when

"no

longer

in

allegories

I will

speak

2B

At that day ye

v/iiv, to you,

aWd
but
that

rov irarpbg "'ctvh.yyeXw'-v^tv. Trept Tvappr]ai(f. plainly concerning the Father I wiU announce to you.
t'ifxspg, >}//p^

^^^^^

j^'^'"

tv iniivy 26 iv itcEivy ry
In
^^

iv n^.ovofiari'.fiov. aiTrioscrOe' tv rt^.ovofiari'.ixov. airriosaOi'


in in^

'day

my name
the

ye sball ask
Trepl
for
ifxe

; ;

Kai and

ov oh
^not^

^^t"^i'<; ^ that I vv^ill pray yc^^ the t^e Father for yon:

Xlyw vulv on

tyoj ipuJTriaoJ
will beseech

tov Trarkaa
Father

vuwv' 27
.

^^^^'; J^^^^^^^^j^ u\ ai/- ye have loved me, and


^"""^
_

^^

'l4aytoyou that I Tog yap 6 TraTi)p


8eli

you,
^

*Wm-

came
come

fTL God.I out from rH


into the world:

'for -the ''Father


'

<piKi vfidg, 'on loves you, because


1 <

vfjmg
ye
T

me
>v >

TTf^tX^jcar?, /cat 28 i came forth from have loved, and the. Father, and am
/I

TreKiarBVKarE

"

on
that
<

"Trapa
from
^
.

have.believed ,11
tlie
f

iyoj irapa "rov Wf ow .1 from God


V

/-I

rov rrarpog
Father
y

/cat

k\7)nv(fa eig rov and have come into the


/
V ,

->

'^.

/I

>

it,i]Xvov again, I leave the came out world, and go to the Father. 29 His disei' '^ /coctjuov TraKiv a(pir)fii pies said unto him. Lo, now speakest thou again world I leave

t^riXOov. came out.


;

28

en

,5-

/I

TOV Koo^ov Kai TTopsvofiai npog tov nartpa.


the

c>(->

29 Asyovaiv
^Say

>

'

plainly,

and speakest no proverb. 30 Now


are

~ ,</ AaAug, ,~ii. /i,,_*j5, wv ^Tcappr]aiq. >~ ''avr({)" QL-naifqrai.avTOv, Joe,


.

world

and

'

go

to

the

Father.

we

*to ^him
'

'his ^disciples,
'

-Lo,
^
'

now

irapoifiiav
''allegory

ovcsfuav Ksyeig.
'no
speakest.

i-

'

on ov

wv

Kow
_

needest not that plainly thou speakesf, and any man should ask ., thee: by this we be./J 7 oloag oioafisv oti neve that thou earnest we know that thouk;iowest forth-fromGod. 3I Je

Kai and

knowest

sure that thou things, all

nayra, Kai ov
8.11

things,

and ^not

ng^ at. ipwTq,. X9^'^"^^ ix^ig 'iva ^need 'hast that anyone thee should ask.

"' roi/r.^

^'^'^ow bliTeteT32'B^c-

By

this

'hold, the

hour cometh,

i^i)XBtg. TTiaTtVOIXtV 'on cn^b Gtoy we believe that from -God thou earnest forth.
""o"

'lr]ffov'g,'ApTL TriarsvtTt
'

32
?

Jesus,

Now

*do ^ye ''believe

i6ov, ipxtrai Iio, is coming an hour and


each
I"

31 'ATrtKpiOn avTolg ^f^hlTbe Tattered' ^Answered ^tltem every man to his owu| wpa Kai ^vvv'\ -^'^ ^^^^ ^^ave meanow
ifxi^

tXr]XvQtv,
has come,
t

'iva oKOpTntsBfiTt that ye will be scattered

'tKaafog tig Ta.iSia,


to
bis

'/cat

own,

and

me
<> >

Se
L.

but LTTrA.
=

have iv TW

a TrA. ^ aoet shall take LTrA. f ^'

aWa

ovop^CLTi li,OV TTrA.

ni ajrayyeAd) LTTrAW. > <i iv LTTrA. fLJTTrA.

GLT. vvy /xeV Xvinqv LTTrA. e av rt if anj'thiug LTXrA. ' [LjrrrA. * LTTrA. oAA U[LjTTrAW. " ex LTTrA. rov l'; tov TraTpb; the Fatlter TiA. ' ' ' rui' LTTrA. ' <cap,e TTrA. b TirA.
oii/cT^
.

<=

eftre shall
Suicret vjttti/

brf.

\rifX.\{ieorffi

'

OVKert, GLT. P avT(i>

236
ione:

Q A N N H
^
;

S.
fiOVOC,

XVI,
VTl
6

XVn.

/JiT with and [yet] I, am not aloue,' mc' "^"""^ ye will kavc thur^'^'^'wfth 63 These things r hare Ifiov icTlV33 rai)ra Xi\a.\t]Ka V[xiv "ivaiv t/Xoi ilpTjVlJV spoken unto you, that peace mo j These things 1 have spi/keu to you that in in rae J e might have ^, , , '.xv. n peace. In the world ye frtpffir, tV T'}} KOafJl({ t/AHf/a' ^tX^Tfl UAKu tX^T^Bhall have tribulation: ve may have. In the world but be of good ccurage, lri\)ulation ye have ' ' but be of good cheer; , , , 1 have OTercome ihe tyw VEVlKlJKa TOP KOrrfiov. world. have overcome the world. I
CKprjrS"

and yet I am not noi'OV

KaL

OVK.tlfH

TTari^p for the Father

__

^^.|

.i

",

17 1'avTa
These word.'; .XVII spake Jesus, and lifted
These things

iXciXijaev *o" 'Irjcrovc, Kul '^l-Tjptv^' rovQ 6<li0u\' Jcu.s, -eyes and liCtvd up spoke

up his

eyes to heaven,

note " ^ dvrov


,,
.

elc ^
^

Tov ovnavbv ^KaV'


.

opd said, Father, the hour is come; piorify jjp^^.

t"s

to

the

heaven

'

and

{Ittsv, llorfp, -j i..v lather, said,

tklikvOiv t) si < wv hasVomc'th9

^o^acov
2
O
^^"ff KuOlltg
*s

Sfo may

glorify thoc^ 2 as thou hast given

^''"^;

fli^-^h^rhr!hould
give 'eternal

(jV \ ^^^''

(Tov Tuvv'lov, 'iva 'Kfti" .Son, tl:at also ^^^ (doJKac aVT({) i^OVffiav

o,i'for.*crov''

^ot,nay

thy Son
7r(7/;(,'

may

glorify

CnOK('iC,
fle-.-^h,

na
that [of]

thougavust

kirn

authority
^ClOff^'^

over all

many
is

as

to as tjniu- ha-t
life

ttUV
j^

CsSdJKaq
^j^^^ , ,
jj^^^^ ;.yg^.

UVTifi,
j^i^ .<

given him. i And this cRTUal, that life they might know thee the oniv true God, and Jesus Chri-t, whom thou hast sent. 41 have
glorified tli.. ou the earth: X have finished the work which thou
ft

,;yj^(,j,

3
,

aVTTf.Ck

tOTlV
j^

TJ

aiWt'lOQ C^t],- iVa


eternal
.
.

^Wt'lV CtUoTtOV. lifo'v oiemal. he should give t6 them ' ' '
'

aUTOlQ

'

'yiVWOKOJail'"
\ r

ii

at

TOV
'

^^^

^jjj^

^^e
/i

life,
>

that

they should

know
-

theo the

>

fxovov ciAi]mvov Vov,

Kill

ov
~

aTnoTfiKaQ
^didst
^ >,

lijaovi' xpi<yTov,
'Jesus
\
'

A' TO ipyOV "iTtAilUXja O work which I computed And ^ y Eavest me to do. CiCtiJKaQ O KaiVVV COtUtTOV fi GV, TTUnow, O Father, glorify fX0{. IVa TTOiryCTW glorify and now me thou, Fathou me v.iih thine thou hast given me that I should do ~ ~ ~ r ; own self with the glory y Ty C-Ogy ^ (XOV TTpU TOU TVV KOffj-lOV which I had with thee TEp, TTUpa CTEaVTtft,

.,, tyU)
l ^, ^

only

true
.,/.

God,

(TE
/

thee

iOOt.acra ITTl glorified on


/

,,~
i

and ^whom *thou


Tljg yt]q th6 earth;

Send

"Christ,

.|<>

the
,

'

r^

>

<

before the world was.

ther,

with

thysell, with the glory

which

had before the

world

thl.'name^unto'^^the Bivat men which thou ga vest was

Tupa
with

Coi.
thee.

'E(pavkpUJCyd rrov TO OVOf-ia TOhj avOpiOTTOlQ name to the men 'I manifested -thy
fiOl

tWnrthey wtr^^alfd
thuii pavest tbeui me';

^'^Q

^ttCWK-ng"
thou hast givon
*^f f

tK

TOV

whom
them

me

out of the

KOfTj-lOV Gol i 1]aaV, ^Kul world. Thine they were, and

tyio'l}^

tome

th'word^'y^XowU^er have known that all


whatsoever things thou hast given me
-

^'"''"''C

^WXftf"

Kal

TOV.XoyOV.OOV
thy word

thou hast given, and


,

^TtTr]pr]KaaiV.'' they have kept.

vvv Kow

OffU tyv(jJKaV OTl TTUVTU ^CS^WKac" UOl, TTaod SOV: ' ., ^ ..u ^ n .ii_v * .<. \ ^c ^\. of thee For I "'"^ have known that all things whatsoever thou hast given me, have given unto them ilffrit^^ % OTl Til pq^ttTCt d ^CtCUiKCig'^ flOl dtSwKa aVTOig' word^ whijch thou hast given me I have givei* them, *''* ^^ ^^^ gavest"rae^ and they have received tlitm, ^^l aVTol tXaftoV, '/Cfli f yVOICaj/" a\7]9wg OTl TTdpCL (tOV and hare known sure^-^ received [them], and knew truly that from thee ]y that I came out ^ , from thee, and tbey t^rjXOov, KOi tTriOTtVaaV OTl OV fiE aTTfffTElXaC. 9 tyuj TTipi hare believed that J came out, and they believed that thou me didjit send. I conctrningr thou did-st send me. ^ i\\T It 1 pr.ay f or them I UvfuJV ipoJTUJ' OV tpioTUJ,. TZEpi TOV KOTftOV' pray not for the "world, them make request not concerning the world make I request, but them which' but for . tOV Cil'OJKag EKTIV. .TTEpi lU Knt Tfl thou hast given me; for flOl, OTL 001 they are thine. 10 And concerning whom thou ha.st given me, (and 'tliing.I for thine they are :. all mine are thine, and ,, t./v CECOt,a(Jfiai and t/Xa TTUVTU (TCi tCTlV, KCfl TU.Ga iflW Kai thine are mine lam glorified in thi;m. -my .''all 'thine *are, .and thine [are] mine:) and I have been glorified ^ Jl And now I am no ~ < , ,m n n (/!( iV T(f) KOGIXtf), KUl "oVTOl" IV more in the world, but ^V aVTOlQ. ii Kttl '"OVK ITl them. And and the world, in no lonj^er 1 am in the world, these ia these axe
are of thee
8
'

^
,

'

>

..

aWa
,

,.

,i>
ii

>/

>

<

>

>

>

>

>

koI lttta. having lifted up LTTrA. y " 6ao-ei he shall give a. .eyii/Mi* eS(OKa.^ thou having completed LTTrA. ^ TeAeiwcras cTKOvcnv they know ttt. ' Kafi-ol Tr. e TeTrjprji^av LTTrA. iScoKas thou gavest L. givest.LTTr. " OVKe'ri LTW. ^ [koX iyvuffav] h. i^icrii/ TTrA. s5u>(cds thoU gavest LTTrA. " auTol they T.

Kal x-TTrAW.

V t^ere

ye will have Et.

"

t.

'

eirapa?

(TOV (read

the Son) TTr[ a].

''

"^

XVII.
Tip K6(ruiii d(riv,K(u the world -are, and
(TOV
tyu)^^
I

JOHN
jrpog
to
ere

237
^''''-

tpxofiai.
come.
Poi)f,-"

thee

TrciTSp (iyif., Tfjpi]- S?^ ^ ^"^^ ^ ^Father 'Holy, keep ^^ro^gj^^X"^

^^'^

aVTOVQ tV
them
in
'iv,

TqJ.dl-O/JLari.aoV thy name


as

SfdcVKac

[4,01,

ha
that
the
5.<

name
*{Jj

those

whom
are.

whom
When

thou hast given me,

"^^
is

S'^^ '^^

uxTiv
they
'

Ka9wg'i
,

may

bo one,
. \

I'meig. we.
,

l^ors
.

I'lfii^v /iet'

arrwv
them
"

'tv T<p
in
II

one.
J?

we
I

KOam^
world

tyoj
1
jj.01
, '
.

irtjpOVV
was kecpiu?
.

avrovg tV
them
, ,

>

1
>

wns with

While

*'^em

was with

the world, I

in
t.
> .

Tfi^.OVoflCITl.aOV thv name:


V

^OVg''
,

whom

clokoc
<,

J.

'

hiistgivia rao

viog
Bon
/

T>ig aTTOjAeiag,
of perdition,

,.,
; V

i(pr\ai,a, Kai ovcsig tt, 1 guarded, and no one of


t'

T-

avTwv aTroJMro,
them
TT\i)pMmj. might bo fultilled.
>

>

'

C- kept them inthyname: thou those that tlmu gav.est me I have ki j.t; and ei.jut) o none of them is lost;
" , , ;

iva

1-

ij

ypaft}
scripture ^ X ~

perished, y\-

irv~vi
"

except the t>ut the son of perdition that the Kcrip16 vvuxt ture might bo fulfilled.

that the
~

And now

irpog at tpxofiai, Kai ravra KaKw tv t(^ Koa^if) rva e^Wr to the'o I come and these things I speak in the world that they may
ffi;'

'

"

have S'j

Tt]vxa()av rr/v im/v -joy 'my


theru
tfC

ctCaJKa

,,1 >~\'v/ avToig Tov.Aoyov.ffOv,


,

7r7rArjp(.jjUei'/i/
fulfilled

'u'-iii^'" "mro(g." 14 them. ,t/>. avTovg, ,/ Kat o Koafiag tfiKJi^asv


/

tr-

I to thee anfl those thinga i speak in the world, th-at they mi^rht hare I'^y joy fulhll-d in (-yt^.thftmsciTos. Ribave

13

And now come


;

in

have given

thy word,
the

and the

world

hated
OVK.eilxl am not

them,"

given them tlij: word and the wurli hath hated theui.-bcciuiso th'jy-afe not 'of the
;

;OTl

OVK-ilUtV

TOO KOffUOV,
,

jeoause they are not' of

world,

ICaOijjg as

tyuJ
t

tK
of

TOV
the

not onh^worW.^ Tsi pray not that thou

Koafiov.
world.

a{>TOvg k ro5 15 ovK.lpwTw ^'roftteworidlta out of the t),at thou shoiUdest I do not make request that thou ahouldcst take them
,

Vm

apyg

Koa/iiov,
world,

evii^ ^i6 They are not evil. gf (,ijg world even as "Ik tov Kocyuov oi'K J ""^^ not of the world. sanctify them ', 17 .. ^-L J jv ij Of the I of the world "not through thy truth world they are not, as EiMi." ayiaaov aiiToiig tv Ty.dXnQeia.'^croV^' oXoyog 6 aog J^y, '^5!f'' '?; t/i'th. ' 18 As thou hast sent ._ 1.1 ..1, o' i V i_ J thy .1 truth =Hvord 'am. ^Sanctify by them "'^ meintotheworld.eveb ^ ^ dXiiOaici ItJTiv. 18 KoQCttg iuk drrstrrsiXfig fig tov k6<tuov, ^o have I also sent )-''. ^"'"''iworld, truth is. AS me thou didst sJud into the ^'J'^f |'l' '
'

ciW'
but

'iva Trjprjayg that inou shouldest keep


,

avrovg
them

iic

rov Trovnpou.

out of the

10 - TOV Koatiov ovkmuii', KaOihg ayw Ik

re
;

'

'U And
'

for their sakes

fcdyw aTTfcrreiXa avrovg tig tov KocjfioV vmrld Xalso sent them into the
"

"tyw

21 that they all may be eig one as thou, Father, on art in me, and I in / ,^ ' ' thee, that they also / T /> 1 ^T ! o iv sfioi, may be one in us: that tfW 21 ^ya Travreg ev- waiv, KaVojg av, "Trartp" me,' the world may believe Father, [art] in that all one ma\ be, as thou. me; " " that thou hast sent ~ ' h'~ iva o Kofffiog ^g 22 And the glory icai avroi tv tijuv "fv' ujoiv Kayn) tv aoi, in us one maybe, that the worl^ and I in thee, that also they which thou gavest me

might be for them sanctifled through the < ' tjyiaafitvoi tv truth. "20 Neither pay sanctified in I for these alone, but sanctify myself, that alsp they maybe I -, ' ~>^^< ^or them also which ~ ' M aAtjBiK^. 20 Ov TTfpl TOVrojV Of cpwr<0 fXOVOV, akXa ahall believe on me through their word ; but truth. "Not ^for 'these 'and 'make "I "request =ouly,

19 Kat virtp avriov


and
II

I sanctify n-yseif, that

they also

<

ttytrt^w tfiavTov, iva

'/

I'

^Kai avrot w(ni>


1

>

r.\^><

,
',
'

Kai nVo
,

TWV -' 7rpl for tho^e who

'

11

>>

>

^TTlCrr^VaOVTWV"
.shiUl believe
,

jgta

tOV.AOyOV.avrtUV
their

~ \

>

through
>

word
II

'

'

>

>

'

nm

>

>

'

II

'

^TrKTrf/'o-y" on av jue aTrkffTHXag. 22 ^mi syw" rriv BoKav JhatYhe/may bl'^one! glory - g.ygQ a^s we are one: didst sci d. the And I may believe that vhou me 'iv, KuOwg ?^ L!? *i!-Tv uaiv nv ^Sidwkdg" uoi oalojfca avrolg, 'iva uj.iy in me, itiar Luej *^,^v as that they m y be one, which thou hast givenr me have given them, be made perfect in orre; ^^^ that 23 tyd) tv avroTc, Kai av tv tuoi, 'iva may know the world t'lusic 'iv Hcjiiiv'^' " ^ that thou C , lu ' me, that in them, thou in are I and i,

.....
we
one
il(Tn>

.,>.,,.
J,

'

'

"^

..

rtrsXtiixJ^tvoi
be
perfected

they

may
icayuj

^kuV^ 'iva yivitXTKy 6 Koauog into one, and that 'may*know 'the ^world^
Big
'iv,
1

<-

LTTrA.

ij>

which. GLTTiaW.

KOi alsO

Tr.

1'

Tw

KOCT/iCO

LTTrA.

' o>

* which TTi-A. + Kr'i ai.d (read I was keeping them in ihy name wh.ich ihou ha.st given " iai'roi? iTrA. ovk cl/j-i sk rov /c6<tmov i.rrrAW.'. me, and I guarded Iti.emj) [i.JiTrA.

w
'

(701)

(read the tnith) i.tiia;


J
<1

avro'i

LTTrAW.
LTTrA.

ttio-t^oi'tioi'

^ f/w 'j-md ay. I sanctiryj [l]i. TraTTjp fTrA. believe Gi.TTrAW.

.,.
''

y wtriu Kai
ei/

-iTiaTeofl TTt.

Ka-yuj I.TTrA.

6wa5 th(jU guvust

L.

'

[i.Jn. a.

ia-fJiev

(read [nns]) -ITrA,

(cat

23^
hMt gent mei and
'

QANN H

2.
<.

XVII, XVIII,

haet ;; j^y, n oTrsffrEtXac, Koi wydTriJCTac avrovc KaOiltc tut riyd^ r" ii loved them, as tnou ,, . ^. ,., . j ,j 'i i ,_ lovedst them as ^'''*'' ^^"> me thou *" bast loved me. 24 Fa- ***' """^ '"'' thei-, I will that they -jj-^jaag. 24 ''IlarEp," 'oi)g" J^f^ajfcaf" /iot OsXw t'ya ottov iui Father, whom thou ha-t givcu n.o I J...sire that where 'am ^ven *e" e with me lo-^^dst. where 1 am that th< y iy(]j KUKilvOl UiaiV IXET i^OV, 'iVd OiajpuXTlV Tt)v bo'iaV TTIV may behold my glory, ,j that they may behold they also may be with mc, ^Vlory which thou hast given , _ ' ,, / ., i.., ^ me: for thou levedst fu^j/ r}v ''fOaiicac" fioi, OTi TfyaTrijmii; fxs npo KurajSoKriQ me before the founda- \^ which thou gavest me, for thou lovodst me before [the] foundation the world. tion of , ' r. i righteous father, 25 CIKUU, KOI 26 'Ilarfp KOUflOVKOOftOQ CE OVK.iyvWy the world hath, not of [the] world. 'righteous, and the ^'Father world thee knew not, known theS: but I have' , > , \ known thee, and these lyw.CE <T tyViJV, KUL oilTOl lyvwaav OTI OV fl aTTtfTTElKag' have known that thou but I thee knew, knew that thou mo and these didst semi < hast sent me. 26 And ^^ ^ tyvwptffa aVTOlQ T0.OV0fia.(7OV, KUl yi/WjKffai' I have declaxed unto -tO KUt thy name, and will make [it] known ; them thy name, and And I made known to them t / .< ^ will declare it: that " r; ayaTrr] i]V nyunyjaag fi tv avToig y, Kayut the love wherewith, ^va with which thou lovedst me in love them may be, and I thou hast loved me that the may be in them, and I > >7^ ^^ avTOlQ. in them. then\. in
;
,

^
'

>

<

.,

>

<

\Q Tavja

EiTn'ov

'"o^^'lriaovQ t^i'i^Oiv aiiv toXv /.inOrfTulg

'Jckuk w.'utout with 'These 'things 'having' said 'di^ciidoa XVIII When Jesus these avTOV TTtfjUV TOV XUfiUppOV "rwV KtC/OUIV," OTTOV 1)V (T^TTOC,", spoken had words he went forth ,,^3 of Kcdron, where was a garden, beyoud the winter stream with his disciples over ~ . ., ^ .n n brook Cedrou, (.IC, the OV /(T//A0l' avTUQ Kai Ol.^aOiJTai.aVTOV. 2 yCfl.Cf tfcu where was a garden, iu- imo which "eneered. his disciples. And 'knew '^aUo 'he and the -which he enterto <> ,. ^^ / ' aVTOV TOV TOiroV OTI TToWaKlQ lovCag O TrapadlOnvQ ed, and his disciples. 2And Judasalso,whieh 'Judas 'who *wa^^ ^delivering 'up "him the place, biccause ^often betrayed him, kuew ~ ~ ~ o /i _t 'i', a avviJX^^ <^ \T]a0VQ tKtl ^tTU TitlV.p.ai)riTU)V.aVTOV. 6 o,mvthe place: lor Je-us
^
.
1

>

<

>

>

,,

'

'

ofttimes resorted thi- 'was ^gathered his disciples. 'Jesus there with ''Therefora ther with his disciples. ,,,. / . \/d> TtjV aTTflpaV, KUl tK TWV ap^tSpeWV Cat P 3 Judas then, having lOVOaQ '.Iud.a8 having received the band, and "from ^the *chief 'priests 'and received a band Q/"?ncn

KupwV

~>

chief "priests
risees

and"pha- ^ap'Craiwv VTZ^ptTag, tpX^Tai


'I'harisees
>^^'^
^'^'1

titfl

fllTO.

(pqvwv Kai XafXTrdSljJV


torches
arid
,

cometh thither
therefore

'olHcers,

comes

there

with

lamps

rorcts'rndTeapons*'
4

O^^'^^weapons.

Jesus

'Ir,(To5c Jesus

"oiv"
therefore

.'^0,^

TTUVTa
all

tA

ipxOfieVU

knowing

things that were coming

^^' ^''' .'^^^^r .'^''f"rr>f'^'wi""^''^/^n' ^'^rto them, Who*i seek ye ? Xbej him went forth and upon him, ha^ving gone forth said them.whom ^ptO/jffav avT({i, 'Itjoovv TOV Na^wpaTov. Atyti avTolg *o said unto Nazarsean. him, Jesus the'^ "S^s 'to Hhem lwered\im, Je^sus^of answered

Kho^iidiomiupfi

Nazareth.

unto them, I am /le^ And Judas also, which

Jesus eaith 'Ijjcroug,"


ijcsus,
'

'Evw
I

ti/xi.'
1.

FAarr]KEi.6e

Kfd 'lovSag
'Juda-,

TTUOaVas'-de^^

betrayed him, stood sviththem. 6 As soon then as he had said unto them, I am he, they wont backward, and fell to the ground. 7 Then asked he them again, Whom seek ye ?
ofNaj!arr:th. 8 Jesus answered, I have told Ae; if I

SlSoVQ
^.^gring 7p
,

am .[he].. And "was j aVTOV fliT aVTibv. G


e^im
>

'standing 'also ^
^

Vho

Q,g

OVV
.

dlTTtV avTolg,

'

On"
,

with
~\

them.
>

%V}icn therefore he said to them,


KCll

tyui

tlfll,

^ n ^aTtljAUOV eig.Ta.OTTKJUJ
'

^tTTEaOV
-

i^ajUOri.

j backward and fell to [the] ground. am [he], they went _ ,^ /> $ y ^ t Ol.OS 7 TTCAlV OVV ^aVTOVg tTTljOWTtJCev," I IVU iT]TSire 'he "questioned. Whom seek ye? And they Again therefore Hhem
<
'

'

bIttOV, 'lr](TOVV
said,
.

Tbv Na^wpaiOV. 8
the
>

Jesus
./
.

you that

am

therefore ye seek me, let these go their way:

VfllV OTI tyWElfll.

Nazai'sEan. _> t OVV 1


"

AlTiKpiBj] ^6" 'l>J(TOVg, EZttov ^Answered 'Jesus, I told


i,T)reire,

>

Ifjil

a(pTB
euffer

TOVTOVQ VTTUthese

<

you tbat

am [he].

Ii. therefore

me ^e seek,

to go

i jraTTjp LTTrA. given* LTTrAW.

I' SeScoKa; tbou hast 6o)Ka5 thou gavcst L. " TOV KiZfXOV Ot ; TOV KeSpov T. 6 TTrA. " P ^ Si and (Jesus) Tr. ' i^ri\0tv Ta)i'LTi[A] ; tK riov from the t. 6 *TrA. ' ' 6 "iT/aovs {read he says) TrA, 6 T; Kol Keyei went forth and says lttfa. on " fnecTav LTTrA. eirripuiTrjvev avrovi LTta ; avrbs emipuLTlr. ' atrriKOav LTTrA. y 6 G LTTrA w. TJJveV W.

'

what

TTrA.

'

TraTTJp

LTTrA.

"

XTIU
yiiv
away;
fojKac
, . '

JOHN.'
9
'Iva
tliat

239
ovq
Sbthou

7rXj;pw^y

'

\<>yoQ
wori.1

ov
wliieh

n-rviv.
hi; -aiil,

On
^
^

mij,hi hcftilijllod the

Whom

ll^tumueT'^hi^hhl
sp,,]je of tl'ani which thougavest me have I

ln.sl

givenii.o

uoiovK r
.

a7ri!>\trra (E
I
T

lost

jf

avrCov ovoiva.
.u

10 ^iniov

th.m
diew
^

. not^oue.

an. > - ^^^^^^^

oiv

lost

JltTfioc
'Peter

tYUJV
having ^

^l""^"^ uavaipav, c'lXKvaiv avrnv, Kai i'niaev rov sword drew


'^

none.. 10 Then Shoon Vut^r having- e, it, and

a .word,
'

it,.

rov
.^ ,

OYIpWe
,

SovXoV, Kal cnrtKO^eV avrOV to 'ujtIoV^ to


'bondman,
J

and /a.
hia

smote
/
.

the

'"if';*'''''"fcut off servant, and i,7"'J;<l h'a right ear. Tlie


"^

'of 'the 'hiyh 'priest

and
^

CfClOl'
'rio'ht.
, ,

ll](y0VQ
'Jesus

bvOfXa Tip COv\<{) MaXxog. And -was ^name 'the 'bondman's Malchus.
7JJ'.Cf
'

\,

T(f)TlST^'ti), to Peter,

BAe
.

Put

|S''T''V'"'^ ,V^'n Malcbus. ,11 Iheusaid Jesus unto Peter, Pat "Said -therefore up thy sword into the sheath: the cup whieh , A' rilV.yia^Cf.lpaV.'^aOir eig Tt/V 9l]Kt]V. my Father hathg-ivnn ^le, shall I not drink thy sword into the sheath

cut olf

=ear

^^

/v

-X

11 iiiriV
11

OVV^

>

>

TO TTOTTjpiov
the

csoo)KiV uoi o irdriip

cup

which ^has "given

avTo; ov.fjii).irm} ^nve 'the "Father should I not drink it ?


6

12 'H
The

ovv

aiTHpa
'baud
,

kciI

x'^'^PX^^
chief captain
'

'^"'

''^

v-K^pirai
officers
'

tmv
of the
,

-tliereforo

aud the

and the
1

'lovSaiojv avi'fXaSov rov'lnaovv, Kal 'i^ntyav avrov, 13 /cat ,. . v j ^ 12 Inen the band and 1 1 T i T J Jews Jesus, aud. bound him; took hold of aud t^e captaia aud officers of the Jews took ^uTTyjyayov avrbv^^ Trpbg 'Avvav ttowtov' r)v.ynp mvijtpbg Annas first; they led away him to for he was father-in-law is'^nd^^ecl him aw!fy Toh'KduKpa^Og ijV apxt^p^vg TOV.iviaVroil.tKiivOV. 14 JJV.St to Annas lir.st for ha ^". ^*''^*^'' i". If'" ' of Caiaphas, who was high priest that year. And it was Caiaphas, which was Kdiacpag 6 (jv/tjSovXevaag Tolg 'lovSaioig, on crD^^apfj the high priest that
,

T.

J!

',

Caiaph.as
fl'rt

who
.

gave counsel
,

to the
11

Jews,
~ ^

'

UVVpWKOV
man
- Ti(

'

f 6r one
- >,

'^a7roXt<JVai" Virip TOV XaoV. toperith for the people.


-i-r/
>

<

,.,--..
>
<

that

it is

profitable

saiiic

year.

14

Now

16 liKoXovUfl.Ce Now there followed


^'
i\
-

/^

^,

Caiaphas was he, wliich pve counsel to the


Je"'3, that
it

was ex-

r(^ l;;(Toii Jesus


T

z^wi' liErpog
Simon
kij6wn
Peter
.

rf

'

/cat

II

\ n aWog f.uwr]rrig.
"-v

o ot fiaUijnig should

pedient that one man die for the peo16

iKElVOg 1}V
'that

yvwarog

-;'

and the

other

T({J

apX^fptl;
I

~.
and

disciple.

And

ICai

~\ n UVVilfT1]XHtV

~>r
TI{)
,

^disciple -

pl^-

And Simon

lljaOV and
Jesus

"was
\

ug
Ty
the

'

rrjv

>-v> avXijv too apx'-^9^^Q

~,

to the high priest,

entered with
'

.-lij'j'TT' lo o.ct.Utrpog
but Peter

'

tKrrrjKEi
stood^

vpog

Peter followed Jesus, so d/d another dlsciple: that disciple wa? known unto, the high

into the

court

of the high priest,

evp<ji

door

'^^w. wiUiout.

IKiiXOev

ovv

;ua0r,r,k o

aXXoc ^Sc
'other
'f*

Went out

therefore the' 'disciple

who was
'<^')r-

V
T

at

and went In with Jesnsinto thipapri.st,

l^L^' Peterffiti
the

door

-without.

yvwarbg ^n^

known to the high priest, yev TOvTISTpOV. llXsyei


Peter.
T.
i

PX'V"'"
c.

^ai d-rrtv and spoke

Ty

Qvpajpt^

to the door-keeper

and
I

oth?r rs"ipi?'whi?h brought ivas known unto the


t->;
=>

iraiS'iaKn il Ovpiopbc r 4-, 2 -J liT&ays Hherefore 'the 'maid the *door-koepor


^l)
Siv,

ovv
^

ii.-L

high priest, and spake unto her that kept the ^g^r, and brought in
^steri? i\*J" saith

Iljrpw,"
to Petor,

M)
'not

Kai
*also

cii

Ik
=of

rwv
Hhe
not.
.

uaOnTtLv
'disciples

'd
'art

tov avQpw-Kov
of

Hhou
I
>

'man

JJj^ ^S'ot ''ilnto'^Petw'

'vovtov;
'this?
,

AkyH
"Says
,

tKih'0,OvK.ii'f.u.
^he,

18 EiffrrjKnaav.ci'
But

,/
1

oi
/

am

''were 'standing 'the

Kai 01 *and "the


,

VTnipiTai
'officers,

avQpoKiav- 'TmronjKOTsg, oti


a
fire of coals

'rt

SoiiXoi Aitvot thouaiso <ie 'bOndmen f ^^'^tt'''^!.! 1'^"'' H^ saith, I am Pl^^


'

Kai WepfiaiVOVTO' and were warming themselves

,^

'-->>,
i]l'.Ct
/-.

having made,

"{.IET

)!.
for

\U7>xog
cold

-qv,-

not.
there,

18 .Uid the serofficers

avnlJV oJlsTpOg''
"them
'Peter

,,' iCfflug
it

was

vants and
a
fire of
<"''^

stood
for
it

who had made


coals
;

^^'^ ^^^^ themselves: lU OSpi^aiVOfJLtVOg. rjpWTI^fTEV tov It]- and Peter stood with and warming himself. and warmed The high priest therefore questioned Je- them, ~ himself. 19 The high _^ ~. ^ ^ ~ _ n TTfpi aOVV TWV-HaUrjTWV.aVTOV, Kai rnpl rtig dtdax^g priest then asked JeBiis concerning his disciples, and concerning 'te.iching sus of his disciples, aud
;

and 'was ^with


T

Km

/^

ir.

11O.OVV.apXiep^Vg
'
'

standing
,

'^'"^

>

warmed
'

'

'

aiTOV.
'his.

20 dTreKpiOv
'Answered

'avTi^i''

''o"

'Irjcovg,
'Jesus,

'Eyti
I

nappyjaiif sl''aifswe;ed\fm'!''f
openly

^him

spake openly to

the

wTopiov TTFA.
i^yayoi' TTr
,

t;

*> <rou (read tlipsword) Gi.TXrAW. riyayof [avrov] they led Inm _ anodaveiy to die LTi ia '' [aTTJiyyayoi/ outoi^ a. o (rcail another

' 6 TTrA. LT[i a], TOiD apxi^pew^ of the high Jiriesl TXrA S toJ IleTpw i" i} Ovpiupoi LtTrA. ' Kai (alsoj 6 UeTpos fjieT avTtoi' LTTrA ^ [avTipJ U
'

6 Tlr.

r;

rasgio-jcn

240
yoTid

1
;

QANKH
'Koautti'.

2.
'

XVIH.
always
always
nothing.
i

and i P0^ in the temple>hither the Jews always rS- yaiy^ Kai have'l^Baid'notMnl.' S^e^^ ^^^ 21 \v^y ask8t thou Tat, mi me ? ask them which gather, and
.

m the s>Tiagosrue,

I ever tanght

|XaXjj(Ta"
^
^

rw
K. ^ ^^^

Tj world;

lyw Travron tdida^a iv


^^

V I

.j.

taught
the

t^

la

'^rv" ,* the

avvav/-'"--*
^

syrror

tv Ti^ ifp^j OTTOU "izavTOTf}* oi'lov^cCLoi crvvk()XOv~


'
*>

temple, where
I epoke

Jews

obnie po-

iv Kpv7TT<^ iXaXj/ffa ovS'tv.


in
secret

21

Ti fiB

HirfpiuTi^g

Why me dost thou question ?

said unto

he- iirtpwrqcfov^^ TOVQ dKTjKooraQ Ti kXaXrfCTa avToic oiroi those who havo heard what question I spoke to them"; lo, they lBaid ^^22^nd sTh^n he had thus spoken, o'tdaGiv tlirov Ifw. 22 TavTa.ik avxov.ilirovTOQ elc ^rwv one of the officers {j jj^g^ ^j^^^ -^^^^^ But*these 'things' *on "his 'saying one of which stood by struck ^ / n Jeaus with the palm of VTrrjpETWV IZaptaTtJKUQ tCit)Ki.V paniQliaT(^ his hand, saying. Anofncers Btanding by blow with the palm of the hand gave a Bwerest thou the high ,, _ , _ , / , , ^ . lr](TOV, ElTTiOV, OvTiOQ UTTCKpiVy T({t priest so? 23 Jesus an23 ATTtKpiVq ; swered him, If I have to Jesus, saying, Thus ansWerest thou thp high priest 7 -Answered spoken evil, bear wit~ < >-nMi'r -r^> TTBpi TOV nossof Ihtevil :butif aVT<f> '^a IrjCOVQ, Ll KOKUfQ t\a\r]<ja, ^apTVpiJGOV well, >\ hy smitest thou 'him 'Jesus, If evil I spoke, bear witness coiiceruing the me? 24 Now Anuas >;. / / -. <, \ n^ a ' r ' UVTOV (l-Ci KaAWQ, Tl /Xf CSpHQ , 24 ATrjffTflAeV h?.d sent him bouud IcaKOV but if well, why me strikest thou,? unto Caiaphas the high evil; "Sent 'him
:
.

them

We

tM

>

?;

apXUpH

~>\'\

<

><

^"''^

'Avvag dCi[ikvov
'Annas

irphq ]^aia<pav fbv apxitpka.


to

bound
IliflOJV

Caiaphas

tha

high

priest.

25 And Simon Peter and warmed stood himself. They said

^5 '\ivM
>iow 'was

nkrpoC
'Peter

icTTWQ
standing

wj
and
tIC
^

eEp^aiv^u.vOQ'
warming
himself,

'Simon

^Ittov

oZ'V

OVTip,

M?)

KOI

av

fWV.paOrjTUiV.aVTOV

his 'disciples irrnoTthoualsol^e They said therefore to him, "Not -aUo Hhon =of of his disciples? He 'HovrjaaTQAKHVOQ, Kul tlTTSV, OvKMUtf- 26 Ayt eJc fj demed !, and_said, ,^^j, ' Re denied, and said, I am nbt. Says on*
1

am

not.

2i>

One

of the servants of the

tK

,.^-, TWV OOliktOV


,,
,

TOV UpXI^p^t^Q) ffVyyUn/JQ

,,',

tOV

oi

high

being Ai3 ^f ^-^^ kinsman bondmen of the high criest, being [of him] of -whom kmsman whoeo ear , Peter cut off, eailh, aTTSKO'^JlV TlETpOQ TO OJTIOV, QvK.tytJ (Xi tloov IV TOJ KTJTTtft Did not I see thee in ^^at 'o2 'Peter the par, *thee 'saw "I ^ot in the garden the g.-u-den with him ? , , , _ ,,-. , tn-B-,/ ,^/ ovv 7)pvr)craro*o JfeTpoQ,Kai evViajQ 27 Peter then denied /iST avrov; 27 iiA/j' ^aiu and immcdi- vvitlj him? Again tijerefori, "denied 'Poter, and ifnmediatclv etely tha cock crew. , , ^
priest,

,,,".

,,/

.,

okiKTwp f^yr/fftv.
ft

cock

crew.

.28 Then led they JeBusfromfaiar.ha.= nDto the Imll of judgment

^^

'^J^TT They lend


'

rbv'ln<yOVV

CITTO

TOV Kaii^a
Caiaphas
entered not

tig

i.^'Y therefore
it

TO

Jesus

from
they

into tho

TrpaiT(opiOV

1]V.Si

V,OWta"''
esj-ly.

Kui aVTOl OVKMGrjXOoV tig TO

prietoriiim, '^ 7 they thcmrslves went they' themr^tvZ w^nt not into the judgment TrpaLTU}piGV, ' hail^ l/,6t they sUc.ild ^toriU, ' be deiiSed but that *, they might eat -tha Trd<7j(a, 29
:
'

and
'iVt 'iva

was

And

into the-

[.ii).fiiav9uiaLV,

^aXX' tVa"
.

0dyw<Ttv

to

tha that they might not be defiled,

hut

that they might eat the

passoTcr. then wt;it

13 Pilate

out uiito
ftviu.

passcver.
i.

thsm, and

What

yflTTiV,

,-,, them, and TlVa KaTTjyOpiai' ^fptrC 'KUTa TOV.avOpUTTOV.TOVTOVi


"therefore
/

l^iikOn' 'Went "forth

oZ'v

6 "IliXrrof:" * Trpog
'

avTOvgf Kai
/

T-ata

to

accusation brin? yo ^aid, What accusation bring ye against this man ? Bgainst this mnn ?_.,,. , _ u ,-, 30 They ansv.ered :.i.d 80 ATZBKpiVtjOUV Kflt *Z7rOJ/" ayr*^, El OVTOQ "kUKOflTJ.TJV said onto him, If he and said They answered to him. If "were 'not 'he an evil were not a malefactor, / / > < , , -,, u TrapiOWKajJEV aVTOV. 31 E/-7rtl' we would not have de- TTOlOg^'' OVK aV VOL livtred him up niito doer, *to 'thee 'we "would have delivered up him. 'not 'Said thee. 31 Then snid ~ t < r t h wtt \ ' v k a Aa[5iTS aVTOV V/JSig, Kai '^ofir" avToig "o" "uiXaroc, Pilate unto them, Titke ye him, and judge hirn "therefore *to 'them 'Pilate, Take him ye, and nccording to your law. / .. / ' < n tit f t Kara EIttov 'ovv" TOV.VOUpV.VIlOJV KpiVUTS ^OtTOV." iha Jew3 therefore your law judge him. 'therefore eaid unto him, It is not according to *S.aid

,-,,,_.,

ii

' li

>

>

>

>

ii

'

ktKdXrjKo.

have spoken i.TTrAW.


.

all
1

6 LTTrA.

GLTTiAW.
T.

" rtetAaros
*>

ROJcby irCUtiV

"> > TrdvToOtv E rrj {read a) GLTTrAW. navrti P TrapecrTTjKuis Ttav vTrrjpeTU)V LTTrA. epwr^i fpioTtjdov (eTrep. w) LTTrAW. -^ 6 LTTrAW. ' jrpwt OLTTiAW. ^ aKKa. LTTrA. ' -I- OVV ihurelorc ELT[Tr]A. ' + efw out LTTrA. elnav LTTrA. T <j>ri<T(v 8ayS TTiA. Kara T. '' ' ' [ojrl L. * - ailTOV T. " TrA TTrA. oiv LTtA,
;

XVIII, XIX.
,

JOHN.
t^sariv
it is
-i
'

241
-^to
1.

avTui ,'?

'to

"him
(I'a

oi the
,

'lovdalo^i'Wulv ovK ~
.,,

Jews,

To us

, ji permitted to put

a7roKTE7vai ov^tva' 'awful


4j

.u death no "one
1

for us to put nny man to death: :;<> that the sa\ in" of
J^i-"?
"J,'^^*,
si Jnify^ne ^"^

32

\6yog Tov'lrjaov

that the word


IToiti)

7r\t]pco97j ov tlntv ai]fxahnov of Je.su3 might be fulfilled which bespoke Mgnifying

^J"''

^hatXath
die.

Oavdrti)
death
,

by what
,

'X Xai k(pWV1]t7tV TOV and called Jesus, and TO TrpairwplOV TTCIAIV" O "lltAarOt.', ^^'^ "''*?. l^'' ^.'"t 'Filate, and called 'again into Hhe >rretorium thou the King of the ,., ^ _,, ,, O paCJlAiVQ TWV iQVtanUV Jews? 3-4 Jesua an\r](JOVV, Kdl HTTtV aVT(^, Z.V tl
/

Bf(g
.

rjfZtWei' aTroBvijaKitV. to die, he was about i, ^


II t
.

33 Eiai]\9iV
^Entered
,

oiv
^therefore
'

he should

judgment

r''"'-'^ <""t<'J-ed

33 Then into the

hall

again,

,,,

~.

Jews? to him, =Thou 'art the king and said of the ~ ~ '11 , .. n ~ii k' A J.' '^ A(p crv It^OVQ., laVTOV rOVrO 34 ATreKpiVT) 'aurtu o" 'I ^him From thyself Hhou 'this 'Answered 'Jesus, ~ V x X - , T n AiyEtg, tj aX\Ol '(TOl EITTOv" TTfpl l^OV ; 30 ATreKpimj 'Answered 'sayest, *or 'others 'to ?thee 'did say [it] concerning me? 1, ^ / 'Q . hn \ HI ' J. "lli\a-pog, Mi]Ti tyu) lovcaiog (/ui ; to twog roaov Kai "Nation 'thy and 'Pilate, 'am? *I "^a^Jew
Jcsus,
"'

'

'

swered him, Saycst thou this thing of thyself,

T,

II

>

late

or did others tell thee of ipe ? 35 Pianswered, I a

Am

Jew?

Thine own na-

<

'

II

'

>

'

tion and the chief priests have delivered

^hee unto me: what hast thou done? 36 Jc-

c'l

the chief priests


'0" *It,(70lV,
'Jesus,

dpxiipi'fg -rrttpkSwKOv ae fjuor ri iTroi7]aag ; dG'AwfKpiBri k",%dom',^not^of th?3 'Answered delivered up thee to me what didst thou ? world: Lf my kingdom
:

'UfSarnXda
'kingdom

>)

tfirj

'my
i)

OVK.taTlV Ik TOV.KOfTflOV.TOVTOV ^^tn would'my'^Ir:


is

not

of
>'/

this
o't

worl3

vants fight,

that

f!
if

Ik TOV.ic6(Tf.inv.rovTdv rjv were this world of

f3a(ri\fia 'kingdom

t/K/j,

inrijokrai
'attendants

^av

'my.

to^the
jj

Jew^s''-

^y

b'ut'now kingdom not


37 Pilate

^rj.Trapa^oQCj Tolg 'Jov^aioig' 01 iiioi rjytunXoiTo'' 'iva would Pght Jews that I might not be delivered up to the

fyom hence.

^y

^^^ ^^^
then
?

j^j^p^

^ king

VVV.di
but now

y)

(iaaCKi.ia

Yj

i^ff

pVK.idTlV tvnvOei'. 37 EItTEI'


'

OVV

Jesus answered,

'kingdom
'Pilate,

'my

is

not

from Uence.

'Said 'therefore
;

aiiTip 6 TO 'him

^UiXaTOg," Ovkovv jSaaiXevg


Tlicn
r/

d
.

a king^^^To^ this end


I

av
/

'AniKptOr) "o" was


'Answered
.

bom, and

for

a king

art thou?

Irjaovg,
'Jesus,
,

Su
Tbou

\syeig,
sayest
, ,

oti
for ~

paaiXivg
a king
>\
'

/J

'

\|i

*u '""??.v''T? I '^3 theworld.thatlshould

'^

ei/xt'^'tyw.

'^tytu
1
'

sig
for

tovto
this "

[it],

'am
>

'I.

yiyivvr]fiai. Kai have been horn, and


'

eig

aXrjBiia
tnith
?

rrag o.wv tK Trjg Ty a\TiUfi(f. l.iapTVpq(Tit) truth. Everyone that is of beaj witness to the the ~ > / ~ ~ . i-rT \ ' ^ 00 A aVTt}) O "UlAaTOg, aKOVH flOV Tr]g <p(Vl]g. 6g voice. -Says 'to *him my 'Pilate, hears ~ ' '\ ^y~\ Ci >-v'/i rr

for ''\ -

n Tovro i\i]\vUa this I have como


\
/I
'

ag
into
<

roi> the
.

ko<t^iov,
world,
~
<-\

>

may

AtyU

'

II

Kai tovto

'

(7rjj/,

TraXiv
again

And
and

this

having
to

said,

e^j/Aysj/ irpog he went out to


fault

is truth? And when aArjfJeiag he had said this, ha went out again unto truth the Jews, and saith rriTl trtTlV unto them, I find in What is him no fault at all. But ye have a cus-

bear witness unto the truth. Every one that IS of the truth heaxeth voice. 38 Pilate iva that Eaith unto him, What

my

n
1

'

'

Tovg
the

i39

torn, that i should re.lease unto you one at

lovSaiavg, Kai XtyEi avrolg, 'Eyw ovSeijiav 'airiav evplffKW tv {i|r(Sore'^that^i^r^Jews,


says

them

net any

6nd
I

in

lease

unto

you

the

cfjVy."
him.

39

tariv.St avvi}9Ha vjuv ''iva 'iva ^vfiiv But it is a custom with you that one to you

ottoXiktw"

should release again sayin'' Not this


^o'w' b robber.

^'^hen CTied\hirail
"rlbblrwa: a XIX. Then

Iv r<p 7ra<rxa- (3ovXe<Tee


at

the

passover

will ye

H,fi7v^7roXvau,^' TOvfiaaiXka therefore to you I should release the king

olv

rwv
of
ing.

'\ov5aiujv\ Jews? the


Not
X^fTrrig. a robber.

40 EKpavyaaav
They
but
oft*

ovv

TraXiv "Tra^rrs^,"
'all,

Xggay-

'cried *out 'therefore 'again

/,;,,

jeius^ ^and^^scourged 2 And the sol-

yovTig, M?)

tovtov,
this one,

dXXd rbv BapajSfSdv


Barabbas.

rjv^^t

Bapo/3- ^'^"
'BarabJesUs

platted a

crowu

Now
'Pilate

'was

pSg
bas
i:ai

19 Torf

'{Xa(3ev

o^HiXctTog^'TOv'hjaovv

Then therefore took

i/jLauTiyioaEv. 2 Kai oi aTpaTia>Tai TrXk^ai'Tfg scourged [him]. ' And the and soldiers having platted

ark^avov
a crown

K TToAtf et? TO irpaniLpiov I.TrAW. ^ eZirov crot TrA. airo creaUTOU LTrA.

i"

IIeiA.aTOS T.
"^

'

6 [a]w.
'

6 GLTTrAW.
1 [eyojj L.

avrio 6 LTTrA ainiS W.


;

" oi efioi ^y"'''^*"'''''' "'' Tr,

iy(i>

(read

et/jit

T
*

am)

~Tr[A].-

'LTTrA.

aTTokvffU vy.lv LTTr,

anoK}j<T<a viJiiv

LTTrW.

jroi/Tes

'

evpidKui kv
T.

avrw airlay

242
oi thorns, and put t ^? onhis noaa, Had they 7 put oji hini a purple *
roTiS; 3
.,

IQANNHS.
aKavQiLv iirkBiiKav avrcv
*^''"''
,

XIX
Ttj

. put

/i [it]
r

on
^

v his

KfcbnXy,
_^'''*'^'

Kai

''''

laii

(')

luariov
clonk

irop-
'pur-;

ii

and

aid, iTaa,

fhvpOVV 'KiodQakoi' aVTOV, Q


'lovcai(uv' Jews
1

" Kill

fXiVOV, Xalof,

ijucriXfVCi

their hiinas.

4 Pilate xJiv therefore went forth pf^he again, and sal th u:ito
thetji. Uehoici, I

hiiu forth

toy.

11

bring tlmt

4*
,

E?J)Xyj'

ye may kuc"' tlmt I find no fault iu hiin.

*Wcnt
.

^oilj''' TraXti^ *^^u o riiXrtroc," Krti 'out 'Pilate, atid therefore 'a?aiu
'

Kai "u'/f oi'j'" avrtf) pmrin fxara hini blows with ihf palm of the hand.' and ' thoy gare
.

'

'

Xtyfi
says

fii'iroff,

lOE,
, .

a-^ljJ

V^iV aUTiiV f^W,. IVa


,
ii

,,

to them, ,

y)'(ir

Ort

"*l/

aVTift
,

5 Then c;ui.e Jesus Behold, 1 briof; ^to *you Miira ''nur, that ye may know that in him w.junng the forth, '_ y r ',.>--v/i tb'n'r crown of thorns, and OVCfj-Hav aiTiaV evpirDCW." O Li,ll\t)tV *OVV "o" IrjffOlig i^<t>i Iho i)ui]4e robe. And I find. Went therefore Jesus not any fault out,. saith nnto Pihitt ' ^ , ^ a BehoM the ^OpuiV TOV aKnVVLVOV OTfCJiaVOV KUl TO ITOil^VpOVV IflOTlOV. them, crown man etTh^n thechief wearing the thorny and the purple cloak;
.

>

>

rnoers saw
crieil

thy out, sayin;;, Cru-

MA^

KUl Xf'yf I aVTOlQ,


and he "says
to thorn,

'^"l^f"

6 avBpwTTOQ. man. Behold the


I

6 "Or
'\\'hen

oiv

''fWov"
saw'

therefore

pnate""'saith'^'^uriTo them, T.ike ye him,


find nrl^uuTniim'^ 7 I'he Jews .answered

OVTOV
him.

01

ao\;(fpac:

the chief priests

Koi 01 VTTrjphai iKpavyuaav ^Xsyoi'T^Ct" oiiiccrB they cried out and the saying,

^Tavpojffov, aTavpioaov^.
Crucify,

Alyfi avToTg oSUiXdrog,^' Aa^fre


=Sayb 'to *thcm
-Pilate,

crucify

[him].

Take

and'

by''

^.:i,:ht

i-yoj.Ycip oi'x 'i'pi(yii<^ om- "^laV'Tc ^^''''ov viiEic Knl araiipojcjarf tind not. and "^'him], for I him ye crucify to die, because
'

tv avTifi in him
a law
^

SonTf'^Go.r^'s

When o'lTiav.
a fault.

7 'ATTEKpiOrjaav
^Answered"

^ai'T<l>-

o'l

'lov^aToi,
"Jews,
.

'Hfidg vifiov

Pilate tlion'.'fore heard that saving, he M3 the more afraid 9 and went again into the
;

-him

'the
'

We

{'youev,
hTe,
'q^i
^^'^I'^se
-

Ar'

Kai

Kara

and according

j.
Son

TQV.vouov.'iiuwv^' ",
our law

to.

he ought

6<l)(i\iL ' .^

atroBav^'iv, '
to die,
j.

judgment ""

hall,

and

^taVTOV'
himself

y'lbv

Whi ucc
pTlate

Je.susgave

fluWov tlpofUfQl], 9 KOI ^^'^ f*^^] ^""^ '^''^ ^ "='" '^''''^*^" ElCFriXQiV dlQ TO TTpaiTWpiOl' 7ra\lV, Kul XsyEl T<^ I Ijtrov TloOiV tome- knowestthou prstorium Into the again, and /itys went to Jesus, Wht^nce not till! tJt have power ~ , ^. J^ , to crucify thee, and H av ; 0.06. lr}(TOVQ aTTOKpiaiV OVK.tCWKev aVTIji. 10 XiyCl have power to releaso ^rt thou ? But Jesus an answer did not give him. "Says
ViiDi

thou ^^bIu no ;,n-

9iov" ino'trjaiv. of God he made.

8 "Or of J' fiKOvatv When tlicrcfore ^'hcard


'

o KlltXarOc"
"

TOVTOV TOV \6yOV

unto" "htm Speakest thou not iin-

'^''''*^

'

-.

thoe

awercd, Thou couMest 'oiiJ'" aVT^) O^YllKaTOq, ^j.101 OV.KaKUQ; OVK.QlCag haTo no povYer ac o/< ^therefore Ho Miim 'Pilate, To me spe.akcst thxiyi not ? Knowe.st not thou q^aiust nie, exc pt it ^ ,_ \y f^w '"aTovpwcai (j, Kai tt,ovaiav ix(^ ano<vere given th.^ from OTi tt,ov(nav fibove therefore he that authority I h.ave to crucifj' thee, and authority" I,have to rethat delivered me un- \<-\ / i i ' n n n'li'r nr >v ^^OVOiaV to tHec hath the great- Xvsai (TE" ] 11 AirEKptUt]'' "o" Il](TOVg, OvK ^dxiQ

11

Jesus

an-

,,

>'

t-t

-v

'

't-,

<

>

,y,
ii

>

ii

frflm tliiMiieforih Pilate s.-uiiht to release him but tile Jews cried out,
or =in
U'

And

lease
n
>

thee?
^
'

^Answered,

'Jc.^us,
*

Thou hadst 'authority


CeCOjUEVOV"
given
fJiElZ,OVa
^ ^
'

^OVOEjXiau
'not "any

KUT

>

tjXOV"

"ii

,'
.BL if
it

fir}.r}V

r '^(TOl

n UVwOeV
f

against

me
_

were not to thee


flk

from aboTe.

^Ms maJ^,*thou

art

Sia.TOVTO ^TrdpaClSoVQ^^ 6 delivers up On this account he who


tx^i.
}ias.

(TOl

d/jLapTtav
gin

me

to thee

greater.

12

'E/c

TOVTOV
this

^i^rjTEi

6 TliXciTog"
Pilate

diroXvaai
to release

avTov.
him
diro'
re-

Frotn

sought

o'l.di

'lovdaJoi *"fK:oa^ov,"
'

XsyovTeg, 'Edv tovtov


saying,
If
this

but the

Jews

cried out,

[man] thou

' + Kai ripp^oj/To irpbs avjoi' and came to him XTTrA. * i&ibofxav LTTrA. ' koX '' ^ o DeiAaTos i^oi t. LTrA. y 051" Glttla^. ou6e/xtai' qItuiv evpi(TKio <v b [oj Tr. " ISov avT<u LTr ; oiTi'ai' iv avriZ ovSefiiav evpi<TKii) A ; aiTiaf ov^ evpicrKtu T. f <* < TTrA. ISov T. avTOv him Gl.w. S IleiAaTOS T. Aeyovres T. oVTcIl T. ' i7iu.wi' (read the law) lttpa. kavrov vVov toO Oeov e ; vlov 6eov iavrov i/n a. " aTToASo-ac ere, (cat i^ovcriav x<^ crraupwcrat <Te LTTrA. ovi'.t[aJ. avT<Z him

and

''

'

[L]Tr[A].
io/tteVoi' <roi
.*

oOLTTrAW.
LT
;

e^^'S

thoU hast

T.
t

1 /car"

t'/otoi)

oii^e/xiaf

LTTrA W.

'

'

Se-

LTTrA.

iiipavya^oi/

^ iropaSovs delivered iKpaiiyaaaf Tr.

up

LT.

6 IIiActTOs (IletAdTOs t) e^'iTet

LlTrAt

XIX.
\v<TyQ
lea^c'

JOHN.
oiiK.d
TTOiCbv
_

243
6
/SaffiXtn
"'J^^fp^''.'"''*
^''.'\"''h

0/Xoc tov Kaiaapog.


of Cie^ar.
T(i>

iraq

thou art not a friend

Evf-ryono 'the

^avTov"

ch'TiX'iyii "himself-. 'makint' speaks against


,

Kniaapi.
Cajsar.

13
ttiO out

<king himsclT a'kiug"s'prak'O.ovi'.^YliXaTOQ'' \}\.."^'^\"^^ (.sesHr.


,

dKOl'irraQ 'having licard


, /
,

^TOVTOV TUV Xoyov/ yyayEV


this
>

TUV hjaoi'V, Kcd


Jesus,
,
,

Pilate 'therefore ~
>

JL v*" i tliat saying, lore heard


.']^'.
,

"^?''*"

lie

brought
'"''"^at

Jesus

word,
~|,

led
,

lKnOl(TSP
snt

tTTl

^TOV
tlie

^/
prifiarOQ,
juilgmcnt-seat,
r~:

ttg TOTTOV
at
-I

AeyOflfVOV
called

AlOo'

and n'

??''''}

down

upon
,,^,j

a place
A 14
.

Pavepreparation
~
>

incnt,

14 And it was thcpreparatiou of the I'assover, and about the mpa "Ce Wafl" eiCTT]' Kai AtySl rotg loV- siith hour: and he TOV TTCiaxa, of the passovcr, ['the] "hour 'and about the sixth ,) and he says to the Jew^, saith unto the Jews, N Behold your Kmg I T . ~ , r h<-> 5, ,j *, J J^. Ice u.j.-ia(nAfV(:.vnwv. lo "Oc.Ce iKpcwyacrav," Apov 15 But they cried out, Caioig, your king But they cried out, Away, Away wiih him, away Behold

CrpioTW,
,

LppaiaTl-Ci

but in Hebrew

lOfijiaiJa Gabhatha
f ,,.

r,

n~

^' JyJ'.Ot

in EOat in called the Parement. hut in the Hebrew ,GRbbaUitt,

down

DUdgmcnt
that

a place

is

irapnCKiVl)

(and

it

was
,

[the]
/

~,

t.

'

'

'

'

11

apov, araupMcyov
away,
crucify

ahrw.
him.

-,

A'tyH
Says

avrolq
"to

6 ^TliXdroc,"
'Pilate,

Tov

'them

piiVtesaithun^to^them', Shall I crucify your

(SncriXia.vjxuiv (rravpioao) ; shall I crucify ? Your king


"we "have
'

AnSKpiOrjaav
"Answered

tvoMfv BaatXia sLun Kaiaapa. " , ^"- H : ^


a king
except
'

10
J

(.a?sar.

01 apxiepats Oj'/k p^'j^fj' ftn?wred'^\\^9 'the ^chief "priests, 'Not have no king but CiETors ovv Trapi^ioKev f^^>"-."ji~hen delivered he him therefore unto rf^ ^-i. r X. 1 KJ

Ihen thcreforohedeliTcredup
'^^i'
1

tjjpnj

(q
led

y,Q

crucified

avTOV ,avToic ..
.

him

.t

to

^i them

'iva *i i Uiat u he

CTavpioOn.
might be
1.^1

TJapiXalSov
'Ti 1* -lhcy"took

crucified.

11
I

rdvlri- And
JcI

they took Jesus,

'and
hi8 cross

ond
17

hwi

awav.
h'is

And he

bearing

rrovv "^Kai aTr/Wayoi/'" sus and led [him] aw.ay.


,
,

17
,

icai

fSaardZ'^v ^Tuv.aravpov.avTOV^^
,

cross

went forth into

l^riXUev eig he went out to


in

bearing And ^ tov XeyOftSVOV KpaVlOV


the
^called
T

a place called

TOTTOV,
'place,
1

t'^

>

'ug"

XsyErat
is

skull, whidh IS called in the Hebrew

Meyoce

,_*..,_Eppafirrt ToXyoUn.
rt-

"of "a

^skuU
K

which

called
>

lb ottov avTov iOTarpwoav, Kai


x^here
,

"

j^ist

p^'g^t^a 18 where ^^^y crucified him, and two other wiui


:

Hehrew
~ ..,x\

Golgotha:
^,
~ri

him
% 1

they crucified,
'

and

with
f>

J'ini.on either side one,

aVTOV aXXovg ova tvnvUeV vai tVTmUev,


him
.

~n
\

and Jesus in the midst.


19

"others
)

'two
T r>

on
*T-i

this side
I

and on that
J"
<

side [one], and


T-ri \

fieaoV.Ct in the middle


'
II

And

Pilate wrote a
;'(

title,

and put

TOV iTfaovv.
Jesus.
fl
,,
,

ly
~

Lypaxj/sv.ct And'wrote
-.
7
cross.

Kai
"also

titXov
*a ftitle

'

n ^UtXaTog".
'Pilate

>

cross.

i6T]Kev tTTl put on

TOV aravpov
the

r]v.6i

J.

yey paufxtvov,
written,

'..,--.
This

And

it

was
Jews.

OF THE JE\V.S \r](jovg o 20 This titife then read Jesus the many of the Jews; for

Kai was, JESuS of naand ZARETH.'mEKlNG

And the

on the writing

Na^oiparoc,
Nazarsean,
,^.^,
.

o {SamXevg
the

t&v
ofJ.he

'lovSaiiov.

20 Tovrov
J-

king

oiV ^^aV^iuelfi^edTa/nrgh "therefore to the city: and it was


riv
'^'^]}i';
'

TOV titXov TToXXoi dvsyi'diGav twv lovSaiwv, oti tyyvg '


'title

*many

/ J -iread

of the

j.^,

T Jews,

for

near

"was
l)v
it

<

ona Greek,
21

Then

5t^''5^' CT?i(/ Latin, said the chief

,'

^TfJQ voXeujg b Toirog,^^ ottov taravpwOi] 6'It]aovg' where was crucified 'the "city the place, Jesus;.

Kai
and

was

"^'f^}^ Kiiieo'f the


t^"'*
'^^

^t}^'^'^'''^%}

Jews
I

but

yeypauusvov "EBpaiari,
written
In
/

^'EXXrjvKrri, 'Pw/iaVtrri."
in Greek,
,

21 tXsyov
'Said
,
,

'^'^i^<

im

Hebrew,
.

oiv
therefore

T({j

'UlXarif)" 01
1

apXl^pf^lQ
>

^ TMV
Hhe
' '

in Latin.
,

lovcaiufv, MTJ.ypdipE,
~

'to '"Pilate 'the "chief ^priests 'of


>
tv -v
>

O
The
k

~ \ ^ o paaiXEvg TUIV loVOaiLJV aXX

king

"ei/ii

Tujv
of the

of the 'T J

'

lovcaibijv.
'Jews.

Jews, ort
II

22
O'l

1am.

oti tKHl'Og elTrSV, BafflXevg had crucified Jesus, took his garments, he said. King*nd made four parts, to ' 'Q 'A ITT ^ ' -"rk ATTSKpivr] o^IltAaro^, y"Answered 'Pilate, What I. have
but
that
II

I'

"Jev/i. -

Write not,
'
'

'

*^^ '"^'^jJ^,'g., ?* answered, Pilate '^^ what I have written hare written 23Then J *-" soldiers, when they

ypatpa

ysypaipa.

23

oi<v

written I have written.

The

"therefore

(TTpartwrai, otb saTavpuxrav 'soldiers, when they crucified

TOV 'irjcovv tXaf3ov


Jesus

took

Ta.ifidria'.avTOV, Kai t-Koirjcav ^rtaaapa''^ his garments, four and made

i*

eavTOi'

GLTTrAW.

ITetAaTOS

(fead a judgment -seat) LTTrAW. tbey therefore cried out TTrA.


CrTrA.

avToi (eaVTOJ T) toj/

PufioiVTt, 'EAATji/io-Tt TTtA.

" rov tmv koyiov toutojv these words LTTi AV.'. ^ eKpavyaaav ovv c/cetfoi t^v ws was about LXTrAW Koi ainjyayov ovv therefore jLTTrA. ' ^ koi .fjyayov G S 6 Torro? rijs TroAeois GLTTi AW. ' & LTTrA. (TTavpbv LTTrA. ^ Tuv'IovSaioiv eiii-i IrA. TcVo-epa TTrA. ' IleiAdTw T.

T.

>'

'

'

244
dvoiy Boldicr a part;
,

Q AN N H
,

S.

XIX.

n'ipn, iKaoTip aTQariwrr) UfPoc, Kai Tov viTwi'a. nv.di 6 r i ^' if " ,. '^ and also Aw coat: now " 'T " ,^ a ^u u \. i toeach soldxer and the a nart, tunic; but 'was .^7 'the the coat was witliout P'^'''''. woven from ^irojv "'dppa(pOi;,*^ iK TW%> CLVijjBiV IKpaVTUQ dl'.'6\oV. 24 "fZstatu, "'""'^ seamless, froin the woven top throuirhout. They Thty^said therefor^
24

among
lots

thcmselve8,l.it

jrov^^
^^j^j
^

oiv
therefore

irpOQ
to
,
,

us not rend vt.but cast


for it, whose it shall be: that the Bcripturo might -be

XX>'/Aoi'Ci one another,


,
,

M/)-aXlffW/(V
Let us not rend
ti
<

auTOV,
it,
,

oXXd
but

\a')(M jlfV TTfpl


let us cast lots for
,

aVTOV TlVOg
it

fulfilled, which saith, ^ . \ , , ^ ">; XtyoKaa," Aiif.if^pi(javTQ Ta-ifiaTia-fiov Thoy parted my rai- pu,Qy eavTolg, ment amougthem,and fulfilled which They divided among. them, says, my garments
, ,

taTUl' IVU y ypa^rf 7rX?}whose it shall be; that the scriptore might be

for my vesture they did cast lots. These things therefore tjie
soldiers
i

Kai
and

nri
for ^

Tov.iixariafioi'.fiov
,

id.

crpftTiwrai
'soldiers

>'/d \ ipa\ov they cast my vesture ~ Tavra tTroirjaav.


/
,

KMipo)'.
a
lot.

\ -

Ol fUV
The

r\<

ovv
^therefore

tho.?c

things

did.

25

Now

there stood

25 EiarnKHaav.Si irapa
And
,

rui
the

aravp<^ tov
cross
,

motlier's sister, Mary the u>{fe of Cloophas,

by the cross f Jesus his mother, and his rOV,


and Mary Magd.aicne.

stood
,

by
,

'Ijjffou of Jesus
/

n.imTnp.av'
his
u

mother,
~

<

^
^jg^tir
/

KCbi

1)

ao{K<pi]
,
ii

^^^ ^^g
^f Clopas,

rfJQ.fllJTpOQ.aVTOV, of his mother,


>

^Mapta"
Mary
'

?/

TOV

the [wife!

KXwTTa, Kai PM ap(a'


and
,

//

maydaAi]vr]. 2o Irjgovg
Magdalene.
/i
<

'

r>r>

ovv
>

towv

>

>

26 When Jesus therefore ^aw his mother, and the disciple standing by, whom he loved, he saith unto his mother. Woman, behold thy sou 1 27 Then Saith he to the disciple, Bt.hoid thy mother I

Mary
,

the
,

Jesus
~
.,

therefore seeing
^

[his]
,

Ti)v fll]rfpa, KUl TOV IXamjTijV TrapeOTiDTa vv tiyaTrci, disciple standing by whom he loved, mother, and the
\

MyEl
says
rtfi

'

ii

fiadi^Ty,
'

Tij.fxr}Tpt.'iavTOV, to his mother, ~ n r'T^^'ii


^

\ r"- <ii nn t-it Tvvai, Ucov" O.VIOQ.COV. "21 Lira ASyfl


-m
'

'

<

<

'

'

Woa'an, behold

thy.on.
t/ Kcu an
'
'

Then he says to the


< >
-

I^Ov"

And from^tbat hour

disciple.

Behold
'her
'the

Ti.ixinvP-<^ov. thy mother.


'C
;^o.

u:^o^'^roJ^homf
25

^"^ajSev
'took

"avnjv 6 [xaOinVs'
^disciple

After

this,

Jesua

And frotu rdJSia. 28 Mfrci his own [home]. After

iKivi](; that

TVic

" ^ wpa^

hour

tovto
this,

thingl"iei'e''^now acoompiished that the scripture might be fulfilled,

eiSwQ 6 'h](TOVQ 0Ti'7rdvTai]S7]" TenXecTCu,


''knowing
'

'Jesus

'iva TikuOiQy that all thingsnow have beenfinished,thatmightbefulfillcd

Bait%

29 Now vessel fiiU of vinegar:

thirst. there was set a


X

AivI/W. ' ^ ^i.- i the scripture he says, I thirst.


'

ypa0n XevEI, '?;"',,


^o'lM

29

'S.KtVOQ

'ofv"" *KirO
x therefore,
ii,

O^OVf
VtTtTWTT*^" ^hyssop

A
i

i vessel

was

i. ^ t 3 set "of 'vinegnr

^^(jtov'
'^^"^11-

<K\r)aaVTfQ (JTTOyyoV
filled

6t,0VC,

KCli

syvingo with

and put

it

Tiuega* upon hys-

and they -having

a sponge with vinegar,

and

mourn

30 When Jc! BUS therefore had received^the vinegar, he


said, It 18

TrSplOkl'TiQ 'having =put [^it] 'on

TTOOariVSyKaV
they brought

aVTOV
Jt

Tip-dTOlJiaTl.
to [his]

30

OTB

mouth.

When
Kai
;

Q^p
tjierefore

'iXajSeV TO
"took
^

O^OQ ^6
,

nnisned;ana

'the 'vinegar

'ir)ffOVg" bItTSV, TerfX?(T7-af 'Jesus he said, It has been finished


,.
^

and
,

.,

.,

he bowed his head, and ghost, p:ivo up the 81 The Jews therefor'-,

K\h>ag
,

TTfV
.

KE<f>aA7]V

TrapsCWKEV
he yielded up
< .

TO TrVEU/Ka.
[his]
,
,

31 Ot
The
~

having bowed the

head
n
^

spirit.

bo(auseit was thepreparation, that the hodies should i)Ot rem.lin upon the cross on the . bbath day, (for that
^

ovV
ajjiercfore

loVOaloi,
<

IVa

^irj.flElVTJ

tTTl

TOV
the

cross

ffraVpOV
r]v," was,

Ta
the

awfiara
bodies
,
,

r<n' kv Tq) aalJpaT(f), 'tTTEi


on
,

'Jews, -

that

mifrht not remain

'v
-

on

TrapaaKEVi]
o/d
'
>

>t[it\
it

rit'.yap
*

cabbath

day was an

the
,

hi!;h dny,) besouifht Piliite thnt their logs rn ipht be broken, aud
f/ia<

lUtyaXjj
^gxaaK,
..

r/ jyjUf

pa ^tKEivov
'that
-.

,>'"*

sabbath,
n

because [the] preparation


'

(for
>

was
Pi-

TOV aappaTov, r]pMTi]aav TOv^lVittvTwv Ta OKBAr],


'their
'"'legs,

btt

'day

.1

they might beta- Xarov" 32 Then late kon away.


'

'

iva

KaTfaywiTiv

"sabbath,) ~
.

requested
'^
^ '

that 'might "be ^broken


01 therefore the

KUi and
first

aptluiaiv. taken aw;iy.


broke

a-

"
'

brakVt'h/'legrof the first, and of the other

32 fjXOoV
Came

oiv

OTpUTlMTai, Kai TOV


soldiers,

f^ltV

TTpWTOV KaTSn^aV

and of the

when

hTm "33^ But they came to Je-

rd

ffKkXrj legs the


n eiTrav T.
T

Kai TOV

dWov TOV ^cvaTavpioBivTog' aiiTipwho


was
crucified with

33 kmJs
but to

and of the other


o

him
i
' rjSij

" apa<^os TTta.


[his]) [L]TTr[A].
V

ij
'

Aeyovcra lt.
6
j^(,a0j}Tr)S

" triroyyoj' o^v fieCTOvrov ( oJ^ l.TTiAW. therefore full of th vjiiegar, ^hyssop LTTi A. iicetioj e. iTKivri fiv placed after 'lovSatot XTrA.
.

iSe

GLTTrA

rov Tl o^ows
'

p Mopiifx. avTTjv GTi A W.

t.

Trai'ra

omtov Iread LTTrAW.

xxTCTMirta (vcrajTra)

I,) .1

spon^O
rrapa-

[6]Tr; -netAdrov
"^

o "Itjctovst.
T.
''

y eTrel

(ruva-TavpuOevTOi lttta.

'

XIX, XX.
Tov
'lijrrovu Ju^us

JOHN".
tXOSvTEQ,
aiirov
his

245
li

slSov '^aVTOV li^rf TsOvrjKOTa, BUS, and' saw that ho was dead already, they already was dead, he hKviug come, when they sa^ brake not his frs
bJQ
to. ffKtXt]'
legs,

ov.KUTia'Cai'
they did not break

34

dW
but

elg twv one of the.

arpaTiwruiv
soldiers

34 but one of the soldiers with a sjioar pierced his side, and

with a spuar

i^ijXOsv^^ forthwith came there out blood and water. .30 And he that saw it itopaKuiq fii^iaprvpiiKiv, ical bare record, and his u 35 Kal alfia Kai voojp. ha.s borne witness, and vocord is true: .lud he blood And he who has seen and water. knoweth that he saith a\rj6r) tri.e, thutye miglit bedXi]9i.vt) aiiTOV toriv / fiaprvpia, ^KaKilvog^^ olSev lieve. 30 For these and he knows that true witness, true ^his 'is tilings were done, that ravra h'a tlicsi'ripture shonlilbe Xtyei, 'iva^ vHeTg ^TTKTTEixnjTE.^^ 36 ycvro-ydp For Hook place 'these ^things that fulfilled, A bone ofhim may believe. ye he says, that shall not be broken. 'Ottovv.ov avvTpi(ii]<7ETai avrov. 37 And again another rr\T]pit)9y, t) ypaipf) shall bo broken ofbim. scripture saith, They Not a bone scripture might be fulfilled. t\\B shall look on him ov 37 Kai TrdXiv irepa jpacprj \iyei, 'Oipovrai eig whom they pierced. And again another scripture s;iys. They shall look on him whom

\6yxy

avTOV r^V TrXeupdv ivv^tv, Kal


his

^ev9v^

side

pierced,

and immediately came out

on

fXiKSVT7](yaV. they pierced.

38 Merct-Sk
And
^t"

Tavra
these things

after

))pwT7]<Tev asked

tov "TTtXarov"
Pilate

and
(from

'

ApLfxaQaiaq,
Arimathsea,
fear

wv ixaOrjTrjg being a disciple


Jews,)

tov

^id
through

TOV 06j3ov TWV 'lov8aiojv,


of the

'iva

that he might take

TOV

'Ijjffou* of Jesus :

Koi 7rrpi//V 6 'ntXdrog-" 'Pilate. and ^gare ^leave

"/jpEv" t6 (Twjua" took away the body


'

Ptov

'IrjaovJ^
of Jesus.

39

o iXOuJv rrpog '^tov 'irjaovv^^ vvKTog Jesua bearing a mixture by night at first, who came to civ apvpvijg Kai dXorjg'^oJtyeV' XiTpag ficarov. 40 'iXalBov
of

sus: and Pilate gave liim leave. He came therefore, and took the body of Jesus. 39 And therefore and there came also NicorjXOsv.Se Kai 'NiKodiji^og, demus, which at the Jesus first came And came also Nicodemns, night, andtobroughtby a To.irpCJTOv, <ptp(ov fxiyna mixture of myrrh and

38 And after this Joseph of .Vriinathcea, being a disciple of Jesus, bu j secretly for fear of 'Ijjctou, KEKpv/ifjth'OQ.Si the Jews, besought Piof Jesus, but concealed late that hemighttake aw^-ia nway the body of Je'6" 'Iio(j))(p Josejih

dpy

to

away

the

body

""rAOfv" He came

oiv

Kai

myrrh
a<x)f.ia

and

aides

about

^pounds 'a "hundred.


^

about an hunpound loei'jht. Then took they tlie They took therefore body of Jesus, .and
aloes,

dred
40

wound
as the

it

in

lincu

TO
the

TOV

body

'li}(J0v, of Jesus,

Kai tcr]aav avTO and bound it


ta-riv
is

oOovioig

fXETa toiv clothes with the spices,


the

in linen cloths with

manner

of the
1

Jews is to bury. 4

Now

dpwfiaTCJV, KaOiljg
aromatics,
as

'iQog
a custom

'lovdaioig Tolg Jews among the


ottov
where

svTato prepare for


Kt'jTrog,

^td^eir.
burial.

41

r]v.Sk
there

Iv r<p roTry
was
in

taTavpivQr}

in the place where he was crucified there was a gai-den and in the garden a new se;

he was crucified a garden, pulchre, wherein was never man yet laid. Ovd'tTTtJ-OvSaig tTkBr}. 42 There laid they JeKKZC iv T(p KfjTTIf) fiVJ] flElOV KOlVOVj iV tp was laid. sus therefore because a -tomb 'new, iii \\hich no one ever and in the garden

Now

the

place

42 tKU
tyyvg
near

dtu Ti)v TrapaaKivifV twv Theio therefore on account of the preparation of the

ovv

'lovSaiwv,
Jews,

on

because

of the Jews' preparation day ; for the sepulchre was nigh at

ijv

to p,vmxiiov, WrjKav tov 'Irjaovv.


tomb,
fii^
first

hand.

was the

they laid

Jesus.
'/

20
comes
the

Ty.^f
But on the
early

twv cra^^aTWV 'Mapta"


[day] of the

MaydaXr]vi)
Magdalene
of

XX.
the

ipX^Tai TvpwX anoTtag tTi


*dark
^stiU

Mary Magdalene early, ovarjg Eig to jxvr]pHov, Kai (iXsirei when it was yet dark,
^being to

week

Mary

the

The first day week cometh.

'it

the

tomb,

TOV Xidov j'jpnivov


Btcne

sk tov- fivrjueiov.
tomb.

taken away irom. the


ij

unto the sepulchre, and and sees seeth the stono taken oHv Kai aw.iy from the sepulrps\;ei She runs therefore and chre. 'JThen sherunneth,
iJ.a.9r}Triv disciple

ipX^Tai TTpbg 'S.lp.wva H'sTpov Kai TVpog tov dXXov


ccmcs

Simon
the

and cometh to Peter, and to,


disciple,

imcn

Peter

and

to

the.

other

ctiev

"^

ij^>j

avTOV TTrA.

f$^\Oev

evfliij

TTrA.

e n-io-TeuTjre T.

^ lleiAaTOt' T.
" ripav T.

" ^i'.doi' they came t. t ainov him him T.

6 LTTrAW.. to
.

Kal eKelvos LTr.


''

6 LTrA.
'

K<x\

clso'GLTTrAW.
'

ITciAoTOS

T.

<rii>ti.a

T.

p ovtov of

him

LTrA

avroif

LXIrAW.

' utt

GLTTrAW.

-t"

V W.

llcuKaiJ. T.

240
^^'

QANNH

2.

XX.

chre,

"HpUV TOV KVplOV *0'^^' 'JriaOVg, Kui XsjH aVTOtg, r'it>runto"them'''i'hey 'Jesus, and eays to them, They took away the Lord hJ.Tu taken away the '^^o ^loved Lord out of the sepul^Qy uvjlUHOV, KOi OVK.oWaUtV iroV WtlKav aVTOV. J^f
, c i.\. whore they have laid ' 3 Peter there- 3 'E^)X0fl'
'^
1

audwe know not

v tomb,

j and

we know not
i
j.

_u where

.u > they laid


i

uhim.

him.

c:imc It^l other disciple, and A that Yu'"^.i, , to the sepulchre. f(g TO flVTHlBlOV' 4 irpBXOV.St 01 SvO OfiOV' ^Kui (V ciWoQ 4 So they ran both toand the to the tomb. \nd ^ran 'the ''two together, other folhor and the other /. / -.^t' disciple did outrun Pe- ^aur]Tr]Q ^pOfopajliV Ta\lOV TOVlilTpOV, Kai TjXOev TTpuiTOC, ter, and came first to ran forward faster than Peter, and discfple came first the sepulchre. 6 And , , ' n\ ' n he stooping down, and Eig TO fivffjx^iov, o Kai TTapamixpag pAeTTfi ^Kiifisva ra oyovta," looking in, saw the litomb, and stooping down he sees lying the linen clothe tathe neu clotiies lying yet ' , , - ~\ a y i ^' c " tt' wenthenotin. 6Then OV USVTOL (l(Tt]M(V. O tpX^'^'O^ OVV ^ Z,lflU)V llirpog QKOAOVcoincth Simon Peter 'not however 'he '^entered. followComes then Simon Peter foUowing him, and rt~ > ~-\ n > ~ ~ n ra avr<ft, KOI iiarJAVSV tf TO flvrfl^SlOV, KOI Viiopei went into the sepulhim, chre, and seeth the li- ing and entered the into the tomb, and sees neu clothes lie, 7 and ' n' n \ ~ j' OVOVIU Keifieva, 7 KOI TO ffOVOapiOV O ^V (TTl TtJQ KKpaAfig the napkin, that was Tbead and theliandkerchief which was upon about his head, not ly- linen cloths .-lying,

bJl'fTpOl^ Kni 6 ^Went "forth therefore 'Peter and the other

OVV

dWoQ

ua9r)rr)Q, KCli disciple, and

ypXOVTO

came

>,,
,

t\a
""

<

<

>

ii

'

"^V
>

'

>

>

'

i\

i%t)>~
but

dfthr^f but*^^ap^d avTov, OV 'Ws, not together in a place by


pie,

fXETd with
-in

Twv
the

dOoviivv
linen cloths

Kelfievov,
lying,

aX\a x<^pk
'by 'itself

tv(>

iTsfih.at''oth'er"d"sc leTvXijfiBvov sIq


which came first to
folded -up

'iva
'a.

Tonov.
^place.

8 TOTS

olv

el^nWiv

Kai
also

Then therefore entered

the

dXXp^ fia6r]Tii)g 6 i\9il^v TvpivTOg dg to fxvrjfifiov, Kai dcfv. saw'^^and^'beireted^ otl'sr disciple who came tomb, and saw first to the 9 For as yet they knew not the scripture, that ical iTTiaTevaev 9 ovSkiTio.ydp ySiiiTav Trjv ypa^-!]v, believed; ^''^ for not yet knew they the scripture, that f r^omThe deId.VThen the disciples went a^fi aVTOV 10 aTTJjXQoV IK "i'BKpWV avaCTtivai.
:

on

Went away to rise. own ''home '^Tl But >* behoves him from among [the] dead Mary stood without at oiv TToXlV TTpOg ^taVTOVg^^ 01 IXoOrjTaL 11 ^^^Qoi a". St the sepulchre weeping: therefore again BufMary to their fhome] the disciples. and as she wept, she ^ , y , t k \ "istooped down, and ei(TTr]KH irpog ^TO flV7] p,eTov'^ KAaiOVCra f4w." wg OVV into the sepuliooked '^weeping 'outside. gtood at the tomb As therefore
'

'

ii

the

7rapsKV\ptv Big TO fivrjfxeiov, Iz Kui Ueujpei cvo ayangels in white sitting, tKKaiBv, one at the head, she wept, she stooped down into the and beholds two antomb, ,v >>' fvnd the other at the < ~ ^. ^ ,., feet, where the body ,yt\ovg iv AEVKoig Kat)sc,ofxivovg, lya TTpog Ty KtqyaXy Kai eva lain, gels the .head and one of Jesus had in white sitting, one at t< 13 And they say unto ~ % ~ - 't j. ~ i o < -ii

chre, 12

and seeth two

,.,

-t^

>

',

/iv'

J^~

her,

Woman,

why TTpog TOig TTOOLV, OTTOV fKBlTO TO CwfXa TOV 17]&0V. Id


She
.at

'"/Cat"

weepest

thm* ?

the

feet,

where was
'they,

lai,d

the Tl

body

of Jesus.
',

And

cau^e'tiiyh^e"t'aket aw.iy my Lord, and I

Xfyovffiv avTy SKslvoi, Fvvai,


say
"^'''

KXaiBig

AiyH
?

avToJg,
to them,

Ho "her
flpav

Woman, why

weepest thou

She.s.iys

haviTlai'tlhim^'HAnd when she had thus

tOljKav TOVKVpiOV-IXOV, Kal-OVK.oUa TTOV my Lord, and I know not where they laid Because they took aw.ay
'^'"'Ol'-

**lf 1 ^'k *^s*^w*j'^*"" BUS standing.and knew not that it was Jesus. Qc^i^pfl

14

"'Koi''
*^"**

TaVTU flTTOVfja laTpCKf)!) these things having said she turned


standing,
ahid

(Ig.Td.OTTldlO, Knl backward, and

TOV 'l7]novv iaTuiTW Kai


Jesus

her

Woman,
thou? thou?

wliy
She, to be

t)ehold3

oiJK.ydsi OTi ^6" knew not that

'hjeovg
Jesus

ttTTlV,
it is.
;

>vcepest scekest

whom 15 Xgyfi avTy*o"


sg^
^
^
^

'irjcovg, Tivai, Tl
'Jesus,
'oTl
,

supposing him

Ho "her ~
SoKOV(Ta
thinking
'

^r}TCic; Woman, why weepest thou? Whom seekcst thou?


;

KXakig
i

Tiva

the gardener, Saithunto him. Sir, if thou have borne him hence,
tell

E/fflVlJ
gj^g
,
>

O KTJTTOVpOg iCTlV, XtyEl avr<p, KvpiE,


it is.

1
if
i

that the gardener


' >
'

says
> \

to him.
//
>

Sir,
n
>

me where thou

(TV

o (pacTTauag avToi',

BiTTS fioi

hast laid htm, and I will take him away. lejesussaith unto her, Mary. She turned her" b.te'L.

thou didst carry

avTov
iiim

,,

apw.

,_

off

him,
'

teU
'Says

, n a ^ >-rMi'i lo AtyEi avTy 6o" Irjffo'.;, fci.. "Mapta." z.Tpai

me

TTOV 'avTov- tOrjKag'" Kayut where him thou didst lay, and I
'

will take away.

'to "her
T

'Jesus,

Mary.
'

Turu-

l(o (JLvrineita

6 OLTTrAW.

-<^ Kai also TrA. o^dvia Kii^Lva^L. OLTTAW e^<i) KKaiovtra TfrA ; efu) L.
TO.
>

"

6 LTTrAW.

"

Kol
B

avTOVS TTr.
T.
<*

&t}Kai

avrov GLTTrAW.

6 LTTrA.

Kai QhTiiAVf
"

Mapia^

T.

Mopioi^ TTiA.

XX.
cpeiaa inivri og round she

J
Xkyn
says
''6"

N.
J[;^J;

247
R"fbbM,\"' wh?ch
is

auTtfi\ 'Pn,8/3owt- oXkyfrm, ^a<jKn\i.


to him,

Rabboni,

that
,

to say,
>

Cnichcr.

is

to'say.Maato'r. 17Je-

17 Xkyei avry ,,i w. jr, ' Saya Ho 'her

'Iijoroi'd
,1 'Jesus,

utttov,. ov7ru).ydi ' .XT ^ , 'Not "e 'me Houch, for uot yet

Mn

uov

cvaBk- S;'^ 1^^^^ not; for ^'''^ Touch me ""i I am t T have I


^^
iOfXd)Ol>C

(3>]Ka irp^ Tbv.Trarspa.^UOV'" a^oeuded

TrOpfVOV.Sf
^ut go
to

npoc rove
t^

my

^.^^ .-iscended to Father, but go to

tiOV,

ICai

dm
^

mj^Aerf
I

^oreWen 'i^^.^X^'^j'^l'^:^
(Cai

ahroic, 'AvaBaivu) TTOOC TOV.TraTepf UOV


to them,

unto

my

Father, aud

Vuy,
,

and
^

siy

ascend

my ^

FaUv
^

^^d
'Comes

''"r T'^V'^^LrOnrt" Gofl.ana your (joa.

my

iraripa.VflwV,
your Father,
mn/r
.,

Kai
and
^ \

OeuV-j-lOV

my God
>

Kai /Oedv.VfUOV. and your God.


". n
i

18 Epx^rai

Mat;dalene 18 Mary came aud told the

"'mapia
'Mary
,

II

<

1.

ri

MaycaXijvt) "aTrayytAAovaa"
^Magdalene
,
,

.=the
1,

bringing word

she has seen

"iWpaKEV'^ TOV KVptOV, Kai the Lord, aud

Tnvra

eiTreV

avry.

Toilg /tair^raXg disiples to the . ~ ./^ T


./

on

"

W Vvffrjg.OVV
It b:ing therefore

>(,.
eTeiling
.

oy/iCtQ Ty.T;ijbip<jl.tK(lvy, 94 that day,

~./

,,

ry

.^.^
flia
first T

these things he said to her.

VvpwV
dooi'B

ng..
fear

the

>'tU)V .aapfia-MV^ [day] of the week,


f\

,i~u

JD-

/cat

TwV
the

and

<

.'

K(.K\StaHEVU)V OTTOV 1](Tav 01 fiapr)Tai 'iaVVl]yHlVOl,


"disciiiles
'

-
~

<

I!?''

tlU

ha^iug been shut where ^were 'the


~
'T

assembled,
'

through
'

_A-. ,*A/3-, TOV ipOpOV TWV


of the

\OV0ai\x)V,
Jews,

tjAUev O
"came

'^ /I

'I

"

iTJtrOVg Icai 'Jesus and

tart]
stood

eig
in

to
the

>

had and spoken these things unto lier. 19 Then the same day at evening, being tlio first day of the week, when the doors were shut where the discipies were assembled for fear of the Jews, came Jesus and stood in the midst, and saith nto them, Peace be 20 And unto you.
disciples that she

sccu
''''

the

Lord,

^'^

^^

Htffov, Kai XkyH avTolg, Elprfvr] vfuv. midst, and says to them. to you. Peace

iSei^Ev 'avrolg Tag x^'ipag Kai r>)v he shewed to them the hands and the
(Tav

tovto elirwv And this having said rrXevpav .oruroD." ixdpr]'20


side

Km

she wed^mt1)'' them '/,i^ h-anda and his side.


'^^Jf g\^a^ ^h!n^lh"y gaw the Lord. 21 Then

of himself.

^Rejoiced

civ oi fiaOrfTai idovTtg tov therefore 'the "disciples having seen the
*6
'l/(T0U|f"

KVpiov.
Lord.

21

dinv

ovv

^Said 'therefore

avTolg
*to
jUf

^them

'Jesus

TrdXiv, Elprjvr] vfuv' again. Peace to you

KaOutg
:

dwkaTaXKev
'has "sent 'forth

g^ii"^*'pcact6e^Tnt"o you;' ^g my Father ^*^\'^""^'^'

"f^^a

as

me

O TraTl'tp, 'the =Father,

Kayd)
I also

TTEUTTW
send

vudg.
you.

22 Kai tovto
'And
J,his

(.ItTUV
haTi'ig eaid

^jjen he had saidtjiis, he breathed on thni,


^"^^J^^*'*y^"*^"^/J^'J,"j:

iv(pVfft)aEV, Kai Xsyl aVToXg, ho breathed into [them], and says to them.

AdjSeTt
Receive [the]

TrveVfia
'Spirit

ciyiOV.
'Holy:

Ghost: 23 whose soever

remitted^""to'^thcm
:

23

aVTol[g' anrf whose soever s/n.? ^d<pievrai^' ye retain, they are r<p they are remitted to them ^ ^, ^ , tamed. 24But Thomas, 24 Owfxag.ce, etg tK one of the twtive.caii^av".Tivci)v KBKpaTrjVTai. KpaTrJTf., But Thomas, one of <^d Didyraus wa:s not of whomsoever ye may retain, they have been retained. with them when Jesus ,., TtoV CWCeKa Xeyouevog ALCVflOg, OVK.nV .jIBT aVTWV OTE came. 2.";Tbe other was uot with them when disciples therefore said twelve Didymus, the called
of

'dv'.TlVUJV Tag d<pfJTe whomsoever ye may remit the


_

UjiapTiag,
sins,

.,^,,,.
'"6^^

,^

r]X9ev 'came
1-,
/

'hjaovgi.
'Jesus.
,

25 eXeyov
/
-

'Said 'thcrefdre 'to 'him'the


</-v
5i>

hujpaKanV tov KVpiOV,

We

have seen
-

the
>

Xord.
~
^

Taig.Xp(TlV.avrOV tov TVTTOV TUJV TJAUV, Kai the mark of the nails, and his hands

'

a\Xoi.jua0r/7-a(,' seen the Lord. But he Misciples, said unto them, Except 'other y 1 shall see in ills liands "i' O.de elTrev avTOlg, haV-flTJ lOW IV thepriut of the nails, Unless I see in and put my finger into But he. said to them, ~ "\ ^ liJ,^ paAw xX CUKTV- the print of the nails, ^TOV ^^,. ..
o'l

oiv
T

avT<^
>

'

'

>

put

'finger

^j^^' thrust hand into his side, I will not

my

\ev aov" elg ToyyTVTroy^^ tS,v


'my
into

I'iXwv, Kai ISaXuj ^Tfiv.xeipd.fiov"


nails,

into the

marjc

of the

and

put
2(5

my hand
And
Kai
add
after
"days"

^fJit'da/s'^f^4ln''*W3 disciples were wlthiu,

ug Trjv.TrXavpdv.avTOV,
his side,

ov.ftri

TnaTEvaoj.

Kaij[Z9'?yuspag ^^^^.^^5^"^^^;^}*
p^^^
j}jg

not at

all

wiU

I believe.

OKTU}
'eight

TToXiv
*gain

i)aav

iaio

oi.fiaOrjTai.avTof),
'his 'disciples,

Qwfidg
Thomas

fiiT

^but,

and stood

doors beUig in the

were ''within
Jesus,

with
I'ottj

'j.vtCjv.

tpx^Tai 6 'Itjaovg, tCjv 6vpu>v KSKXeiafikviuv, Kai


Comes
the'

them.
>

doors

having been shut, aud

stood

" Ma,c>(,o/x TTrA.


I

[L]TTrA. _P tcoj' LITijA-W. tiopafco I have seeu TTrA. ayye'AAovcra LTTrA. ^ o Kai t) Tas xfipa<; Kai Trjv TrAevpaf avToli LTTrA. Kai ( " a^euii/Tai they have been remitted Lirr. iav L. IrjcroDs (yead he said) TTr[A]. mov Tijy ' /xov TOV Sa.KTu\ov T. y Tonov place lt. 6 i/iTi A. x^'P** I"'''*'

'E^poioTi in

Hebrew
>

6 LTTrA.
<>

ftov (read the Father) [L]TTrA,

CTvnjy/ici/oi LTTrA.

S-i'*^

re'unto'you'^lv Then E.aith be to Thomas,

^'^

*'" J

M^.^o^
midst

I Q A N N H 2. mi eZ^v, Eipi,v7j

XX,
vfuv. 27 EZra Xlya to you. Then he says
Kol and
iSe
see

XXL
Kui
and

and

TV e^M^,
to Thomas,

said,

Peace

Reach hither

tiiy fin-

c[)fp

TOV.SaKTvKov.aov
thy finger

wSi,
here,

rdg.xfioag.fiov

^ handl'f an.f reach bi^ ^""/"er ther thy hand, and rtjpe r^r.Yftpa.'crow,

myknds;
Tnv.TrXevpdv.uov'

KUI

Bc'tXe

iic

and" bV not Ti^hlet; butbjiieving. 28Afld

^-^

'^--'',

'"^l

,^^
but
...

P"' C'
.

^'

ujj.yivov
^e not
^

Thomas answered and


said

dTTiTrog,
unbolieviug-,
.,

oXXd
,

TTiarog.
believing.
,
,

-^ -^e 28 ^Kat" aTreKnLfJn


;

Kal
and
''oH

unto

him.

Lord

and

my

My
God.

And
,

^answered
/

<

Oiofxag Kai bLtt^v avT(f,

O.Kvpiog.^iov Kui o.Geog.uov,


<

29 -Jesus saith unto 'Thomas and said to him, My Lord and' my God. -Says him, Thom.i3, because > , ~ v t' ~cii.t /-v Ar^ iwpaKag /IE, ^Oojua, TrtlTKTreVKag' thou ha-ot seen me, avTi^ ^_Q hjcTovQ, Oti thou hast believed: sto'him 'Jesus, Because thou hast sefti me, , Thomas, Ahouhast believed : blessed are they that / < . ? / /
'

29 Akyei

'

have not

seen, hg,ve bGlievcd.

and

j/sJ

fiaicapioi
blessed

01 they T?ho

u.7].i6ovTEg KUI have not seen and

^larevaavTSg.
Ijavo believed.

30Anci

many

Many signs truly did> in the presence of his disciples, which are (^ovg evujTriov in prestnco not written in this bus

other Jesus
.

30 IloXXa

fitv

oiv

Kal

ofXXffl

ar]ixua
-signs

.~)^
^'''

/3~e>~ii'^ Twv.fjLaarjTwv.^avTOv," a
~

^therefore "also ^

'other

> ovK.iffTiv
are not

(.TToirjaev did

o'lr)Je-

ysypafiwritten

of his disciples,

which

wit^'t^ty'emigh? f'^^^
believe that Jesus
is.

ry.lSt/3XVro^T<^.
this

31

TOvraM
6
the
is

ysypa^rac6
the
ij'iqg

book

but these have been written

'iva that

iug ye might have through his name.

God'^-'^an^'thfft beiievlife

^TTiOTei/crjjre"' ye may believe

OTL
that

^o" 'lr]<Tovg
Jesus
,

kauv
ye

x.ptarbg
Christ

tov

Sou

Qeov,

Kai

of God, and

"iva that

TTiaTevovreg ^(i)r)v ^
believing
life

f X'/tc

iv
in

rtp ovofxari

may have

^name

avrov.
'his.

21 Merd
things' Jeeus

ravra

tAavepcjasv tavrbv
^manifested
'himself

TiroKiv '6 'iriaovg^^


'again
'Jesus

After these thingfe


himself again to the to the
idisciplos at the sea of

shewed TOig fiaO.TjTaTg ETTt Trtga\d(7crT]g TrjgTij3epuidog'

icpavkpwatvM
And

Tiberias
v.'ise

and on this shewed he Aim;

," .of ovTwg' 2 iwo-V


disciples

at

-the

sea

(ffiov

i~v>' Zifiijjv

of Tiberias.

[iiimself]

thuS:

There were together Simon

TltTpog, Kai Ow/iaf a Peter, and Thomas

tt'

</-\~<
riig

he manifested

geUic/ Simon^ Peter" Xeyofievog called and Thomas called Di-

AiSvp-og, Didymus,
i
[sons]

Kal 'NaOavaijX 6 ajro and Nathan.ael from


of Zebedee,

Kavd
Cana

FaXiof Gali-

o/rnitniahleeTnd ^"^<fSr
the
SGiis

'^^

TOV Ze(3^0aiov, Kai oXXoi BK TU>V ,Xa9r,TU,V


and
"others ^of
^disciples

of Zebedeo
"'^^"^

^^e,

and the
''""o-

dfsci *Te3*

Shn'on

o^vrou ^ilo.
''^i*
"

3'Xsyfi avTolg '2ipo)v UsTpog, 'TTrdyoj dXievfiv,


Says to '"them '^Simon
'Peter,
I

Peter
I

sl^ith

unto them,

go

to

fish.

They Asyovcnv avTfii, 'EpxofieQa Kai i)uiug ^avv coi. ^'E^r)XQov 'we with thee. ^Come ''also They went forth They say to him, l^'w'ith thee. They went forth, and en- izai 'dvsjS/jffav" ug TO ttXoXov "'(vOvg,^^ Kal iv tKHVy Ty into the ship immediately, and during, that went up ^^'^
go a
fishing.

med?atel'^*'-"'a^ud^'that

thing. 4

morning

night they caught no- vvktI iTrladav oliSkv. But when the njght they took nothing.

Trpojtag.^f.

i)8x}

"ysvopkvTjg^^ iaTrj o"


being come
,

was

now

Btood on Irjaovg the shore but' the dis'Jesus ciples knew not that ,, _
c.ome, Jesus
:

,_,,., ^Hg^ TOV


on
,

itiyiaXov' ov

.../
shore;

And morning
, ,

already
j/'L

'^stood

the

it

was Jeans.

Then

iTjaovg toTiv.
Jfesus
,

c o

M AtyEi.
-'
<=

uei'tol "not ^howgver


t
,

yoHuav
*knew

,.,

oi

paOrirai oti
,.

ovv

Jesus saith unto them, Children, have ye any

it is.

Tl irpOtTipayiOV tXiTE ; flf] have ye ? him, No. 6 And he food any B~.id unto them. Cast ~ t '\^ the net on the rigbt EtTTEV' aVTOig, BaKtTB ELg Ta Cast to the Bide of the ship, and said to them.

.,

^Says '^therefore ,.

avTOig 'o 'toHhem


,^

. ., lr]<Tovg,
'Jesus,
>

'the Misciples that ., .

^ llaicia,
r* b

Little children,

-^

meat? They "I'fiwered

ii

>

'i!''' OEi,ia pipt)


right
side
"^

ATrEKpiffTjaav aVT<f), They answered him,


'

r\'

Ov.
No.
the

r'r\ $> ^ O.Ci

And be
net.

~ \ >S" TOV TTKOIOV TO OlKTVflV,


of the

ship

Kal GLTTrAW.

>

6 GLTTrAW.

[6] Tr.

@(i>fj,a

OLTTrAW.
>

avTOV
i..

f jricrTevvjTe i;. ~r- b gltTfaw. (read the di.sciples) LTTrA. ^ ^ [kol] and -^ 6 'IrjcroCs (read he manifested) a ; 6 TTr ytl/O/aeHJ? breaking TTrW. OLTTrAW. .. evOus LTTrA. ' Ae'yei he says t. 6 xa. [p 'Ir}(Tovs3 L ; [6J lijcrovs Tr ;

-f [alcoi/ioi']
'

eternal

L.

O LTXrA.

eve^rjcrav

entered
P cirl LX.

XXI.
Kai
and
ivp{]aST. ye shall fim

JOHN.
"ElSnXov
They
the
oi'

249
avro
it

o{}p,

Kai ^ovk
and
no
fishes^

cast therefore,

tVi" longer

iXicilcrat

ye shall

find.

They

to draw

'i'(TXi'<Tni'"

diro rov. ttXijOovq rivv ixOvajv,


multitude
of the

7 Xsyei
Sayg

ovv
therefore

were they able from


6./.ia6t]T)}g.kKEivoQ that disciple

cast therefore, and uow they were not; able to draw it for the umltitude of fishes. 7 Therefore that disciple

i]yaira b'\r\G0VQ
'

ri^V Tp(j},
to Peter,

"0 Kvpioq whom


The
Lord
Sftith

Jesus

loved

iariv.
'it is.

"Zifiuiv

whom ^loved oZv Ufrpoq,


'Peter,

Josus

the Lord.

unto Peter, It is -Now \vlicn

Simon therefore

ciKov&aq on 6 icvpiog iartv, having heard that the Lord it is,

Simon

Tov
[hie]

STrevStiTTjv dts^Maaro' upper garment he girded on,

^v.ypp yvfivoq'
for he

Kai tjSaXEV
and
oaSst

was

naked,

tUvTov
himself

iig
into

ttiv
the

QaXaaaav.
sea.

Peter hca; d that it was the Lord, he girt /i fisiur's coat unto him, (for ho was naked,) mid did cast himself into t:ic
,

o'lSe And the


far

aXXoi
other

fjiadijral
disciples

roJ
in the

'!r\oiapi(^ T^XBov' Email ship came,


(jjg.aTTo

ov.yap
for not

8 And the otlier disciples came in a little ship tfor the3^


E.
;

Ijcrav

fiaKpdv dirb rriQ


.

ytjg,
land,

'aX\'" were
but

were they

from the
the

not far from land, but as it were

Trr)x<^v

StaKoa'tMV^
'two '^hundred,
cnrsl3i]<Tav

avpovrsg to ciicrvov twv


dragging
Eig
net

two hundred
fishes.

cubits,)

dr;iggiug the net with

somewhere about ^cubits

ixOviov.
of fishes.

.9

,they see of coals there, and fiifa laid thereon, an^ Kai dprov, bread. 10 Jesus saith a fire of coals lying and fish lyiug on [it], and bread. unto them. Bring of ye haTe lOXsyet di'TOig '"6" 'Irjcrovg, 'Ei'JyKare dwo twv dtpapiojv utv the fish whichllSimbn now caught. Says -to 'yiem fishes which Peter went up, and 'Jesus, Bring of the to land ETTidaaTe vvv. 11 'Avtj3t] ^ JiifKi/v TltTpog, Kai (.'iXKvcrav to drewofthe netfishes, an full great ye took and drew the hundix'd and fifty and just now. Simon Peter, Went up three: nnd for all there SiKTVov y|7ri Trig y^^," j-isffTov '('^Oiiwi/ fxeydXMv" tKaTov were so many, yet was

'Qg When

otfv

rrjv
the

yrjv
land

9As soon then as they were come tp jSXtirovffiv Land, they saw .a fire

therefore they Went up

on

avOpaKiav KUfxkvriv kcu oipdpiov tTriKdjiEvov'

net

to

the land,

full

'

o "fishes

'large

a hundred [an'!]

not the net broken.

^Tr^vTr}KOVTaTpi(x)V^^ Kcn rorrovrwv oi'rwv ovk.LctxktUi] to 12 Jesus saith unto them, Come and dine. fifty three and [though] so many there w.ere w.is not rent the And none of tlie discidiKTVov. 12 Asygt avToXg ''6'' '\r]aovii, AiVT(. dpi(JTiiaaTe. ples durst ask him. Who art thou ? knownet. 'ji'sus. Come ye, dine, ^Says ^to ''them ing that it was the ovS^lg.'^Se'^ tToXfia twv fiaOrjTwv liiTdcai aliTOv, 2v Tig Lord. 13 Jesus thpn But none him, "vunturod 'of '^the ^Thou 'who Cometh, and taketh ^disciples to ask bread, and giveth. el ; eldoTEg oti 6 Kvpiog tcrriv 13 ipx^rai '^oi'v 6" Irjaovg them, and fish likewise. 14 This is now ^art? knowing that the Lord 'Jesus '^Comes ^therefore it is. the third time that Kai XajufSdvei tov dpTov Kai SiSojmv avTolg., Kai to 6\l/dpiov Jesus shewed himself tri his disciples, .'iftor fish and gives takes the bread and to them, and the
;

Ofioiwg.
in like n-v-iner.

14 tovto
This
[is]

i'jS)]

TpiTOV

i(pavEpwQr] ^6" '\r](jovg


'XJesus
'

now

the third time ^was 'manifested

Tol^fidSijTa'ic.'avTOv''
to his disciples

iyepBeic
having been raised
''says

Ik

veKpiov.
dead.

that he wasrison from the dead, l.'i So when they had dined, Jesus s.aith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of .Ton.'is,
lovest thou me more than these? Ho saith liim, Yea, Loni thou knowest that I
;

from among
*Simou

[the]

15 "Ore When
^iixiov
"Nai,
Yea,

ripicTTtjcfav, therefore they had dined,

ovv

Xfyei r<p S//xwvi TisTpo) 6'li](7nvg, unto


'to

^Peter
;

'Jesus,

s'lhjvd,"

dyairag
lovest thou

ju? ""TrXfTov"

rowT-wv

Simon [son] of Jonas,


Kvpii' Lord;
ail

m"

more

than these?

He saith love thee. Afysi avTtfi, unto him. Feed my He says to him, lambs. 16 He saith to
avrcfi. to him,
liim again the second time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me ?

(T. <piKui thou knowest that I have affection for thee.

olSag

oti

Aeyet He says

Bo(T(C Td.dpvia-fiov. Feed my lambs.

16 A^ya
He
fie
;

avTCJi
to

irdXiv
agaiu

hvnpov, Yi/uwv
a second time, -Simon

He saith unto him, Yea,


Lord
that
;

thou knowfst

s.ays

him

s'lwi'a,"
[son]

dymr^g

Atya

of Jonas, lovest thou

me? He says

avTijJ, 'Nat to him. Yea,

Kvpif
Lord;

av

oldag

thou knowest
^sheep

He I love thee. saith unto him, Feed my sheep. 17 He sailh

(piXix) ae. that I have affection for thee.

AtyH
He

avTip, Yloifimve
Shepherd

rd '7rpo/3ard"

says to him.

"

OVKeVi
fie

GLTW.
LTTrA.

icrxvof LTTrA.
'

y ei^ TTjr yrju


e

but [Tr]A. disciples) LTTrAW. little sheep T.

_ ovc a ovv 6
;

iJ.eya.Xojv

" dAAa TTrA. lyOvdov L. LTTr A.

" [o] Tr
^

1+
'

ovr therefore TrA.


*>

* irei/nJKOi'Ta rpitoiA LTTr.

6 LTir^.
l"

aiiTOv (read the

[0] Tr.

e 'loicii'ou

John

LTi

"Iwdvvov TA.

jrAeoi'

LTTcA.

Trpo^ctTia

250
unto iiim
the
third
' ^ Jo?*^V u'"et tbou'me? ^'^^ Vvlvv was ijri&ved be- \f~iQ wf Cjius^.- Iv; said uuto him affection for me ihi? tliird lime, LoTe^t

I 2

NNH
^'^^

2,
^[fiiuv

XXI.
''Iwva,
[soa] of Jonas,
J/Tre;/
,

ov. 17 Atyfi avTt^ TO


**'"'
;

rpiTOV,
third time,

(pt-i

'' ''''"

Simon

bast thou

"EXvKTJfQl]

6 IlsrpOg
'Peter,
. ,

Ori
.

avrt-J
-to
,

TO
the
,

'Was

'grieved
"

because he sid
,

bim

' tlioumc? Audheaid rpiTOV, ^iXhq fJ.B ; unto him, Lord thou third time, Hast thouaffection for me ?

'(Cai" ""{iTTSJ/

atTy,
to him.

Kl'plf,
Lord,

"fft;

kiiowcsc

all

things;
1

tiiou

knowtst that

TiavTa ^oloai^'
all

<jv
;

,., yivwoKHq
Tcnowest

and

said

thou
,

OTt
, -, ,
,

0tAw

at.

Asyei
"Says

Jcsu>aith unto him. Food my


love thee.

hwp.

18 Verily, verily, I say unto theo,

avT<i)
^to
,
,

.,,,. 0
*him
aOl,

thiug^jiowest

b/CJOUt;,"
'Jeaus,,

>, BoGKE
Feed
^

thou

that I have affection for thee.

Ta-^TTpopaTa'-flOV.

,_
.

>> Tn'> afifjV lO aUtjV


Verily
,

my
VttJTtpOQ

sheep.

verily
,

wast thou thou girdi.lst tliy:-eif, and walkedst Tviulhor thou would<!st: hut nben thou Bhalt bo old, thou fhait stretch forth thy hanJs, ntid another shall gird thpo, and

AVhen jomig,

MyU)

OTt

VQ

thyself, and thou wast younger ,. " , ?> n > oTav.dt yr]paayQ SKTTtpitTTaTEiQ oTTov ridiAtQ' where thou didst desire but when thou shall bo old thou shalt walkedst ^ ~ " y ' "x \ q t TtVtlQ TttQ-XtlQaqMOV, KOI aXKoq V 4w(T,' KUl OlOtl and anothei- thee shall gird, and bring [thee] thy bauds-, etretoh f ortti
x say

to thee.

When

,y , ti!,iOVVVtg thou girdedst

CtaVTOV,
'

KUl
>

'/

">

li

OvMXtig. thoif wo.Udes'l'''no" OTTOV where thou dost not desire. I'J This spake he, sig-

19

ToVToM
But
this

tlntV
he said

CTJfiaiviOV
signifying

TTOKft

by what

TOVTO tlTTWl' \kytl aVT<^, TOP QtOV. So^aOtl ho^sllouldy'oHfy^God! SciVaTiiJ And this baring said he says to him, God. death he should glorify And when he had spokcu thia, he saith un- AKo\ov9il UOl. 20 'EwiffTpaibtiQ^Ci^^ 6 UtTOOQ (SXtTTil TQV r* ' to hini, Follow me. . ^ ,, i, . u r> . .i Peter But having turned sees the Follow me. 20Theu Peter turning about, seeih the disci- uaQiiTriv ov TiyaTra o'lncovc aKoXovQovvra.oc Kai av't~tait '/ , pie whom Jesus loved ",..'' ,, , ,, \, if who aUo reclined Mesus following, whom 'loved following; which also disciple leaned on his breast at ly ^^ 'dtiTTl'M tTTl Tb.aTr\QoQ-aVTOV Kai t'lTTtV, KvOlt, TIQ tOTlV supper, and said.Lord, ^' who is it and said, JLord, his breast eupper on ^^ which is he that be-^ ^ ,^ trayeththce? 21 Peo TTCtpatl^OVf fff, 21 ToVTOV ^ ICOIV O IlSTpOQ Xsytl Ttfj IjJter seeing htm aaith ^,j^ j delivering un thee ? says =Him "seeing 'Peter to Jeto Jesus. Lord, and , what iAaH this man aov, Kvpit, \i)aovq. ol'TOQ.oi T ; 22 Atyti ovTt^ dvf 22 Jesus saith g^, 'Jesus, 'Says Ho *him If Lord, but of this one what uiJlo lum. It I will ,. , / , / TrpOQ at ; that he tarry till I aVTOV OV OtXtt) fitVtlV tU)Q lp\Ofiai, Tl come, what !4- <A(ii to ^^.i^ thee? "Thou what [is it] to till I come, 'I MesLre to abide thee? follow thou me. , . ^ t , r, oo 'T^y-\ n w" \' u 23 Then went this >.'<y- ^aKoXovUti /XOl. 2o bjt,r]XotV OVV ^U.AOyOC.OVTOg" tig iug abroad among the this word Went out therefore among 'fo^ow me. that that brethren, > ./.,-. n n t ^Kai disciple should not TOVQ aCt\<l>OVg, Oti O.^uUrjTIjg.tKtlVOg OVK.aTTOVVriaKtC dii.: yet JesHs said not However does not die. brethren. Thai that disciple the unto him. Ue shall not ,, c< n > ~ , >w' tr
i ,

KM

'

>

'

>

r.'

,..,._

,, Eav

ii

'

<-

'

<

>

die

but. If 1 will tluit


till

OVK
'not
>

,,

tlTTtV
aid

ttVTtft
*

he tarry

I come, what is that to thee ? .vnai, .!. lu uu, r

*to

'him

O IrjaoVQ, OTI OVK- aiTOVVtiaKtL he does not die 'Jesus, That


;

>
/

>

aW

Eav
If

'

but.

avTuv
^him

6(Xu)
'I

/r \

,/

'desire to abide

fiivtiv twg- tpxoi^cu, ^Ti till I come, what

Ttpog
[is it]

n aty

to

thee?

irtpi tovtcdv, 24 OiTog iaTiv 6 ^a9r]T7)g 6 fiaprvpwv 21 This IS the oisctthe disciple who bears v/itness concerning these things/ jhis is pic which tostiiieth >\' ,. _ ,. /i' " ypaxf/ag of these things, and Kai TttVT.a' Kai oicafitv oti aXrfBqq ^tanv rf wrote these things: and [who] wrote these things and we know that true is and we know that his j,, ^ \ ,,. . true. fiapTVOia.aVTOU.'' 20 "taTlV.Ct KOI TTOAAa r" ^OffO' testimqiiy is 25 And there are also 'many whatsoever And there are also 'other^hiugs his witness. many other things , ,, _ , ^ o' " H r" Irjaovg, uTiva tav .tv, ypafi]Tai ovct^ which Jesus did, the fTTOi/jcTEv which, if tboy should 'Jesus, which if they should be written one by one, ^not ''oven 'did / , , bo written every one, . o ,o> Oljiai TOV KOaflOV ^x^P^l^'^'- ^" ypa(pofitpa pip/\ia. J suppose that even aVTOV tha world itself could ''i.tself 'I 'suppose ^the 'world would contain the 'written 'booka. / not coutaiu the books { , n o-, * Af^rjV.' " S' that should be writ,

>

<

,_,..,.

aWa

<

kM

ten.
''

Atiion.

Amen.

'Ituaiov
;

LTTrA
r

John

'Irjtrovs

Itiai'i'OV TA. LTr (lead he says) T{Tr].


;

'

[(cal] L.

^ 4- [ere] thee L. 6e but LTTi AW. " oCto? 6 A67OS LTTrA OVK il-niV St Tr. verae 25 T. naprvpia e<TTiv TTrA. \

"A.iKu

*>

=" Ae'Yei says T. " Traio-a <ri> LTTrA. 6 i ^iLcni ae Tta. TTpo^and little sheep TTrA. jaoi aicoXovflet LTTrAW. -f- OVV therefore LTTrA. ' -f 6 who LTr[A]. " ainov J ri rrpos <7e T.

''

=0 which

LTrA.

"i

ovS' LTrA.

x<"OTCiv

fr.

cJi.TrA.

Kara

'loidioji'

(ludwriv a) according to John TrA.

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