You are on page 1of 35

The Island of Hawaii - an uncommon field

trip
(c) Stefan Thiesen, 1994
Introduction............................................................................1
1) The Trip..............................................................................2
2) Origin of the Hawaiian Islands ..........................................7
3) Climate and Weather in Hawaii.......................................15
4) Hawaiiís Biological Heritage ...........................................19
5) Astronomy and Space Science in Hawaii.........................25
Literature:............................................................................32
Introduction

The big island of Hawaii is among the places on 

Earth with the best conditions for scientific research in 

practically all major sciences, ranging from marine over 

earth to the space sciences as well as ecology and 

conservation biology and many more. The unique geographic 

situation of the Hawaiian islands as well as their 

natural history and relatively young geological age make 

them a profound source for interdisciplinary research. 

Geological and geophysical processes similar to those 

driving volcanism around the world but also the 

biological evolution of species which ­ due to the 

islands isolation ­ has gone it's own distinct ways can 

be easily observed. The Pacific ocean is a vast, still 

mostly unexplored area of research by itself and Pele ­ 

the ancient Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes ­ has provided 

us with Mauna Kea,  the worlds foremost astronomical 

window to space. Hawaii is of course more than just a 

collection of intriguing scientific phenomena ­ the 

culture that evolved in the islands is just as unique as 

their nature since in present time here is the merging 

point of the Americas, Asia and Oceania bringing together 

elements of all world cultures. 

During this Field trip I had the chance to explore 

two of the big Islands most exciting aspects: Volcanoes 

National Park with it's vast, almost surrealistic 

landscapes shaped by lava flows, craters, cinder cones, 

1
unique tropical forests and the more and Mauna Kea 

observatory,  still caught in the excitement about 

observing the effects of the Comet Shoemaker Levy 9 

impact on Jupiter.

In the following report I will attempt to present a 

brief survey of the field of “Hawaiian Studies” including 

some historical and geographical aspects. Our scarce 

knowledge about the achievements of the ancient "Kahuna", 

the scientists of old Hawaii, will guide me through my 

explorations. Since there is a lot of literature about 

the islands, and knowledge about geology and ecology is 

quite common nowadays, I will concentrate a little more 

on some aspects of their history rather than only 

summarizing the conclusions of the modern textbooks I 

read. This paper is not designed like a traditional field 

trip report. Instead I chose to present a cross­section 

of my impressions and insights, those gained during the 

excursion as well as those I derived from lectures and 

textbooks.

1) The Trip

During the time I lived in the State of Hawaii I 

only had the chance to explore two islands to some 

extend: Oahu, where I have spent most of my time and Maui 

where I visited during spring break 1994. This is why I 

originally decided to participate in the “Hawaiian Field 

2
Studies” course offered by Hawaii Pacific University 

which unfortunately didn’t take place due to a lack of 

interest among the students. Hence I decided to organize 

a tour to the Big Island myself and do some independent 

studies on my own as part of my external degree program.

I arrived at Hilo airport in the morning of July 

25th 1995 and immediately left for Volcanoes Natl. Park 

with my rented Jeep. I purchased a one week ticket for 

the Park and spent the rest of the morning at the 

visitors center, gathering information and watching 

movies about recent volcanic activities of Kilauea and 

Mauna Loa volcanoes. Later I drove around the Kilauea 

caldera on the crater rim drive, exploring sites around 

Kilauea and Kilauea Iki craters and exhibitions at the 

Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory and Thomas A. Jaggar 

Museum. The crater rim drive was partly closed due to 

recent earthquake activity. Some scenic stops included 

sulfur banks, steam vents, the rift zone with the 1982 

lava flow, Keanakako’i crater and as said before: Kilauea 

Iki.

During the following time I drove to the tourist 

centers of the Kona coast which gave me the opportunity 

to validate the effects of extensive development on the 

natural environment. Apparently the culture of the Big 

Island still is far more shaped by native Hawaiians than 

it is the case on the other large islands, so naturally 

the current political tensions involving the legitimate 

3
Hawaiian Independence Movements represented by the "Ohana 

Council" and others are more obvious. Here on Hawaii the 

most recent conflict was partly caused by plans of the 

State Government to allow extensive real estate 

development as well as the building of Golf courses on 

sacred ancient Hawaiian grounds. “What would you say if 

somebody would just go ahead and built Hotels on your 

cemeteries?” a young Hawaiian asked me. Many of the beach 

parks however were closed or occupied by protesting 

natives with Hawaiian “War Flags” displayed at park 

entrances. This made it difficult for me to find 

campsites where I could spend the night ­ I was forced 

for example to spend my first night at a rather expensive 

hotel in Kailua since all official campgrounds were 

closed. The situation wasn’t as difficult in the Natl. 

Park area and on the Hilo side and most Hawaiians 

actually were very friendly and peaceful and didn’t have 

anything against backpackers and campers ­ their protest 

was mainly directed against the government policy and 

mass tourism. As soon as they found out that somebody was 

really interested in Hawaii they immediately invited them 

to stay in Hawaii as long as they wanted to. 

Despite the bad weather which was caused by a whole 

chain of hurricanes passing by the islands in the South I 

spent some time at South Point Hawaii, named Ka Lae in 

Hawaiian, simply meaning “the point” which is the 

southernmost point of the ‘US’. South Point has coastal 

cliffs and a very turbulent ocean, and it was here where 

4
some of the first Polynesians landing in Hawaii settled 

down. Most of the area now is under the jurisdiction of 

Hawaiian Homelands. Sites of archeological interest can 

be found here, including those of a heiau and a rather 

well­preserved fishing shrine. There also are many canoe 

mooring holes drilled into the rock ledges. Ancient 

Hawaiians used to anchor one end of a rope through the 

holes and tie the other end to their canoes, so the 

strong current would pull the boat straight out to the 

deep, turbulent waters where they could take advantage of 

the splendid fishing grounds without being swept out to 

the sea. 

A surprising feature nearby is the unexpected 

scenery of a modern wind park: 37 high­tech windmills 

lined up beside the road, cattle peacefully grazing under 

them. It is a rather surreal scenery. Each of these 

generators however can produce enough electricity to 

serve 100 households and it was calculated that the 

entire electricity demand of the complete state could be 

served ­ at least in theory ­ by wind energy conversion.

  It is truly intriguing to observe the change of 

landscape and climate along the road from Kona to Hilo, 

the street leading the traveler through completely 

different zones ranging from tropical rain forests to 

arid volcanic deserts. There are several reasons for this 

natural diversity, some due to differences in altitude, 

others as a result of lacking precipitation on the 

leeward side as well as ongoing volcanic processes. I am 

5
doing some extensive hikes to get an impression of the 

landscape and nature beyond the road, exploring ancient 

petroglyphs and burial sites, the biggest impression 

being quietness and solitude in a seemingly untouched 

nature, especially in Kau desert and along the southern 

slope of Mauna Loa. 

Together with Fred Conroy, a retired navy nuclear 

technician whom I had met at Namakani Paio Campground in 

Volcanoes Natl. Park , I spent some more time at the 

Park, attending lectures at the visitors center and 

driving down the Chain­of­Craters road to the current 

eruption site of one of the minor breakouts of Kilauea 

down by the ocean, where new land is formed. Fred was 

looking for a house to buy in Hilo, which gave me the 

chance to get to know Hilo and some of it’s inhabitants a 

little better than I would have otherwise.

The last item on my itinerary was Mauna Kea with 

it’s unearthly volcanic landscape, intriguing 

archeological sites and of course the observatory. A 

unique Hawaiian mystery awaits the curious visitor in the 

summit region of Mauna Kea: about half an hour from the 

summit road, walking and climbing over volcanic rock in 

the thin air, one finds lake Waiau, right there in the 

center of a cinder cone at an altitude of 13,020 feet 

(which makes it the third highest lake in the USA). The 

lake is mysterious for several reasons. How can a lake 

exist in the center of a porous cinder cone in desert­

like conditions with less than 15 inches annual rainfall? 

6
It is fed by melting winter snow and permafrost which 

quickly evaporate at other locations on Mauna Kea and 

although the lake doesn’t have any freshwater springs, is 

no more than 10 feet deep and even feeds a little creek, 

it somehow maintains it’s water level. Up to now 

geologists were unable to solve this mystery. For the old 

Hawaiians however, there was no mystery at all: for them 

it is a lake of the gods.

The freshwater reservoir probably also was the 

reason why there were early settlers on Mauna Kea in 

ancient times, mostly people who worked in the stone 

quarries found everywhere around the summit area. 

Native Hawaiians used to bring  the umbilical cords 

of their babies and throw them into the lake, hoping the 

children would gain the power and strength of the 

mountain...

2) Origin of the Hawaiian Islands 

From the geological point of view, the Hawaiian 

Islands are considered to be young, the big island being 

the youngest member of a still  growing family of 

islands. Here nature was so kind to give us easy access 

to  the complete natural history of tropical volcanic 

islands, ready to be examined and analyzed by scientists. 

In the case of for example the French Frigate Shoals, 

Necker Island or the Midway Islands far in the northwest 

of the chain, we find small atolls ­ remedies of formerly 

7
much larger volcanic landmasses ­ in their very latest 

state of development, whereas in the southeast we can 

observe "islands in the making", the big island still 

growing due to the activity mainly of Kilauea volcano. 

Beside the existing landmasses there is Loihi Seamount, 

an active submarine volcano in it's shield building 

stage, already rising approximately 4000 meters above the 

floor of the Pacific Ocean. Here it is interesting to 

review the knowledge the native Hawaiians themselves had 

about natural history and origin of their homeland, their 

"aina" which approximately means "the living land". Those 

carrying and passing on the secret scientific knowledge 

were called the "Kahuna" who were far more than just 

mystic priests of a religious order. Actually they had 

more in common with the modern western scientist, 

mastering their profession only after more than two 

decades of studies and training in a strict scientific 

discipline. They were the trained professionals of their 

time in the fields of medicine, agriculture, 

architecture, education and the sciences, responsible for 

conserving natural resources as well as passing on and 

advancing knowledge with all means accessible to them. 

Usually the members of the Kahuna were recruited among 

the children of the ali'i, the ruling class of old 

Hawaii. However children of exceptional ability from the 

commoners, the lower ranks of society were accepted also. 

The main criterions were intelligence, interest and 

willingness to learn and study hard. A short survey of 

their history and customs is given in L.. McBride's book 

8
"The Kahuna", which I refer to below. I will concentrate 

on some of the actual knowledge of the Kahuna and compare 

it to modern day scientific research results.

There was one order of the Kahuna that specialized 

on "Earth Studies" (kilohonua) and another group of 

experts was learned about the configuration of the 

landscapes, both being the ancient pendants of modern 

Geologists and Geographers. The greatest of these learned 

specialists were supposed to be able to identify any rock 

specimen from any district on the island of Hawaii as 

well as the place it was cropped out. Density, color and 

usability were the parameters applied for rock 

classification, and there were about two dozens of 

different types in the three categories that could be 

identified by these experts. Even nowadays scientists all 

over the world use the Hawaiian terms pahoehoe and a'a to 

distinguish between smooth and rough lava flows. 

Similar to the practices elsewhere around the world, 

much of what the Kahuna knew was passed on to their 

students by means of poems and mystical stories about 

ancient gods and heroes, and the mental abilities 

required in oral traditions often dramatically exceed 

those in societies that use writing for information 

storage. In the case of geology and the earth sciences 

the main protagonist of these living stories was Pele, 

the goddess of volcanoes, earth and fire. These Tales 

show us that the Kahuna had advanced far beyond the realm 

of common sense and every day knowledge. One of the most 

9
striking examples is the mystical story about the 

creation of the islands by Pele. The legends tell that 

Pele arrived at the unknown islands far in the northwest 

and proceeded along the island chain finally settling on 

the Big Island, where she found perfect conditions to 

stay. This story corresponds surprisingly well with the 

view of modern geologists regarding the relative age and 

origin of the islands, but the analogies go even further. 

An ancient chant says:

She comes first to the top of the mountain

Young and beautiful, dancing in all her glory

Then she sleeps, becomes old and ugly

Moves through the hidden ways of the mountain

To come out near the seashore 

Angry and capable of great destruction 

This is a type of cyclic volcano behavior that has been 

observed again and again by scientists: melted rock rises 

from 35 Miles below and fills a huge reservoir just 

beneath the summit of the volcano, splitting the top of 

the mountain as soon as the pressure exceeds stability 

limits. Spurts of lava shoot into the air like  beautiful 

gigantic fireworks. After the summit eruption the 

mountain behaves calmly, sealing itself off on the top. 

The lava then invisibly seeks it's way downward the 

slopes through cracks and old lava tubes towards the sea 

and breaks out wherever the system is weakest, usually 

near the shore or even underwater as I could observe 

10
myself at the end of the chain of craters road during my 

visit to Volcanoes Natl. Park. Interesting is also that 

the legend tells us that after a fight between Pele and 

her mortal husband Kamapua'a they divided the land of 

Hawaii between them, Pele claiming the parts south of 

Mauna Kea (the Mauna Loa and Kilauea region) whereas the 

remainder of the island chain was given to Kamapua'a and 

the mortal humans. This too corresponds with our current 

knowledge: Mauna Loa and Kilauea are active volcanoes and 

the remaining area to the north­west is comprised of 

dormant volcanic structures such as Mauna Kea, Haleakala 

on Maui and others. Bearing in mind the existence of 

Loihi, the following is an intriguing prediction Pele 

gave to Kamapua'a:

Someday I will build for you a new island

Another land in Hawaii

And there we will live together

Forever in Harmony...

While the Kahuna Knowledge regarding temporal order of 

events during the creation of Hawaii can be explained by 

their thorough exploration and observation of nature 

(they new about erosion and were aware of the process of 

volcanic land formation), it is hard to imagine how they 

could have had any knowledge whatsoever about the 

existence of submarine volcanic activity south east of 

Hawaii. It is thought to be a coincidence but I prefer to 

think that a brave Kahuna made what nowadays would be 

11
called an "educated guess". Another chant also displays 

how far advanced the Kahuna's understanding of natural 

processes was. They may have been the only ones in 

ancient time who knew about the connection between tidal 

waves and volcanoes and earth quakes and  in distant 

places. Somehow they figured out or guessed that Tsunamis 

in Hawaii originated in places far away and had their 

origin in volcanic type events:

In far Kahiki 1

Pele stamps the long wave

The high wave

The broad wave

The wave that dashes the shore

Of Hamakua

And of Hilo ­ And overturns the land...

It is of course true that modern Geology knows more 
about the Hawaiian Islands than the Kahuna new. We know 

the chemical composition of rocks, measure the movements 

of volcanoes and landmasses as well as seismic events and 

the exact temperature of lava and many other parameters. 

We know that the islands were formed as the result of a 

volcanic "hot­spot" transferring heat from the earth's 

interior to the upper crust and that the Pacific plate 

slowly moves over the spot so that instead of a single 

large island an island chain is formed. We don't know for 

1 Kahiki originally is thought to be the name for Tahiti, or even for


Java according to different sources. Later it became the general
word for "far abroad".

12
sure however, how this hot spot came into existence. Is 

it the result of a meteor penetrating the earth’s crust 

in a catastrophic event? Until now this question remains 

unanswered. 

If we take into account that we have the means of 

satellite remote sensing, deep drilling, submarine 

vessels, high precision chemical and physical analyzing 

methods and more at our hands, whereas the Kahuna only 

had the techniques accessible to a stone age society, we 

cannot appreciate their achievements high enough. 

It is believed that most of the land area nowadays 

comprising Volcanoes Natl. Park possibly will be subject 

to a catastrophic land­slide in the future. It is proven 

that several similar events took place in the islands in 

the past. Some of the steepest cliffs ­ such as those on 

the Windward coast of Kohala on Hawaii or the Nuuanu­Pali 

on Oahu have been formed through this process. Extensive 

geologic undersea mapping around Hawaii revealed that 

complete sectors of all volcanoes, including Mauna Loa 

and Kilauea, have been lost after frequent landslides 

which is the second reason for landloss in Hawaii ­ 

besides ordinary erosion. These repeated processes: 

eruptions, subsidence, landslides and erosion together 

are responsible for the formation of the distinctive 

Hawaiian landscape. The big island is actually built of 

five different volcanoes, Kohala being the northernmost 

and oldest one. Kohala’s rainy northeast flank has been 

13
eroded into steep cliffs and fantastic canyons, south of 

Kohala we find Mauna Kea which ­ as I mentioned before ­ 

is thought to be dormant. It’s last eruption occurred 

long before humans settled in Hawaii, approximately 4000 

years ago. The summit of Mauna Kea is covered with snow 

during winter time, and during the last ice age even a 

glacier formed at an altitude of more than 4000 meters ­ 

it’s terminal moraines are still visible today. Hualalai 

volcano dominates the western part of the island which 

the last time erupted in 1801. Mauna Loa and Kilauea are 

considered to be the most active volcanoes in the world, 

which was one of the reasons to establish volcanoes natl. 

Park through a division of the original Hawaii Natl. 

Park, the other part now being Haleakala Natl. Park on 

Maui.

Volcanic activity is different around the world and 

so is the chemical and physical composition of the 

erupted material, namely lava and subterranean gases. The 

most abundant oxide in lava is silica (between 40 and 

75%). As the fraction of silica increases, the fraction 

of the alkalis increases too (potash and soda), and as it 

decreases, the percentage of iron oxide, magnesia and 

lime rises. This can be observed in Hawaii where the lava 

mostly is near the lower end of the silica scale while 

being rich in iron, magnesia and lime. Most of the 

islands’ landmass consists of basaltic rock and most of 

the lava extruded by the active volcanoes in the Natl. 

Park is olivine basalt.

14
Average chemical composition of Lava:

Oxide Symbol Percentages


Hawaii  Mt.St.Helens
___________________________________________________
Silicon SiO2 48.4 63.5
Aluminum Al2O3 13.2 17.6
Iron FeO 11.2 4.2
Magnesium MgO 9.7 2.0
Calcium CaO 10.3 5.2
Sodium Na2O 2.4 4.6
Potassium K2O 0.6 1.3
Titanium TiO2 2.8 0.6
Other 1.4 1.0
___________________________________________________

The above table shows a comparison of lava composition at volcanoes 

in Hawaii and Mt. St. Helens in weight percent (source: Hawaii 

Natural History Association).

The absolute and relative abundance of oxides is 

only one parameter that is used to characterize lava 

types. Others are viscosity, temperature and the amount 

of gaseous substances in the lava, the latter two greatly 

influencing the first. All this is described in great 

detail in Macdonald’s, Abbott’s and Peterson’s splendid 

book “Volcanoes in the Sea ­ the Geology of Hawaii” as 

well as in the field guides available at Volcanoes Natl. 

Park.

3) Climate and Weather in Hawaii

15
Frequently rumors occur that the Hawaiians never 

developed a word for "weather" since it is nice and 

beautiful anytime anyway. It is obvious that whoever 

invented this rumor never actually visited the islands 

for their weather system is comprised out of a great 

variety of micro climates and also seasonal and daily 

changes. This must have been so in ancient times too 

since there was a Kahuna order devoting their lives to 

the science of "Meteorology", called nanauli. On the top 

of the hill named "Halekamahina" (house of the moon) was 

their residence, maybe the oldest known weather station 

conducting systematic synoptic meteorology whatsoever. 

From what we know, their knowledge of the art of weather 

forecasting was about as far advanced as our knowledge 

was before the introduction of satellites and high speed 

computers enabling us to use complex numerical modelling 

­ a technique not more than 30 years old!

The Kahuna had names to describe each change of the 

wind, denoting it's strength, direction and temperature. 

They also had a system naming every type of rain taking 

into account the amount of relative precipitation, 

direction and duration. Once more thorough observation of 

natural phenomena such as cloud morphology, wind speed 

and direction, waves, visibility, the twinkling of the 

stars, the color of the sunset etc. allowed the Kahuna to 

draw correct conclusions and apply them to every day 

tasks. 

16
It seems that the Kahuna generally were not so much 

concerned with the question "Why is this or that?". Their 

main goal was to gain knowledge for the purpose of 

practical application. Since Hawaii is fairly isolated 

knowledge transfer from other regions and cultures was 

limited, so the Kahuna didn't have the chance to "stand 

on the shoulders of giants" during their scientific 

pursuits. When Hadley for example developed his first 

simple model of global atmospheric circulation, he had 

the advantage to have the resources of European 

universities at his hands ­ compiled knowledge of 

thousands of years of research and academic work from 

around the world, an advantage no Kahuna ever had, 

especially since to our knowledge the Hawaiians never 

developed any writing at all beyond petroglyphs. When 

analyzing the factors that drive the Hawaiian weather 

system, we need to apply a more global perspective than 

the Kahuna were capable to imagine.

There are two factors that are responsible for most 

of the weather phenomena in Hawaii: the north­east trade 

winds and the local relief of the islands. Hawaii is 

situated just north of the intertropical convergence zone 

(ITCZ), so the climate is subtropical and fairly well 

described by the idealized Hadley circulation model. The 

trade winds are carrying air of high humidity from the 

north so that due to the high rising volcanic mountains 

and mountain chains all of the large islands can be 

clearly divided into a leeward zone of low and a windward 

17
zone of high precipitation. The effects are so extreme 

that Hilo is "Americas rainiest city" (up to 300 inches 

annual rainfall) whereas less than a two hour drive away 

a desert like landscape can be found, beginning just a 

couple of miles beyond Volcano village. The differences 

between the micro climates are extreme on the Big Island 

due to the windward/leeward effect but also due to 

drastic altitude changes. The extremes during my visit 

were a temperature of above 40°C in Ka'u desert, high 

precipitation in Hilo and dry weather with frosty 

temperatures on the summit of Mauna Kea. The lack of 

rainfall and almost perfect weather is the reason why the 

leeward Kona coast of the Big Island is the preferred 

tourist spot and subject to rampant real estate 

development. However ­ without the high rising mountains 

intercepting the clouds of the trade winds and so being 

responsible for the "bad weather", the south­western 

Hawaiian islands would be as barren and hostile as the 

flat atolls in the north­west, and there simply wouldn't 

be enough water in Hawaii to support a large human 

population. This is a good example for the influence of 

physical geographic factors on human settlement: although 

the dry and sunny leeward areas of the islands, be it 

Oahu, Maui or Hawaii bring the tourism industry to the 

island state (in itself a double edged sword), this 

wouldn't be possible without the windward weather zones. 

Hawaii's setting in the Pacific ocean and close 

proximity to the inner tropical convergence zone are the 

18
reason for the fact that two other climatic phenomena 

have large impact on the local weather system: the 

occurrence of Hurricanes and the El Niño Southern 

Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon, the latter being closely 

connected to the atmospheric/oceanic circulation system 

of the Pacific. El Niño is also thought to be an 

indicator for the effects of antropogenic climate change. 

In 1994 it probably was responsible for the formation of 

the numerous hurricanes north of the convergence zone as 

well as almost three months of rainstorms in a row during 

winter and spring 1994 in Hawaii that caused considerable 

damage. Because of Hurricanes and the repeated danger of 

flash­floods, an extended warning system, shelters and 

evacuation plans were developed to help insure the 

security of locals as well as visitors.

4) Hawaii’s Biological Heritage 

I will begin this chapter citing Charles Darwin himself:

"The archipelago is a little world within itself, or 

rather a satellite attached to America, whence it has 

derived a few stray colonists, and has received the 

general character of it's indigenous productions. 

Considering the small size of these Islands, we feel the 

more astonished at the number of their aboriginal beings, 

and their confined range. Seeing every height crowned 

with it's crater, and the boundaries of most lava­streams 

19
still distinct, we are led to believe that within a 

period geologically recent the unbroken ocean was here 

spread out. Hence both in space and time, we seem to be 

brought somewhat near to the great fact­­that mystery of 

mysteries­­the first appearance of new beings on earth."

These words of Darwin describing his impressions of 

the Galapagos islands almost sound like a religious 

experience. Hawaii certainly is no geographic Satellite 

of America, but otherwise the same words could have been 

told about Hawaii. Isolated islands proved to be crucial 

for modern evolutionary biology, and continuing 

evolutionary studies largely depend on the survival of a 

meaningful sample of endemic island flora and fauna. The 

ancient Kahuna however were not very much concerned with 

the survival of species and studies of evolutionary 

processes ­ it was their duty to put nature to the use of 

man and their admiration and adoration of their natural 

environment might have had quite pragmatic roots. As 

other Polynesians the old Hawaiians had a highly 

developed agriculture and may also have been the first to 

introduce the systematic science of botany, including a 

detailed plant taxonomy. The classification system 

consisted of groups and sub­groups allowing the 

identification and description of certain plants. The use 

of a general name such as  a'e, pilo, hapu, kokio, or  

ohia had the purpose to associate those plants sharing 

certain characteristics. Then the plant was given an 

additional name to further specify the type of bloom, 

20
form of leaves or some other trait and in some cases yet 

another name was used to still further distinguish plants 

from another. I found the following example of Kahuna 

plant taxonomy in McBride's book "The Kahuna":

"For example, using Ohia as the general name, lehua 

was added to describe the feathery nature of the bloom. 

In addition the color of the blossom is described or 

another trait included to name the tree exactly.

Ohia lehua apane Red bloomed ohia

Ohia lehua polena Yellow blossomed ohia

Ohia lehua puakea White blossomed ohia

Ohia lehua ai Ohia with edible fruit

Ohia ha Ohia with tiny edible fruit

Ohia maka noe A Kauai shrub

Ohia lehua haole Foreign Ohia"

Even today many problems in Hawaiian plant taxonomy 

remain to be solved. Among the local flora there are many 

complex and only poorly understood groups and species 

that require further field and laboratory study. Although 

a large number of specimen has been collected, there 

definitely hasn't been enough study of natural 

populations in the field. A big problem is that a large 

number of studies were based on dried herbarium specimens 

only and few attempts have been made to find correlations 

between the results of biosystematic laboratory study and 

field observations. Therefore, taxonomic entities such as 

species or varieties were often described with poor 

21
biological understanding of the plant, solely based upon 

one or a handful of specimens only.

One order of Kahuna were expert farmers (Kahuna  

hoouluai) with highly specialized knowledge about the art 

of agriculture, horticulture and the use and plantation 

of numerous herbs (the latter together with the Kahuna  

la'au lapa'au, the pharmacologist and general 

practitioner of his time). According to legend Kahuna 

medicine, pharmacology and herbology were developed to a 

stage enabling the doctors to even treat some of the 

worst maladies, including cancer.

Little is known nowadays about the agricultural 

tricks of old Hawaii, however, we have some knowledge 

about the results. It was reported that when Captain Cook 

discovered the islands in 1779, there were 70 different 

types of bananas, 24 kinds of sweet potatoes and hundreds 

of varieties of kalo or Taro, which probably was the most 

important of all Hawaiian crops. The entire plant can be 

used for human nutrition, and based on an estimate of the 

botanist Dr. Otto Degener, as little as one square mile 

of intensively cultivated Taro fields would be necessary 

to continuously feed as mmany as 15,000 people.

It is not known whether or not the Kahuna had a 

systematic knowledge of what nowadays is conservation 

biology. From old chants we get the impression that they 

were aware of the fact that the damage to nature is 

inevitably followed by damage to man. One consequence of 

this knowledge was a number of Kapu, or "dos and don'ts" 

22
restricting the tempering with the environment. The 

"aloha aina" may have been a central theme throughout 

Hawaiian history, although the term itself originates in 

the political movements of more recent times.

Modern conservation biology is concerned with a much 

greater variety of problems than the Kahuna had in mind. 

Hawaii is no longer an almost completely isolated island 

chain virtually in the middle of nowhere, but a modern 

country, one of the Earth’s largest military bases and 

one of the worlds most preferred tourist spots, all 

putting tremendous strains onto local environment and 

culture.

The following words of Danielle and Charles Stone 

are suited well for the purpose of expressing the scope 

of modern conservational biology in Hawaii and elsewhere. 

"Conservation biology is the combination of art and 

science, compromise and stubbornness, judgment and 

serendipity necessary to perpetuate some semblance of 

natural biological diversity on Planet Earth. Concern for 

natural areas and native plants and animals is not just 

something that is "nice" to do if all else is taken care 

of. Nor is it an exercise in futility. The global loss of 

biota is approaching a crisis ­ one more severe than the 

widespread extinction of dinosaurs or even the loss of 

most life of the seas in the distant past. It is a crisis 

that may be irreversible this time, because plants are 

being widely affected and because the stock for future 

23
evolution of life on Earth is being severely depleted. 

And this time, the cause is humans ­ our numbers, 

aspirations and decisions. 

Human populations depend on other life forms more 

than most of us realize ­ for food, medicine, and 

economic well­being; for "ecological services" including 

oxygen, climatic effects, cleansing and sanitation; and 

for aesthetic satisfaction. All of this is ultimately 

related to the perpetuation as well as the quality of 

human life, no matter how much we may take it for 

granted. It has been said that we need fewer "ego­

logical" and more ecological decisions ­ ironically, for 

our own good!

Hawaii is on the leading edge of species loss 

curves. (...) Extinction and endangerment have 

accompanied uniqueness and endemism at dramatically 

increased rates since humans arrived; (...)

Hawai'i is also a world leader in studies of 

evolution and biological invasions, two contradictory 

processes ­ with the deck stacked heavily in favor of the 

invaders. Alien or introduced plants and animals from 

other parts of world stifle the exuberance of the natural 

creative process of evolution and lead the rush to 

"deadly dullness". Much of Hawaii’s lowland landscape 

looks like many other areas of the world because rooted, 

crawling, running  and flying "weeds" prevail ­ species 

that are really out of place in Hawai'i, no matter how 

much people may appreciate them. (...)"

24
I chose to adapt these words from the preface of the 

book "Conservational Biology in Hawaii" since I don't 

think I could express it better. I can only add that the 

whole variety of Hawaiian nature is at stake, endangered 

not only by accidentally introduced alien species but 

also by deliberate economical, developmental and large 

scale agricultural activities ranging from huge cattle 

ranches and pineapple plantations (namely Parker and 

Dole) over enormous touristic developments (Waikiki and 

Kona) to the omnipresent facilities of the world’s 

largest military machinery all over Hawaii. Hawaii still 

has the chance to  become a role model for the world and 

show others how to deal effectively with severe 

ecological and cultural problems ­ it may also become a 

nightmare, an example for what is yet to come on a global 

scale.

5) Astronomy and Space Science in Hawaii

Hawaii is leading in oceanography thanks to the 

Pacific, in biology thanks to the unique environment, in 

geology and volcanology thanks to the "hot­spot" 

underneath the seafloor, and Hawaii is a world leader in 

astronomy mainly thanks to Mauna Kea and Haleakala and 

their splendid observation conditions. Mauna Kea is 

considered to be the world’s best observational site for 

a number of reasons, the most obvious of which is it's 

altitude of 4200m enabling the observatory domes in the 

25
summit area to remain far above the humid trade winds and 

their clouds most of the time. Besides this, the 

geographic setting in the middle of the ocean is 

responsible for a smooth, laminar airflow almost 

completely lacking turbulent disturbances and thus 

enormously reducing the effects of "seeing" during 

observations. Another welcomed fact is that since Mauna 

Kea is a dormant shield volcano with quite gentle slopes, 

it is not to difficult to get access to the summit, which 

is an important economical locational factor during the 

evaluation phase of a prospective observatory site. If 

modern engineers would have to design the theoretically 

perfect observational site, it certainly would closely 

resemble Mauna Kea ­ what wonder that the ancient Kahuna 

also were experts in astronomy (although they had no 

observatory on the summit). Nowadays astronomy is one of 

the fundamental research disciplines with little apparent 

connection to every day life and only few direct 

"earthly" applications, at least none that have anything 

to do with deep space and planetary observations as 

conducted at modern observatories. During the times of 

the Kahuna there was a completely different situation: 

astronomy mainly was astrometry, was the precise 

measurement of positions of celestial bodies. High skills 

had to be developed to become perfect in this difficult 

task having only stone age means at hand. The precise 

knowledge of the star positions and their change during 

the year was essential for safely navigating the Hawaiian 

seafarers over the oceans and allow them to cross the 

26
vast abyss of the Pacific, regularly reaching 

destinations as distant as Tahiti, Samoa and possibly 

even South East Asia. The following again is largely 

taken from L.R. McBride, “The Kahuna”.

Our knowledge about the astronomer Kahuna (kilo  

hoku) again comes mainly from ancient chants, one of 

which reads like this:

Innumerable are the stars

The large stars

The small stars

The red stars of Kane, O infinite space

The great moon of Kane

The great sun of Kane

Moving, floating

Set moving about in the great space of Kane

The great earth of Kane

The rain encircled earth of Kane

The earth that Kane set in motion

Moving are the stars, moving is the moon

Moving is the great earth of Kane

Today only few stars and formations still can be 

named by their traditional Hawaiian names. Of the several 

thousand stars that can be seen from Hawaii only the 

names of approximately 120 have been preserved. Gemini 

for example was called Kamahana (The Twins), the Big 

Dipper's name was Na Hiku (The seven) and the Pleiades 

were known as Makali'i (Little Eyes). Only few of the 

27
Hawaiian constellations were identical with their western 

pendants. They actually more closely resemble the 

asterisms, smaller groups such as the Hyades cluster in 

the Head of Taurus (Kanuku o Kapuahi), the "belt and 

sword" of Orion (Na­Kao), and most likely Lyra and Vega 

together were baptized Keoe. 

The Kahuna astronomers had reached approximately the 

same standard as their European colleges prior to 

Galileo’s invention of the telescope, with exception of 

the mathematical abilities for which they substituted a 

fabulous memory. The oldest known astronomical 

observatory in Hawaii is situated on the saddle between 

Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea (although it’s exact function 

remains a mystery) and another one on the eastern point 

of Hawaii. The latter was called Ha'eha'e, "where the 

great stones caught the sun". The Hawaiians of old were 

able to "calculate" the equinox without the means of 

actual calculation at hand. It was known to them that the 

ecliptic (heleakala) changes slowly throughout the year 

and so the sun constantly rises at a different point of 

the horizon, oscillating between the two extremes. Once 

the solstices were fixed, the equinox could easily be 

measured halfway between them. This way the nineteen year 

cycle of 235 lunar months was determined, which 

harmonizes lunar an solar year.

The Kahuna learned to utilize the cycle of 223 lunar 

months to predict eclipses. These days there of course 

still was a close relation between astronomy and 

astrology, the chiefs and people of Hawaii expecting the 

28
Kahuna to predict future events from celestial phenomena. 

There is no doubt however that the most skilled 

astronomers were the navigators, who had to virtually 

become human computers to master their task. By the time 

a Kahuna Navigator completed his long years of study, he 

had to be capable of recalling at any time the setting 

and rising points of at least 120 stars as they changed 

throughout the year. They also learned the directions of 

foreign lands from stone alignments as well as the seas, 

weather and winds found along the way. I think it was 

Niels Bohr who once had said to Einstein:” A dog will 

never be able to learn Newton's laws!" and the great man 

answered:” Well, well, I think he knows them very well! 

Have you never seen a dog catch a ball?" Just like a a 

dog or a child learns to apply Newton's laws without ever 

knowing the mathematics behind them, the Kahuna had 

managed to master precise measurement, experience and 

intuition and merge them into an incredibly complex 

system of highly complex sciences.

Modern astronomy is dominated by computer systems, 

electronically operated ground based and space telescopes 

and complex mathematics. Astronomy is a high tech science 

and some of it's current masterpieces and brightest minds 

can be found in Hawaii. The astronomy programs and 

facilities in Hawaii are under the supervision of the 

Institute for Astronomy of the University of Hawaii at 

Manoa on Oahu. The first realized observatory was the 

Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala/Maui in 1963, 

29
followed by the UH 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea in 1970. 

During the 1970s three additional large instruments were 

built on it's summit: the 3­meter NASA Infrared Telescope 

Facility (IRTF), the 3.6m Canada­France­Hawaii Telescope 

(CFHT) and the 3.8m United Kingdom Infrared Telescope 

(UKIRT). In 1993 the largest Telescope that was built up 

to date became operational at the W. M. Keck Observatory: 

the 10m Keck I Telescope, it's identical twin being 

currently under construction. Also under construction is 

the 8m Japan national Large Telescope (JNLT or "Subaru"). 

All these instruments benefit from the remarkably low 

seeing at this site and the unique atmospheric 

transparency to infrared wavelengths. By the end of the 

century, an unprecedented eleven of the worlds largest 

observatories, among them the Gemini Northern 8m 

Telescope (a joint venture of the UK, Canada, USA, Chile, 

Argentina and Brazil) will be located on Mauna Kea. The 

optical and infrared observatories are accompanied by two 

sub millimeter telescopes, the 15m James Clerk Maxwell 

Telescope (JCTM), run by an international group sponsored 

by the UK, the Netherlands and Canada and the 10m Caltech 

Sub millimeter Observatory (CSO). Also near the Mauna Kea 

summit region is a recently installed 25m VLBI radio 

telescope.

On Haleakala the Mees Solar observatory conducts 

observations of the sun following a daily schedule. A 

variety of detectors mounted on a Sun­tracking spar are 

used. Some of the projects currently under way are 

coronographic, oscillation and magnetic field studies. 

30
The LURE lunar laser ranging observatory is also situated 

on Haleakala, as will be the 3.7m advanced electrical­

optical system (AEOS) telescope which is currently under 

construction by Philips Laboratory. Of particular 

interest to astronomers and physicists world wide are the 

gamma ray observatory on Haleakala and project DUMAND 

(Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detector), a gigantic 

telescope for cosmic rays under construction in a deep­

ocean trench off the island of Hawaii. 

To reduce disturbances of stray light from 

artificial light sources (mainly street lights), there is 

a law in effect on Hawaii regulating the type of lights 

to be used in public areas. A gas­charge light system is 

used, emitting light at a single wavelength in the orange 

part of the visible spectrum. The advantage is that a 

single line can be easily reduced from the observations. 

There also are strict regulations regarding the use of 

car­lights above the cloud layer in the Mauna Kea area.

There are many other active local and international, 

private and governmental research and educational groups 

in astronomy in Hawaii besides the Institute for 

Astronomy. Planetary sciences, theoretical and high­

energy astrophysics, stellar astronomy and cosmology ­ 

only to mention a few fields ­ are examples for the 

thriving and blooming research landscape of Hawaii 

(recently the Planetary Society tested it’s 

Russian/American Mars Rover in Volcanoes Natl. Park ­ 

following in the footsteps of the Apollo crew testing 

31
their “Moon­Buggies” in “Moon Valley” on Mauna Kea). 

Research and education in Hawaii are a mirror image of 

the islands' nature and culture. They are highly diverse, 

active and in many cases innovative and successful and in 

a distinct, almost unrecognizable way, all of it somehow 

still seems to be imbued with the "Aloha Spirit" although 

one has to look for it with patience and open minded to 

still find it these days. Hawaii by no means is a 

paradise, but it is a thriving state, almost a country by 

itself, where internal problems are settled quite 

reasonably and sources of conflict such as racism are 

virtually nonexistent so it really can be an example for 

other parts of the world. 

Literature:

The following literature was used:

Macdonald, Abbott & Peterson: Volcanoes in the Sea, Univ. 
of Hawaii Press 1990

Robert and Barbara Decker: Volcano Watching, Hawaii 
Natural History Assoc., 1980

Macdonald and Hubbard: Volcanoes of the National Parks in  
Hawaii, Hawaii Natl. History Assoc., 1993

L.R. McBride: The Kahuna, Petroglyph Press, 1992

32
James Cook: Entdeckungsfahrten im Pazifik, 1768­1779

Charles and Danielle Stone: Conservational Biology in  
Hawaii, Univ. of Hawaii Press 1989

Department of Geography: Univ. of Hawaii: Atlas of  
Hawaii, Univ. of Hawaii Press, 1983

Martha Beckwith: Hawaiian Mythology, Univ. of Hawaii 
Press, 1976

Katharine Luomala: Voices on the Wind, Bishop Museum, 
1956

David Lewis: We, the Navigators, Univ. of Hawaii Press 
1972

Will Kyselka: An Ocean in Mind, Univ. of Hawaii Press, 
1987

Glenda Bendure: Hawaii travel survival kit, Lonely 
Planet, 1990

Inst. for Astronomy: Astronomy in Hawaii, Univ. of Hawaii 
Inst. for Astronomy,  1994

Various handouts from HPU and newspaper articles from 
Hawaiian newspapers

33