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2013

2 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

Dear Readers, We know that you will enjoy our 29th Annual NIE Week special section, which exhibits the award-winning results of our Design An Ad & Journalism Contests. The purpose of this special section is to promote literacy, to showcase outstanding student writing and graphic ability, and to recognize classroom teachers for their efforts and encouragement to the next generation of creative thinkers. The printing of this 40 page-page special section is made possible due to the financial support of 27 local businesses listed on the last page. Through their generosity this special section will reach readers of the Intelligencer Journal / Lancaster New Era on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. Approximately 1,600 students from Grades 2 to 12 in 92 different classes in public, private, and home schools submitted hand-drawn and computer-designed ads for the Design An Ad Contest. Each class was assigned one of the twenty-seven advertisers who in turn selected the ad which would represent their own business in this special section. Many of these advertisers support this project year after year. We are grateful for the encouragement they give to the young artists. More than 300 students from Grades K and 1 submitted Illustrated Headlines taken from the pages of the Intelligencer Journal/ Lancaster New Era. Approximately 1,500 students in Grades 2 - 5 participated in the Writer’s Choice category. News Features captured the interest of more than 1,200 writers in Grades 6-8. Approximately 450 students in Grades 9-12 entered their work in Editorials and Photojournalism. Our literacy partner, the Lancaster-Lebanon Reading Council (LLRC) tackled the task of selecting approximately ten to twelve semifinalists from each grade level in each category of the Journalism Contest as semi-finalists. They used a standardized rubric, which was available to all participating teachers, to select the semifinalists. The LLRC in collaboration with the editorial staff then selected the finalists. Each year the LLRC and the Intelligencer Journal / Lancaster New Era hosts a reception for the 1st place winners. Turkey Hill Dairy and Julius Sturgis Pretzels, as well as the LLRC, generously provided the refreshments for this reception. You, the readers, will see the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and honorable mention places. Additionally the NIE staff gave the teachers the option of selecting one entry from each of their classes which they thought deserved special recognition in the final publication if the piece was not selected as a finalist. The Lancaster Newspapers, Inc. is proud of all of the entries and appreciates the efforts and enthusiasm of both the students and teachers who spend countless hours brainstorming, editing, and submitting their work. Please turn the pages and enjoy the creativity and talents of our local students.

1st PLaCe • EDITORIAL

Tech Heads
into a lesson, but most teachers do not know how to use them and need to be taught how to integrate them into their lessons. Technology could be used so much more in the classroom if the teachers knew how to use the technology and were given ideas on how to capture their student’s attention. If teachers were given the opportunity to learn about the new technology, they would be able to help their students and let them use technology to teach the lessons. Stacey Roshan, an Advanced Placement calculus teacher at Bullis School, uses video lectures for her students to watch at home, so they have more time in class to work and ask questions. This gave her students a leg up on the AP calculus test, and the scores went from a 3.59 average to a 4.11 average (Lytle). Technology captures the attention of students, so integrating it more heavily into the classroom would go a long way. Schools cannot just sit back and keep using the same old ways to teach students. The world and their students are advancing around them, so why should they hold them back?

Sarah Whyler Grade 12 Penn Manor HS Teacher: Cece O’Day

According to Jim Tracy, a headmaster in Massachusetts, “students inhabit a 21st century world for 18 hours a day, and all too often, educators put them in a 19th century classroom for six hours of that day, and the students feel a tremendous disconnect. We have a responsibility to teach them the skills to optimize these tools” (Lytle). It is clear that the young generation is a generation consumed by technology, and it is time for schools to step up and advance with technology and their students. At Penn Manor High School, there is some integration, but not much. There are several computer labs and computer carts, but they are only used for some projects such as typing a paper, creating power points, or doing research. Most teachers do not go any further and don’t try to add in any other multi-medium lessons into their curriculum. Now, while the rule of the high school does not allow students to have their cell phones out during school hours, most students do. Teenagers are often consumed by their phones, so why not use them as a tool to help educate them. There are many new ways/programs to integrate a phone

Janis Harrington
Marketing Specialist Lancaster Newspapers, Inc. jharrington@LNPnews.com

Amanda Stoltzfus
Marketing Specialist Lancaster Newspapers, Inc. astoltzfus@LNPnews.com

WORk CiTeD Lytle, Ryan. “Study: emerging Technology Has Positive impact in Classroom.” US News. U.S. News & World Report, 14 July 2011, Web. 23 Oct 2012. www.usnews. com/education/high-schools/ articles/2011/07/14/study-emergingtechnology-has-positive-impact-inclassroom.

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 3

1st PLACE • EDITORIAL

Trans Fat and the Health Face to Face
Amanda Nadu GRADE 11 Penn Manor HS Teacher: Mindy Rottmund

It’s not hard to believe that trans fats are one of the leading causes of obesity. Trans fats are found in almost all of the Americans favorite foods such as: crackers, margarine, snack foods, fried foods, doughnuts, even processed foods. With an average intake of 5.8 grams of trans fat each day, it has become even harder not to become obese. Today trans fats are used in way too many bakery products, and prepared food products, and should be limited. Trans fat is a type of fat that is formed when liquid fat is turned into a solid fat. This happens when

hydrogen atoms are added. Many companies use trans fat when cooking because it is cheaper, easier, and lasts a lot longer. Over time, the continuous consumption of trans fats end up clogging the arteries. A diet that is high in trans fats can lead to a heart attack, obesity, stroke, even the development of diabetes. Some better options of avoiding trans fats are to check the food labels. Avoid foods that say “partially hydrogenated oils.” Also stay away from deep fried oils. Instead, try using monounsaturated fats (olive oil and canola oil) or polyunsaturated fats (soybean

oil, corn oil, and fatty fish such as salmon.) These are the “good fats;” they are good for your heart and cholesterol. Not all food labels list the amount of trans fats that are in the product. However, just because “trans fat” isn’t listed on the label, doesn’t mean that there aren’t any in the product. Companies are figuring out a way of advertising trans fats on the labels. If there is less than 0.5 grams per serving then they will consider the item to be “trans fat-free”. This should help the consumers not to be fooled by the food labels.

Stauffers of Kissel Hill Supermarket
ad designed by TIM MARTIN Grade 5 Resurrection Catholic Teacher: Kim Ingram

4 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

1st PLaCe • EDITORIAL

Internet in Classrooms
The Internet is a far better resource for learning and researching in the classroom than obsolete textbooks. Books have been taken over by the Internet since the start of the 21st century. Devices such as laptop computers, SMART boards and handhelds have encompassed classrooms across the world. From these laptops to handheld devices, the world has taken a change for the better in and outside of classrooms. Laptop computers give students a vast array of knowledge directly at their fingertips. Most of the United States has diverged from the original textbooks that students have been learning from for years, to a new and improved laptop computer. Many schools agree getting laptop computers will benefit their school. This is an important issue, due to the fact that many people still favor the textbooks over laptops. Teachers can also send their students home with work on the computer that the students can complete and then upload. These computers help to facilitate the work a student has. They can help with quick communication and give students a better way to work. Some people say that textbooks are better. They think that students could be going online and playing games and not doing work. While this is a strong point, there are many more advantages from having a laptop other than just doing schoolwork. Students can also easily connect with each other and teachers through the Internet. For every disadvantage of having computers in the classroom, there is an even stronger advantage. As the Internet and laptops take over the classrooms across the US, student’s knowledge will continue to increase. Every classroom should undoubtedly make the switch to laptop computers. The Internet is a much bigger resource for learning than textbooks are and this is for the better.

Owen Geedey Grade 10 Pequea Valley HS Teacher: Aftan Fisher

1st PLaCe • EDITORIAL

Legalize Gay Marriage, Legalize Freedom
Abby Mack Grade 9 Manheim Township HS Teacher: Marty Pflieger

Everyone has basic rights. One group of individuals should not be denied the same basic freedoms that are granted to anyone else. Gay marriage should be legalized. The United States, as a nation, has evolved; so should the policies and laws. The kind of discrimination being shown to gay couples resembles that of the oppression in the Civil War: the refusal to give everyone basic rights, not just a select few. Everyone should have the right to love one another and publicly acknowledge it. Many people say that gay marriage destroys the sanctity of marriage. What destroys the sanctity

of marriage is celebrities getting married for 72 days, the length of Kim Kardashian’s marriage, and then getting divorced. If that example isn’t good enough, how about when Carmen Electra got married in Vegas then got a divorce because, at that time, she had been too intoxicated to make a proper choice. Statistics show that 50% of marriages in the United States end in divorce. If that doesn’t obliterate the sanctity of marriage than who knows what does. Two people getting married because they love each other certainly does not. People denying others the right to marry is ruining the sanctity of equality.

Gay couples are also denied admittance into the ambulance or emergency room with their partner or child in cases of emergency. This is because of their marital status, which has been denied them. These couples can be forced to wait in the waiting room for hours, just to see their child. America is a place that people come to for a better life, for freedom, not to be denied their right to love. Gay marriage should be legalized not just for the right we are granted as humans, but because it is the right thing to do.

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 5

1st PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Secrets of Stonehenge
name of the site of a circle formed of megaliths, or massive stones. Construction of Stonehenge started around 3100 BC and ended around 1600 BC. The true creators of Stonehenge are disputed, and nobody knows for sure. There are many theories as to why Stonehenge was built. One theory is that it was used in some form of ritual or funerary procession. This theory is the more favorable of the two most common theories of today. The reason being is that there have been multiple burials found around the area of Stonehenge. It may have also been used for some sort of sacrificial purpose. This could also explain the burials if the sacrifices were human sacrifices. Another common theory about Stonehenge’s purpose is that it was used as some kind of secular calendar. The stones are arranged in an astronomical design, allowing for it to be used as a way to determine the date. This would help whoever made Stonehenge to plan when to farm certain crops and know when the seasons were going to change. Another, less common belief is that they were built from the idea they would have some form of healing properties, explaining why many of the bodies found showed evidence of trauma or deformity. Whatever the reason may be, to this day, Stonehenge remains one of the world’s greatest mysteries.

GRADE 8 Centerville MS Teacher: Cristin Kramer

Colin Boltz

They’ve been standing for millennia, yet not much is known about them. The stones of Stonehenge, located in the English county of Wilshire, are shrouded in mystery. Although a bit is known about when Stonehenge was made, the biggest question is what its purpose was. First of all, Stonehenge is the

ad designed by CHLOE GARBER Grade 3 Lancaster County Christian Teacher: Tammi Dodson

Penn Cinema

6 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

1st PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Escape to America’s Favorite Family Resort
Zip like a falcon, bounce like a frog, and scurry like a mouse! You can encounter all these things at Smuggler’s Notch Family Resort, secretly nestled in the majestic mountains of Vermont. This allseason resort hosts family-friendly events for children of all ages… including those who are just children at heart. The activities range from soaking in the beauty of the mountains while lounging at one of the three refreshing pools to the wild, adventurous zip lining or rappelling at Arbortrek, Smuggler’s very own outdoor adventure. Not one day goes by without finding something new and fascinating to whet your appetite for fun. Speaking of appetite, Smuggler’s has their own Ben and Jerry’s ice cream shop right on location. Double fudge brownie anyone? Still have a craving for adventure? Enjoy a ten-minute hike to Morse Mountain and spend the day at Rum Runner’s, bounding like a frog on the inflatable trampoline or sending each other flying with the Aqualaunch. Need a rest…rent paddle boats to enjoy the tranquility of the Morse Mountain reservoir. And, last but not least, definitely not for the faint of heart, head to the Segway headquarters and hop on your very own two-wheeled, battery-powered riding machine and embark on a special excursion like none other. You’ll scurry like a mouse as you travel along the resort’s unpaved dirt roads, creating dust clouds in your wake. If you haven’t been to Smuggler’s Notch, you haven’t lived yet! Book your reservations now!
Aaron Swope GRADE 7 Landisville MS Teacher: Scott Feifer

1st PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

The Benefits of Hybrid Cars
Brooklawn Paving
ad designed by IKE HOLLINGER Grade 7 Landisville MS Teacher: Diane Anderson
Ian Campbell GRADE 6 St. Leo the Great Teacher: Ellen Tucker

and ensure efficiency. In the series hybrid, the gas engine charges the batteries of the electric motor. When the batteries are fully charged, the gas engine shuts off. In the plug-in hybrid, the car can be plugged into a household electrical outlet so the car is charged when not in use. These engines help keep the environment healthy and the car owner’s wallet thick! Although hybrid cars are growing in popularity today, they didn’t start out as an everyday car. Invented in 1899, it has taken over 100 years for the car to become popular. The first American hybrid cars were made in 1993 by the government and the auto industry. Hybrid cars are both helpful to the environment and the owner’s wallet by enabling longer trips with less gas. With continued advancements in hybrid technology, more and more people may choose to go hybrid!

The cost of gas makes it tough for drivers to operate their vehicles at a low cost. Hybrid cars may be part of the solution to this problem. Hybrid cars have two engines that provide the driver long distances at low costs. These engines are gas and electric. The driver can choose between three different kinds of hybrids: the parallel hybrid, series hybrid and plug-in hybrid. In the parallel hybrid, the two engines work together to move the car forward

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 7

1st PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

My Little League Tornado
my teammates and I were getting ready to start our first tournament. All of a sudden the lights blew out! Then it started to rain hard so we went under a pavilion. Then all of a sudden my coach saw something that caught his eye because he told us to get down next to everybody! Second, I heard a crash, the pavilion fell on us! I heard screaming and “get off” and “help”! Off of adrenaline my dad and someone else lifted a beam off of my teammate’s dad. My dad and I scurried up to the truck. Once we got up to the truck my dad screamed that his chest hurt! Finally, everybody was scared and the aftermath was even scarier. I saw downed power lines, downed trees and damaged buildings. My dad amazingly drove us home. My mom took us to the hospital. My dad had five cracked ribs. My dad still is hurt. That horrible tornado was the scariest experience in my life!

Robert Fellenbaum GRADE 5 Bart Colrain ES Teacher: Mrs. Schmitt

Certified Carpet
ad designed by J.J. KECK Grade 3 Resurrection Catholic Teacher: Hollice Coccio

The tornado that I experienced was the worst day of my life! First,

1st PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

My Gravel Mud Mask
It was the second day of our cycling trip and it was already cloudy when we started. Halfway to our lunch stop it started to rain lightly. We put our rain ponchos on, but it rained so hard we got soaked down to our skin. My dad was riding right in front of me so all the dirt from his back tire kicked up on my face! Since my bike was attached to his bike I had nowhere to hide! By the time we found some shelter I could barely see out of my glasses. Everybody was wet and grimy but I think I was the grimiest. I even had gravel in my mouth which felt and tasted like wet sand. Now, whenever my family talks about our trip, my thoughts always come back to the day I got a gravel mud mask.

Samy Monroy GRADE 4 Lancaster County Christian Teacher: Alecia Weaver

About a year ago, my family and I went on a cycling trip on the Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) Trail for the first time. We planned to ride 30 miles each day and stop at different bed and breakfasts each night. It was really exciting, especially one day which I am going to tell you about.

8 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

1st PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

1st PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

A Day to Make You Want to Sing

Colder Weather Blows In

Art design by Claire Eckroat Grade 1 Eshleman ES Teacher: Carole Chismar

Art design by Dominick Baksh Grade K St. Leo ES Teacher: Jan Bixby

Ebersole’s Vacuum Cleaner Sales & Service
ad designed by CHRIS PETERSHEIM Grade 7 Linville Hill Mennonite Teacher: Joe Luethy

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 9

1st PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

The Tornado

1st PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

My Amazing Dog, Checkers
I would like to introduce my dog to you. Her name is Checkers. I bought her at a shelter where there were many other animals, like horses, cats and goats. While my parents were paying for her, Checkers saw a cat and took off like the wind. Another dog stopped her from running away by barking at her. Since she wasn’t trained on her electric fence, I took her to my grandma and grandpa’s house that has a yard with a fence. Checkers had tons of energy, so my grandpa designed a game for her with bottles. The bottles were tied to string. I twirled them around while Checkers jumped up and tried to catch them. At first, whenever we weren’t playing with her, Checkers would chew our shoes and the outside laundry vent. Checkers once ate a dozen rolls and a stick of butter. We are training Checkers to be a therapy dog. We took her to puppy classes to teach her to obey us. We taught her to sit, lie down, and stay. She will make a fantastic therapy dog because she enjoys meeting people. I can’t wait until Checkers and I can go to help people.

Easton Herr GRADE 3 Lancaster County Christian Teacher: Tammi Dodson

Aiden Beiler GRADE 2 Lancaster Mennonite Teacher: Sylvia Weaver

This fall, a tornado sped by our house. We were on the top floor of our house and had to dash to the basement. We had lost power so it was very dark. When we got to the basement, the tornado was over. It sounded like a really loud freight train. We all camped out in my parent’s room because we were frightened. The next morning my dad came home from work, and we drove around our neighborhood in our Ranger to see the damage. There were uprooted trees, tree limbs, smashed barns, and houses missing roofs. At one spot you could not see down in the woods but now you can. The next time I see a tornado I hope it’s not in our backyard.

Julius Sturgis Pretzel Bakery
ad designed by LIZA PEACHEY Grade 9 Elizabethtown Area HS Teacher: Kevin Goss
219 E. Main Street, Lititz, PA 17543 Open MON-SAT 9-5 (717) 626-4354

10 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

2nd PLACE TIE • EDITORIAL
Marlene Sharp GRADE 12 Penn Manor HS Teacher: Cece O’Day

An Escape In Art
students have the ability to focus and concentrate more effectively. According to Fran Smith, contributing editor of Edutopia, “Involvement in the arts is associated with gains in math, reading, cognitive ability, critical thinking, and verbal skill. Arts learning can also improve motivation, concentration, confidence, and teamwork” (Smith). This increase in students’ interest and drive to attend school is fueled by the guarantee of a place to let loose and enjoy themselves in a positive, artistic environment. Artsusa.org states that art in education “Stimulates and develops the imagination and critical thinking, and refines cognitive and creative skills, nurtures important values, including team-building skills, respecting alternative viewpoints, and appreciating and being aware of different cultures and traditions.” (“Americans for the Arts”) Years of research have proven that art is closely linked to academic achievement as well as social and emotional growth. Without art, students like the girl described above are potentially missing out on serious developmental opportunities, both inside and outside the classroom.
WORKS CITED
Smith, Fran. “Why Arts Education Is Crucial, and Who.” Edutopia.org. The George Lucas Educational Foundation, 28 2009. Web. 17 Oct. 2012. <http:// www.edutopia.org/arts-music-curricumchild-development>. “Steps to Art Early childhood Arts Education Initiative.” Americans for the Arts. Americans for the Arts, 04 2009. Web. 19 Oct. 2012. <http://www.artsusa. org/get_involved/advocacy/funding_ resources/default_005.as

A relaxing sensation enveloped the student as she stepped into her second period art classroom. She heaved her heavy backpack off her shoulder, dropped it onto the floor next to her stool, and made her way out into the hall where she found her current piece in progress leaning against the wall. She brought it in and set up her materials; graphite and water soluble pencils, a kneaded eraser, a ruler, paintbrushes, and other supplies surrounded her workspace. The drawing is center stage. In that ninety minute period, this space became hers, and she freed her mind as she drew.

This educational experience in the Arts is in jeopardy and must be saved. Several Art classes were cut from the curriculum for the 2012-2013 school year at Penn Manor High School due to lack of funding. The school board decided to drop Watercolor and Fine Art, feeling that these art classes were not necessary for general schooling. What they did not realize, however, is the importance these courses have in students’ educational experience. Art is a small hiatus in a stressful seven-hour school day; it provides an outlet for students to channel creativity in a relaxed setting and most importantly, to do something they are passionate about. By providing a needed break from rigorous academic classes,

2nd PLACE TIE • EDITORIAL
Megan Holiday GRADE 12 Lampeter Strasburg HS Teacher: Susan Fetterolf

Death to Pennies
The amount of time that Americans spend counting pennies also contributes to the monetary deficit. By fiddling with pennies, Americans lose one billion dollars a year to opportunity cost. With this in mind, it’s very hard to see why the US would willingly keep in circulation a coin which loses it untold amounts of money each year. There are few reasons to keep the penny; Abraham Lincoln is the most popular president, but his face also appears on the $5 bill. While some argue that Americans would lose money to rounding, countries that have already removed their pennies, such as Australia and Canada, testify differently. The solution to this problem is very simple: circulate the dime and a 50 cent piece (we should also abolish the nickel, which cost 11 cents per coin). Vendors simply round up or down to the nearest tenth of a dollar, following suit with other penny-abolishing countries, and the penny no longer hinders the exchange of goods.

problem that it’s illegal, but it also throws away millions of tax dollars to keep a coin in circulation which fails to serve its only purpose. This purpose is to facilitate the transactions of goods and services. The penny is, nicely put, inadequate at this job. Almost all machines that accept coins do not accept pennies. Even when pennies are accepted forms of payment, using them is tedious. $20 of pennies — 2,000 coins — weighs roughly 11 pounds.

As the penny actually costs the United States money; “worthless” is an inaccurate term; this coin is worth far less than nothing. In short: America needs to abolish the penny. It costs 2.4 cents to mint one penny. Not only does this disparity encourage the melting of pennies for a profit, which became such a

Iron Valley Golf Club

ad designed by EVAN WEAVER Grade 7 Landisville MS Teacher: Scott Feifer

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 11

2nd PLACE • EDITORIAL

Benefits of Social Networks in Schools
Kelly Antonacci GRADE 11 Manheim Township HS Teacher: Marty Pflieger

A couple of years ago, I would have said that social networking sties were complete wastes of my time. Today, however, I have come to the realization that, without social networking sites, extracurricular activities for many students would fail to operate Of course, with the forever growing number of cyber-bullying incidents, critics of Facebook

argue that teenagers are unable to appropriately use these networks. Of course, we, as teenagers, are lazy and disrespectful and cannot possibly handle this new world at our fingertips. But, what these critics fail to realize, is that Facebook offers new methods of organizational skills that large non-profit organizations in our school, like Mini-Thon and Key Club, are utilizing. Facebook offers the option to create a private group, which helps leaders contract other club members with the touch of a button. The group makes what

would have been a difficult task very easy; reminders and meetings can be scheduled with ease. These groups also encourage collaboration and feedback, which in the long run, creates an improved internal atmosphere. Critics also fail to realize Facebook’s ability to effectively advertise fundraisers to a large portion of school. Because of Facebook, word spreads, and consequently, fundraisers are more successful. It also engages the rest of the school in an activity they would not normally be involved in.

Because students not involved in the activity are able to see public pages on Facebook, clubs are able to gain more support and club members are given a chance to learn about what supporters think about the organization. Students have found ways that social networks can benefit the school. Schools shouldn’t hide from social networks; they should embrace them because, although, in the past, they have been used for evil, they also can be used for good.

Landis Homes
ad designed by GABE WAHLBERG Grade 5 Landisville ES Teacher: Jess Wise

12 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

2nd PLACE • EDITORIAL

Bloomberg Bans
Cole Fisher GRADE 10 McCaskey East HS Teacher: Karen Morrisette

theaters, where over a quarter of profits come from soda, would suffer profit losses because of the ban on soda. Some health-nuts might say the government has a responsibility to keep people healthy. However, 60% of the population of New York

The United States of America is endowed with the principle of freedom. However, Mayor Bloomberg of New York City has issued a ban on sugary soft drinks, which does not allow the sale of soda and other beverages in cups that are more than 16 ounces. We should be allowed to buy a large soda if we want. The passing of this ban is completely biased in favor of Mayor Bloomberg. The Health Board of

New York City allowed this ban to pass. However, the members of the Health Board of New York City were all appointed to their positions by the mayor himself. With the Health Board of New York City being under the influence of Mayor Bloomberg, what will stop him from putting bans on the amount of Tastykakes one can buy or how many potato chips are in a bag? The ban on 16 ounce sodas will affect businesses. Places such as 7-11 will still be able to sell soft drinks over 16 ounces. However, any business using a restaurant license will be subjected to this law. Businesses including movie

City considers the ban to be a bad idea. The ban, regardless of whether someone drinks soft beverages over 16 ounces or not, infringes on freedom of choice. People should be allowed to purchase a legal substance in whatever size they want.

2nd PLACE • EDITORIAL

Are advertisements going too far?
Malaisha Hinton GRADE 9 McCaskey East HS Teacher: Karen Morrisette

On TV today there are many inappropriate commercials for kids. Parents blame it on the current generation. But still, many parents believe that these commercials are too explicit and inappropriate for their younger children and are concerned. The other day I asked a mother if she was okay with the commercials on television. She replied, “My ten and six year olds come home and watch the television. Two days ago, my six year old daughter told me that she wanted to be just like the Victoria Secret model on the TV. The day after that, my ten year old asked me who Captain Morgan was

and wondered what kind of a pirate he was.” My point is that nobody wants to know that their kids are being taught things they don’t need to know right now. Non-parents seem to think that parents should not blame the TV stations for their own inability to watch or raise their children properly. A teenager I talked to said, “I think that if you don’t want your children to view such commercials then you should not sit them in front of the TV.” Advertisers should show some responsibility and only air certain commercials when they know little kids aren’t watching. Through a combination of strict parent guidelines for television viewing and advertiser responsibility, we can keep kids away from harmful ads on TV.

Mount Joy Family Restaurant
ad designed by NICHOLAS MESIAS Grade 4 Donegal Intermediate Teacher: Keith Royer

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 13

2nd PLACE TIE • NEWS FEATURE

Conestoga River— Safe Stream or Toxic Tributary?
Matthew Saad GRADE 8 St. Leo the Great Teacher: Ellen Tucker

The Conestoga River is a peaceful stream that seems harmless enough. However, during many floods and storms it swells, sometimes damaging the sewer system and taking in raw untreated sewage. This is very dangerous to the ecosystem that thrives in the river. The question is, what impact do these events have on the environment, and how can we stop it before it kills off massive amounts of the flora and fauna that call the Conestoga River home? Traditionally, the waters of the Conestoga River have been a stream of beauty, attracting hikers, kayakers and many others to enjoy the recreational benefits that the watershed has to offer. But during Tropical Storm Lee, the

river filled with mud, trash, and other pollutants, which turned the tributary to a bright orange color, and it smelled distinctly like raw sewage. Fortunately, people are working hard to help improve the quality of the water. For years, Lancaster City has been repeatedly fined by the EPA for raw sewage spilling over into the Conestoga, eventually causing trouble for the Chesapeake Bay. But now, city officials are planning a solution that would cut the overflow by 750 million gallons a year, by using “green” infrastructure, like planting trees and paving parking lots and streets with a porous pavement. Although the project is projected to be expensive, at $140 million, Lancaster would otherwise face fines of $37,000 a day that could quickly add up. The Conestoga is a vital resource that we must protect from pollution.

Roni Reed and Megan McDermott, Representatives for Sylvan Learning Center

Sylvan Learning
ad designed by LUKE FREY Grade 6 Central Manor ES Teacher: Katie Watkins

14 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

2nd PLACE TIE • NEWS FEATURE

The Pledge
Jordan Ort GRADE 8 Centerville MS Teacher: Cristin Kramer

Have you ever considered why students are told to recite the Pledge of Allegiance every day and where it came from? “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America...” These words were originally written by Francis

Bellamy, a Baptist minister, in 1892, as a celebration of the 400th anniversary of discovery America. Even to this day, many schools require that children attending that day stand up with their right hand over their heart, facing the flag, and recite the Pledge, or that they at least stand respectfully while their peers recite it. When Bellamy originally wrote this expression of loyalty, it was

a mere twenty-two words, in comparison with today’s version containing thirty-one. Many words we now use were not all originally in the Pledge or have been changed. For example “the flag of the United States of America” was only “my Flag” when it was written in 1892. In 1892, as part of the Columbus Day celebrations, this flag salute was included in the school system for the first time. To this day, these words

express one main theme. This theme is the freedom in America, shown through the concluding section of the Pledge, “one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” Overall, although this daily activity may seem pointless and a waste of time, it signifies the great qualities of the United States and allows students to appreciate them daily.

2nd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Writing for the Community
Wearhouse Consignment
ad designed by NATALIE ESDAILLE Grade 12 J.P. McCaskey HS Teacher: Lisa Wolf
Adrianna Hiller GRADE 7 Landisville MS Teacher: Scott Feifer Nearly 20 years ago, Scott Feifer, Hempfield English teacher, took the opportunity to attend a writing class for teachers. Highly inspired by this class, Feifer began inviting his students and their parents to attend a similar program once a marking period. He called this program, “The Writing Circle.” Feifer continues to offer “The Writing Circle” to his students, current and former. But, not all of them attend a school. Over the years, Feifer began writing in shelters, support groups, detention centers, recovery programs, and prisons. These circles are a very unique way to communicate. Feifer begins by telling the history of the circle. Then, beginning with, “I remember,” he instructs everyone to begin writing for 8 minutes. People share about bad choices they made, such as starting drugs or being involved in a gang. Some write about good memories they have and don’t want to forget. One woman wrote about how watching the birds motivated her throughout her struggle with cancer. “The Writing Circle” is a safe place where people reveal strength and humility, make sense of the past, learn to accept the present, and decide who they to be in the future. I asked Feifer why he continues to offer “The Writing Circle.” He replied with, “Providing this program has made my heart grow bigger and my students have taught me about the ability to care about others. This work calls me to it.” It’s amazing how one small gift can make a huge impact on the entire community.

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 15

2nd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

The Get in Touch Foundation
Jenna Weinman GRADE 6 St. Leo the Great Teacher: Ellen Tucker

Mary Ann Wasil Nilas lived with her husband and two daughters in Milford, Connecticut in 2004 when she learned she had breast cancer. She realized that it would be important to teach her daughters to do breast self exams. This would be a lesson for life.

She developed a foundation called The Get In Touch Foundation to educate girls in grades 5 - 12 on the importance of and how to do a self breast exam. Along with a medical consulting board that included a school nurse, a pediatrician, an oncologist, a breast surgeon and a radiologist, Get In Touch developed what they called the Daisy Wheel. This wheel has tips on it that educate girls about self breast examination.

The Daisy Wheel is being praised in the medical community as a tool that will alter the face of breast cancer. Diana Klunk of Life Changes, a health and healing boutique for women living with cancer in Hanover, PA says, “The Daisy Wheel is a great way for young girls to develop an awareness of cancer and how to detect it early.” The foundation would like to put a Daisy Wheel in the hands of every girl in the world.

ad designed by LAUREN MATYAS Grade 6 Landisville Intermediate Teacher: Debbie Wrightson

Stadel Volvo

2nd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

Geocaching
Reagan Sheehan GRADE 5 Homeschool Teacher: Angela Sheehan

where we sign our geocaching username and the date we found the cache. Geocaches can be hidden anywhere: hiking trails, playgrounds...I even found one in a mailbox once! My favorite geocache was one I found with my soccer team. We were at an all day tournament and searched for a cache between games. I liked sharing my hobby with my friends. We try to find at least one geocache at every new place we visit or vacation. I would recommend geocaching to anyone who loves being outdoors and wants to make an ordinary hike a LOT more interesting!

One of my favorite hobbies is something that my dad introduced me to. It’s called geocaching. We use a geocaching web-site to load coordinates onto our GPS. Then we use those coordinates to locate a hidden cache. The closer we get to the cache, the lower the numbers on the GPS go. When we get within twenty feet of the cache we start looking. Some good places to look are behind logs leaning against a tree or holes in a tree trunk. Some caches have little toys in them. There is also a log book

16 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

2nd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

Just like Plymouth Rock
“Step right up and get your luggage pulled for free! The blue mini van to the left is waiting!” My dramatic first grade brother yelled over and over. The sun was just rising when I stepped in the car. It was a beautiful morning, and it was such a pity I had to be in the car. Screeeech! Did we arrive in Maine yet? I put down my book at once. I turned my head to the window like a deer would when he hears a twig snap in the woods. Out the windows I saw grass, sand, and an extraordinary amount of rocks. One big rock caught my attention the most. After helping to set up the tent, I ran down the tree root steps to the rock. The wild Maine water splashed against the rock. Suddenly, it hit me. When the Pilgrims landed, they saw Plymouth Rock, a mighty rock like a boulder. In my view, the sun made the water look purple. I waded into the ocean, turned to the perfect angle, and I saw the most amazing sight. The next few days were absolutely wonderful, but not as special as that first sighting.
Emma Humbert GRADE 4 Bart-Colerain School Teacher: Donna Railing

2nd PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

Sometimes It Is Good to Have A Cow

Art design by Jordyn Ray Grade 1 • Paradise ES • Teacher: Cortney Bushnell

CTC Lollipop Co.
ad designed by ASHLEY VELEZ Grade 10 J.P. McCaskey HS Teacher: Matthew Lawrence

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 17

2nd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE
2nd PLACE • ILLUSTRATING HEADLINES

NYPD Officer’s Kindess Sparks Online Buzz

My Friend Kyah
One vacation I met a friend. Her name was Kyah and I met her at Discovery Cove in Florida. She was very active, loud and loved the ocean. She loved to fish and eat the things she caught. She likes to go fishing in the ocean. Sometimes we would do piggyback rides in the water. I would hang on around her neck, but usually it was hard to hang on because she was so slippery and swims very fast. She never rode around on my back. She didn’t exactly speak English, but she always said, “click”! As I would ride around on her I would think about how soon I would have to say bye to Kyah. I wanted to take her home with me, but I don’t own a large pool. Eventually my family and me had to say bye to Kyah. Even though she didn’t understand it. I hugged her then smiled and went to greet a new group of people. Oh, and did I mention she was a dolphin?
Julia Nauman GRADE 3 Landisville Primary School Teacher: Katie Diffenderfer

Art design by Matthew Carroll Grade K • St. Leo the Great • Teacher: Jan Bixby

George J. Grove & Son
ad designed by ISAAC CHESTON Grade 3 Central Manor ES Teacher: Megan Quinn

18 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

2nd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

3rd PLACE TIE • EDITORIAL

My Hobbies
A hobby I enjoy is writing stories and making books out of them. I really enjoy doing this as it helps me practice my writing and also my spelling. The stories I like to write about are mainly about animals. Dogs and Cats are my favorite. Sometimes I write about Christmas over the holidays. Sometimes I make Santa into a dog and he barks and brings gifts to all the stray animals in the town. He also makes sure they all get nice homes to live in so they don’t have to live in the cold and wet any more. The most fun I have writing stories is that I get to make the endings happy and sometimes make the stories funny. Sometimes I write stories with my friends, this is fun because they give me cool ideas and help me to think of things that I could not think of by myself. I really like to use my imagination and writing my thoughts down stops my brain from exploding from all the ideas in my head. I hope you can make up stories like I do and get to have a collection that you can look back on and read.
Sara Kell GRADE 2 Eshleman ES Teacher: Elizabeth Kaplan

Are Hands for Driving or Talking?
Why has texting only been addressed? Has the government not seen that talking on a cell phone is as dangerous as texting while driving? Talking with one hand holding your cell phone is taking half or more of your attention away from the road and pushing you to have more tunnel vision. This seems to have slipped through legislation as if it were a safe driving practice. The government has not made any change to this, but continues to enforce the problem of drunk driving. According to Matthew Walberg of the Chicago Tribune, drivers who talk on their cell phones are just as impaired as someone who is intoxicated to the BAC level of 0.08 (Is Driving Using). The government rules that texting and drinking are both dangers of the road, but still resists recognizing that talking is just as dangerous. If legislation were passed to outlaw holding your cell phone while talking and driving, it would not fully eliminate the freedom of communicating completely and would make driving safer. There are alternative methods to avoid holding your cell phone. Head units that use your sound system as speakers and give you a microphone, Bluetooth headsets, and even just regular headphones with a built-in microphone allow you to talk handsfree. This frees up your hand to be used for steering. It also eliminates tunnel vision. Being more aware of what is around you and not focusing on holding something up to your ear allows the driver to perform tasks safely on the road and would eliminate many accidents as a result of talking and driving. Some people may argue that this method is still not safe, but it is much better than what is happening currently. It is the furthest the government can go without taking away the right completely.
Steve Armstrong GRADE 12 Penn Manor HS Teacher: Cece O’Day

Amanda Eden, North Museum of Natural History & Science

North Museum

ad designed by JACKLYN MARTIN Grade 4 • Hans Herr Intermediate Teacher: Beth Hendrix

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 19

3rd PLACE TIE • EDITORIAL

PSSA — Please Stop Standardized Assessments
Standardized tests are not just an inconvenience; they are detrimental to a child’s overall education. The 2001 Teacher of the Year, Michele Forman said, “Learning and teaching is messy stuff. It doesn’t fit into bubbles. I don’t think a simple pencil-and-paper test is going to capture what students know and can do.” (Wetzel) Standardized tests rarely evaluate high levels of thinking. Still, teachers must modify their lesson plans to incorporate the test material, which is often unrelated, shallow, and not applicable in real world situations. Test preparation and the tests themselves are also time consuming. During the 2011-2012 school year Penn Manor High School students lost approximately 3 hours each week to preparations for the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA). Penn Manor juniors devoted an additional 12 hours to actually taking the PSSA. During these 12 hours the remainder of the student body was forced to resort to watching movies or doing pointless busy work. It is not worth losing weeks of class time for one test. In addition to interfering with a child’s education, standardized tests are biased. They require a certain amount of prior knowledge and skill that is found more among privileged children. Also, in the creation of a standardized test, poverty, inadequate facilities, and language barriers are often completely disregarded. Every student, school, and city is different; therefore they cannot be evaluated on the same test. A test is worthless if it does not fairly assess all students. I am against standardized tests for many reasons. I am not some lazy student, bitter because I failed the standardized exams. I am a straight A, honors and AP student and I performed well on the PSSAs. But I have seen first hand the damage that is caused by standardized tests. They are discriminatory, time consuming, ineffective and need to be eradicated from our school systems.
WORK CITED Wetzel, Bill. ‘No More Tests!’ Mothering No. 115. Nov./Dec. 2002: 68-71. SIRS Researcher. Web. 30 Mar, 2011

Hannah Breidenbaugh GRADE 12 Penn Manor HS Teacher: Cece O’Day

Lancaster Toyota
ad designed by ETHAN BICKEL Grade 6 Landisville Intermediate Teacher: Clare Daher

20 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

A Special Thank You To All The Participating Teachers
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
COCALICO Denver Elementary Jill Carper LAMPETER-STRASBURG Lampeter Elementary Lauren Burns Elizabeth Fluck Suzanne Mannix Virginia Sitler Brittany Snyder Amanda Spealman Allison Wagner Hans Herr Intermediate Jeanne Garrett Beth Hendrix Vanessa Moore Martin Meylin Middle Jennifer Risser Strasburg Elementary Angela Golazeski Shelly Morgan Rachel Petruso Virginia Sitler Lampeter-Strasburg High Timothy Dougherty Susan Fetterolf SCHOOL DISTRICT OF LANCASTER J.P. McCaskey High Matthew Coonan Vanessa Horst Matthew Lawrence Lisa Wolf McCaskey East High Karen Morrisette Burrowes Elementary Barbara Rule Elizabeth R. Martin Elementary Darrell Yoder MANHEIM CENTRAL Doe Run Elementary Leisa Bowman MANHEIM TOWNSHIP Bucher Elementary Marian Good Kerry Kuipers Reidenbagh Elementary Kathleen Geltz Marian Good Neff Sixth Grade Marian Good Nathan C. Shaeffer ES Marian Good Kelly Horst Allison Zell Landis Run Intermediate Don Mellinger Barbara Peachey Jamie Weisser Manheim Township High Julie Frey Marty Pflieger William E. Nitrauer ES Mike Heverling PENN MANOR Central Manor Elementary Sue Althouse Shelly Arment Jerrell Birch Jenna Boyd Liz Crum Becca Eichler Casie Saxton Bonnie Gambler Kim Garvey Laura Heverling Cheryl Hogg Jennifer Loreto Beth Mader Ryan Mitten Pam Noll Heather Piatt Carol Purzycki Megan Quinn Beth Schoelkopf Patricia Shover Joanna Treier Katie Watkins Amy Weidman Stacey White Amy Wiggins Fred S. Eshelman ES Carole Chismar Elizabeth Kaplan Gail Thomson Penn Manor High Sara Bodde Cece O’Day Mindy Rottmund Martic Elementary Candy Steiner PEQUEA VALLEY Pequea Valley High Aftan Fisher Tim Hess Salisbury Elementary Nate Bushnell Diane Hemperly Becky Marks Elizabeth Martin Gabrielle Oberg Mallori Sapovchak Barbara Schreck Paradise Elementary Eileen Ard Courtney Bushnell David Marks Maryann Strayer Sara Tomison SOLANCO Bart-Colerain Elementary Rebekah Bouffard Melissa Miller Evans Donna Railing Greg Schmitt Shelia Schmitt LANCASTER COUNTYY CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER Willow Street Campus Mark Maisano Brownstown Campus Randy Hess

COLUMBIA BOROUGH Columbia Jr/Sr High Kimberly Shaw CONESTOGA VALLEY Conestoga Valley High Melanie Upton J. E. Fritz Elementary Sue Gehman DONEGAL Donegal Intermediate Linda Good Keith Royer EASTERN LANCASTER COUNTY (ELANCO) Blue Ball Elementary Lori Noyes Brecknock Elementary Kerry Kuipers New Holland Elementary Susan Hurst John Steel ELIZABETHTOWN Rheems Elementary Melissa Clark Elizabethtown High Kevin Goss HEMPFIELD Landisville Intermediate Jon Chronister Clare Daher Josh Diffenbach Linda Fungaroli-Azaroff Ryan Hehhman Jane Kilefner Jessica Wise Debbie Wrightson Landisville Middle Diane Anderson Scott Feifer Christine LeFevre Kim Petrosky Centerville Middle Jennifer Axe Cynthia Green Cristin Kramer Tamara Silvis Hempfield High Sarah Dilorio Chris Hanusa Landisville Primary Center Katie Diffenderffer Mary-Kay Mulcahy Nancy Neff

PRIVATE/FAITH BASED SCHOOLS
LANCASTER COUNTY CHRISTIAN West Lampeter Campus Tammi Dodson Alecia Weaver OUR MOTHER OF PERPETUAL HELP Theresa Chanko Elizabeth Eberly Deborah Spencer ST. LEO THE GREAT Stacey Berger Jan Bixby Art Festa Irene DeSolis Paulette Moore Kaitlin Philbin Ellen Tucker OUR LADY OF THE ANGELS Kathy Baringer Teri O’ Donnell LINVILLE HILL MENNONITE Renae Bender Karen Donaldson Joe Luethy Keturah Peterson RESURRECTION CATHOLIC Sylvia Buller Hollice Coccio Kim Ingram Kim Kramer Kristy Legenstein Mary Scaccia

LANCASTER CATHOLIC HIGH Christine Kennedy LANCASTER MENNONITE New Danville Campus Kelly Buckwalter Lindsay Grosh Jennifer Miller Jill Milton Eloy Rodriguez Beth Yoder Locust Grove Campus Susana Brown Martha High Elizabeth Kennel Stephanie Kreider Jenn Esbenshade Jessica Newswanger Chris Peterson Pat Shelly Curry Snell Melinda Stevens Lancaster Mennonite High Kris Horst Kraybill Campus Sylvia Weaver

Alma Charles Angela Sheehan

HOMESCHOOL EDUCATORS CYBER SCHOOL EDUCATORS

Lorraine Harmer

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 21

Advertisers & Design an Ad Winners

NIE Week Reception

A Special Thank You to All the Participating Advertisers, Judges & Staff! Judges
Lancaster Lebanon Reading Council Preliminary Judges Gale Burkhart Barbara Carr Jeanne Cassidy Karen Davis Sue Francis Kathy Geltz Bonnie Karly Ann Leonard Cindy Longenecker Sue Martin Andrea Morrison Sue Mowery Sue Francis June Shultz Dr. Linda Young Eileen Zaledonis Final Judges Barbara Carr Karen Davis Sue Francis Kathy Geltz Ann Leonard Cindy Longnecker Dave Martin Sue Martin Andrea Morrison Dr. Kelly Poniatowski June Shultz Deb Weaver Dr. Linda Young Lancaster Newspapers’ Editorial Staff Larry Alexander Tim Buckwalter Earle Cornelius Jo-Anne Greene Brett Hambright Bill Hannegan Jed Kensinger Dan Morris Dan Nephin Dave O’ Connor Todd Spidle Jennifer Todd Chad Umble Paula Wolf

Randy Hess

LANCASTER HONDA
Tyler Jones Grade 10, Brownstown CTC

John Ebersole

EBERSOLE’S VACUUM
Chris Petersheim Grade 7, Linville Hill Mennonite

Staff
Karyn Miller
HINKLETOWN INSURANCE
William McCormac Grade 4, Our Mother of Perpetual Help

Jennifer Henry
JULIUS STURGIS PRETZEL BAKERY
Liza Peachey Grade 9, Elizabethtown Area HS

Lancaster Lebanon Reading Council Officers
President Carol Severance President-Elect Jody Allen Vice Presidnet Sandy Haines Secretary Julie Baumbach Treasure Cindy Anderson

Lancaster Newspapers’ Staff
Marketing Specialist Janis Harrington Marketing Specialist Amanda Stoltzfus Editor Genine Antonelli Special Features Page Designer Jenny Long Photographer Joyce Fitzpatrick

Linford Good

LANDIS HOMES
Gabe Wahlberg Grade 5, Landisville ES

Debbie Drescher
STAUFFERS OF KISSEL HILL
Tim Martin Grade 8, Resurrection Catholic Ryan Buchwalder Grade 5, Central Manor ES

A special thank you to Turkey Hill and Julius Sturgis Pretzal Bakery for their generouse contribution to the NIE Week winners’ reception!

22 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

3rd PLaCe • EDITORIAL

Are Childhood Sports too Competitive?
Some people say children’s sports are too competitive. That statement is ridiculous; a sport is a competition. Your age matters not in a competition. When you play a sport, you play to win. Period. Sports build friendships, chemistry between players and create bitter rivalries. If your team is playing their cross-town rivals and you’re fighting for the #1 spot in town, losing is unacceptable. When your youth football team is down by a field goal in the championship with a minute left you’d better believe it’s competitive. These kids have worked as hard as they can all season long to get to this point and they will not give up. Competitive sports also build character for young kids. It teaches them to lose, accept the loss and move on. It teaches them to get back up when they fall and try again. Without competition as a kid they won’t know how to take defeat later in life. Children need competition as an important part of their mental growth process. Some people feel kids shouldn’t have to go through the mental state of feeling like a failure. They say children cannot take defeat, however, if not now, they’ll never learn. People say hard hits in youth football should be banned, but then how will a future quarterback be able to take a sack from a larger player at full speed in higher levels of play? I’ll tell you how they’ll be able to take it; they won’t, plain and simple. Plenty of people are against childhood competitive sports but in reality, it helps the kids grow. It builds their character and overall toughness. It teaches them to take defeat and move on and try again. Most importantly it gives them something to work hard for and keeps their dreams alive.
Noel Milland Grade 11 McCaskey East High School Teacher: Karen Morrisette

3rd PLaCe • EDITORIAL

3rd PLaCe • EDITORIAL

Going Abroad
Going to college is a scary thing for many students in the United States. College is a time of hanging out with friends, doing studies and living on independently for the first time, except for that roommate. But many are finding out that there is an exceptional alternative to going to a college in the United State. Attending a University in another country is a fantastic, once-in-alifetime opportunity. There are many reasons why a student should consider going to a university in a different country, including the price differences. For instance, going to NYU is about $50,000 per year, not including the dorms or food. London Metropolitan University in central London has an average price of $11,000 per year; also London Met is one of the most affordable higher education institutions in all of England. Going to a university can also be done in a shorter time period than in the United States. The average time that a degree can be obtained in England is approximately three years, with the possibility to obtain a Master’s in another year of studies. Compare that to the average of the United States, which is four years of studies just to obtain a Bachelor’s degree. One of the best reasons though about going to college in a foreign country is the cultural change. Going to a university in a different country gives the student a chance to see the world, which they may have never been able to experience. It also gives the individual a chance to experience the real world outside the borders of the United States.
Daniel Poole Grade 10 Pequea Valley HS Teacher: Aftan Fisher

Art Students Losing Their Rights
Many classes that encourage creativity in students, such as art, music, choir, and photography, are being taken out of school electives because of low funding. This is one of the worst decisions a school district can make. These classes promote creativity and let students express themselves in ways they could not in other classes. Taking art classes out of students’ school life will just create a new generation of bland adults lacking the ability to see the art and beauty of everyday life. Who designs all the things around you, sings all the songs you love, or choreographs all the dances you enjoy watching and wish you could learn? Not businessmen or mathematicians, but artists and actors and singers. It is these classes that promote creativity and individuality that students usually find themselves. Kids nowadays can get scholarships to a college for playing an instrument or being an amazing artist. These kids want to pursue what they love, and should not have that desire taken away from them in high school. Also, kids interested in the arts can be part of school clubs or even get a job by selling their art. With art and music classes taken out of school, there would not be as many things happening around the building. Art students build things for dances such as homecoming and create props in school plays. Instead of cutting down on classes that students like, schools should spend more time trying to raise money at fundraisers if they have low funding. It is not fair to the student body that we should suffer on behalf of the school. We’ll finish our thoughts with a quote from Demetri Martin: “The earth without art is just eh.”
Andrea Covaci Grade 9 Manheim Township HS Teacher: Marty Pflieger

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 23

3rd PLACE • NEWS FEATURE

School Resource Officer, a Valuable Resource, or “Big Brother”
Hempfield High School, like many high schools today, has a full time School Resource Officer. This seems to be following a practice, not only in Lancaster County, but across the country. While some parents and students like the idea of having a police officer at their school, others may not. Whichever side of the opinion you fall on, the idea is not new. School Resource Officers have been in use for more than 10 years. School Resource Officers are responsible for the safety of students and faculty. They are also responsible for the enforcement of laws which protect the rights of all. A School Resource Officer is a person in authority who students can go to whom they may not normally see on a daily basis. On the other hand, one could argue that a School Resource Officer presents an invasion into their school life. Students may feel that the watchful eye of law enforcement may influence their choices, self-expression, or ability to have “fun” at school. While some parts of the opposition may be true, the positives of having a School Resource Officer far outweigh the negatives. In light of the violent crimes committed on school properties across the nation, School Resource Officers serve as a valuable asset. A School Resource Officer is also a reliable person for students to come to with problems or issues with other students. These officers are placed in schools to ensure the safety of students and faculty which is of utmost importance.
Brynn Zerbe GRADE 7 Landisville MS Teacher: Scott Feifer

Pasquale’s

ad designed by DAVID HORSEY Grade 7 Landisville MS Teacher: Scott Feifer

24 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

3rd PLACE TIE • NEWS FEATURE

The Unusual Hobby of Playing the Bagpipes
Do you think playing the bagpipes is an unusual hobby? I do, and so does Dave Weisman, a bagpipe player from Lebanon, Pennsylvania. He has been playing the bagpipes since 1994 when he was 24 years old. In Scotland, where the bagpipes are the national instrument, children start playing around the age of five. He has practiced at least two times a week to maintain air because it is a very physical instrument. You play the bagpipe by blowing into the blowpipe which goes into the bag. Then you squeeze the bag so the air comes out one of three drones. There are two tenor reed drones and one bass reed drone. The chanter, located on the bottom of the bag, has nine notes ranging from low G to high A plus various other embellishments. Embellishments enhance the main notes on the drones to make different sounds. The instrument is simple and primitive, but it does need a good set of reeds to make it sound better. It’s a very personal instrument because you need to have reeds that are comfortable for you. If the reeds are to easy, they will squeak. Since the bagpipes sounds unusual, Dave sometimes gets kicked out of the house when practicing. Dave says, “I play the bagpipes because I love the culture that surrounds the instrument. I’m not Scottish or Irish, but am fascinated with the instrument and the traditions that surround it. It give me great pleasure.” Owen Walker
GRADE 7 Landisville MS Teacher: Diane Anderson

3rd PLACE TIE • NEWS FEATURE

States Game
They drink up their bottle of thirst quenching water, and make their way to the field. Who knew that they would make it this far? Pequea Valley boy’s soccer team competed against Lancaster Mennonite School in the most nerve-racking game of the year! On November 17, 2012, in Hershey, both teams played to become the best soccer team in the state. As the crowd made its way to the bleachers, the game began. Everyone’s eyes were glued to the ball, waiting for it to hit the net! One hour in and still nothing was on the board. Everyone’s mouth gaped in amazement by the score. There were so many things happening at once! Both teams worked their heart out to get the one point they needed! The crowd had gone crazy, demanding to win! Time flew. They went into overtime, twice! The ball moved closer and closer to the LMH goal! PV boys managed to keep the ball between their feet! Pequea fans were wide-eyed! With only minutes remaining…then POW in the net! Amazing goal by Isaac Mohr! The PV boys all jump up and down with big smiles on their face, hugging each other in relief! The crowd screamed his name over and over! The PV soccer boys were state champs.
Makenzi Dienner GRADE 6 Linville Hill Mennonite Teacher: Karen Donaldson

Marketplace.com
ad designed by EMMA SHENK Grade 4 Central Manor ES Teacher: Laura Heverling

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 25

3rd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

3rd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

The Turkey Adventure
“Laura!” Mom’s voice sounded up the stairs. “Time to get up for school...Oh my word, come here!” I jumped out of bed and ran out to the kitchen. “What is it?” I asked. “Come look out the window,” my mom replied. I almost jumped out of my skin because I was so astonished at what I saw. A turkey in my own backyard! “Cooper! Quiet down!” I yelled sharply at my dog. As the turkey strutted around the backyard, I gazed at his beautiful collection of feathers. What a glorious sight it was! His feathers were like a fan of cards. The turkey just opened up his mouth to gobble when...”Laura, Laura wake up. You have to get ready for school.” My mom was leaning over me trying to get me out of bed. “Oh well,” I thought to myself, “The day has just begun.”
Laura Sauder GRADE 5 Brecknock ES Teacher: Kerry Kuipers

The Big Pitch
Gulp...the butterflies in my stomach were getting worse, I was next up to pitch at my softball game and I was as nervous as a shy kid speaking to a LARGE crowd. I was shaking when I walked out to the pitcher’s mound. My team all smiled, winked, or said good luck when I went past them. That made me feel better. I placed my feet where they needed to be, picked up the softball, took a deep breath and waited for the batter to come out. Finally, when she arrived I took another deep breath, put my ball in my mitt, and did a windmill. The ball went flying towards the batter’s box and landed on the ground. I had 2 more tries, here I go again... perfect pitch! The softball was coming towards me, it was a pop-fly! I took a step forward and opened my glove a little wider, got my hand ready to cover my glove, and as soon as I knew it, the softball had landed in my glove! I got the batter out! That was one of the most exciting experiences of my life!
McKenzie Manning GRADE 4 Hans Herr Intermediate Teacher: Beth Hendrix

3rd PLACE • WRITER’S CHOICE

The Terrible Ride
It was a bright sunny day. I was anxiously waiting in line for the roller coaster. Finally, it zoomed down the track and screeched to a halt. I gave the man my ticket and leaped into the seat. The belt went down and the ride started. It felt like I was on a jet with no windshield. My guts sloshed up and down the whole time I was on that raging ride. When it was over, I realized I was still screaming! Everyone was looking at me. I felt my face turning red. That was one of the worst rides I had ever taken.
Zachary Nell GRADE 3 Lancaster Mennonite Kraybill Campus Teacher: Sylvia Weaver

Moravian Manor
ad designed by MADISON HENRY Grade 6 Central Manor ES Teacher: Stacey White

26 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

3rd Place • ILLuStrAtIng HEAdLInES

3rd PLace TIe • ILLuStrAtIng HEAdLInES

Flu Bug Bites Early

Art design by Tyler Keller Grade 1 • Eshleman ES • Teacher: Carol Chismar

Barnstormers Sweep

Art design by Abrielle Fisher Grade K • Linville Hill Mennonite • Teacher: Katurah Peterson

3rd PLace TIe • ILLuStrAtIng HEAdLInES

3rd PLaCE • WrItEr’S CHOICE

An Elf’s Story
I love my elf on the shelf. Her name is Candy. She comes to visit every year at Thanksgiving. I’m guessing her favorite color is red because Santa wears red every year. Candy hides in different places around our house each day. She goes back to the North Pole at night to tell Santa if we were good or bad. We make Candy feel welcome by giving her notes, treats, and sometimes present. Candy is supposed to go with Santa back to the North Pole on Christmas Eve. I love Candy because she makes Christmas a magical time of the year.
Mia Loney GradE 2 St. Leo the Great Teacher: Mallori Sapovchak

Feathers Flying in Eagle Land
Art design by Hayden Winey Grade K • Salisbury ES • Teacher: Mallori Sapovchak

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 27

HONORABLE MENTION
Although technology has the potential to advance society and humanity, too often it is misused for entertainment and other mindless endeavors. Students in particular have fallen victim to this pointless and unscrupulous use of technology. Cell phones, smart phones, and PDAs hinder students’ ability to learn; attempts to utilize students’ technology in education does not negate the class-passiveness that these devices bring into schools. Texting, games, and other noneducational activities are the primary reason students use these devices; why should educators justify usage of these entertainment-centered tools in their school? Clearly, these devices of distraction have no place in the educational realm. Being a student, one is constantly reminded of the cyber-delinquency in his or her day-to-day schooling. Every class has at least one person who finds her or himself enamored with their device rather than focusing on the educational material at hand. This occurrence is so common, in fact, that most teachers appear to have given up the fight for the deviceuser’s attention; this encourages other students to use their devices in an air of nonchalance, effectively allowing distraction to pervade the classroom.

Master Distracter
Of course, in order to remove this technological-plague from schools, new propositions and punishments must be enacted. A no-tolerance, four-step warning policy will empower teachers to remove students’ devices on sight. The four steps are as follows: A stern warning to put the device away; taking away the device for a day; a week; a month; and finally, a year. This system would work best school-wide, with teachers reporting the usage of devices on an online district database. Devices other than those provided or mandated by the district should be outright banned on school property. The “device” as we know it must be purged from our schools before education is purged from our children.
Josh Betts GRADE 12 Manheim Township HS Teacher: Marty Pflieger

HONORABLE MENTION

Girls need better role model
Teen girls see beautiful and thin models and celebrities on the covers of Teen Vogue and other magazines. They see unrealistic ideas of how women should look according to the media, and this is what causes bad body image. Girls see the glamorous clothing on skinny girls, and they think to themselves: “What do I need to do to look like that?” They only see faults in the mirror; this is what leads to bulimia and anorexia. The habits start at a young age and follow girls the rest of their lives. Even though every person is supposed to look different, the girls see the same type of skinny, long, and beautiful bodies on magazine covers. Teenage girls are not shown the difference between realistic women and the girls they see on covers. This needs to change. There are three things needed to help girls realize that being different sizes is okay. Magazines need to stop using only stick thin models; they

ad designed by ROLANDO LOPEZ-SALATA Grade 11 Hempfield HS Teacher: Chris Hanusa

Chapman Auto Group

need to show how diverse women really are and how women are all different sizes and shapes. The teen girls who look at these magazines need to realize how unrealistic those girls are compared to all the women in the world. Girls need to realize that what they see on the covers is not the normal body-type. Magazines need to show reality instead of fantasy. Parents and teachers also need to educate their kids on body image and what eating disorders do to girls’ bodies by not accepting themselves for who they are. Another thing is to show regular girls in articles instead of always using celebrities. Girls need more realistic role models to emulate so they don’t harm themselves. Not every girl is supposed to look like Barbie.
Ashley Noel GRADE 11 Manheim Township HS Teacher: Marty Pflieger

28 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

1st PLACE • FEATURE PHOTO

2nd PLACE • FEATURE PHOTO

A Wood in Progress, Frank Cullen Grade 9 J.P. McCaskey HS Teacher: Matthew Coonan

Wallet, Josh Farrell Grade 9 • Pequea Valley High School • Teacher: Tim Hess

3rd PLACE • FEATURE PHOTO

November Snow, Emily Hershey Grade 9 • Pequea Valley High School • Teacher: Tim Hess

Sunday News Comics

ad designed by McKENNA MUNOZ Grade 7 Our Lady of the Angels Teacher: Kathy Barninger

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 29

2nd PLACE • NEWS PHOTO

1st PLACE • NEWS PHOTO

A Bridge in Progress, Frank Cullen Grade 9 • School District of Lancaster • Teacher: Matthew Coonan

Photograph by Devon Mallay Grade 12 Pequea Valley HS Teacher: Tim Hess

3rd PLACE • NEWS PHOTO

Ralph and Reba Zerphey, Jordan Heagy, Grade 11 Elizabethtown Area HS • Teacher: Kevin Goss

Stauffers of Kissel Hill Garden Center
ad designed by RYAN BUCHWALDER Grade 5 Central Manor ES Teacher: Jennifer Loreto

30 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

HONOrABLE MENTION

HONOrABLE MENTION
Local musician warms up before his performance in the Mount Joy Winter Fest December 2012, Charlie Hamaker Grade 11 Elizabethtown Area HS Teacher: Kevin Goss

A Change in Season, Kristin Cain Grade 9 • Pequea Valley HS • Teacher: Tim Hess

HONOrABLE MENTION

HONOrABLE MENTION

Exercise
Are those dumbbells in the corner used for paper weights, or are they just collecting dust? Or maybe between dropping the kids off at school and picking up some groceries, going for a run simply does not fit into the average American’s schedule. Cramming exercise into already busy lives can be a challenge, but it can also be a very health conscious and rewarding decision. Although working out may seem to make a person’s day more tiring, according to a Mayo Clinic study, daily exercise will work more nutrients into the tissues and boost physical endurance levels. So when squeezing in that extra jog around the block may seem to just produce more fatigue, in the long run there will be more energy for and left over from completing daily routines. Cleaning the stuff off that treadmill (a.k.a. the bookshelf) and working off a couple hundred calories can also counteract the afternoon’s big mac too! It’s pretty simple; when more calories are burnt, the day’s meals and excess energy are consumed and weight gain is prevented. Pick up that medicine ball, and put down the calories! Working out and getting a little extra daily exercise can help prevent America’s obesity onslaught! The world wasn’t formed in a day, and neither are we. Set small goals and build upon them,” said Lee Haney, a former Olympic body builder. Take it slow! Augmenting daily schedules with increasingly long workouts will help with easing into a new type of lifestyle. Multiple studies confirm that sustained daily physical activity can prevent diseases like diabetes and cancer. Make the choice, take the initiative and improve your self image!
Mason Stoltzfus GrAdE 10 Lancaster Mennonite HS Teacher: Kris Horst

Bullying
Bullying is a worldwide issue that has been going on for many years, and today, is still going on. Many kids, some as young as 10, have committed suicide because they are being bullied at school; also they are bullied on the school bus and even on social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter. People think that these networks are safe places to be themselves, but the reality of it is that, this is where most of the bullying happens. The thing about cyber-bullying is that the kids think that they can get away with it with no consequences. The problem with kids being bullied at school is that other kids will see it happening, but they do nothing about it. About 39% of students have admitted to seeing someone bullied online or at school and ignored it. According to TehachapiABC, 37% of students in the US have been bullied at school, 39% of social network users have been bullied and 17% of teens have admitted to bullying someone either offline or online in one-way or another. Most people think that bullying is just pushing someone in the school hallway. That is part of it, but bullying is much more than that. Bullying could be anything from writing something offensive on a social network site to violently threatening, harassing or intimidating someone. Parents, teachers, and especially students; the community, need to work together and pay attention to the bullying around us. We may not notice it, but even the smallest things can be considered bullying and someone could take it offensively. And when you do see bullying happening, don’t ignore it, stand up for those people. Take a stand.
Keanna Vaughn GrAdE 9 Manheim Township HS Teacher: Marty Pflieger

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 31

HONORABLE MENTION

The Catcher’s View
Whoosh, CRACK! The ball flies as a player speeds around the bases. Almost there, BUT WAIT! An outfielder grasps the ball in midair. Silence travels throughout the stands, everyone waiting for the call. A homerun!! Cheers fill the stands! This is a normal play in a game of softball, a competitive, thrilling, and challenging game. The game consists of 7-8 innings depending on time. No matter where a player is, out on the field, batting, or even on the bench, they are still involved. Players on the bench prepare, yell cheers, or encourage their teammates. At the end of the game, no matter who won, both teams walk towards each other giving every player high fives. Hanna Greineder is the catcher for Penn Manor’s 14 U team. While catching, she feels anxious because the ball is coming straight for her, but feels relieved when she catches it. If Hanna misses the ball, she is disappointed, yet knows there will be more chances. Hanna says, “I love softball because you can hang out with friends and try out different positions. It’s not about winning, just having fun.” Most teams play fall ball and spring ball, and you can come to any games. Some play on weekends in the fall and play at other schools. If you want to join softball, talk to a coach, gym teacher, or guidance counselor about entering. Hanna explains, “I chose softball because it sounded fun. I would recommend it to others because you are always involved!”
Abigail Mitchell GRADE 8 Centerville MS Teacher: Jennifer Axe

Lancaster Mazda
ad designed by SKYLER FIEL Grade 11 Manheim Township HS Teacher: Julie Fry

HONORABLE MENTION

Encore Dance Center
Dancing with your feet is one thing, but dancing with your heart is another. Encore Dance Center is a studio in Lancaster, originating in 1985. At an early age, Alvina Kline, owner of Encore, was inspired by Francis Cole, her first dance teacher. Alvina adds, “She was not only kind and nurturing, but also my role model. I modeled my studio after the things I learned and carried on from her.” From the moment she started, she said she “knew it was her calling.” Encore is such a successful studio due to the talented teachers, their dedication, and the nurturing atmosphere students encounter everyday. Between the students and their teachers, the studio as a whole encourages one another to dance and perform, whether for recreation or to move on professionally. Between the students and their instructors, a strong bond has been woven. The environment promotes self expression through motions. Teachers have a place in their hearts for each girl and can only hope they excel. Alvina explains, “The instructors love what they do and want each child to have the same experience.” Fourteen instructors choreograph many of the twelve types of classes offered including tap, ballet, Pointe, and jazz. From class to class, laughs are shared, memories are made, and a passion for dance is educated daily. “I can only hope that every student that attends Encore feels special, learns great technique, and has memories they can cherish the rest of their lives,” Alvina expressed.
Jillian Buterbaugh GRADE 7 Centerville MS Teacher: Jennifer Axe

32 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

HONORABLE MENTION

Let’s Move!
On February 9, 2010, First Lady Michelle Obama began a new government program to help fight childhood obesity. Obesity is extra body fat. Let’s Move! provides parents and kids with information about how to make healthy food choices and learning the importance of getting regular exercise that lead children on a healthy path. Healthy eating is about portion control and adding to the number of fruits or vegetables eaten daily. According to Let’s Move’s website (www.letsmove.gov), thirty years ago, children used to eat one snack a day. Nowadays, kids eat about three snacks a day. Additionally, food portions have become huge and that adds calories into daily diets. Processed foods are especially unhealthy because they contain lots of salt or sugar, which can lead obesity and other possible health risks such as juvenile diabetes. In fact, the website mentions that the average American eats fifteen pounds more sugar a year now than they did in 1970. Making better, healthier food choices is a great start, but regular exercise is also important. Kids used to walk to school and play outdoors a lot more thirty years ago. The fact is, that kids ages 8- 18 spend 7-1/2 hours a day on some type of video/computer/or television entertainment! There are many useful resources and recommendations on the Let’s Move website. Let’s Move is available for schools to partner with it, and parents and kids can access the program on their own too!
Mary Murphy GRADE 6 St. Leo The Great Teacher: Ellen Tucker

LancasterOnline.com
ad designed by JASMINE THOMPSON Grade 4 Hans Herr ES Teacher: Jeanne Garrett

HONORABLE MENTION

The Battle In The Sun
It was a dreadfully hot day, with the sun blazing down on top of us. I was making an ocean of sweat! Sticky and exhausted, I was feeling more miserable by the second. But, I had to make sure our team won the game! I got the ball, kicked it, but missed the goal. I felt as if I was shattered into a million pieces. The ball came my way again. Oh no! Someone was in my path that would keep me from scoring. I dribbled toward the goal and barely passed him. Then, with my tired worn foot, I had a clear shot. Boom! I kicked the ball right past the goalie. I couldn’t believe it! I made my first goal of the season! I was shocked and joyful! When everyone came over to say, “Good job!” I couldn’t help but blush. I had enough energy when I needed it, even though it had been a tough soccer game we had to play in the scorching sun.
Zachary Lees GRADE 5 Lancaster Mennonite Teacher: Sylvia Weaver

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 33

HONORABLE MENTION

HONORABLE MENTION

From at Bat to the Hospital
When I was seven, I was the most skilled batter on the Iron Pigs Little League Baseball team. It was a sunny Saturday at 6:00 and I was up next to bat. In the Little League we use metal bats. I was practicing hitting. I turned around and wham. The metal bat hit me in the middle of my nose. Blood started gushing out of everywhere. I was crying and my mother came running to get me. She held paper towels to my face to stop the bleeding. My parents took me to Reading Hospital. They did x-rays and we waited for five hours for the results. It was 11:00 when the doctor finally told us that my nose was broken, but the cut was too small for stitches. I went home with a Band-Aid and acknowledged his advice that I could go back to the game next week. From now on I will be more careful when teammates are batting.
Ryan Kern GRADE 4 New Holland ES Teacher: Susan Hurst

My First Riding Fall
It was Wednesday and that meant I had horseback riding today. I was so excited because today everyone in the house was coming to see me. This time I remembered to take carrots to feed Stars, my pony. When I got to the barn I ran inside to see my teacher getting Stars in the grooming station. Stars nodded his head when he saw me. “Hi Stars!” I said. I got to work grooming him. After I was done grooming and tacking him up, I led him to the ring. My family sat down to watch me. I got on Stars and made a sound to make him go. He started to talk, I steered him to the fence. After I was done walking him along the fence, my teacher hooked him on the lunge line so I could trot. When we were trotting there was a sound. Stars got scared and started to canter (which I didn’t know how to do). I fell off!!!! I had sand in my eyes. I started to cry. I remembered my family was watching so I got back on. When I finished riding I still gave him the carrot. ONE carrot.
Navya Reddy GRADE 3 Bucher ES Teacher: Marian Good

HONORABLE MENTION

My New Cousin
Last year I found out that I was going to get a new baby cousin. I was very excited! Then a couple months later I found out it was going to be a girl. I was so happy because I would be able to dress her up and do her hair. On May 18th she was finally born. Her name is Madison. I like to call her Maddie for short. The first time I saw her I could not believe how tiny she was. I got to hold her, she was really cute. I was so glad she was finally here. I like to read her stories, it makes her smile. When she gets older I plan to go outside and build forts with her and my brother. I think Maddie and I are going to be the best of friends!
Carly Keene GRADE 2 Eshleman ES Teacher: Gail Thomson

Leisure Lanes

ad designed by ELLIE LEFEVER Grade 2 Locust Grove Mennonite Teacher: Melinda Stevens

34 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

Kim Ingram, Resurrection Catholic School, wins Kindle Fire
Kim Ingram, a 6th, 7th, and 8th Integrated Language Arts teacher at Resurrection Catholic School and annual participating faculty member in the NIE Design An Ad and Journalism contest is this year’s winner of a Kindle Fire. Mrs. Ingram’s name was selected in a random drawing from all of the teachers who participated in the NIE Design An Ad and Journalism contest. Writing and developing creative thinking skills are a top priority in this enthusiastic and well-liked teacher’s classroom. Since she has participated for several years and since she encourages students to enter both contests, she begins the assignment almost from the first day of school. Devon Soto commented, “I think the writing contest is important because it helps us become better writers. The ad design is cool too because I like to draw.” She has implemented several writing programs in her classroom which the students complete in a shared computer lab. Through Ed Modo she posts homework, and then the students save it in the virtual backpack to Ed Modo, and open their virtual backpacks when they arrive at school. The excitement the students exhibited when Mrs. Ingram opened the Kindle Fire was genuine. Mercedi Albert said, “I think writing the features are important so other people know what we care about. It may also give people an idea about what they can do to help others.” In fact, a few classes later a student put it to good use. The computer lab
Front Row: (left to right) Anatasia Pena, Allison Keck, Amanda Rivera, Eryn Albright, Vanessa Joseph Second Row: (left to right) Lizzy Danz, Nathalia Rivera, Jordan Talbot, Erin Fulmer, Sonya, Mercedi Albert Third Row: (Left to right): Abraham Facio, Geovanni Diaz, Luiz Garcia, Devon Soto, Mrs. Ingram, Carter Ickes, Ayanna Cannon, Juan Hiraldo Fourth row: (Left to right): Tierza Mendez, Mariah Bollyer, Ashley Sanchez, Michael Wolpert, Tobey Prime, Alex Dominguez, Dylan Aponte

was being used. She had a project to finish, and she soon became the envy of the class as she was the first to use the Kindle Fire. Mrs. Ingram’s emphasis on writing has had many good results. Not only are Mrs. Ingram and her class winners, but also 8th grade student Tim Martin, designed the winning ad for Stauffer’s of Kissel Hill Supermarket. Mrs. Ingram and her classes were thrilled with the unexpected win. “We do have a computer lab, but not all of my students have Internet service in their homes. This will definitely be a help for students to complete their daily writing prompts and integrated technology book reports.” Jordan Talbert added, “The best part of entering the NIE this year was winning the prize! It’s awesome!!!! I can’t wait to use it in class!”

HONORABLE MENTION

Stink Bugs: Pests Turn up as Weather Turns Cold

Art design by Harrison Petersheim Grade 1 • Strasburg ES • Teacher: Virginia Sitler

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 35

HONORABLE MENTION
Local Birders Chase Hurricane
Art design by Evelyn Finch Grade K • Rheems ES • Teacher: Melissa Clark

HONORABLE MENTION
Barnstormer Sweep
Art design by Deseree Smucker Grade K • Rheems ES • Teacher: Melissa Clark

Hinkletown Insurance

ad designed by WILLIAM McCORMAC Grade 4 Our Mother of Perpetual Help Teacher: Theresa Chanko

36 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

TEACHER PICKS
In an effort to raise a healthier generation and fight the current obesity crisis, it should be a priority to provide students with low-cost, nutritious food and beverages during the school day to ensure that they are not encouraged to make unhealthy choices due to price. However, lunches that meet the nutritional guidelines and provide students with adequate calories are currently unaffordable. Unless qualified for the free or reduced meal program, students must pay up to $3.45 for lunch and up to $2.00 for a la carte items, with the more nutritious items at the high end of the cost scale. Critics of the healthy school lunch reform claim that most children will choose unhealthy eating options regardless of price. This is inaccurate in many ways because studies have shown: 1) students will eat healthy if healthy options are made available, 2) students are more likely to choose healthy options if they are affordable, and 3) students are even

Affordable Nutrition?
more likely to make healthy choices if unhealthy foods and beverages are less affordable than the healthier options. In summary, price does play a significant factor when it comes to making food choices. To make nutritious foods more affordable, and encourage students to consume these items, every effort should be made to manage food procurement cost by buying in bulk or buying from local farms and lessen preparation cost (i.e., investing in proper equipment) to make nutritious school meals more affordable to the average family that does not qualify for the free or reduced lunch program. By reducing the cost of healthy items and simultaneously increasing the cost of the unhealthy items, schools could offer students nutritious meal options at affordable prices.
Veronica Edkin GRADE 12 Hempfield HS Teacher: Sarah Di Iorio

TEACHER PICKS

The Sweetest Charity
Sweet Charity is a boutique and thrift shop located at 21 West Main Street in Strasburg, PA. It sells womens and childrens brand name clothing, accessories and shoes at low prices. It also supports the charity Imagine Goods and works to end human trafficking by selling things in a separate room. These items are traded by women in Cambodia. Imagine Goods is a charity that goes around the world and helps people in Cambodia. They want to make a difference in this world and find peace. They also have a room dedicated to selling local artist’s works. The workers are very nice and create a fun, comical atmosphere that will leave you smiling. It works to help others and not just for them. They are dedicated to their work and they will always do their best to help others. This is a great source for good clothing and great hospitality. They work for others and you can help if you just buy one thing. If you want to learn more about Sweet Charity and Imagine Goods visit www.sweetcharityshop.com or www.imaginegoods.org.
Roslyn Talbert GRADE 8 Resurrection Catholic Teacher: Kim Ingram

MyHempfield News.com

ad designed by SAMI NAU Grade 7 Landisville MS Teacher: Diane Anderson

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 37

TEACHER PICKS

TEACHER PICKS

Catch and Release Program May Save Strays
Nearly four million felines that are placed in adoption centers and shelters are euthanized each year. While some of those events are happening for medical reasons, the majority of those cats are disposed of due to overpopulation. For that very reason, I believe that shelters should not be permitted to euthanized felines. The majority of vets are dismissing strays and euthanizing them for immoral reasons and if more people knew that, then the voice of opposition on this matter would have the power to prohibit it. The biggest mistake I see shelters making, especially these days, is how they ignore the actual meaning of euthanization. According to the American Heritage Dictionary, euthanasia is only to be used when someone is suffering from a terminal illness, or an incurable condition. It’s easy to image why shelters may look to euthanasia, due to overpopulation and lack of space, and money. There are other alternatives. A volunteer at the Humane League in Lancaster shared some information concerning what’s known as the “cath-and-release” program. Cages are placed in a selected area of the county with food waiting inside (like a huge mouse trap). Strays that are hungry will be lured to those cages. From there, they are taken to the local shelter and spayed/neutered before being released again. This helps to control any pregnancies that may occur. People are only aware of a portion of what happens in the field of feline euthanization, and the reasons behind it. If people knew was really going on and why cat euthanization shouldn’t be allowed in animal shelters, except for extreme medical conditions, there would definitely be more space open to alternatives.
Kess Hayford GRADE 11 Conestoga Valley HS Teacher: Melanie Upton

The Golden Age
Suvilla Smoker Kauffman, a Gap resident, who has lived thourgh two world wars and the Great Depression, celebrated her 106th birthday in December 2012. What is her secret to a long life? “Don’t drink soda. It’s not good for you. Eat well and live your whole life for the Lord.” Suvilla is the ninth child in a family of eleven. She was born to Isaac and Hannah Smoker on December 31, 1906 on a farm in Intercourse, PA. She has 7 children, 33 grandchildren, 124 great-grandchildren, and 6 greatgreat-grandchildren. In 1929, she married her husband, Christian B. Kauffman, and moved to Bird-In-Hand, where her husband and father-in-law started Kauffman’s Fruit Farm. Suvilla and Christian loved to travel. They visited Europe and the Holy Land on a few of their trips. When Christian died in 1966, Suvilla still traveled. She loved to see the sights in South America when she visited her missionary daughter Verda in El Salvador. Suvilla has a very adventurous spirit. “She climbed the Santa Ana volcano in El Salvador when she was sixty, and even went sledding into her mid-80s,” remarked her daughter, Verda Yoder. Some of Suvilla’s hobbies include sewing, crocheting, Scrabble, and gardening. “I am thankful for everything the Lord has done for me,” states Suvilla.
Mindy Beiler GRADE 7 Linville Hill Mennonite Teacher: Karen Donaldson

Lancaster Honda
ad designed by TYLER JONES Grade 10 Brownstown CTC Teacher: Randy Hess

38 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

TEaChER PiCKS

TEaChER PiCKS

Girls on the Run
You hear the people on the side line yelling, ‘You Go Girl!’ Streets are blocked off just for you. Who is it? It is Girls on the Run. Girls on the Run is a program for 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders and starts in the fall. This program gets girls to run a 5k. During the practices, that are held after school, the girls and leaders talk of feelings, how to be safe and healthy. At almost every practice you run a 5k and play games to get you ready for the race. Aunts, uncles, cousins, Moms or Dads run the race with their girls, to help them to win and to give support. After the race you are filled with pride that you ran that race! Your coach hands you a medal. You know that all your hard work has paid off. Even if you weren’t one of the first girls done with the race, you are filled with pride just because you were able to accomplish this. At the end of the race, people are already talking about next year’s team. You hope all of the girls will be there. Many new friendships are built and you learn to believe in yourself and help others.
Madison Haas Grade 6 Our Lady of the Angels Teacher: Mrs. O’Donnell

Snow Cones for Everyone!
There were pieces of ice everywhere in the kitchen from top to bottom. My mom slipped on the ice and almost fell when she came in. It was a good thing the cabinet was there or she would have fallen down. My mom started yelling at me about the mess in the kitchen from the snow cone maker. She asked me for the directions, but I didn’t know where the directions were. Then I found them and gave them to my mom. She read them and taught me how to do it. We cleaned the mess up and my mom said, “Next time read the directions.” I made snow cones for everyone in the neighborhood!
Haley White Grade 5 Elizabeth Martin ES Teacher: Darrell Yoder

TEaChER PiCKS

TEaChER PiCKS

My Brother Rylan
I have a little brother named Rylan who is 16 months old. He does all sorts of silly things. When he tries to stand up, he does it by trying to stand on his head. When he drops his sippy-cup on purpose, he says, “uh-oh” even though it wasn’t an accident. I talk to Rylan and ask him questions, and when the answer is supposed to be “yes,” he shakes his head “no.” He will also hand me a toy and take it back right away. I think Rylan wants to play the drums or cymbals when he gets older because he is always banging on something or banging two things together. Even though Rylan is only 16 months old, he tries to read books, but holds them upside down, and it sounds like he is speaking a different language. He has a car that is also a push toy and when he pushes it around, he runs into everything, including me. If I don’t get out of his way, he runs right over my foot. I think my brother Rylan is very funny, and he will always be that way — after all, he is my brother.
Bayley Ranck Grade 4 Doe Run ES Teacher: Leisa Bowman

My First Kickball Game!
“You’re out!” the boys yelled. Even though it was a whole year ago, boys would think from fall to fall, seven to eight years old. I would have forgotten kickball! Not on Denver’s great kickball team! This is the story of my first kickball game… One day I looked over at the kickball field and thought to myself, “If boys play kickball, why shouldn’t girls? Does it have anything to do with the fact that men only play national baseball that goes on TV? Or do they think girls just aren’t good enough? Every day I watch those boys and the two teams getting outs, fouls, balls and better at kickball. DON’T have any girls on the team. Never!” So I hurried over to the kickball field, almost immediately. I was at the field. I had a nice feeling inside me. It was courage. It was confidence. I was building up courage and confidence like speed stacking up. But when I went to ask, all the cups were knocked out. I was scared. I wanted one certain boy that seemed the best. He was in, and…I was in! I was so happy! Here are the things I did: caught a rolling ball, got a boy out, got out, and wanted to play more. I made new friends and learned a lot. Most importantly I encouraged girls to play kickball. Do you want to play kickball too?
Delaney Gable Grade 3 Denver ES Teacher: Jill Carper

Lancaster, Pa

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

MARCH 5, 2013 • 39

TEACHER PICKS

Art design by Anayah Rose Grade K Lancaster Mennonite New Danville Teacher: Jen Miller

Long Orthodontic
ad designed by TIFFANY IRAHETA Grade 4 Lancaster Mennonite ES Teacher: Pat Shelly

TEACHER PICKS

American Girl Doll Fashion Show
A couple of months ago, my mom signed me up for the American Girl Doll Fashion Show! A couple of months after my mom signed me up for the fashion show, the staff of Hands-on-House emailed my mom while I was at school. The email said your daughter was chosen to be a participant in the American Girl Doll Fashion Show. Audrey is going to be Ruthie. When I got home from school, my mom told me I was going to be Ruthie. There are only two rehearsals. I didn’t know where the fashion show was! I think it was October sixteenth, when I got to try my outfit on! When I got to the fitting I was so excited! When I got into the changing room I saw that the big dolls — because Ruthie is a big doll — get to wear three dresses. I was so happy! I got to practice my walk. I got two regular dresses and one pair of pajamas. By the way, my name is Audrey Pavlica. Do you want to be in a fashion show? I hope you do!
Audrey Pavlica GRADE 2 Reidenbaugh ES Teacher: Miss Geltz

40 • MARCH 5, 2013

NEWSPAPER IN EDUCATION

Lancaster, Pa

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