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The Competency Framework Document Summary

As well as being measured against a set of annual objectives an individual will also be assessed against a set of competencies which define the behaviour and skills required by an individual to achieve the objectives. The competencies required to perform a job are identified at the point a job is created and these automatically become the competency set which an individual will be assessed against during the annual review process. This document lists the competencies available for selection and provides guidance on the selection of these competencies.

Table of Contents
1 INTRODUCTION TO THE COMPETENCY FRAMEWORK...........................................................................2

2 WHAT DO COMPETENCIES LOOK LIKE?......................................................................................................3 3 HOW TO SELECT COMPETENCIES................................................................................................................3 4 DELIVERING RESULTS....................................................................................................................................5 4.1 CUSTOMER SERVICE ORIENTATION.................................................................................................................5 4.2 INITIATIVE AND COMMITMENT TO ACHIEVE.........................................................................................................6 4.3 ATTENTION TO DETAIL AND QUALITY...............................................................................................................7 4.4 ORGANISING FOR RESULTS...........................................................................................................................8 5 PEOPLE FOCUS...............................................................................................................................................9 5.1 TEAMWORK...............................................................................................................................................9 5.2 EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION........................................................................................................................10 5.3 INFLUENCE AND NEGOTIATION......................................................................................................................11 5.4 INTERPERSONAL ABILITY.............................................................................................................................12 6 IMPROVEMENT ORIENTATION.....................................................................................................................13 6.1 ADAPTABILITY AND INNOVATION....................................................................................................................13 6.2 CONTINUOUS LEARNING.............................................................................................................................14 7 EXPERTISE.....................................................................................................................................................15 7.1 PROFESSIONALISM.....................................................................................................................................15 7.2 BUSINESS AWARENESS..............................................................................................................................16 8 PROVIDING DIRECTION................................................................................................................................17 8.1 LEADERSHIP............................................................................................................................................17 8.2 PROBLEM SOLVING AND DECISION MAKING ....................................................................................................19 8.3 STRATEGIC THINKING.................................................................................................................................20

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Introduction to the Competency Framework

The Competency Framework is a tool to recognise and assess how individuals achieve results. Using competencies ensures: a) assessment is objective, clear and as accurate as possible b) a close match between the job and the person recruited c) constructive feedback is given to develop or focus the individual on areas to improve The Competency Framework can be used as a "shopping list" to help managers and supervisors recognise both effective and less effective behaviour against the definition and give feedback to staff that is both specific and objective. Competencies are defined in many different ways depending on what the organisation wishes to emphasise. The Emirates Group definition is as follows: A competency is an individual's ability a) to apply personal attributes, professional skills or knowledge b) to achieve a standard of performance which contributes to the goals of the Emirates Group Under the first point, the key word is apply. A manager may believe that an employee has ability in a particular area but you must be able to see and describe examples of behaviour which demonstrate that the individual uses that ability in the workplace. Competencies might be a mixture of one or more attributes, professional skills or knowledge e.g. adaptability is partly an innate quality (you are born with it) and partly a learned one (events and people in life may teach you to be more/less adaptable). However, no matter what we are talking about - skill or knowledge - behaviour is the only thing which is observable and thus allows an assessment to be made as to an individual's level of ability. Under the second point, reference to 'achievement of a standard of performance' suggests that competencies can be measured against a baseline, and that an individual's level on a certain competency can be rated. As for contributing to the goals of the Emirates Group, the examples of behaviour that have been included in the competency framework are those which also reflect the values of our organisation. These have been chosen as the key behaviours for all staff. These types of behaviours are considered necessary for the future success of our business and what we as employees need to aim for. The above is a broad definition of the concept of a competency. There were many suggestions throughout the organisation for qualities that might be included as competencies. Flexibility, attention to detail, even basic intelligence were some of the recommendations but how was it decided which ones would contribute to the corporate framework? There are several characteristics that make a competency clearly recognisable. A competency must be: Observable - an observer (a manager, supervisor or a colleague) must be able to see the behaviour. For example, loyalty is difficult to observe whereas attention to detail is more easily demonstrated. b) Measurable - you must be able to measure it against a standard set of behavioural characteristics. c) Coachable - an individual should be able to develop with the right training or support. Basic intelligence is therefore not a competency, as it does not improve over time. It cannot be developed. "Communication Skills" can improve and as such is one of our competencies. d) Critical to the success of the individual and corporate performance - this is likely to be different for every company. For example, a highly competitive marketing-based organisation might have market & competition awareness as a competency. The Emirates Group has chosen others such as continuous learning which is more appropriate as well as critical to the company's future. a)

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Our Competency Framework covers all jobs within the Emirates Group and includes 15 competencies. Another organisation's competencies will probably look quite different. Some organisations have only 10 to 15 while others have more than 50.

2 What do Competencies Look Like?


Our competencies are clustered under five areas which were created to link in with our Corporate Values. The clusters suggest what are considered important characteristics for the continued success of the Emirates Group: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Delivering Results People Focus Improvement Orientation Expertise Providing Direction

Each cluster has several competencies attached to it and each competency is divided into the following parts: The Title The Definition Behavioural Indicators The name of the competency The corporate definition of the competency reflects its meaning Behaviours which can be observed as an indication of a person's rating - high or low - on a particular competency. The behavioural indicators for the competencies are further classified under four different levels (Individual, Supervisory, Management & Leadership) to indicate the different degrees of expertise required in various roles These are not necessarily the direct opposite of Effective Behavioural Indicators, and hence are not strongly negative. The purpose is to lift average performance to a higher level of achievement rather than focus only on poor performers. These behaviours highlight specific areas of difference between a consistently superior performer and an individual who may be performing adequately but still needs development and improvement on a particular competency

Less Effective Behavioural Indicators

3 How to Select Competencies


The exercise of selecting competencies is a little like choosing a car, the basic objective is the same - to choose a means of transport to get from A to B - but everyone has different needs and preferences. Within the Emirates Group, this means that some competencies may be critical in one department or for one position but not necessarily for another where a different set of competencies from the framework may be more appropriate. Each job can be defined in terms of six essential competencies i.e. the key areas of behaviour that an individual needs to demonstrate in order to be considered "successful" in a particular role. Ideally people may need to have more than six competencies. Practically speaking, assessing a person on more than six competencies would dilute the effectiveness of Recruitment or Performance Management. "Best practice" tells us that the number of essential competencies for a job should not exceed six. The Competency Framework Page 3 of 20

Let us go through the steps of selecting the 6 essential competencies of a job. Step 1 Read the Job Description and focus on the key accountabilities. Make sure you understand the whole job and the challenges and difficulties of the role. Review the Competency Framework and jot down all the competencies you feel might apply. Don't worry if the list is more than six at this stage. Read the detailed definition and behavioural indicators for each of the short-listed competencies. Be sure to think carefully about the Emirates Group definition of the competency rather than your understanding of the meaning of the title of the competency. This is also important to maintain consistency across the organisation. Sometimes the title of the competency may seem critical to the job, but it is the behavioural indicators described that need to be matched to the job description and focus. As you read through the indicators, ask yourself "Is it reasonable to see this level of behaviour from an individual in this specific role at this grade?" You will quickly learn which competencies are appropriate. Work through each competency in this way until you reduce the number to six. Once you are satisfied with your short-list you may like to discuss it with your own manager or the HR Business Support representative for your area. While you are developing a proposed list of competencies for a role, the jobholder, if he can participate, should also be working through the same process. It is critical that you agree the competencies with the jobholder rather than simply handing them down.

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4 Step 5

An illustration of each competency and the behavioural indicators attached to it follows:

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4 Delivering Results
4.1 Customer Service Orientation
Definition: Discovers the needs of internal and external customers and strives to deliver services and products to meet these needs. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Acts as an "advocate" for customers within the organisation; follows up on feedback to ensure long-term, fundamental service improvements are implemented. Takes a lead in striving for service recovery where customer has a serious, unresolved complaint or problem. Acts as an "advisor" for customers by offering several options and discussing the pros and cons; helps the customer to make the best decision. Considers the impact on customer as a key factor in any decision. Actively seeks feedback from customer rather than waiting for complaints. Plans available resources with the customer as the key priority. Is receptive to the needs of internal and external customers, determining those and meeting these where possible. Empathises with customer complaints by pacifying them; investigates the issues, identifies the source and correct problems promptly. Explains reasons behind decisions to customer; offers alternative solutions where practical. Rapidly establishes rapport by being friendly, cheerful, patient and polite. Is confident and competent in delivering the product or service to the customer to standard required. Takes a personal interest in and listens to, the needs of the customer, and meets these where practical - goes beyond the normal requirements of the job where needed. When problems occur, is understanding, calms the customer and personally corrects problems quickly. Builds trust and confidence in customers by following through and doing what has been promised. Anticipates the needs of the customer and responds promptly to questions. Puts knowledge to maximum use and focuses on the details of service to satisfy customers needs to the best of their ability. Responds rapidly, clearly and politely to customer requests (internal and external). Is receptive to feedback to minimise/eliminate errors to produce a high quality service. Always considers the effect of their actions on the customer. Demonstrates a timely completion of assigned tasks, to the standard required. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Allows customer complaints to escalate before providing a proposed solution Uses rules and procedures as excuses for not satisfying customers

Jumps to conclusions without listening; provides solutions before fully understanding requirements or problems

Fails to recognise internal customers as customers Is submissive to customers; goes out of the way to satisfy their needs without considering organisational objectives or the bottom line Raises expectations of customers; makes promises that cannot be kept

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4.2

Initiative and Commitment to Achieve

Definition: The tendency to act in a self directed way, by taking action before being directed or forced by events; to seize opportunities, probe for in-depth information and deliver significantly more than the minimum required, whilst protecting safety, health and long - term productivity. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Looks beyond precedent and invites suggestions from within and without The Group to strive for constantly improving processes and products. Takes action to protect the long term productivity of their team by exploiting opportunities to minimise workplace stress. Recognises and supports, formally and informally, proactive actions and ideas from the team. Seizes the opportunity to improve organisation wide performance by achieving greater co-operation, integration and alignment with other departments. Critically evaluates team and personal performance. Consistently sets an example by striving to achieve high standards. Recognises improvement opportunities and proactively exploits and enhances them to the maximum. Regularly monitors performance against targets and goals and provides data to illustrate strengths and areas for improvement. Maximises available opportunities to enhance long term productivity of self and others, by recognising and seeking to relieve workplace stress in striving for of life balance. Sets and monitors achievable yet stretching objectives and targets for self. Demonstrates resilience, even when faced with initial setbacks and barriers to achievement. Goes beyond the defined role to tackle issues as a means of increasing overall effectiveness. Is proactive by exhibiting high personal energy and getting things done. Investigates and follows up to find alternative ways around obstacles. Plans and completes work without waiting to be prompted to do so. When faced with problems, proactively suggests solutions. Takes actions and decisions as appropriate, without constantly referring to the boss. Demonstrates a can do attitude to meeting challenges. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Restricts work to the formal boundaries of their role; follows instructions Plans and carries out work only when prompted to do so When faced with problems waits for others to provide solutions Highlights obstacles as excuses for not achieving objectives, rather than proactively attempting to overcome them Always refers decisions to their superior; avoids taking a stand on issues

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4.3

Attention to Detail and Quality

Definition: The ability to consistently produce error free output; concerned with maintaining high standards of accuracy and quality. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Acts as a role model in promoting quality. Establishes and reviews approaches and methods to ensure quality standards are exceeded. Highlights examples where detailed and quality outputs have led to success. Can adopt a helicopter approach by adjusting altitude as appropriate down to the detailed level and up to survey the big picture. Ensures that policies and procedures are being followed. Regularly conducts spot checks to maintain standards. Avoids jumping to conclusions and making assumptions by taking time to listen and probe for the details. Does not lose sight of the big picture by focussing exclusively on the detail. Provides specific and detailed feedback on the work of others to improve overall quality. Probes for clarity on expectations, roles, deadlines, and tasks before accepting a new task. Sets up and maintains efficient and effective systems of information storage and retrieval. Raises concerns about quality and suggests means of improvement. Makes the time to plan effectively to ensure all required work is completed on time and to the standard required. Reviews own work to minimise / eliminate errors and omissions in order to produce high quality work. Plans work down to the last detail. Follows tasks through to ensure that all assigned work is completed within deadlines. Ensures that quality standards are met, even when quantity of work required is also challenging. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Exceeds deadlines due to taking extra time to produce work output Misses detail and makes errors in over enthusiasm to complete work Jumps to conclusions and makes assumptions, thus missing key points Goes into an inappropriate level of detail, without tailoring the message to the audience Is content driven rather than process driven; loses sight of the big picture in the detail Works in an unstructured and unsystematic manner, often missing important points

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4.4

Organising for Results

Definition: Translates objectives into practical and achievable actions by prioritising, planning, co-ordinating and managing resources to deliver results in a quality, timely and cost effective manner. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Considers the balance of benefits and costs/risks of undertaking a course of action before endorsing it. Focuses on ensuring the scope of a project does not become unwieldy or conflict with other plans. Identifies the critical path; what needs to be done, how, by whom and when. Establishes relevant interdependencies and details how these can be managed. Accurately matches resource inputs to required work outputs. Can retain an overview of the overall objective without focussing only on the details of the current task in hand. Anticipates potential problems or opportunities and plans for contingent and takes preventative action. Reviews the potential success of a project or task against objectives and budgets. Re-prioritises and adapts to changes in the work requirements with minimal disruption to deadlines. Realistically assesses effort required to complete a task or project. Plans for quality control checks before completing an activity. Monitors progress, establishes milestones and follows up to ensure that work is completed as per schedule. Plans to use all available resources, other people, expertise, IT equipment, etc, to the optimum to achieve the objective. Structures a logical approach to work that ensures transparent accessibility of information, e.g. filing systems. Acquires a clear understanding of systems and procedures before taking action. Plans ahead, produces and revises a plan of work in which tasks are prioritised and actioned to meet requirements. Ensures that problems are identified and any changes in plans are clearly communicated. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Manages by crisis; responds to changes or setbacks only as they occur Continuously works beyond regular hours, irrespective of workload Reviews a project plan at irregular intervals; does not fully consider contingencies Allows the scope of the project to expand beyond its initial objective in an unauthorised manner

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5 People Focus
5.1 Teamwork
Definition: The ability to work with and support others as part of a team, both within and across functions, and understand the need to work together to create an environment of co-operation, trust and mutual responsibility. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Acts as a role model by creating an environment that promotes trust and cooperation. Promotes cross-functional and cross-departmental teamwork by highlighting the benefits to the organisation as a whole. Discusses plans, strategies and problems with own team and with other departments. Talks frequently about the importance of considering other departments as part of the overall team. Facilitates open discussion between conflicting parties and keeps the focus of conflict resolution on long term, overall interests of the organisation. Reviews successes and failures by providing feedback to own team and other departments. Seeks to involve others in new areas of work. Gives credit and recognition to the work of others. Positively communicates decisions to all affected. Strives to remain impartial when dealing with conflict. Provides constructive criticism and suggests ways to improve overall efficiency. Adapts approach to the situation and culture of other team members. Willing shares knowledge, information, ideas and experience to assist others. Welcomes individuals from other cultures into the team and encourages interaction through a common language. Moderates own personal objectives for the overall gain of the team. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Presents ideas and suggestions of other team members as ones own Retains new and valuable information which could be useful to other team members Confines working relationship to hierarchy / peer group; avoids working interdependently with other team members Often dominates the team, suppressing quieter members

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5.2

Effective Communication

Definition: The ability to convey a message, verbally or in writing, to both individuals and groups, actively listen to the response and successfully hold their attention to achieve the desired impact. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Makes time for effective communication to ensure that standards, priorities and future direction are shared effectively with those concerned. Structures written work and presentations to ensure that the information needs of the audience are met within the given parameters. Uses a variety of tools and techniques, e.g. presentation software, humour, participation, etc, to ensure that an audience is engaged throughout the delivery of a presentation. Answers questions in a knowledgeable manner; takes a positive approach to negative or critical questions. Encourages two way communication by asking questions and listening to the responses. Prepares reports and written work in a concise and structured manner. Stresses the key information in a message, written or verbal by highlighting the key points. Moderates the tone, language and content of the message to the needs of the recipients. Confirms an easy understanding of written documents or presentations by asking a third party for feedback. Makes use of own body language and appearance to communicate a positive attitude. Listens appropriately to unspoken or partly expressed feelings of others, e.g. by responding to non- verbal cues from others. Fully familiar with operation of any communication equipment to be used e.g. telephone, PC software or audio-visual equipment. Communicates clearly and concisely, avoiding misunderstanding, ambiguity or jargon. Confirms the message has been understood by seeking feedback. Listens carefully and avoids interrupting to fully interpret the message before responding. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Interrupts others; does not listen to their full communication Uses the same level of language for all kinds of groups, often resulting in confusion and misunderstanding Uses jargon when presenting unfamiliar matter to the audience Waits for the audience to respond, rather than actively elicit Underestimates the time required for a presentation and questions

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5.3

Influence and Negotiation

Definition: Uses appropriate personal style to gain acceptance or agreement to an idea or plan; changes others opinions by effective persuasion. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Applies appropriate influencing styles for different groups; e.g. peers, staff, managers, bosses. Uses anecdotes, humour and personal experience in addition to logical reason to support arguments. Varies approach to appeal at both rational and emotional levels. Identifies and uses common values or aspirations as a key influencing strategy. Considers alternative methods of influencing when the initial approach is not successful. Strives for commitment by highlighting the specific benefits and the disadvantages of adopting an alternative approach. Prepares likely timing and sequencing of negotiation by clarifying opening position and minimally acceptable outcome, and the points in between. Seeks to understand the personal and business motives of others to build rapport and use as an input to determining a negotiation strategy. Is prepared to compromise where necessary to reach agreement. Seeks a win win outcome by persuading others to adopt a course of action by offering them incentives and guaranteeing certain benefits. Rehearses influencing and negotiating in advance, on own or with others, to clarify objectives and prepare likely counter arguments. Relates honestly to others and openly expresses feelings in order to build trust and confidence in own abilities. Responds to verbal and non-verbal cues of others. Shows enthusiasm and interest through body language and appearance. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Spends insufficient time probing and investigating others motives before planning a negotiation strategy Uses authority to bend rules and regulations; reminds others of own status / level in the organisation Adheres rigidly to own point of view Makes promises that cannot be kept

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5.4

Interpersonal Ability

Definition: The ability to use a wide range of behaviour to establish and maintain productive working relationships, e.g. through diffusing conflict, having a network of contacts or exhibiting a sensitivity to the needs of others. This includes where others come from different cultures and backgrounds, having different values, beliefs and expectations. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Facilitates open discussion between conflicting parties in order to reach a mutually acceptable conclusion. Takes the time to visit relevant departments and businesses to fully understand their needs, strengths and areas for development, as well as to be visible both locally and internationally. Contacts network members regularly to maintain relationships; shares information as appropriate. Uses tact and diplomacy to manage inter departmental and intra departmental conflict. Attends appropriate social functions and conferences where current and potential contacts are likely to be present. Responds to the needs of a number of individuals simultaneously. Takes time to follow through with contacts. Exercises tact to ensure confidential information is not divulged. Uses tact and diplomacy to resolve conflict within the department. Helps others through difficult situations and asks for assistance when faced with their own difficulties. Proactively probes to find out cultural differences; seeks clarifications. Observes cultural patterns to adapt approach to the culture concerned. Uses a high level of self control to deal with own emotional responses. Works to find areas of common interest with others and develops these areas. Adapts own approach to the needs of the other person. Remains impartial when dealing with others; listens to the arguments of both parties. Shows awareness, tolerance and sensitivity towards cultural differences by moderating own cultural behaviours. Handles awkward or difficult individuals by managing emotions and choosing words carefully. Includes individuals from other cultures into the group and encourages interaction through the use of a common language. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Interrupts others; does not listen to their full communication Uses the same level of language for all kinds of groups, often resulting in confusion and misunderstanding Lets conflict escalate before taking action Does not readily share contacts, even if they might be useful to others Remains in own office a majority of the time; conducts meetings in own office rather than visit others Interacts with others selectively usually only with those of the same race and culture Jumps to conclusions without attempting to understand and appreciate differences in cultural behaviours

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6 Improvement Orientation
6.1 Adaptability and Innovation
Definition: The ability to change ones own approach to work effectively with a variety of individuals, groups or situations, including the conception and implementation of original ideas to develop and improve processes, products and services. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Consults and constructs teams of people to generate ideas. Uses tools and techniques to stimulate others creativity. Takes appropriate risks in pursuit of improvements and supports others in doing so. Builds on healthy debate as a tool for driving through organisational improvement and advancement. Talks positively about flexibility and the need for change. Benchmarks within and without the organisation and industry to stimulate ideas for change. Supports the change process by encouraging others to take ownership of driving it forward. Uses problems and difficult situations as a means of initiating change. Recognises and exploits opportunities by moving quickly to implement changes in own area. Proactively initiates change in the workplace to achieve improvements in quality or efficiency. Questions traditional thinking in order to initiate new perspectives. Evaluates ideas for practicality and feasibility. Uses different styles and approaches, as needed, to be effective with different people and circumstances. Develops ideas and thinks through to an innovative conclusion. Builds on information and ideas provided by others. Improvises effective solutions when faced with ambiguous and difficult situations. Organises the work and reviews priorities of self others to meet changing needs. Takes into account external environmental factors when planning an approach. Admits mistakes and learns from past experience. Organises own work and reviews priorities to meet changing needs. Recognises the merits of views or positions different from their own and incorporates suggestions into working practices. Remains responsive when plans and requirements are constantly changing. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Prefers tried and tested methods to solve problems, rather than to think of new and innovative solutions Is over reliant on past experience; does not think laterally Adopts a wait and see attitude, instead of championing the change Focuses heavily on the risks rather than the opportunities in a new approach Is uncomfortable when working in undefined areas where procedures have not been clearly established

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6.2

Continuous Learning

Definition: A strong personal commitment to self-development reflected in establishing and enhancing a high level of expertise and knowledge related to your functional area that adds value to the quality or quantity of your work. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Is sought out by others for advice and guidance. Looks outside of the organisation to gather accurate and useful information to improve products and services and respond promptly to industry changes. Works to establish sources of reliable data and sorts this according to needs. Has personally established on-going systems, approaches or habits for information gathering through professional memberships, literature and contacts. Uses expertise and knowledge to expand and develop further services or to make recommendations for further improvements. Identifies the skills and knowledge required for the future and takes steps to develop these in self and others. Actively seeks professional development opportunities, both inside and outside the organisation. Volunteers for assignments that contribute to individual learning goals. Seeks opportunities to work with others of diverse backgrounds, experience and viewpoints. Utilises knowledge to maximum effect to satisfy customers needs. Answers questions of technical knowledge readily and accurately, without reference; otherwise knows where to refer. Sets clear personal development targets focussing both on behavioural and technical enhancements. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Over emphasises the importance of professional development at the cost of work priorities Sticks to current area of expertise rather than broadening experience Prefers to cover up mistakes instead of seeking feedback for learning Does not independently pursue new information and opportunities for development

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7 Expertise
7.1 Professionalism
Definition: Strives to follow a clear code of personal, business or ethical values so that individuals, situations or issues are handled with integrity. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Reviews and determines the ethical standards expected from self and others. Highlights areas in self and others where there is a shortfall against agreed values and takes action to reinforce develop improvements in standards. Walks the talk, by acting as a role model and personally committing to the standards expected of others. Acts to support the safety and dignity of colleagues and customers by giving feedback on the behaviour of others. Treats others how they would expect to be treated themselves. Delivers what is promised, when and how it is promised. Respects and protects the safety and dignity of colleagues and customers. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Applies theoretical knowledge to a work situation without testing relevance and applicability Avoids a challenging debate Does not follow through on agreements reached or promises made

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7.2

Business Awareness

Definition: The ability to understand the inter-relation of financial performance, customer satisfaction, the expertise of employees and the efficiency of internal procedures, along with the formal and informal decision - making process affects the performance of our own and other organisations. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Recognises unspoken organisational constraints; what is and is not possible at certain times in certain positions. Understands the industrys/professions/economys informal structures; identifies key decision-makers and influencers. Addresses the reasons for on-going organisational behaviour involving the underlying problems, opportunities or political forces affecting the organisation. Benchmarks financial data against outside comparisons. Understands the organisations informal structures; identifies key decision - makers and influencers. Works behind the scenes to lobby support for a new venture. Prepares budgets, allocating resources in the most effective way to achieve objectives and targets. Understands the roles of various external stakeholders and how they impact business decisions. Sets and monitors clearly defined and realistic, but stretching objectives and targets; takes corrective action when financial results are below budget or over budgeted. Uses corporate language and style for maximum effect. Takes into account political influences on decisions. Understands the departments informal structures; identifies key decision makers and influencers. Performs cost benefit analysis considering both long term as well as short-term benefits for all significant expenses to support a course of action. Understands the role their performance, and that of their department plays in contributing to the success of the organisation. Can relate the current performance of the Group. Is conscious of cost implications of every action and seeks ways to reduce costs wherever possible. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Over emphases the cost impact without also considering quality or timeliness Incurs expenses without a clear business case or approved budget Prepares budgets by passively accepting past norms; does not fully analyse or consider alternative approaches Jumps into volatile organisational situations without recognising power relationships or key decisions makers Fails to understand key industry trends or external influences on the business

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8 Providing Direction
8.1 Leadership
Definition: Encouraging and motivating people to achieve high standards and meet organisational objectives by actively developing team member's skills and knowledge, providing constructive feedback and creating an inspiring vision. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Clarifies the direction in which the organisation needs to move. Communicates a realistic picture of future plans so people know what has to be done and why. Gains commitment from stakeholders, colleagues and team members. Promotes vision and change through influence and personal example. Empowers individuals to achieve results, and develops an environment that facilitates the sharing of ideas and enables change. Partners with individuals to find out how they want to be managed and work together. Uses appropriate situational leadership style depending on individual ability and the task or goal to be accomplished e.g. directing, coaching, supporting, and delegating. Recognises the use of planned delegation as a powerful tool for individual, and organisational development. Delegates whole tasks, empowering individuals to take responsibility for their actions and outputs. Acts as employee performance champion and motivator by recognising and rewarding excellent performance of individuals. Encourages and facilitates individual development by actively seeking and employing development methods that match individual needs and goals. Challenges individuals to set goals and work to achieve them. Reviews progress at agreed intervals to ensure timelines and standards are met. Prefers a coaching approach to managing performance and solving problems, to gain commitment. Delivers balanced, owned, objective and specific feedback in behavioural rather than personal terms. Expresses positive expectations for future performance. Distributes work equitably and according to the abilities of individuals within the team. Arrives at decisions by consensus, where appropriate, to gain team trust and commitment. Identifies own leadership strengths and acknowledges areas for development. Encourages feedback from others to facilitate self-development. Leads by example. Displays behaviours that reflect the desired way of doing things. Guides and directs new staff, setting clear goals and standards. Encourages others to complete tasks on their own, but provides support and assistance when required. Communicates performance expectations to all members of the team, and monitors to ensure results. Gives balanced feedback to others that highlights both strengths and areas for development. Treats all team members fairly and equally, without preference or bias. Praises positive performance, and addresses poor performance. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Takes good performance for granted and points out mistakes as the only means of giving feedback Exclusively focuses on the achievement of immediate objectives, rather than developing staff for long-term gains

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Relies exclusively on controlling leadership styles to maintain personal power and makes excuses for not developing individuals Regards training and development to enhance performance as a luxury, a digression from "the real work" Delegates only routine tasks, while retaining the new and challenging ones Takes independent decisions and expects the team to follow instructions without questioning Takes credit for the work of others but passes blame for failures or difficulties Avoids admitting own mistakes or limitations

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8.2

Problem Solving and Decision Making

Definition: The ability to take a balanced, logical view to break complex issues into their component parts, recognise priorities and weigh up different options in order to judge the best course of action Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Takes the impact of decisions on all relevant stakeholders into account. Rigorously probes the rationale and process used to arrive at a decision, approach, solution or recommendation. Follows a logical, systematic process for researching and evaluating new ventures. Actively seeks out and evaluates information, analyses the facts from different angles and chooses the best option. Uses sound judgement to anticipate potential implications of all decisions. Balances and considers the benefits and the risks of a particular course of action. Analyses all of the options available, using a rational unbiased approach, before selecting the most suitable one. Monitors trends, using past data to forecast future trends and to assess current needs; investigates reasons for changes in trends. Uses a balance of quantitative and qualitative factors as supporting evidence. Judges the degree of consultation required to gain commitment to the decision or solution proposed. Analyses and presents information in a logical format. Maps out complex sequences to provide greater clarity. Strives to collect and validate data for evaluation of current situation. Accepts responsibility and accountability for own decisions and is able to explain the rationale behind them. Identifies areas of uncertainty and asks questions to ensure complete information is available. Uses judgement to decided when to make a swift decision even in the absence of all necessary information, particularly where this has an impact on customer service. Breaks down tasks and issues into a number of smaller steps in order to organise each part systematically. Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Takes decisions without fully considering long term consequences Is selective when considering alternatives before taking a decision Jumps to a cause or an alternative without considering all the factors when solving problems or making decisions Tries to consider all options and accommodate all points of view resulting in poor or delayed decisions

The Competency Framework

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8.3

Strategic Thinking

Definition: The ability to see high level patterns or relationships between complex situations; being focused on the long term, big picture issues, as well as the day to day business. Individual Supervisory Managerial Leadership Behavioural Indicators Recognises and shares patterns that are not obvious to others. Identifies useful connections amongst complex data from potentially unrelated areas. Takes a global, long term view of issues, rather than a provincial, short term view. Identifies other businesses with the potential to build synergistic relationships for long term organisational benefits. Analyses the strengths, weakness, opportunities and threats of situations and develops long term approaches and objectives based on these findings. Generates and test hypotheses or explanations for a given situation critical to long term planning. Applies and modifies learned concepts, models and methodologies to specific situations.

Less Effective (Less of This) Behavioural Indicators: Considers issues from a narrow perspective; plans without considering the overall impact on the organisation Keeps up to date in own area but does not actively seek out information form related areas, businesses or industries Handles issues without considering past experience and trends Does not seek to align own strategy to that of the team / organisation

The Competency Framework

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