www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 167
BUDGET CUTS LOOM
NATION PAGE 6
PANTHERS
IN FINALS
SPORTS PAGE 11
TOYS TO KEEP
PETS HAPPY
SUBURBAN PAGE 19
BREAKTHROUGH ON REPLACING OR EASING THE IMMINENT
SPENDING CUTS STILL SEEMS UNLIKELY
Elegant Home Design Since 1952
650•685• 1250
FREE ESTIMATE
165 N. Amphlett
San Mateo
www.rudolphsinteriors.com
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Does San Bruno need more than
two stores that sell guns?
A third technically has the per-
mits and could operate, but current-
ly doesn’t. Looking into what’s
right for San Bruno when it comes
to regulating the sale of guns and
ammunition was the direction given
by the City
Council to staff
this week.
During its meet-
ing Tuesday, the
San Bruno City
Council dis-
cussed gun regu-
lations proposed
nationally, in
California and
in nearby cities. While there were
numerous questions, the council
generally supported state and
national efforts and asked staff to
come back with more information
about a variety of ideas from creat-
ing a permit system for San Bruno
retailers to establishing an anony-
mous tip line encouraging residents
to report the illegal use or sale of
guns.
“Whether it be pipeline safety or
gun violence, it needs to start from
the bottom up because it’s not going
to start at the top,” said Mayor Jim
Ruane, who added the proposed
changes won’t solve all issues with
gun violence but perhaps may help
prevent something bad from hap-
pening. “It’s very important to me.
Something needs to be done.”
Councilman Ken Ibarra agreed,
adding there were still many ques-
tions but “we need to take a stand
and start.”
City Attorney Marc Zafferano
explained staff was looking to
gauge the council opinions about
the national, state and local options.
The council supported the state and
national efforts. Vice Mayor Irene
City sets sights on gun rules
Limits on gun shops, hollow-point ammo ban, large ammo sale reporting among possibilities
Jim Ruane
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With Woodside’s extensive
wealth, affluence and proximity to
Silicon Valley, an online dating site
known for publicity stunts is offer-
ing the small San Mateo County
town a cool $11.65 million if it offi-
cially changes its name to
Sugardaddie.com, U.S.A.
The website links attractive
women wishing to be “spoiled” with
successful men to share “his great
style.”
The company recently offered a
Texas city, Sugar Land, a similar
offer as it celebrates its 10th
anniversary, for much less money
than the Woodside offer, but the
mayor rejected.
“We are very serious about brand-
ing the city and giving birth to the
first dating site-sponsored city in
America,” the company’s Chief
Executive Officer Steven Pasternack
wrote in a statement.
The company has looked at other
cities too in its quest to have a city
named after it including Sugar
Sugardaddie.com
courts Woodside
for name change
Dating website on the prowl for
publicity, offering $11.65 million
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With just about three months left
on its lease at the Bridgepointe
Shopping Center, Ice Center of San
Mateo officials have their eyes set on
constructing a new facility nearby
and have called Werder Park in Foster
City the perfect spot for an ice rink.
Foster City recently acquired
about 2.6 acres of land from San
Mateo County near the Werder Pier
adjacent to State Route 92 on the
city’s western edge and is seeking
public input on how the land should
be used.
Ice Center officials recently
Ice Center says Werder
Park perfect for new rink
Property owner wants to close
current Bridgepointe location
See NAME, Page 18
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
There are a number of refrigera-
tors at Burlingame-based CALL
Primrose, many filled with food
which will soon go to those who
need a little help.
Typically, the offerings for meat
are limited to chicken or ground
turkey. That’s changed in the last
year.
Each year, about 40 percent of the
food produced for people to eat in
the United States goes to waste.
Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa
Clara and San Mateo counties is
working to get some of that food
into the hands of those who need it
with its Grocery Rescue program.
Through the agreements between
Second Harvest, local grocery stores
and partner agencies in the food
bank’s network, thousands of
pounds of food are being rescued
each month instead of going to
waste.
CALL Primrose is coming up on
its one-year anniversary with having
such a partnership with the Millbrae
Lucky Supermarket.
“It really helps,” said Watts,
adding it’s provided consistent
donations throughout the year as
well as a variety of meat and bread
to offer clients.
Normally, there are few options to
give people. With a variety of food
coming in, Watt can offer people
more choice in what they take
home. Also, it’s easier to match food
with family size so larger portions
of meat go to big families while
Rescuing groceries for others
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
CALL Primrose Executive Director Mary Watt shows the variety of meat she now has access to through the
Second Harvest Grocery Rescue program, which partners the Burlingame nonprofit with the Millbrae Lucky
Supermarket.
See FOOD, Page 18
See RINK, Page 20
See RULES, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Comedian Gilbert
Gottfried is 58.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1993
A gun battle erupted at a religious com-
pound near Waco, Texas, when Bureau
of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
agents tried to arrest Branch Davidian
leader David Koresh on weapons
charges; four agents and six Davidians
were killed as a 51-day standoff began.
“Education is learning what you
didn’t even know you didn’t know.”
— Daniel J. Boorstin, American educator (1914-2004)
Hall of Fame auto
racer Mario
Andretti is 73.
Actor John
Turturro is 56.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A member of a rival team is hit by an orange during an annual carnival battle in the northern Italian town of Ivrea.
Thursday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs around 60.
North winds 5 to 10 mph...Becoming north-
west 10 to 20 mph in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Clear. Lows in the mid
40s. North winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s. North
winds around 5 mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s. North
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs around 60.
Saturday night and Sunday: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the mid
40s. Highs in the mid 50s.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 40s.
Monday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 50s.
Monday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 02 Lucky
Star in first place; No. 03 Hot Shot in second
place; and No.04 Big Ben in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:44.42.
(Answers tomorrow)
BRISK VAULT REDUCE PARLAY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When the actress started appearing in com-
mercials, she became a — “SELL-EBRITY”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SKNUT
HECIT
CLAAAP
WANEAK
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
Print your
answer here:
0 5 8
6 7 13 15 43 7
Mega number
Feb. 26 Mega Millions
1 3 9 24 26
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 2 2 0
Daily Four
9 2 5
Daily three evening
In 1844, a 12-inch gun aboard the USS Princeton exploded as the
ship was sailing on the Potomac River, killing Secretary of State
Abel P. Upshur, Navy Secretary Thomas W. Gilmer and several
others.
In 1861, the Territory of Colorado was organized.
In 1911, President William Howard Taft nominated William H.
Lewis to be the first black Assistant Attorney General of the
United States.
In 1942, the heavy cruiser USS Houston and the Australian light
cruiser HMAS Perth were attacked by Japanese forces during the
World War II Battle of Sunda Strait; both were sunk shortly after
midnight.
In 1951, the Senate committee headed by Estes Kefauver, D-
Tenn., issued an interim report saying at least two major crime
syndicates were operating in the U.S.
In 1953, scientists James D. Watson and Francis H.C. Crick
announced they had discovered the double-helix structure of
DNA.
In 1960, a day after defeating the Soviets at the Winter Games in
Squaw Valley the United States won its first Olympic hockey gold
medal by defeating Czechoslovakia’s team, 9-4.
In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon and Chinese Premier Zhou
Enlai issued the Shanghai Communique, which called for nor-
malizing relations between their countries, at the conclusion of
Nixon’s historic visit to China.
In 1975, more than 40 people were killed in London’s
Underground when a subway train smashed into the end of a tun-
nel.
In 1983, the long-running TV series “M-A-S-H” ended after 11
seasons on CBS with a special 2 1/2-hour finale that was watched
by an estimated 121.6 million people.
Producer Saul Zaentz is 92. Architect Frank Gehry is 84. Actor
Gavin MacLeod is 82. Actor Don Francks is 81. Actor-director-
dancer Tommy Tune is 74. Actor Frank Bonner is 71. Actress
Kelly Bishop is 69. Actress Stephanie Beacham is 66. Writer-
director Mike Figgis is 65. Actress Mercedes Ruehl is 65. Actress
Bernadette Peters is 65. Energy Secretary Steven Chu is 65.
Actress Ilene Graff is 64. Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul
Krugman is 60. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Adrian Dantley is 57.
Rock singer Cindy Wilson is 56. Actress Rae Dawn Chong is 52.
Actress Maxine Bahns is 44. Actor Robert Sean Leonard is 44.
Rock singer Pat Monahan is 44.
Zoo’s bald eagle
captured after three days
A radio transmitter and then a feast of
quail and mouse led to the capture of a
California zoo’s bald eagle after three
days on the lam.
The Palo Alto Junior Museum and
Zoo’s tame 24-year-old bald eagle
Sequoia was enjoying her daily exercise
Saturday at a park when strong winds
spooked her.
Instead of returning to handlers, she
flew north and roosted in Menlo Park.
Sequoia was tracked Monday to a
Redwood City tree.
The famished bird finally dropped from
her perch to the arm of trainer John
Flynn, who rewarded her with a quail and
mouse feast.
Sequoia ventured out on her own eight
times while at the San Francisco Zoo. She
joined the Palo Alto zoo last year.
‘Tanning mom’: Life
‘living hell,’ I’m moving
NUTLEY, N.J. — A New Jersey
woman widely known as “the tanning
mom” is celebrating a grand jury’s
refusal to indict her on a charge she
unlawfully let her 5-year-old daughter
into a tanning booth.
Patricia Krentcil addressed reporters
outside her Nutley home Tuesday night
by yelling: “cha-ching!” Prosecutors
announced earlier in the day she no
longer faced a child endangerment
charge.
She says her life has been “a living
hell” and she plans to move to London for
a year to decompress while her husband
and kids stay in New Jersey.
Krentcil became a tabloid sensation
because of her own deep tan and pro-
fessed love of tanning. She says “tanning
is not a crime” and she’ll keep at it.
Asked what she learned from the whole
episode, she replied, “People suck.”
Lions, bears removed
from gangster’s property
BUCHAREST, Romania — A man
known as Nutzu the Pawnbroker has been
indicted for leading a fearsome criminal
gang, but the public seems to be more
interested in his pets: four lions and two
bears.
Ion Balint — his real name — had long
been known to have an affinity for wild
beasts in his home.
“You said I fed men to the lions?”
Balint was recorded saying on a video-
tape as he rode away from prison on a
black stallion in 2010. “Why don’t you
come over and I’ll give you some lions!”
Authorities won’t confirm that the lions
and bears were used to intimidate rivals at
his high-walled and heavily guarded
estate in the poorest part of Bucharest.
The compound also contained less fear-
some beasts, including thoroughbred
horses and canaries.
Balint, 48, a stocky man with a mus-
tache and a receding hairline, often
appears dressed in T-shirts and tracksuits.
The Romanian news media were awash
in unconfirmed reports about Balint’s
excesses, reporting that he used the lions
and bears to intimidate rivals and that his
house contained a torture chamber.
His son-in-law, Marius Vlad, told the
Associated Press on Wednesday that the
reports were false.
“Many untruths are being reported,” he
said.
Bystanders and relatives who gathered
near the gates of the estate described
Balint as a good neighbor and an animal
lover, and said they weren’t bothered by
roaring lions.
“We can hear them every day, but only
when they’re hungry or the female is in
heat,” said Gabriela Ionescu, 36, clutch-
ing her toddler daughter’s hand. “They
don’t disturb us at all.”
Authorities allege that Balint and his
brother Vasile headed a criminal network
which controlled much of the underworld
activity in Bucharest, a city of 2 million.
Some 400 police and detectives were
involved in the investigation which led to
the arrest last week of 67 suspects,
including the Balint brothers.
In 2009, Balint was convicted of
human trafficking, violence and pimping,
and sentenced to 13 years in prison. That
was reduced to six years, but Balint was
free after a year.
5 6 12 15 39 18
Mega number
Feb. 27 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
Robbery. Passports, iPad and jewelry were
stolen from a residence on the first block of D
Street before 5:59 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21.
Disorderly conduct. A man was arrested for
drinking vodka while pushing a shopping cart
at a cafe on El Camino Real before 11:36 p.m.
on Wednesday, Feb. 20.
Suspicious circumstances. A man driving a
Porsche took pictures of a woman feeding cats
on Middlefield Road before 10:03 p.m. on
Wednesday, Feb. 20.
Shoplifting. A person was arrested for
shoplifting on Walnut Street before 4:04 p.m.
on Wednesday, Feb. 20.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Disturbance. A bartender was groped by an
intoxicated customer on Grand Avenue before
11:52 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 18.
Vandalism. Juveniles were seen throwing
eggs on El Camino Real before 11:41 p.m. on
Monday, Feb. 18.
Suspicious circumstances. A motorcycle
trailer was dragged 25 feet from where the
owner parked it on Third Lane before 10:20
p.m. on Monday, Feb. 18.
Arrest. A intoxicated man was arrested after
he groped two people on Cypress Avenue
before 7:40 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 18.
Fight. Two men were punching each other on
Avalon Drive before 4:42 p.m. on Monday,
Feb. 18.
Police reports
Asleep at the wheel
A man passed out in his vehicle while
stopped at a red light on El Camino Real
and Oak Avenue in Redwood City before
7:18 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 20.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The golden years of 88-year-old Albert
Korn were “sadly reduced to exhibit boxes
and evidence envelopes” rather than dignity
and well-earned retirement because Tyler
James Hutchinson beat him severely before
making off in the Belmont man’s Jaguar with
jewelry and his wallet, a prosecutor told jurors
yesterday during closing arguments in the
transient’s murder trial.
“At his core, the defendant is just a thief
who cares more about property than people,”
prosecutor Morris Maya said.
Maya asked jurors to convict Hutchinson,
25, of felony murder — first-degree murder
during the commission of another felony,
namely burglary or robbery — which would
send him to prison for life without parole.
Jurors do not need to think that Hutchinson
meant to kill or even harm Korn, just that his
actions led to a death.
Hutchinson beat Korn so severely with his
fists during a June 2, 2009 home invasion rob-
bery he died two weeks later and a verdict of
anything less would be an “injustice,” Maya
said.
But defense attorney Jim Thompson, who
called no witnesses, told jurors the evidence
proving Hutchinson broke into the Hallmark
Drive home or was even seen in the area was
circumstantial. He also said there are ques-
tions of whether Korn’s fatal brain injury that
led to a coma and eventual death were caused
by his client’s alleged blows because the
hematoma was on the side rather than the
front or back of the head.
“Just because a scenario is plausible, does-
n’t make it true,”
Thompson said.
Thompson didn’t out-
right declare Hutchinson
not guilty but asked the
jury to question if the pros-
ecution proved its case
beyond a reasonable doubt.
“The answer to that
question, I believe is no,”
Thompson said.
According to Maya’s
case, Korn was at home alone the afternoon he
died, his wife having left for the Peninsula
Jewish Community Center and his grown son
making a run to The Home Depot for address
numbers around 3:17 p.m. Matthew Korn
found his injured father in the kitchen and
thought initially the man had fallen and called
911. He would later slip into a coma and stay
that way until removed from life support. His
injuries from repeated blunt force included
facial trauma, internal bruising, brain injury
and a blown pupil, Maya said while display-
ing graphic photos of an injured Korn for
jurors.
Inside the home, investigators found a win-
dow open with its screen removed, the office
and master bedroom ransacked, blood and
teeth knocked from Korn and a bloody tank
top with DNA matching Korn. Maya said
Hutchinson encountered Korn in the office
after looking through other rooms, beat the
man, then continued to steal before fleeing in
the car with the music blaring. The car was
later abandoned with Hutchinson’s DNA and
fingerprints inside and the jewelry has never
been recovered.
Hutchinson was arrested in Yolo County
after a series of similar home invasion rob-
beries that began just days after Korn’s beat-
ing. When interviewed by Belmont police,
Korn claimed no involvement.
According to Morris, the recorded interview
indicated Hutchinson said once, “I ain’t broke
into no house.” Another time, “I can’t tell you
I was in Belmont because I wasn’t in Belmont.
I was up here.”
But, Maya told jurors, “an awful lot of his
DNA was in Belmont. An awful lot of his fin-
gerprints were in Belmont.”
Jurors began deliberations Wednesday after-
noon. They can find Hutchinson not guilty or
guilty of first-degree or second-degree murder
or involuntary manslaughter. Hutchinson is
also charged with robbery, burglary and the
special allegations of great bodily injury and
committing felony murder.
Prosecutors opted not to seek the death
penalty in part because of questions over
Hutchinson’s mental fitness which also led to
his committal at Napa State Hospital after
being convicted in Yolo County and prior to
beginning trial in San Mateo County.
He remains in custody without bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Jury weighing fatal beating case
Transient on trial for death of Belmont man, 88
Tyler
Hutchinson
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Burlingame High School Principal Chris
Holleran will resign at the end of the current
school year, June 30, he announced
Wednesday.
Holleran, who lives in Santa Rosa, cited a
desire to work closer to home.
“For the last 12 years,” he wrote in a pre-
pared statement sent out yesterday, “I’ve
worked in either Marin County or San Mateo
County. It’s time to reduce that commute.”
Scott Laurence, San Mateo Union High
School District superintendent, thanked
Holleran for his years at Burlingame and
noted that a process to replace him has
begun.
Holleran took the helm at Burlingame in
2008 leaving a position as principal at
Tamalpais High School in Mill Valley. At the
time of his hiring, the district said Holleran’s
ability to improve a program that was already
good had made him an attractive candidate for
the position.
Burlingame High School’s
principal to resign June 30
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
4
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Peninsula
º Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
º |ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
º Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
º |ocrease mob|||ty & ßex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
º Look 8etter
º Fee| 8etter
º |mprove Post0re
º |mprove 8a|aoce
º 8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
™ r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e fi i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. Sao Nateo 0r|ve, Ste 3 º Sao Nateo º 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
Diversity job fair to be held at the
San Mateo County Event Center
A job fair is planned at the San Mateo County
Event Center with more than 30 Bay Area
employers recruiting for hundreds of positions
— entry level, professional and technical.
The Diversity Job Fair is sponsored by
Phase2Careers and will take place Wednesday,
March 13, at the San Mateo County Event
Center located at 2495 S. Delaware St. in San
Mateo. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is
free and open to the public.
A partial list of exhibiting employers
includes: Shutterfly, Inc.; Hyatt Regency San
Francisco Airport; Wells Fargo Bank;
Accounting Principals; Manpower; Franklin
Templeton Investments; Astound Broadband;
Graniterock; AMS Relocation, Inc.; Notre
Dame de Namur University; and more.
“This is a great networking and recruitment
event and a chance to meet employers with a
variety of openings network with a variety of
companies from diverse industries, as well as an
opportunity to learn and sharpen one’s job
search skills, all in one day.” According to job
fair organizer, Ron Visconti.
Additionally, there will be career seminars
throughout the day and resume reviews staffed
by human resources professionals.
Since 2009, Phase2Careers, a nonprofit
organization, has assisted the “Over 40” worker
find new career opportunities through recruit-
ment and networking events, job search work-
shops and panels, career assessment and career
presentations. For more information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
Mercy High School
announces new president
Karen Hanrahan was selected to serve as the
next president of Mercy High School
Burlingame, a choice announced by the school’s
Board of Directors this week.
Hanrahan has 25 years experience in the field
of mission advancement and fundraising. She
will provide guidance and leadership to the con-
tinuing efforts to make Mercy accessible to all
families, upgrade its facilities and support the
educational program.
Hanrahan, who holds a master’s degree in
public administration, believes that Mercy High
School can be an integral part of our civic com-
munity, according to a press release. She has
expertise in marketing as well as student recruit-
ment. In addition to her professional skills,
Hanrahan brings a lived experience of the
Mercy mission having served in a Mercy school
for seven years. In the consultative process
which preceded the school’s search, five major
skills were identified as important in Mercy’s
next president: commitment to the Mercy mis-
sion, warmth, fundraising abilities, marketing
and communication skills and educational expe-
rience. It was the unanimous opinion of the
Search Committee that Hanrahan fulfilled all
five.
While Hanrahan will formally begin her
duties in July, she will join the school commu-
nity for the Making a Difference dinner in April
and will come for a month of transitional time in
June.
Local briefs
Kathleen P. Macfarlane
Kathleen P. Macfarlane, late of Millbrae,
died in San Mateo Feb. 25, 2013.
Wife of the late William Macfarlane for 39
years. Mother of William Macfarlane Jr.;
Lesley Harrison (her husband Mike). Sister of
Margaret McCullough. Also survived by her
grandchildren Alex, Kevin, Lauren, Emily,
Elizabeth and her great-grand-daughter
Harlie, along with her nieces, nephews and
cousins.
A native of Glasgow, Scotland, age 77
years.
Kathleen loved working with her friends at
United Airlines and as a manicurist in
Millbrae, appreciated the flowers in her gar-
den, enjoyed spending time with her pals and
loved dancing with her late husband Billy. A
member of the Caledonian
Club in San Francisco and
a singer in the choir at Our
Lady of Angels Catholic
Church in Burlingame.
Family and friends may
visit on Friday, March 1
after 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. at
the Chapel of the
Highlands, El Camino
Real at 194 Millwood Drive in Millbrae, with
a vigil service beginning at 7 p.m. A funeral
mass will be celebrated 11 a.m. Saturday at
Saint Dunstan’s Catholic Church, 1133
Broadway in Millbrae. Interment will be pri-
vate at Woodlawn Memorial Park in Colma.
Obituary
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo Planning Commission approved expansion
plans for St. Matthew’ Episcopal Church and school at its Tuesday
night meeting on a 3-0 vote. The church, at 16 Baldwin Ave., will
demolish some existing buildings to build new ones that will increase
the school’s capacity from about 230 students now to about 375 stu-
dents when the project is expected to be completed in the fall of 2014.
A new underground gymnasium is also proposed for the project.
5
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Mina “Louise” Huff
Lou was born in 1922 in South Dakota and passed away on February 6th. She was one
of seven kids (Buster, Francis, Peggy, Betty, Elsie, and Bobby) born to Carl and Fannie
Miller. She grew up in Snohomich, Washington. She moved with her sister Betty “Pinkie”
to San Francisco where she met her husband of 59 years Edward who passed away two
years ago. She was his devoted wife and caregiver. Lou is survived by her daughter,
Roxanne and son-in-law Seamus Murray, granddaughter, Jamie and son-in-law Robert
Domenici, grandson, Cody Crosby, great granddaughters Adeline and Georgia Domenici,
siblings Peggy McConnell, Betty Eberhart-Connell and Robert Miller, many loved nieces,
nephews, and friends. She was loved by all.
Louise was known as Mama to Roxanne; G’ma to her grandkids, Tootise, to her siblings,
Auntie Lou to all her nieces and nephews, Grandma Lou to the Murray and McClain
girls, Lou to her friends, LouLou to Liz and all of Roxanne’s friends, but never call her
Mina. Ever the unique personality, loved to hear of her grand kids triumphs, loved living
in Burlingame, was always able to enjoy a party, loved to dance especially at Jamie and
Rob’s wedding, known for her stedfast opinions, her stories about growing up on a farm
in Washington during the great depression and the good times she had dancing in San
Francisco in the 40’s and 50’s.
Lou battled with cancer the last years of her life. She and her family are very grateful
for the wonderful care she received from Dr. Jennifer Brown and the staff at California
Cancer Care and for the comfort brought by Sutter Home Health Care.
A celebration of Lou’s life is planned for this Saturday, March 2nd at 1:00 PM at Crosby
N. Gray, 2 Park Road in Burlingame.
Obituary
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A paralegal already convicted of a dozen
felonies in Southern California for falsely rep-
resenting himself as an attorney pleaded no
contest yesterday to impersonating a real-life
lawyer while helping a man withdraw a crimi-
nal plea in San Mateo County Superior Court.
The negotiated deal on five counts could
send John Hedderman to jail for up to five
years and eight months when sentenced May 7
but spares him a jury trial on 13 felonies
including several counts of practicing law
without a license, grand theft, false imperson-
ation and threats. Those charges carried up to
eight years in prison.
Hedderman, 52, was once a licensed attor-
ney in California but
resigned in 2001 with
charges pending after sev-
eral incidents of ineligibil-
ity to practice law. Last
February, he allegedly rep-
resented himself as Donald
Welch, a real-life Southern
California attorney for
whom he worked as a
paralegal, and took up the
case of Ruben Bisceglia
who wanted help withdrawing a plea of no
contest to possessing stolen property in San
Mateo County. Bisceglia reportedly paid
Hedderman more than $1,000 in fees for three
appearances in San Mateo County Superior
Court between March and August 2012.
When a San Mateo County prosecutor
attempted to contact the real Welch, authorities
learned of the alleged local misrepresentation
and that he was convicted of 12 felonies in
Orange County for falsely representing him-
self as an attorney. Hedderman also stipulated
to the State Bar of California he committed
misconduct in four cases including failure to
perform competently; he must also refund
unearned fees and communicate with clients
and pay court-ordered sanctions or cooperate
with the bar’s investigation, according to the
State Bar of California.
Hedderman remains free from custody on
$50,000 bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Fake lawyer takes plea deal
John
Hedderman
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Norteño gangmember on probation for
attacking the father he blamed for his moth-
er’s imprisonment on attempted murder
charges pleaded no contest yesterday to
attacking a man at a Redwood City taqueria
because he was believed to be a Hispanic
rival.
Jonathan Fuentes Ortiz, 22, also admitted
the new crime violated his probation which
reinstated a suspended five-year term imposed
for attacking his father. The sentence will be
served concurrent with the four years carried
by the assault charge.
“Under the circumstances, it is a good set-
tlement,” said District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe
who added there were
some questions of proof in
the case.
Ortiz is one of three men
charged in the July 21,
2012 assault at Tacos El
Grullenese on Woodside
Road in Redwood City.
The other two men, Juan
Carlos Madero, 31, and Robert Gallegos, 29,
will stand trial March 18 and April 8, respec-
tively. The case is a potential second strike for
Madero.
Prosecutors say the three defendants and
other Norteño gangmembers taunted the man
because he wore a blue shirt and they did not
believe his claims of being Persian. Madero
reportedly punched him in the face and the
entire group then attacked the man with bro-
ken bottles and punches, according to the
District Attorney’s Office.
The man suffered several cuts to his face.
Police reported the attack was caught on sur-
veillance video and witnesses identified the
defendants.
The case came less than a year after Ortiz
was jailed for attacking his father who was
poisoned by his mother. She is serving 13
years to life for feeding the older Ortiz a poi-
soned milkshake and kidnapping their 2-year-
old Ortiz, taking him to Mexico for eight
years.
Milkshake poisoner’s son takes deal for taco stand assault
Jonathan Ortiz
Court rejects appeal
seeking $2B more for schools
SACRAMENTO — An appeals court has
rejected a petition from a coalition of school
districts and education groups that sought to
redirect more than $2 billion in state funding to
public schools and community colleges, state
officials announced Wednesday.
In an unpublished opinion, the 1st District
Court of Appeal in San Francisco dismissed the
appeal, which was led by the California School
Boards Association. The judges wrote that
“there unquestionably is no effective relief that
can be granted.”
The opinion was signed Tuesday and sent to
the governor’s administration late Tuesday
night.
The coalition had argued that lawmakers vio-
lated the state constitution by shortchanging
schools and community colleges in the 2011-12
fiscal year budget.
Police shooting suspect
had history of trouble
SANTA CRUZ — There was no warning for
the two police detectives killed on Jeremy
Goulet’s doorstep when he flung open his door
and opened fire. But there was more than a
decade of signs that indicated Goulet was, as his
father said Wednesday, a “ticking time bomb.”
The quiet beach town of Santa Cruz was reel-
ing as teary-eyed law enforcement leaders
struggled to explain how Goulet, 35, had man-
aged to kill two detectives, Sgt. Loran Butch
Baker and Elizabeth Butler.
The detectives were shot to death Tuesday
soon after arriving at Goulet’s home in plain
clothes to question him about a misdemeanor
sexual assault, Santa Cruz County Sheriff Phil
Wowak said.
Around the state
6
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes • Multi-Family • Mixed-Use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance / Cash Out
Investors Welcome • Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
Advertisement
Defense Department
One of the Navy’s premiere warships, the aircraft
carrier USS Harry S.Truman, sits pier-side in Nor-
folk, Va., its tour of duty delayed.
The carrier and its 5,000-person crew were to
leave for the Persian Gulf on Feb. 8, along with
the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg.
Department of Homeland Security
Hundreds of illegal immigrants have been freed
from jail across the country.
Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials
say they had reviewed several hundred cases of
immigrants and decided to put them on an “ap-
propriate, more cost-effective form of supervised
release”in a moved started Tuesday.
U.S. Coast Guard
Coast Guardrescueaircraft will flyfewer hoursand
cutters will patrol the seas for fewer hours,says the
service’s Commandant Adm. Robert J. Papp.
Emergencies will be a priority and interdictions
of illegal immigrants, drugs and illegal fishing
could decline.
Health Care
Hospitals, doctors and other Medicare providers
will see a 2 percent cut in government reim-
bursements because once cutback takes effect,
Medicare will reimburse them at 98 cents on the
dollar.
But they aren’t complaining because the pain
could be a lot worse if President Barack Obama
and congressional Republicans actually did
reach a sweeping agreement to reduce federal
deficits. Automatic cuts taking effect Friday
would reduce Medicare spending by about $100
billion over a decade. But Obama had put on the
table $400 billion in health care cuts, mainly from
Medicare. And Republicans wanted more.
Transportation Department
The nation’s busiest airports could be forced to
close some of their runways, causing widespread
flight delays and cancellations.
Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood predicts
flights to cities like New York, Chicago and San
Francisco could have delays of up to 90 minutes
during peak hours because fewer controllers will
be on duty.
Though the spending cuts are scheduled to go
into effect on Friday, furloughs of controllers
won’t kick in until April because the Federal Avi-
ation Administration is required by law to give
its employees advance notice. In addition to fur-
loughs, the FAA is planning to eliminate
midnight shifts for air traffic controllers at 60 air-
port towers, close over 100 control towers at
smaller airports and reduce preventative main-
tenance of equipment.
Federal workers
More than half of the nation’s 2.1 million gov-
ernment workers may be required to take
furloughs if agencies are forced to trim budg-
ets.
At the Pentagon alone that could mean 800,000
civilian workers would be off for 22 days each,
spread across more than five months — and
lose 20 percent of their pay over that period.
Other federal agencies are likely to furlough sev-
eral hundred thousand more workers.
Education
Some 70,000 students currently enrolled in
pre-kindergarten Head Start would be cut from
the program and 14,000 teachers would lose
their jobs. For students with special needs, the
cuts would eliminate some 7,200 teachers and
aides. Up to 29 million student loan borrow-
ers and some lenders may have to lay off staff
or even close; some of the 15 million college
students who receive grants or work-study as-
signments at some 6,000 colleges would also
see changes.
National parks
Visiting hours at all 398 national parks are likely
to be cut and sensitive areas would be blocked
off to the public. Thousands of seasonal work-
ers looking for jobs would not be hired,
according to Interior Secretary Ken Salazar.
Salazar and National Park Service director Jon
Jarvis said visitors would encounter fewer
rangers, locked restrooms and trashcans emp-
tied less frequently.
How budget cuts could affect you
By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — With big,
automatic budget cuts about to kick
in, House Republicans are turning
to mapping strategy for the next
showdown just a month away, when
a government shutdown instead of
just a slowdown will be at stake.
Both topics are sure to come up at
the White House meeting Friday
between President Barack Obama
and top congressional leaders,
including Republican House
Speaker John Boehner. A break-
through on replacing or easing the
imminent across-the-board spend-
ing cuts still seems unlikely at the
first face-to-face discussion
between Obama and Republican
leaders this year.
To no one’s surprise, even as a
dysfunctional Washington appears
incapable of averting a crisis over
economy-rattling spending cuts, it
may be lurching toward another
over a possible shutdown.
Republicans are planning for a
vote next week on a bill to fund the
day-to-day operations of the gov-
ernment through the Sept. 30 end of
the 2013 fiscal year — while keep-
ing in place the new $85 billion in
cuts of 5 percent to domestic agen-
cies and 8 percent to the military.
The need to keep the govern-
ment’s doors open and lights on —
or else suffer the first government
shutdown since 1996 — requires
the GOP-dominated House and the
Democratic-controlled Senate to
agree. Right now they hardly see
eye to eye.
The House GOP plan, unveiled to
the rank and file on Wednesday,
would award the Pentagon and the
Veterans Administration with their
line-by-line budgets, for a more-tar-
geted rather than indiscriminate
batch of military cuts, but would
deny domestic agencies the same
treatment. And that has whipped up
opposition from veteran Democratic
senators on the Appropriations
Committee.
Domestic agencies would see
their budgets frozen almost exactly
as they are, which would mean no
money for new initiatives such as
cybersecurity or for routine increas-
es for programs such as low-income
housing.
As budget cuts loom, is government shutdown next?
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Looming
federal spending cuts are expected
to dampen California’s economic
recovery at a time when a housing
rebound and job growth are gaining
traction, but come Friday the imme-
diate effect may not prove to be the
fiscal doomsday that President
Barack Obama has predicted.
The White House estimates that
in California, 64,000 civilian
defense workers would be fur-
loughed and 1,200 teaching and
teacher aide jobs would be put at
risk from the mandatory budget
reductions known as the
“sequester.” Obama administration
officials also said the state will see
program cuts in children’s vaccines,
senior nutrition, student work-study
jobs and assistance for victims of
domestic violence.
Fed cuts would have
limited immediate
impact on California
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Hospitals,
doctors and other Medicare
providers are on the hook for a 2
percent cut under looming govern-
ment spending reductions. But
they’re not raising a ruckus. Why?
The pain could be a lot worse if
President Barack Obama and con-
gressional Republicans actually did
reach a sweeping agreement to
reduce federal deficits.
Automatic cuts taking effect
Friday — the “sequester” in
Washington-speak — would reduce
Medicare spending by about $100
billion over a decade. But Obama
had put on the table $400 billion in
health care cuts, mainly from
Medicare. And Republicans wanted
more.
“What people were really worried
about was the prospect of a huge
deficit bill that could target
Medicare for $400 billion or $500
billion,” said John Rother, president
of the National Coalition on Health
Care, an umbrella group that
includes service providers.
“The health care industry fears
the alternative more than they fear a
predictable reduction in rates,” said
Dan Mendelson, president of
Avalere Health, a market analysis
firm. “They just do not want to roll
the dice. That is why you do not
hear as much of an outcry on
Medicare.”
No ruckus about Medicare cuts in pending sequester
7
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
1840 Gateway Drive, Suite 200, San Mateo, CA 94404
27281 Las Ramblas, #150, Mission Viejo, CA 92691
,
Wednesday February 27
th
10:00AM to 12:00PM
Biltmore Hotel & Suites - San Jose Room
2151 Laurelwood Road
Santa Clara, CA 95050
Wednesday February 27
th
2:00PM to 4:00PM
Hampton Inn & Suites - Sahara Room
55 Old Tully Road
San Jose, CA 95111
Thursday February 28
th
10:00AM to 12:00PM
Jewish Center of San Francisco - Room 209
3200 California Street, San Francisco, CA 94118
THIS IS NOT A PROGRAMBY THE JCCSF
(Parking available under building, bring Self-Parking Ticket into Seminar for Validation)
Thursday February 28th
2:30PM to 4:30PM
Hilton Garden Inn - Orchard Room
2000 Bridgepointe Parkway
San Mateo, CA 94404
Tuesday March 5
th

10:00AM to 12:00PM
The Marina Inn-Marina East Room
68 Monarch Bay
San Leandro, CA 94577
Tuesday March 5
th

2:00PM to 4:00PM
Hotel Sofitel – Salon 1 Room
223 Twin Dolphin Drive
Redwood City, CA 94065
Wednesday March 6
th

10:00AM to 12:00PM
Hilton Garden Inn – Garden Room AB
10741 N. Wolfe Road
Cupertino, CA 95014
Wednesday March 6
th

2:00PM to 4:00PM
Courtyard Marriott
4700 Lakeview Blvd.
Fremont, CA 94538
Thursday March 7
th

2:30PM to 4:30PM
Addison-Penzak Jewish Community Center
14855 Oka Road, Los Gatos, CA 95032
Activity Room A
Tuesday March 19
th
10:00AM to 12:00PM
City of Belmont Twin Pines Lodge
40 Twin Pines Lane
Belmont, CA 94002
Tuesday March 19
th
2:00PM to 4:00PM
Lake Merced Golf Club – Merced Sur Room
2300 Junipero Serra Blvd.
Daly City, CA 94015
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The workshops are conducted by Howard B Garey, a knowledgeable and experienced estate planning
attorney who has devoted his law practice to providing free informational seminars,
and offering affordable Living Trust preparation.
Are you planning a trip in the next 90 days? Don’t leave home unless you have a will and a trust. We can have your trust
prepared before you leave!
If this something you know you have to do but keep putting off, don’t delay any longer.
$
895
$
895
$895.
Wednesday, February 27
th
FREMONT
Fremont Marriott
10:30AM or 1:30PM
46100 Landing Parkway,
Fremont, CA 94538
Free Hotel Parking
Thursday, February 28
th
SAN BRUNO
Courtyard by Marriott
10:30AM or 1:30PM
1050 Bayhill Drive
San Bruno, CA 94066
Free Hotel Parking
Friday, March 1
st
SAN FRANCISCO
Holiday Inn Civic Center
10:30AM or 1:30PM
50 8th Street,
San Francisco, CA 94103
Stop at front desk for
parking validation
Saturday, March 2
nd
SAN JOSE
Courtyard by Marriott
11:00AM or 2:00PM
1727 Technology Drive,
San Jose, CA 95110
Free Hotel Parking
Sunday, March 3
rd
,
BURLINGAME
San Francisco Airport
Marriott Waterfront
11:00 or 2:00PM
1800 Bayshore Highway
Burlingame, CA 94010
Validated self parking
By Alan Fram and Philip Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — After weeks of
arguing constitutional fine points and cit-
ing rival statistics, senators wrangling
over gun control saw and heard the
anguish of a bereft father.
Neil Heslin, whose 6-year-old son,
Jesse, was among those cut down at a
Connecticut elementary school in
December, asked the Senate Judiciary
Committee on Wednesday to ban assault
weapons like the one that killed his child.
“I’m not here for the sympathy or the
pat on the back,” Heslin, a 50-year-old
construction worker, told the senators,
weeping openly during much of his
hushed 11-minute testimony. “I’m here
to speak up for my son.”
At his side were photos: of his son as a
baby, of them both taken on Father’s
Day, six months before Jesse was among
20 first-graders and six administrators
killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School
in Newtown, Conn. That massacre has
hoisted gun control to a primary political
issue this year, though the outcome
remains uncertain.
Father of Newtown victim
says ban assault weapons
By Nicole Winfield
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VATICAN CITY — On Monday,
April 4, 2005, a priest walked up to the
Renaissance palazzo housing the
Vatican’s doctrine department and asked
the doorman to call the official in charge:
It was the first day of business after Pope
John Paul II had died, and the cleric
wanted to get back to work.
The office’s No. 2, Archbishop Angelo
Amato, answered the phone and was
stunned. This was no
ordinary priest. It
was Cardinal Joseph
Ratzinger, his boss,
who under the
Vatican’s arcane
rules had technically
lost his job when
John Paul died.
“It tells me of the
great humility of the
man, the great sense
of duty, but also the great awareness that
we are here to do a job,” said Bishop
Charles Scicluna, who worked with
Ratzinger before he became Pope
Benedict XVI, inside the Congregation
for the Doctrine of the Faith.
In resigning, Scicluna said, Benedict
is showing the same sense of humility,
duty and service as he did after the
Catholic Church lost its last pope.
“He has done his job.”
When Benedict flies off into retire-
ment by helicopter on Thursday, he will
leave behind a church in crisis — one
beset by sex scandal, internal divisions
and dwindling numbers.
Pope legacy: Teacher who returned to church roots
Van Cliburn, pianist and Cold War hero, dies at 78
FORT WORTH, Texas — For a time in Cold War America,
Van Cliburn had all the trappings of a rock star: sold-out con-
certs, adoring, out-of-control fans and a
name recognized worldwide. He even got a
ticker-tape parade in New York City.
And he did it all with only a piano and
some Tchaikovsky concertos.
The celebrated pianist played for every
American president since Harry Truman,
plus royalty and heads of state around the
world. But he is best remembered for win-
ning a 1958 piano competition in Moscow
that helped thaw the icy rivalry between
the United States and the Soviet Union.
Cliburn, who died Wednesday at 78 after fighting bone can-
cer, was “a great humanitarian and a brilliant musician whose
light will continue to shine through his extraordinary legacy,”
said his publicist and longtime friend Mary Lou Falcone. “He
will be missed by all who knew and admired him, and by
countless people he never met.”
The young man from the small east Texas town of Kilgore
was a baby-faced 23-year-old when he won the first
International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow just six
months after the Soviets’ launch of Sputnik embarrassed the
U.S. and inaugurated the space race.
DHS official resigns after immigrants are freed
WASHINGTON — The senior Homeland Security
Department official in charge of arresting and deporting illegal
immigrants announced his resignation the
same day the agency said that hundreds of
people facing deportation had been
released from immigration jails due to
looming budget cuts, according to a resig-
nation letter obtained Wednesday by the
Associated Press. The government said he
had told his bosses weeks ago that he
planned to retire.
Gary Mead, executive associate director
over enforcement and removal operations
at Immigrations and Customs
Enforcement, disclosed his departure in an email to his staff
Tuesday afternoon. The announcement of the release of the
illegal immigrants had come earlier in the day.
President Barack Obama’s spokesman, Jay Carney, said
Wednesday that the decision to release the immigrants was
made without any input from the White House.
Around the nation
Van Cliburn
Gary Mead
Pope Benedict
XVI
REUTERS
Neil Heslin,father of 6-year-old Newtown victim Jesse Lewis,cries during the Senate
Judiciary Committee hearing on the Assault Weapons Ban of 2013.
OPINION 9
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Off-leash
Editor,
I mistakenly thought that the
Burlingame City Council had resolved
the Washington Park off-leash matter last
year, so I was dismayed to read in the
Feb. 23 edition of the Daily Journal that
Peninsula off-leash advocates are still at
it. It’s deplorable that a city as park-poor
as Burlingame is even considering mak-
ing the prime hours of its only
respectable park open to off-leash dogs.
Why doesn’t it follow the lead of other
cities and establish a fenced park area for
this purpose?
This alternative offers several signifi-
cant advantages to turning over the
whole park during prime time:
1). Dogs longing to be off-leash and
their owners can visit the park at any
time;
2). It’s easier to enforce than specify-
ing off-leash hours (the Burlingame
Police have better things to do);
3). Dogs that are aggressive or like to
chase are isolated from children and jog-
gers; and
4). Dog poop that inevitably accompa-
nies off-leash dogs is limited in its range.
A little “can-do” spirit by the Parks
Department would go a long way.
Mike Reitsma
Burlingame
Spat with Realtors
Editor,
Regarding the story, “Realtors
against mandate” in the Feb. 25 edition
of the Daily Journal, the Realtor’s job
is to disclose any and all defects ... dis-
close, disclose, disclose!
Now, are they even able to do the
job? Ask any of them to stick their nose
down a sewer line and they will all turn
up their nose (no competence whatso-
ever in house building/repairs).
Obviously, the old houses with old
sewer lines are going to have an old
design that needs upgrading ... so,
unless there has been a replacement of
the line within the past few years, all
houses sold would need a disclosure
statement that the sewer line is old and
needs to be upgraded/replaced. That’s
the Realtor’s job, but do you see the
listing agent ever doing their job?
The county needs to upgrade the
main sewer lines, but they should be
held responsible up to the sidewalk
where a new clean-out should be
installed. Beyond that point, it is a dis-
closure/inspection problem whenever
the house is sold.
And that is not the only thing that
becomes obsolete in those million-dol-
lar homes.
Jay Grossman
Burlingame
Fascinating column
Editor,
Darold Fredricks’ “Rediscovering
The Peninsula” columns are always
interesting, but this week’s column,
“Electronic life on the Peninsula,” in
the Feb. 25 edition of the Daily
Journal, relating to the emergence of
electronics here, is particularly interest-
ing to someone like me who came here
more than 50 years ago to join the sili-
con parade. During my career, I was
employed at four high tech companies,
including three which Fredricks briefly
covered. Of course, I was aware of all
the companies that he included in his
piece, so his entire effort was greatly
appreciated.
For someone who lived elsewhere
during the first 27 years of my life,
“catching up” with the early years on
the Peninsula is truly enriching.
Another aspect of his columns that
are always appreciated is that, unlike a
weekly column that appears in another
regional newspaper, Fredricks’
“Rediscoveries” do not focus primarily
on “The Rich and Famous” people of
bygone days in our region. Truly, the
excessive focus on the 1 percent in the
other column gets old — fast.
When I arrived in Palo Alto (and
Whiskey Gulch, in East Palo Alto), I
was regaled with interesting and hilari-
ous tales about the doings of the little
guys of the Peninsula in the old days
— those stories were not only more
interesting than the stories of the rich
and famous, they were as interesting as
anything John Steinbeck documented in
his time.
Columns on the little guys of the old
Peninsula would certainly be welcome.
Ruben Contreras
Palo Alto
Letters to the editor
— Ventura County Star
T
elecommuting — working at
home or some other location
outside the traditional office —
was to be the wave of the future in
workplaces, and it may still be.
Made possible by technology such as
video conferencing and instant messag-
ing, telecommuting had obvious advan-
tages.
According to proponents, employees
reported spending more time working
and less time commuting. If they were
looking after young children or aging
parents, they were free of the worry of
receiving a sudden distress call at the
office. And some could work whatever
hours they liked, the ultimate in flex-
time.
Employers saved on office space and
workplace amenities. In some cases,
productivity rose measurably.
Telecommuting was quick to catch on,
a function of a white-collar, knowledge-
based economy whose workers weren’t
required to show up at a factory or a
construction site.
A Bureau of Labor Statistics study
last year said that 24 percent of
employees reported working from
home at least one day a week. A study
by the Families and Work Institute, a
think tank and advocate of telecommut-
ing, said that last year 63 percent allow
at least some to work from home occa-
sionally, up from 34 percent in 2005;
only 6 percent allowed all or most to
work from home occasionally.
But, now, one big high-tech company,
Yahoo, is rethinking the advantages of
telecommuting, and other companies
seem prepared to do likewise.
New CEO Marissa Mayer believes
that what the company gained in pro-
ductivity, it lost in innovation. She is
seeking to rekindle the freewheeling
spirit of creativity that made Yahoo an
Internet pioneer. On Friday, disgruntled
Yahoo workers leaked the company’s
memo ending the work-at-home policy.
The reaction from the workers was
summed up in a USA Today headline:
“Telecommuters to Yahoo: Boo.”
The reaction may be quite different if
Ms. Mayer turns around the struggling
company.
In some ways, she is going back to
the future. The entrepreneurial startups
of Silicon Valley offered free snacks,
video and other games, gyms and
lounges, the idea being to make the
workplace so attractive the employees
wouldn’t want to leave.
Indeed, one might say, much like
home.
Yahoo goes back to the future
Titanic failure?
C
hances are, your heart will go on. But what about
your boat? More specifically, what about your
celebrated ocean liner that all but sealed its
infamy by sheering an iceberg, not having enough
lifeboats and proving that inflated boasts about being
unsinkable are a karmic
pain to live down?
The first cruise ship did-
n’t fare so well but now an
Australian billionaire is
bound and determined not
to let a pesky thing like
history or kismet keep him
from trying a second
chance. If do overs work
for marriages, Hollywood
film favorites, deviated
septums and foreclosed
homeowners who know a
thing or two about being
underwater, why not a
tragic ocean collision so notable it has spawned books,
movies, James Cameron’s hobby-turned-cinematic epic
and showed that maybe only Molly Brown is unsinkable?
On Tuesday, CEO Clive Palmer of shipping company
Blue Star Line, unveiled blueprints for the Titanic II, a
replica of the original that will follow the aborted trans-
Atlantic route of the original between England to New
York. The ship will have the same interior, the same cabin
layout, the same everything down to the dinner plates and
— here’s the kicker that really pushes the plan overboard
— passengers will wear costumes from 1912. The plan
makes those Renaissance Faire aficionados who prance
around in corsets hoisting mugs of mead and Hearst Castle
docents in period garb sound downright shabby in their
authenticity.
Palmer claimed 40,000 people have visited the compa-
ny’s website looking for tickets and 16 are offering
$750,000 to $1 million per cabin for a spot. What? Was
Richard Branson’s inaugural Virgin Galactic flight into
space all booked?
Not to knock anybody whose idea of thinking big really
translates into thinking gigantic but why not chart a new
course rather than dusting off a has been, or rather has
sunk?
Even local boy Larry Ellison didn’t decide to rebuild the
Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria when he got bit by the sailing
bug (although in all fairness the Columbus Foundation did
so). Instead, he bought an ocean liner, some yachts and
jumped into the America’s Cup. True, he took a cue from a
16th century Japanese imperial palace when designing his
own Woodside estate but that doesn’t seem to be an
attempt to recreate some doomed locale at which the simi-
larly obsessed can play dress up and waste excess wealth
for the privilege.
The point is, the idea of a new Titanic causes a sinking
feeling that it, too, might meet a watery end. Palmer could
install modern — and therefore by definition better —
technology and hire a crew that knows what it’s doing. But
that kind of deviates from the script, doesn’t it? Is Palmer
looking for a re-creation of that fateful voyage or a reinter-
pretation with a happier, and less deadly, ending?
Let’s just float another idea: Instead of mocking
Palmer’s grand plan as an epic failure waiting to happen,
encourage him to polish up other catastrophic events with
a thick coating of time-honed romanticism. More than 75
years have passed since the Hindenburg erupted in flames
and crashed. Perhaps it is time to test the public’s fondness
for zeppelin travel. Nostalgia wasn’t enough to keep
Airship Ventures from grounding its “flightseeing” trips on
the Eureka zeppelin from Moffett Field last year but
maybe a tie-in to the past would be enough to drum up
interest and empty out pocket books.
If Branson’s foray into private space travel doesn’t pan
out, he could always give a nod to the American space
program by recreating the doomed launch of the
Challenger.
Or, if boats are really the draw for Palmer, try the Costa
Concordia, this time with a captain that doesn’t “acciden-
tally” fall into a lifeboat while others scramble for safety.
Maybe for something a little less fatal, Palmer could con-
sider the horrific adventure of the Carnival cruise Triumph
that became disabled in the Gulf of Mexico. If anybody
wants a trip redo, it’s certainly those passengers.
Ultimately, if Palmer does relaunch the Titanic in 2016
as planned, he is entitled to do so and chances are he
won’t be hurting for clientele.
Hey, whatever floats their boat.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every Tuesday
and Thursday. She can be reached by email: michelle@smdai-
lyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do
you think of this column? Send a letter to the editor:
letters@smdailyjournal.com.
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
analysis and insight with the latest business,
lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to
provide our readers with the highest quality
information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we
choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Fred Berry
Blanca Frasier Charles Gould
Martin Gomez Gale Green
Jeff Palter Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Elizabeth Cortes Rachel Feder
Darold Fredricks Natalia Gurevich
Ashley Hansen Tom Jung
Jason Mai Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner Sally Schilling
Kris Skarston Samantha Weigel
Chloee Weiner Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number
where we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,075.37 +1.26% 10-Yr Bond 1.90 +1.28%
Nasdaq3,162.26 +1.04% Oil (per barrel) 92.85
S&P 500 1,515.99 +1.27% Gold 1,597.10
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Tempur-Pedic International Inc., up $3.31 at $41.19
A KeyBanc analyst said that mattress shipments rose in January, based
on data from a few mattress makers, including Tempur-Pedic.
DineEquity Inc., down 16 cents at $72.12
Shares of the restaurant chain operator slipped though its fourth-quarter
adjusted results topped Wall Street expectations.
Nasdaq
Dollar Tree Inc., up $4.31 at $45.39
The discount retailer said that its net fiscal fourth-quarter income rose
nearly 22 percent as consumers spent more at its stores.
Papa John’s International Inc., down $5.18 at $51.47
The pizza chain restated earnings back to 2009 after its auditors found
an accounting error related to a joint venture agreement.
DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc., down 30 cents at $16.31
The movie studio posted a fourth-quarter loss of $82.7 million, as it
booked a big write-off on its film “Rise of the Guardians.”
First Solar Inc., down $4.32 at $27.04
The solar company posted fourth-quarter net income of $154.2 million,
but its outlook for 2013 disappointed investors.
OpenTable Inc., up $2.30 at $56.37
A Wunderlich Securities analyst initiated the online restaurant reservation
company with a “Buy”rating, citing reservations growth.
Priceline.com Inc., up $17.42 at $695.91
The travel website operator said fourth-quarter net income rose 28
percent and its results beat Wall Street expectations.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The Dow came within
60 points of its all-time high Wednesday,
rising sharply for a second straight day.
The market surged following more evi-
dence that the Fed will keep interest rates
low, housing will keep recovering and
shoppers aren’t pulling back on spending,
though they’re paying more in Social
Security taxes this year.
The gains were broad: Twenty-nine of
30 stocks in the Dow Jones industrial
average rose. All 10 industries in the
Standard and Poor’s 500 index climbed.
The Dow Jones industrial average
closed up 175.24 points, or 1.2 percent, to
14,075.37. The index is now 89 points
from its record close of 14,164.53
reached in October 2007. It rose steadily
from the opening bell, then peaked near
the record at 3:26 p.m. Eastern Time,
before easing slightly in the last half hour
of trade.
The Dow has surged 290 points in the
past two days, erasing its drop of 216
points Monday when inconclusive results
from an election in Italy renewed worries
that Europe’s fiscal crisis could flare up
again.
“The market psychology has clearly
shifted. It’s no longer sell the rally, it’s
buy the dips,” said Dan Veru, chief invest-
ment officer of Palisade Capital
Management. “The economic data con-
tinues to be strong.”
The Standard and Poor’s 500 index
gained 19.05 points, or 1.3 percent, to
1,515.99. That put it within 49 points of
its record close of 1,565, also in October
of 2007.
The Nasdaq composite rose 32.61
points, or 1.3 percent, to 3,162.26.
Investors were also encouraged
Wednesday that Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke stood behind the
central bank’s low-interest-rate policies
as he faced the House Financial Services
Committee.
His comments dissipated worries about
the bank’s resolve to keep up the pro-
gram. Those worries sprang up last week
when minutes from the bank’s last policy
meeting revealed disagreement among
Fed officials.
Also, the number of Americans who
signed contracts to buy homes rose in
January from December to the highest
level in almost three years. The report
continued a string of positive housing
news. Sales of new homes jumped 16 per-
cent last month to the highest level since
July 2008, the government reported
Tuesday.
Home builder stocks rose for the sec-
ond day in a row. PulteGroup climbed 25
cents, or 1.3 percent, to $19.30, after ris-
ing 5.7 percent the day before.
“Some encouraging news for the bulls
has been the housing data that has come
out over the past couple of days,” said
Todd Salamone, director of research at
Schaeffer’s Investment Research.
The analyst said he remained “extreme-
ly bullish,” on stocks in the medium and
long-term, but cautioned that a pullback
may lie ahead in coming days after the
year’s strong gains.
Stocks have surged since the start of the
year. The Dow is up 7.4 percent and the
S&P 500 has climbed 6.3 percent.
But rising even more is the Dow Jones
transportation average, which is up 13
percent for the year at 5,989.37. Airlines
like Delta and Alaska Air are powering
the gains.
“If the economy is doing well you’ve
got to be moving stuff around,” said Phil
Orlando, chief equity strategists at
Federated Investors. “You’ve got to be
moving people on airplanes, you’ve got to
be moving cargo with trains or trucks, or
UPS.”
Dow nears record, fueled by housing, Fed
“The market psychology has clearly
shifted. It’s no longer sell the rally, it’s buy the
dips. ...The economic data continues to be strong.”
— Dan Veru, chief investment officer of Palisade Capital Management
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CUPERTINO — Apple CEO Tim Cook
sought to reassure shareholders worried
about the company’s sagging stock price
that the iPhone and iPad maker is on the
verge of inventing more breakthrough
products that will prove it hasn’t lost its
creative edge.
“The company is working as hard as
ever, and we have some great stuff com-
ing,” Cook told shareholders Wednesday
before taking their questions during
Apple’s annual meeting at its Cupertino
headquarters.
True to Apple’s
secretive nature,
Cook didn’t provide
any further product
details, although at
one point he said the
company is consider-
ing entering other cat-
egories besides its
popular line of digital
music players, smartphones and tablet
computers.
There has been speculation that Apple is
working on an Internet-connected watch
or TV that will be introduced later this
year. One shareholder at Wednesday’s
meeting threw a new idea for Apple to
ponder — a computerized bicycle. Cook,
an avid bicyclist, chuckled at the sugges-
tion, along with the rest of the audience.
Although there were more moments of
levity, Wednesday’s meeting was less cel-
ebratory than the events in past years,
when Apple’s stock price was soaring to
the delight and enrichment of its share-
holders.
Since hitting an all-time high of
$705.07 five months ago, Apple’s stock
has plunged by 37 percent.
Apple CEO promises investors ‘great stuff’ to come
Bernanke defends Fed’s low-interest-rate policies
WASHINGTON — Facing criticism from Republican law-
makers, Chairman Ben Bernanke stood behind the Federal
Reserve’s low-interest-rate policies
Wednesday and sought to reassure mem-
bers of Congress that the central bank has
a handle on the risks.
In his second day of testimony on Capitol
Hill, Bernanke told members of the House
Financial Services Committee that the
Fed’s bond purchases are needed to boost a
still-weak economy and that they have
helped create jobs for average Americans.
The bond purchases are intended to lower
long-term interest rates. That encourages
more borrowing and spending, which generates growth.
Business brief
Tim Cook
Ben Bernanke
<< Vogelsong strong, Giants-Angels end in tie, page 12
• A’s handle the San Diego Padres, page 12
Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013
NEW YORK STATE OF MIND: CURRY GOES OFF, HITS 11 3’S, SCORES 54 POINTS ... BUT WARRIORS LOSE >>> PAGE 12
Burlingame heads to CCS DIII finals
Panthers’magic runs out
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Burlingame’s Malia Smith sends the ball upfield during a 4-0 loss to St. Francis Wednesday.
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Alex Smith quietly
stayed behind the scenes after losing his job
and watched from the sideline as San
Francisco returned to the Super Bowl for the
first time in 18 years. Yet the No. 1 overall
draft pick from 2005 did make one thing
known: The veteran quarterback still consid-
ers himself a starter.
And he hoped to get that chance again.
Now, he appears to have it.
The Kansas City Chiefs have agreed to
acquire Smith from the 49ers in the first major
acquisition since Andy
Reid took over as the
team’s new coach in early
January, a person with
knowledge of the trade
told The Associated Press
on Wednesday.
The person spoke on
condition of anonymity
because the deal cannot
become official until
March 12, when the NFL’s new business year
begins. Another person familiar with the swap
said the 49ers will get a second-round pick in
April’s draft, No. 34 overall, and a condition-
al pick in the 2014 draft.
After spending his first eight up-and-down
years with the 49ers, Smith will get a new
start. The Chiefs will get the proven play-
caller they hope can help turn things around
under a new coach much the way Smith did
under Jim Harbaugh in San Francisco.
“You never know when your opportunity’s
going to come,” Smith said late in the season.
“The good ones are ready when they do
come.”
Moving Smith was hardly unexpected. He
realized it once Colin Kaepernick emerged as
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
SAN FRANCISCO — The Burlingame
boys’ basketball team had gotten off to
extremely slow starts in its last two games and
was determined to start faster against Mills in
a Central Coast Section Division III semifinal
game at St. Ignatius High School Wednesday
night.
Not only did the Panthers start the game
well, they maintained their high level of play
throughout. Burlingame put together one of
its most complete efforts of the year as the
Panthers buried the Vikings 53-32 to advance
to the finals for the third time in four years.
“I thought we played really well. The best
of the year for four quarters,” said Burlingame
coach Pete Harames. “I was hoping for a four-
quarter game. We played great team defense.”
Burlingame (20-8) will face No. 5 Santa
Cruz in the finals at 3 p.m. Saturday at
Foothill College. The Cardinals upset top-
seeded St. Ignatius 49-48.
Even with shooting guard Connor Haupt
being held in relative check and center Nick
Loew playing only about five minutes in the
first half because of foul trouble, the rest of
the Panthers picked up the slack. Especially
point guard Mikel Floro-Cruz, who knocked
down six 3-pointers and finished with a game-
high 20 points.
“[Harames] was telling me in practice to
shoot more, shoot more,” Floro-Cruz said. “I
was looking for my shot (Wednesday night).
We came out looking to win.”
Not only did Burlingame dominate on the
scoreboard, it dominated in nearly every facet
of the game. The Panthers owned the boards,
See SMITH, Page 14
See HOOPS, Page 15
Smith traded to Kansas City Chiefs
H
ayley Grossman never managed
to make a Central Coast Section
championship appearance during
her playing days at Mills.
Now she hopes to
capture a title as a
coach for the
Woodside girls’ team.
The sixth-seeded
Wildcats advanced to
the Division II finals
for the first time in
school history after
knocking off No. 2
Westmoor, 50-40,
Tuesday night at
Christopher High
School in Gilroy.
“Crazy huh? You
would never guess,” Grossman said. “When
I was in school, [Woodside was] never real-
ly a very good team.”
The win over the Rams was especially
satisfying because they had knocked
Woodside out of the Peninsula Athletic
See LOUNGE, Page 14
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When you’re considered one of the more
successful boys’ soccer teams in your pro-
gram’s history, one that will be remembered
for a long time, it’s hard to see your season
boil down to literally two minutes.
But that’s what the boys from Carlmont
have to deal with as they take inventory on
what was otherwise a great season for the
Scots following a 3-1 loss to Bellarmine
College Prep Wednesday night.
For the majority of the Central Coast
Section Division I semifinal at Burlingame
High School, the Scots were in control. They
had a lead, they were still knocking on the
door and were playing with more and more
confidence as the game wore on.
But then, the 46th minute came.
“We lost focus,” said Carlmont head coach
Jodi Beloff. “We lost focus for a couple of
minutes and we didn’t mark up like we should
have marked up. They didn’t cover each other
like they’re supposed to cover each other and
the rats got in.”
Those pesky soccer ball rats found the back
See BOYS, Page 16
Carlmont
can’t stop
Bellarmine
Alex Smith
Woodside and
Grossman get
shot at crown
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Cinderella story that is the No. 11
Burlingame girls’ soccer team has unfortunate-
ly hit the midnight hour.
After shocking two solid teams in dramatic,
last-minute fashion, the Panthers ran into a
team in No. 2 St. Francis that out-possessed,
out-paced and ultimately outscored them 4-0.
The Panthers came into the Central Coast
Section Division III semifinal against St.
Francis knowing they’d need a bit of magic
dust to stay with the big, bad Lancers and
Wednesday afternoon there was none to be had.
“We just played a better team,” said
Burlingame head coach Phillip DeRosa. “The
team was clearly better than us. We played as
hard as we could and it really didn’t matter if it
was our day or not. We got beat by a better
team.”
The Lancers got a much-needed statement
goal in the 18th minute after knocking on the
proverbial door several times, requiring line-
clearing saves by Burlingame defenders. The
St. Francis attack came in waves and finally
broke through on a superb goal by Annie
Kingman. The forward cut on a dime to the
inside, spotted a window from about 25 yards
out and blasted a shot that no goalkeeper in the
Central Coast Section could save.
It took the Lancers less than six minutes to
double the advantage and put all the pressure
on a Burlingame offense that was already hav-
ing trouble getting the ball into their offensive
third — with so many players forced to defend,
there were few available up top for the Panther
attack.
“We thought that if we could get one goal
and make it 2-1, that we could make a run at
them,” DeRosa said. “It was just tough.”
“I think they have a very good offense and it
was really hard controlling it,” said Burlingame
senior Lena Mendelson. “Their speed, it was
kind of unexpected so what we were hoping
wouldn’t happen did happen. They’re definitely
a very skilled team. And offensively, we just
didn’t have it.”
Even down 2-0 at the half, the Lancers
weren’t necessarily banking on the win and the
Panthers were still upbeat.
See GIRLS, Page 15
12
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We are so confident that our Personalized Martial Arts Instruction will
immediately change your life, we are making you an offer you simply
can’t refuse- FREE 30 DAY TEST DRIVE!!
1100 Park Place, suite 50 • San Mateo, CA 94403
650.286.0105 • www.zultimate.com
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Stephen Curry rose for
another jumper, and by then even the Knicks
probably figured it would go in.
Curry had hardly missed
in a scintillating second
half of the NBA’s most
electric performance this
season, the crowd cheer-
ing even before the ball
left his hands.
This time, Raymond
Felton jumped with him,
making the play New York
needed to finally with-
stand Curry.
Felton’s blocked shot led to J.R. Smith’s
tiebreaking basket with 1:10 left, and the
Knicks overcame Curry’s NBA season-high
54 points to beat the Golden State Warriors
109-105 on Wednesday night.
Curry was 18 of 28 from the field, finishing
one shy of the NBA record with 11 3-pointers
in 13 attempts, in a performance that had the
crowd hanging on his every shot. But the
Knicks and Felton finally stopped him with
1:28 to play and the score tied at 105.
“My main thing is to keep playing. Like I
said, once a guy gets it going like that, there’s
nothing I can really do. I’ve still got to stay in
my mindset, still play my game, and I was still
able to come up with some big plays at the
end,” Felton said. “We all came up with some
big plays to get that win.”
Carmelo Anthony followed Smith’s basket
with another one and the Knicks hung on to
spoil former Knicks star and Warriors coach
Mark Jackson’s homecoming.
Anthony finished with 35 points and Smith
had 26.
“We made the defensive stops we needed to
make down the stretch,” Knicks coach Mike
Woodson said.
Playing all 48 minutes, Curry finished with
seven assists and six rebounds while passing
his previous career best of 42 points, and
Kevin Durant’s 52-point performance that had
been the best in the NBA this season.
“I felt good all night. Obviously played the
whole game, so was just trying to keep my
legs underneath me on the offensive end, and
you know, just stick to the game on the defen-
sive end,” Curry said. “Once I started seeing
that 3-ball go down in transition, all sorts of
spots on the floor, I knew it was going to be a
good night.”
But he had little help without All-Star for-
ward David Lee, who was suspended one
game for his role in an altercation Tuesday
night in Indiana.
Tyson Chandler had 16 points and a career-
best 28 rebounds for the Knicks, who won
their second straight after a season-high, four-
game losing streak. Amare Stoudemire had 14
points and Anthony added eight assists on the
day the Knicks learned they could be without
reserve forward Rasheed Wallace for the rest
of the season because he needs surgery to
repair a broken bone in his left foot.
Strutting all over the court whenever one of
his 3s swished easily through the nets, Curry
easily blew past the 38 points he scored
Tuesday in Indiana, which had been his best
of the season. That was spoiled when he was
fined $35,000 for his role in the skirmish,
which was essentially getting thrown to the
ground by Roy Hibbert when he tried to inter-
vene.
This performance — the most points by an
NBA player in a loss since Kobe Bryant had
58 in a loss to Charlotte on Dec. 29, 2006 —
was spoiled along with Jackson’s trip back to
his old home because of a few mistakes down
the stretch.
Curry threw away a pass on the break with
3:13 left, and Jarrett Jack was called for a
travel following Smith’s go-ahead basket.
Plus, Klay Thompson finished 3 of 13 from
the field, missing two straight from deep in the
final minute.
Jackson, who grew up in Brooklyn and
starred at St. John’s before being drafted by
the Knicks in 1987, didn’t get a chance to
coach here last season as an NBA rookie on
the bench because of the lockout. He brought
his wife, Desiree, to a road game for the first
time this season, had his mother in the stands,
and got a chance to see people he remembered
from playing here years earlier.
He said he hadn’t gotten to look ahead
much to the game because of the schedule, but
clearly enjoyed being back in Madison Square
Garden once the day did arrive.
“This is a special place and it was part of
my dreams as a kid,” he said.
His night turned into Curry’s, fans cheering
even before the ball left his hand in the second
half.
“We were short-handed and we needed a
performance like that to have a chance,”
Jackson said. “He put on a clinic. Knocked
down shots. Made plays. Carried us. Led us in
rebounding. He did it all. I’ve seen a lot of
great performances in this building and his
goes up there. I’ve seen a lot. I’ve seen a lot,
but that shooting performance was a thing of
beauty.”
The Knicks, who hadn’t played since
Sunday, looked ready to blow the Warriors out
early, taking a 25-11 lead that the Warriors
trimmed to 27-18 at the end of the first period
before surging ahead behind Curry.
He scored 12 straight Golden State points,
cutting it to 35-34 with his third 3-pointer of
the second quarter. He followed Richard
Jefferson’s 3 with another one, giving the
Warriors a 40-37 advantage.
Knicks overcome Curry’s 54 to beat Warriors
Stephen Curry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TEMPE, Ariz. — The way Ryan Vogelsong
is pitching this spring, Giants manager Bruce
Bochy should have no worries when the right-
hander leaves for the World Baseball Classic.
Vogelsong pitched three more scoreless
innings Wednesday in San Francisco’s 8-8 tie
with the Los Angeles Angels.
“He really looked sharp,” Bochy said.
Vogelsong, 14-9 with a 3.37 ERA with the
Giants in 2012, allowed a leadoff single to
Mike Trout in the first and nothing else. He
struck out four.
In his first spring start Sunday, Vogelsong
worked two shutout innings. He’s expected to
get one more start with the Giants before join-
ing Team USA.
“Everything felt really good,” Vogelsong
said. “I’ve just got to sharpen up my breaking
ball a little bit and things will be where they
need to be.”
Barry Zito, who had his best season of six
with San Francisco in 2012 with a 15-8
record, replaced Vogelsong and allowed one
hit in a scoreless fourth before allowing a hit
and a walk in the fifth, which both scored. He
was pulled after 1 2-3 innings.
“I’m trying to get a feel for all my pitches
right now,” Zito said. “I was in and out with all
my pitches ... I felt OK.”
One day after he drove in four runs against
Arizona, Angels’ utilityman Bill Hall was
pulled from the game in the third inning with
tightness in his right quadriceps. Hall, who
started at third base, was trying to make a play
while charging a chopper near the mound that
went for a hit. The Angels said he is day to
day.
Top Angels’ prospect Kaleb Cowart, dou-
bled in a run in a two-run Angels ninth.
Left-hander Nick Maronde, the Angels’ No.
2 prospect, according to Baseball America,
gave up three hits and two runs — one earned
— in his second outing. He was pulled after 1
1-3 innings. Maronde allowed three runs
while getting just two outs in his first appear-
ance Saturday.
The Giants built a 7-2 lead and let it slip
away with closer Sergio Romo allowing two
runs in the bottom of the ninth. The game was
called after nine innings, giving the Giants
their third consecutive Cactus League tie and
the Angels their second straight tie.
Vogelsong sharp, game ends in tie
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Dan Straily made his major
league debut before making his Cactus League
debut. In Oakland’s case, that’s not unusual.
Jemile Weeks hit a leadoff home run in the
first inning, Seth Smith later homered and the
Athletics beat a split squad of San Diego
Padres 11-6 on Wednesday.
Weeks, Smith and Jed Lowrie each had two
hits and drove in two runs. Smith homered in
the second as Oakland took a 7-2 lead.
Straily, who had never pitched higher than
Single-A until last year, allowed two runs on
two hits in 1 1-3 innings. He walked one and
struck out one in his first big league spring
appearance.
“There are quite a few guys like that,” Straily
said. “I talked to a few guys about that. There’s
no timidness here. We’re part of the team and
we came ready to work.”
Straily ended last season in the Athletics”
starting rotation, helping them win the AL
West along with fellow rookies A.J. Griffin,
Tommy Milone and Jarrod Parker.
Straily did not pitch during the AL division
series but both Griffin and Milone made starts.
Neither of them started a big league spring
game until now.
“I feel like I’ve been before although I
haven’t,” Straily said. “I’m getting ready for a
long season. I’m getting ready to pitch.”
Straily said he focused on his fastball,
though he mixed in a handful of breaking
pitches.
“I had to knock the rust off out,” he said.
“It’s been a long two weeks waiting to get out
there. I threw a lot of good pitches. I wasn’t
trying to get ahead of myself.”
Cody Ransom homered and drove in two
runs for San Diego. Travis Buck, who previ-
ously played for the A’s, had two hits and
drove in two runs. Padres starter Eric Stults
gave up four runs on four hits and two walks in
one inning.
Padres manager Bud Black wasn’t overly
concerned about Stults’ outing. The left-hander
produced career numbers last year after being
claimed off waivers from the Chicago White
Sox in May.
“I’m not going to look at one inning in
February,” Black said. “He’s still in a strength
building phase and throwing a lot of fastballs.
His change did not come into play.”
Weeks, Smith lead Athletics over Padres
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
a capable starter over the season’s final two
months, and Smith all but said goodbye with
his first pro team when he played briefly in the
regular-season finale against Arizona to cheers
of “Let’s Go, Alex!” and “Alex! Alex!” from
the Candlestick Park crowd.
With Smith now headed for Kansas City,
Matt Cassel is likely headed out of town. And
Reid will enter his first draft as Chiefs coach
in April no longer needing to search for a
quarterback.
The Chiefs’ problems at quarterback are the
single biggest reason they went 2-14 last sea-
son and secured the No. 1 pick in the draft for
the first time in franchise history.
Even memorable names such as Steve
Bono, Elvis Grbac, Damon Huard, Tyler
Thigpen and Tyler Palko haven’t fared well
with this franchise. And then there’s Cassel.
He was acquired by recently fired general
manager Scott Pioli, and has two years left on
a $63 million, six-year deal. He will likely be
cut once Smith is acquired.
Cassel was benched last season in favor of
Brady Quinn, who also is a free agent after
going 1-7 as the starter.
If Smith can bring the steady form that
defined his last two years, the Chiefs might be
able to establish a much-needed consistency
under center. They also found themselves a
team-first player who led the 49ers through
workouts during the 2011 lockout.
Under the three-year contract he signed last
March, Smith is guaranteed $1 million from
the 49ers, and that would have become $8.5
million guaranteed — his 2013 salary — if he
was still on their roster April 1.
Smith thrived under 49ers coach and former
NFL quarterback Harbaugh in one-plus sea-
son as the starter. Then, just like that, it all
changed after he sustained a concussion.
Last week at the NFL combine, Harbaugh
praised Smith and reiterated just how strong
San Francisco was with Colin Kaepernick as
the starter and someone with Smith’s creden-
tials at backup.
Yet everyone knew it was likely the 49ers
would do their best to improve Smith’s situa-
tion considering all he did for the franchise for
nearly the past decade.
“Alex is really playing the best football of
his career the last two years,” Harbaugh said.
“We think we got the best quarterback situa-
tion in the National Football League, feel
strongly about that. Again, that’ll be a process
that plays out. Alex Smith continuing to be a
49er or if a trade occurs in the next weeks or
months. Those are the two possibilities, most
likely possibilities.”
Continued from page 11
SMITH
League tournament semifinals two weeks
ago, 48-36. Grossman wasn’t necessarily dis-
appointed in the result, more with the way
her team played and reacted.
“The last game (against Westmoor), it was
just a bad game for us. It was negative,” said
Grossman, a 2004 Mills graduate. “We knew,
no matter what happened, win or lose, we
didn’t want to have that feeling again. We
just didn’t want to lose.
“Westmoor is a good team, but it’s hard to
beat a team twice (in the same season). We
made a couple of adjustments, but the main
thing was just staying positive.”
Makaela Kitaura came off the bench to
lead the Wildcats with 16 points. Sharnon
Lionel finished with 11, while leading scorer
Madison Michelis, who was held scoreless in
the first half, scored 12 in the second half.
“Kituara really stepped up. It looked like
she was having a blast out there,” Grossman
said.
Grossman knows all about staying positive.
Her high school coach, Kelly Shea Gallo,
passed away from breast cancer mere months
after Grossman completed her senior season.
The two were so close, Grossman didn’t even
want to see a basketball after her season was
over. But as time passed, Grossman realized
her high school coach would not have wanted
her to give up the game.
“I’m definitely living it (my CCS title
dreams) out through them (the Woodside
team),” Grossman said. “My coach passed
away my senior year. We were extremely
close and the reason I wanted to coach is
because I wanted to get that feeling again. I
wanted to do the things Kelly did. Kelly
spoiled us (on the Mills team) and really
made us feel like family.”
Grossman said she definitely has that con-
nection with this Woodside team. She has
coached the seven seniors on the team since
their freshman season as Grossman spent two
years as the Wildcats’ frosh-soph coach
before taking over the varsity duties last sea-
son.
“My whole thing is, you can’t play togeth-
er as a team unless you have that chemistry
outside the court. It took four years (to devel-
op that chemistry),” Grossman said. “These
girls, they’re like my babies. I do care and
want to be part of their lives after high
school.”
The Wildcats will go for the CCS champi-
onship at 5:30 tonight at Santa Clara High
against top seed Presentation. Grossman said
there is not a lot of time to break down what
the Panthers do, so she’ll just focus on what
her team does well.
“All these teams (in the playoffs are great).
We’re just going to go out there and give it
all we’ve got,” Grossman said. “I told the
girls, ‘There’s nothing I’m doing.’ It’s them.
It’s basically heart. Everyone is saying ‘con-
gratulations’ to me, but I give it to the girls.
“We do have one more game to play and it
would be great to finish it off and win the
championship. But I have to keep in mind
how far we have gotten. It’s unheard of. I’m
happy right now. I’ll take second place, but I
know my players want to win it all.”
***
It has toiled in relative obscurity in the hills
above Pacifica, but the Alma Heights
Christian School boys’ basketball team has
made a name for itself the last couple of sea-
sons. Last year, the Eagles compiled a record
of 18-9 overall and a Private School Athletic
League record of 9-3, advancing to the quar-
terfinals of the CCS Division V tournament.
This year, the Eagles took the next step and
are on the cusp of winning the school’s first
CCS title. This year, Alma Heights is 26-3
overall and captured its first PSAL regular-
season and tournament championship, going
11-1. Those marks earned the Eagles the top
seed in the Division V tournament. In their
quarterfinal match against Trinity Christian,
the Eagles nearly reached the 100-point
mark, winning 91-66. In the semifinals
Tuesday night, they grinded out a 32-28 vic-
tory over Eastside College Prep. They take
on No. 2 Pinewood in the championship
game 8 p.m. tonight at Notre Dame-Belmont
High.
Alma Heights is led by the trio of James
Boyd, Joshua Cayetano and Matthew
Kolesnikov, all juniors. Boyd is averaging
16.5 points per game, Cayetano 12.4 and
Kolesnikov 11.1. Kolesnikov is also the
team’s leading rebounder at 8.1 per contest.
While those three provide the bulk of the
offense and rebounding, the Eagles go about
eight or nine deep and are averaging just
under 60 points per game.
They are currently riding an 11-game win-
ning streak.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
out-rebounding Mills (15-11) 37-12, turned the ball over only five
times and limited the Vikings to just 12 of 40 shooting from the
floor.
“I don’t have anything to say, really,” said Mills coach Rick
Hanson. “I give Burlingame all the credit in the world. They played
great tonight. It’s a credit to their team. There wasn’t a drop off
(with average performances from Haupt and Loew). Their other
players are very good players. [Floro-Cruz] was fantastic.”
The Vikings did a good job of limiting touches for Haupt, who
was double teamed for most of the night. He managed only one 3-
pointer and discovered if he wanted to get his shots, he was going
to have to do it off penetration. He finished with 15 points on 4 of
10 shooting, but it was Floro-Cruz who was left open and he made
the Vikings pay time and time again.
“Over-helping on Haupt left Mikel open and he took advantage
of the situation and drained them,” Hanson said.
Burlingame jumped out to a quick 8-2 lead following back-to-
back 3s from Floro-Cruz and Tyler Paratte, and went up 10-4 on a
Will Dobson putback basket. But Mills closed the gap to 10-9 fol-
lowing a 3 from Jeremy Gibbs and a pair of free throws from
Joseph Worku, who finished with a team-high 13 points.
It would be as close as the Vikings would get the rest of the
game. Burlingame responded with a 7-0 run to end the quarter and
continued its momentum in the second quarter, scoring the first
seven points to take a 23-9 lead with 4:50 left in the half.
Mills, meanwhile, went nearly eight minutes — an entire quar-
ter’s worth of time — between points. After scoring nine points in
the first quarter, the Vikings managed only five in quarter number
two as Burlingame built up an 18-point lead at halftime, 32-18.
Mills came out with more intensity and pressure in the second
half and limited the Panthers to 21 second-half points, but
Burlingame was more concerned about milking the clock instead
of scoring. Those 21 points were still better than Mills, which
scored only 18 points over the final two quarters.
Mills’ only chance at making a comeback was to either make its
shots or crash the boards and grab rebounds. The Vikings could do
neither of those things. The Burlingame defense made sure Mills
was limited to one shot as the Panthers consistently grabbed
rebound after rebound. Loew, who finished with just six points,
managed to pull down nine rebounds, as did Dobson and Chris
Graham. Ronai Yuksel came off the bench and in limited minutes
grabbed three rebounds of his own.
“That’s quite a good win,” Harames said. “I think we’ll be ready
for Saturday.”
In other CCS action Wednesday, Carlmont saw its run come to
an end in the Division I semifinals, falling to No. 3 Santa Teresa
54-46, sending coach Dave Low off into retirement. Michael
Costello scored a game-high 24 points in the loss for the Scots.
In the Open Division, Serra advanced to the finals for the third
straight year with a 54-49 win over West Catholic Athletic League
rival Sacred Heart Cathedral. It will be an all-WCAL final as the
Padres will face Mitty for the second year in a row in champi-
onship game at 8 p.m. Saturday at Santa Clara University. The
Monarchs held off Riordan 59-51 in the other semifinal game.
In girls’ action, Burlingame advanced to the CCS Division III
championship game for the first time since 1995 with a 42-28 win
over Valley Christian. The top-seeded Panthers will take on either
Notre Dame-San Jose or Branham in the championship game at 1
p.m. Saturday at Foothill College.
Continued from page 11
HOOPS
“We were extremely motivated, extremely positive,”
DeRosa said. “I could not be more proud of these young ladies
given where we started from our goal was just to make it to
CCS. We are in clearly the toughest division. There’s an
expression that after we won the first game, we were playing
with house money simply because this group, in a compliment
to them, are overachievers. They just played their heart out,
never gave up. As a coach, it’s one of the all-time pleasant sur-
prises.”
As expected, the Panthers did what they could to battle. A
couple of Mendelson and Alexis Prieto runs held a bit of
promise, but come the 63rd minute, the Lancers put the game
away with a goal by Delaney Baie Pridham, who beat the
Burlingame keeper to the ball on a looping through ball that
she tapped over the end line for the 3-0 score.
“When they scored that third goal, that really hurt,” DeRosa
said. “I thought we were going to get a couple of opportuni-
ties, but they’re fast, they’re tough on the 1v1.”
The Lancer offensive pressure did not let up and was good
for one more Kingman goal with a little more than three min-
utes left in regulation time.
“I can’t believe it’s over,” Mendelson said, fighting back a
tear or two that wanted to creep their way through the seniors
eyes. “It was an amazing four years. It’s really emotional actu-
ally. It’s weird. It’s sad that it’s over and that it ends this way
but I’ll never forget my years here. I’m very proud of my team.
I didn’t even think we’d get this far, even get to CCS. I think
we could have done better and obviously I’m going to say that
coming off a tough loss. But I’m really proud of my team.”
Continued from page 11
GIRLS
Missing racing sausage left in Wisconsin bar
CEDARBURG, Wis. — The case of the missing sausage is
closed.
The Journal Sentinel in Milwaukee is reporting the 7-foot Italian
sausage costume, usually seen racing around Miller Park during
Brewers games, has been found after going missing for nearly two
weeks.
Guido, the sausage with the chef’s hat and bow tie, was dropped
off a bar in Cedarburg Wednesday night, hours after the missing
costume became national news.
Jen Mohney, a bartender at TJ Ryan’s, told the Journal Sentinel
two men — one wearing a hoodie pulled over his face — lugged
the costume into the bar, dropped it onto a stool and told her “You
did not see anything.”
She says they left quickly, and she called police.
The costume — with someone in it — was last seen bar hopping
in the area Feb. 16 for a fundraiser at local bars.
The costume is owned by Milwaukee-based sausage company
Klement’s. The Racing Sausages, including the Bratwurst, the
Polish Sausage, the Hot Dog and the Chorizo, are a popular sight
running bases at Brewers home games.
Sports brief
16
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Timing
BELT
Special
$199 +up
30K/60K/90K
Service
Mon-Fri 8am-5pm
Sat: 9am-1pm
(650) 342-6342
635 South Claremont St. San Mateo, CA 94402
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 34 20 .630 —
Brooklyn 34 24 .586 2
Boston 30 27 .526 5 1/2
Philadelphia 22 33 .400 12 1/2
Toronto 23 35 .397 13
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 41 14 .745 —
Atlanta 33 23 .589 8 1/2
Washington 18 38 .321 23 1/2
Orlando 16 42 .276 26 1/2
Charlotte 13 44 .228 29
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 36 21 .632 —
Chicago 32 25 .561 4
Milwaukee 28 28 .500 7 1/2
Detroit 23 37 .383 14 1/2
Cleveland 20 38 .345 16 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 45 14 .763 —
Memphis 38 18 .679 5 1/2
Houston 31 28 .525 14
Dallas 25 32 .439 19
New Orleans 20 39 .339 25
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 42 15 .737 —
Denver 36 22 .621 6 1/2
Utah 31 27 .534 11 1/2
Portland 26 30 .464 15 1/2
Minnesota 20 34 .370 20 1/2
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 41 18 .695 —
Golden State 33 25 .569 7 1/2
L.A. Lakers 28 30 .483 12 1/2
Phoenix 20 39 .339 21
Sacramento 20 39 .339 21
Wednesday’sGames
Cleveland 103,Toronto 92
Sacramento 125, Orlando 101
Detroit 96,Washington 95
Milwaukee 110, Houston 107
Memphis 90, Dallas 84
Oklahoma City 119, New Orleans 74
New York 109, Golden State 105
NBA GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 20 13 7 0 26 69 54
New Jersey 19 10 5 4 24 48 49
Philadelphia 22 10 11 1 21 64 67
N.Y. Rangers 18 8 8 2 18 44 48
N.Y. Islanders 20 8 11 1 17 57 68
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 20 13 4 3 29 58 43
Boston 16 12 2 2 26 49 35
Ottawa 20 12 6 2 26 48 37
Toronto 21 12 9 0 24 59 51
Buffalo 20 7 12 1 15 50 64
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 18 9 8 1 19 50 54
Tampa Bay 19 9 9 1 19 70 60
Winnipeg 19 9 9 1 19 52 60
Florida 19 6 9 4 16 48 69
Washington 19 7 11 1 15 52 59
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 19 16 0 3 35 61 37
Nashville 21 9 7 5 23 45 52
St. Louis 18 10 6 2 22 55 52
Detroit 20 9 8 3 21 58 56
Columbus 20 5 12 3 13 44 61
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 19 10 5 4 24 54 52
Minnesota 18 9 7 2 20 39 43
Calgary 18 7 7 4 18 49 61
Edmonton 18 7 7 4 18 42 49
Colorado 18 7 8 3 17 44 54
PacificDivision
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 18 14 3 1 29 64 48
Dallas 20 10 8 2 22 56 57
Los Angeles 18 10 6 2 22 47 42
Phoenix 19 9 7 3 21 54 51
San Jose 18 9 6 3 21 44 41
NOTE:Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Wednesday’sGames
Philadelphia 4,Washington 1
Montreal 5,Toronto 2
Los Angeles 2, Detroit 1
Anaheim 5, Nashville 1
Thursday’sGames
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Detroit at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
CCSsemifinals
DivisionIII
No. 2Burlingame53, No. 3Mills 32
Mills 95117— 32
Burlingame1715129— 53
MILLS (fg ftm-fta tp) — Worku 4 4-4 13,Matt Wong
3 0-0 7, Gibbs 1 0-0 3, Esponilla 1 0-0 2, Adkins 2 0-
0 4, Man 1 0-0 2, Chew 0 1-2 1. Totals 12 5-7 32.
BURLINGAME — Loew 3 0-1 6,Floro-Cruz 6 2-2 20,
Paratte 1 0-0 3, W. Dobson 1 0-0 2, Haupt 4 6-8 15,
Graham 3 1-4 7. Totals 18 9-15 53. 3-pointers —
Worku,Wong,Gibbs(M);Floro-Cruz6,Haupt,Paratte
(B).Records— Burlingame20-8overall;Mills15-11.
DivisionI
No. 3SantaTeresa54, Carlmont 46
Carlmont 148159— 46
SantaTeresa12151413— 54
CARLMONT(fg-ftm-tp) — Hlatshwayo0-2-2,Prado
2-1-5, Malik 2-3-7, Costello 10-0-24, Pitocchi 2-0-5,
Abinader 0-1-1. Totals 17-7-46. SANTA TERESA —
McGhee 4-0-10, Gallagher 2-0-5, Paolinetii 6-3-16,
Garabatian 2-3-7,Whitmarsh 3-2-8,Long 2-4-8.Tot-
las 19-12-54. 3-pointers — Costello 4, Pitocchi (C);
McGhee 2, Gallagher, Paolinetti (ST). Records —
Carlmont 20-8 overall; Santa Teresa 17-10.
GIRLS’ SOCCER
No. 2St. Francis 4, No. 11Burlingame0
Halftime score — 2-0 St. Francis. Records —
Burlingame 13-6-3 overall; St. Francis 18-3-1.
BOYS’ SOCCER
No. 3Bellarmine3, No. 2Carlmont 1
Halftime score — 1-0 Carlmont. Carlmont goal
scorer (assist) — Harpster (unassisted).Records —
Carlmont 15-4-3 overall; Bellarmine 16-4-5.
SOFTBALL
Carlmont 11, NotreDame-Belmont 0
Carlmont 001073—11101
NotreDame000000— 091
WP — Faulkner. LP — Mifsud. Multiple hits —
Faulkner 2, Yzaguirre 2 (C). Multiple RBIs — Yza-
guirre 3, Giuliacci 3 (C). Records — Notre Dame-
Belmont 1-1 overall.
TUESDAY
BASEBALL
Serra9, PaloAlto2
Serra1205100— 991
PaloAlto0002000—222
WP— Gorgolinski (completegame).HR—Murray
(S). 2B — Paroubeck, Conche, Toomey, Martin (S).
Multiple hits — Toomey 2 (S). Multiple RBIs —
Murray 4 (S). Records — Serra 3-0 overall.
BOYS’ LACROSSE
SacredHeart Prep11, Foothill-Pleasanton8
SHP3224— 11
Foothill 0323— 8
SHPgoal scorers— Male5;Hattler 2,Eiffert 2,White
2.SHP assists — Male,Hattler,Kawasaki.SHP goalie
saves — Appleton 21.
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
SacredHeart Prep12, Saratoga4
SHP goal scorers — Mayle 4; White 3; Johnson 2,
Lamb 2; Muir.
COLLEGEBASEBALL
Gavilan9, Skyline3
Gavilan220100121—9131
Skyline000000003—3123
WP — Katich (3-1). Hidalgo (0-2). Multiple hits —
Carrillo 2,Thompson 2, Orozco 2 (S); Sutton 3, Cid 3
(G).RBIs — Lausen,Santiago (S);Burns,Kocina,Hall,
Sutton, Resendez, Cid, Garza (G). Records — Sky-
line 0-1 Coast Conference Pacific Division, 2-10
overall; Gavilan 1-0, 7-6.
CSM5, SanFranciso0
CCSF000000000— 042
CSM00000122x— 5130
WP — Palsha (2-2).LP — John-Patrick (0-4).2B —
DeFazio,O’Malley (CSM).Multiple hits — Vanden-
berg 2, DeFazio 2, Atlas 2, O’Malley 2, Richards 2.
RBIs — Vandeberg, O’Malley, DeFazio, Richards.
Records—CSM1-0Coast ConferenceGoldenGate
Division, 6-7 overall; San Francisco 0-1, 3-9.
of Carlmont’s net twice in a span of
a couple minutes. By the time
minute 48 came, the Bells were up
2-1 and the shock appeared to
deflate the Scots.
“Once they got the goal to tie it,
they got the momentum switched
and we started breaking down,” said
Carlmont defender Justin Quan. “I
definitely think we came out a little
too overconfident. They didn’t have
too many attacking chances in the
first half because our defense was
shutting them down. But then, we
just took it too easy when we came
back out and any good team will
take advantage of that.”
Carlmont had every reason to feel
confident. The Scots struck first fol-
lowing some cheeky play in the box
between a trio of Carlmont attack-
ers. The ball ultimately ended on
Justin Harpster’s right foot and No.
11 gave the Scots a 1-0 lead in the
13th minute.
From there, Carlmont had a cou-
ple more shots on target and were
playing well enough to keep the
Bells out of their net — thanks in
large part of the play of their goal-
keeper.
“I feel like we absolutely went toe
to toe with them,” Beloff said.
“They had very quick feet in the
middle. But like I said, I thought we
went to toe to toe with them through
most of the game. We lost focus on
a couple of them. We had a couple
of players that didn’t have their best
games which caused some issues.
But for the most part I thought they
did a great job.”
A pair of minutes into the second
half, Carlmont whiffed on a couple
excellent looks at the Bellarmine
net. And the Scots were definitely
kicking themselves for not taking
full advantage of those following
what happened in minutes 46
through 48.
“We just didn’t have as much pas-
sion as we did when we started,”
Quan said.
Bellarmine added the nail in the
coffin on a laser beam goal with 12
minutes left in the game.
“This is the first time a Carlmont
team has gone to the semifinals in a
really long time,” Beloff said, taking
a bit of season inventory after the
loss. “They’ve got that to be proud
of. They have the fact that they are
PAL champions — that again is a
pretty darn good stat.”
Continued from page 11
BOYS
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
FRIDAY
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
CCSfinals
DivisionII
No. 6 Woodside (24-5) vs. No. 1 Presentation (12-
15), 5:30 p.m. at Santa Clara High
DivisionIV
No. 2 Menlo School (19-9) vs. No. 5 Sacred Heart
Prep (21-8), 5:30 p.m. at Foothill College
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
DivisionIV
No. 3 Menlo School (19-7) vs. No. 4 Half Moon Bay
(22-6), 8 p.m. at Foothill College
DivisionV
No. 1 Alma Heights (26-3) vs. No. 2 Pinewood (13-
11), 8 p.m. at Notre Dame-Belmont High
SATURDAY
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
CCSfinals
DivisionIII
No.1Burlingame(27-2) vs.No.2Branham(22-6)/No.
Notre Dame-San Jose (20-8) winner, 1 p.m. at
Foothill College
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
CCSfinals
OpenDivision
No. 2 Serra (25-4) vs. No. 1 Mitty (24-5), 8 p.m. at
Santa Clara University
DivisionIII
No. 2 Burlingame (20-8) vs. No. 5 Santa Cruz (19-
10), 3 p.m. at Foothill College
CCS GLANCE
BASEBALL
National League
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Promoted Dick
Tidrowtovicepresident andassistant general man-
ager, player personnel; Bobby Evans to vice
president andassistant general manager;JohnBarr
to vice president and assistant general manager,
scouting and international operations; and Jeremy
Shelley to vice president, pro scouting and player
evaluation.
NBA
NBA—Suspended Indiana’s Roy Hibbert and
Golden State’s David Lee each one game for insti-
gating an altercation during a Feb. 26 game. Fined
Golden State’s Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson
and Indiana’s Lance Stephenson $35,000 apiece
for escalating the altercation.
NFL
BUFFALOBILLS—Announced the retirement of
DE Chris Kelsay.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Released OT Guy
Whimper, QB John Parker Wilson and DB Brandon
King.
ArenaFootball League
SAN JOSE SABERCATS—Signed DB Clevan
Thomas to a two-year contract.
TRANSACTIONS
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Draperies
Blinds & Shades
Upholstery & Re-upholstery
Home Textiles
Accessories
Call today for your
in-home appointment.
By Jennifer Forker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
We focus so much energy turning
a house into a home, we sometimes
forget to aim our decorating genius
in another notable direction: the
office cubicle.
Home often expresses who we
are, filled as it is with accumulated
treasures and trinkets. But skip on
over to the office cubicle — or, for
that matter, an office with actual
walls — and it can be a different
story.
Some offices “are so dated. It’s
wallpaper from the ’70s, falling-
apart furniture and stacks of files —
generally, an overall mess,” says
Sayeh Pezeshki, a designer who
blogs about decor at The Office
Stylist.
Considering how much time
many people spend at work, “your
work space should be cheery and it
should be fun, and it should be per-
sonal to you,” says Sabrina Soto,
designer host of HGTV’s “The
High/Low Project.”
A soothing environment cuts
down on work stress, designers
believe.
“It really does affect the way that
you work and the way that you
feel,” says Pezeshki.
And, she says, “You don’t have to
spend a lot of money” doing it.
Bob Richter, an interior designer
and cast member of PBS’ treasure-
hunting series “Market Warriors,”
visits flea markets wherever he trav-
els, returning home with one-of-a-
kind mementos.
“I feel like a cubicle or a small
office should feel like a small apart-
ment,” says Richter, who lives in a
small New York City apartment.
“Things have to be tidy but there
also has to be an opportunity to
store things easily.”
Richter suggests combing flea
markets for unusual boxes and bas-
kets for storing supplies on an office
desk. He uses old metal coffee tins
and vintage ceramic planters for
holding pens and other supplies.
“There’s a nostalgic vibe to these
items,” Richter says.
Soto suggests using lacquered
boxes or stylish fiberboard boxes,
like those sold at The Container
Store.
Good lighting, an attractive
memo board, and at least one living
plant or cut flowers are also essen-
tial for cultivating good cubicle
ambiance.
Bring a desk lamp from home for
task lighting; it’ll cheer up the
space.
Bring in low-water, low-light
plants — at least one. Two plants
that are good at surviving indoor
light are pothos and heartleaf philo-
dendron. Peace lilies also crave low
light and are excellent at cleaning
indoor air.
“Keep one on your desk,” says
Richter. “It feels like there’s life
there.”
For the memo board, Richter sug-
gests framing a section of cork, dry-
erase board or good-quality ply-
wood painted with chalkboard
paint. Frame it in a vintage frame —
it’s a tenth the price of a new frame,
he says — or float the memo board
inside the cubicle wall’s frame.
Soto likes to paint her frames in
bright colors, as does Pezeshki,
who’s all in for the bling. Her own
office — not a cubicle — is painted
black, purple and metallic silver. Its
silver accents include a gallery wall
of ornate frames and a large floor
lamp.
“It’s very glam, because I’m very
Bring your personality into your workspace
Bob Richter,an interior designer and cast member of PBS’treasure-hunting series,says ‘a cubicle or a small office
should feel like a small apartment.’
See OFFICE, Page 18
18
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
glam,” says Pezeshki. “I like shiny
things and blingy things.”
That’s the important thing: to deco-
rate your cubicle according to your own
personality, the three designers say.
If you like sports, use memorabilia. If
you’re a movie fan, go that route.
“For me, a place I want to be is a place
surrounded by the things I love,” says
Richter. “I think (the office cubicle) is an
area where you can let your personality
do the talking.”
More tips:
• Keep it tasteful, says Richter, and
check with your human resources man-
ager before turning a cubicle into a fully
furnished room. “There’s a fine line
between personalizing your desk and
going overboard,” he says.
• Ditch the sticky notes and the hang-
ing calendar, which add clutter, Soto
says. Lean a small dry-erase board
against one wall and jot down notes
there. Use an electronic calendar.
• Hang an attractive fabric along the
cubicle walls, attaching it with decora-
tive push-pins. Hang framed artwork.
“Anything to make the cubicle walls
look like normal walls,” Soto says.
• Cover bookshelves and cabinets with
printed contact paper. “It instantly pulls
together the look,” Pezeshki says. Pick
five or six things currently sitting on
your desk and replace them — pencil
holder, frames, tape dispenser — with
the look you want.
Continued from page 17
OFFICE
Creek, Mo., Sugar City, Idaho and Sugar
House, a Salt Lake City, Utah neighborhood.
But Woodside, Pasternack wrote, “repre-
sents the affluence we’ve been looking for in
our search.”
The offer to the city would also require it to
change the name of Woodside Town Hall to
SugarDaddie.com Town Hall; change street
signs to reflect the new name; rename the
annual King’s Mountain Art Fair on Labor
Day weekend to SugarDaddie Mountain Art
Fair; and present the key to the town to
Pasternack in an official ceremony.
The deal would require Woodside to rename
itself to Sugardaddie.com for at least 10 years.
Woodside’s Town Manager Kevin Bryant
told the Daily Journal yesterday he first heard
about the proposal in a forwarded email.
“Quite frankly, I don’t know how we will
deal with this. It doesn’t come up every day,”
Bryant told the Daily Journal.
He does not think, however, that the town
will support the idea.
Sugardaddie.com spokesman Darren
Shuster, with Pop Culture Public Relations,
said yesterday, however, the company intends
to get the item agendized for the council’s
next meeting March 12.
Woodside is a perfect match for the compa-
ny, Shuster said.
“If there are not sugar daddies in Silicon
Valley, I don’t know where they’re at,”
Shuster said.
The offer to Woodside also calls for a statue
to be erected of someone such as Hugh
Hefner, who best represents the sugar daddy
lifestyle.
The effort to rename a city Sugardaddie.com
is a publicity stunt, Shuster said.
“It has generated a lot of publicity for us but
imagine the publicity we will get if we actual-
ly accomplish our goal,” Shuster said.
Woodside only has about 5,000 residents
but some who have lived there include the
richest in the world such as Oracle founder
Larry Ellison, Kenneth Fisher, founder of
Fisher Investments, and Gordon E. Moore, co-
founder of Intel.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
NAME
other items go to single individuals. For
CALL Primrose, it’s resulted in hundreds of
pounds of donated food. Another benefit has
been greater access to sliced bread, she said.
The partnership was formed nationally
between Feeding America and Target,
Walmart and Save Mart (Save Mart, Lucky
and Food Maxx). Second Harvest Food Bank,
one of 202 food banks in the Feeding America
network, established the program locally in
2011. Second Harvest provides extensive
training for agency partners that includes safe
food-handling practices and then connects
them with nearby grocery stores.
“The program is part of Second Harvest’s
effort to supplement our highly efficient phys-
ical distribution of food by connecting people
to other food resources,” said Kathy Jackson,
CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa
Clara and San Mateo counties. “The Grocery
Rescue program allows Second Harvest to get
a significant amount of food into the commu-
nity using a minimal amount of resources.
Most of the rescued food is picked up by our
partner agencies, saving us from having to
pick it up, inventory it and deliver it back out
to our partners. It also means the food gets
into the hands of those who need it much
faster.”
Last year, the Grocery Rescue program
brought in more than 1 million pounds of food
that was distributed to families and individu-
als in need. Locally, 58 stores participate in
Second Harvest’s Grocery Rescue program.
Anyone struggling to put food on the table
should call Second Harvest Food Bank’s Food
Connection hotline at (800) 984-3663 to learn
about food-assistance programs, including
CalFresh. Those who want to support Second
Harvest can call (866) 234-3663 or visit
www.SHFB.org.
CALL Primrose is currently looking for
people to sign up for its Easter program Fill a
Box, Feed a Family. Those interested can
email contact@CALLPrimrose.org or visit
callprimrose.org.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
FOOD
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Our dogs are often as fat as we are, accord-
ing to the Association for Pet Obesity
Prevention. Family cats can look like furry
ottomans. At Tufts University, they’ve set up an
obesity clinic at the vet school.
It’s time to get our pets up and at ‘em.
Dogs and cats love to play, and there are
scores of great toys to engage their bodies and
minds.
Be mindful of your pet’s breed and character
when choosing games and toys, advises
Victoria Wells, senior manager for behavior
and training at the American Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ adoption
center in New York City.
DOGS
“Scent-oriented dogs will respond best to
games that involve seeking out something that
has an odor, so hide treats around the house
that they have to locate,” she says. “Buy toys
that you can hide treats inside, and the dog has
to tumble it to get at them.”
Intelligent dogs need mental stimulation just
as people do, says Wells.
Spot’s Seek a Treat sliding puzzle and
Discovery Wheel might fill the bill. Company
of Animals has a Twister treat-finding game.
The Kong line of toys are pack pleasers; the
toys have holes at one end to hide treats, and
the heavy-duty rubber construction makes
them tough enough for larger dogs. (Available
at many pet stores, or at www.wag.com;
www.companyofanimals.co.uk)
Big, energetic dogs will have fun chasing the
sturdy Varsity Ball. And for a little humor, con-
sider Moody Pet’s Humunga lips-, tongue- or
moustache-shaped chew toys that
give your dog a
hilarious
visage
when they’re holding them. (www.varsitypet-
sonline.com; www.moodypet.com)
Dogs that love to interact love to tug — and
Wells says that, contrary to some opinion, tug-
ging can be a great game.
“It’s all about who’s in control of the game.
You decide when you play it, when the toy
must be released, when it must be dropped,”
she says.
Teaching these skills early in a
puppy’s life makes
play a lifelong joy. But
even a rescue dog can
learn, with patience and
understanding.
Try a tennis ball attached
to a rope, which
makes retrieving
and throwing
easy — no slob-
bery balls to grip.
Petco also offers
Bamboo’s Combat
Bone, a soft and floatable bone-
shaped tugger, while Homegoods’ extensive
pet department, HG Pet, has great squeak-and-
fetch options too. (www.petco.com,
www.homegoods.com)
Sturdy coils of small, medium or large
marine-grade rope also do the job, but for
multi-dog tug action, consider Ruff Dawg’s
four-handled rubber toy. (www.wag.com)
If you’ve got a ball-loving dog, you’ve prob-
ably spent hours throwing one; tennis balls
seem to be the toy of choice. For something a
little different, consider the Mystery Tree,
which requires the dog to trip a lever to release
the ball. And for truly energetic canines, get the
Hyperdog Launcher, which shoots up to four
balls 220 feet via a slingshot-like contraption.
No more goober-y hands or sore throwing
arms. (www.activedogtoys.com)
Some dogs love hide and seek;
Kyjen has a plush tree trunk you
stuff with mini squirrels for Dog to
extricate. (www.kyjen.com)
And how about chasing bubbles?
Activedogtoys.com has the automat-
ic Bubbletastic and Bubble Buddy,
which blow bacon- or chicken-
scented bubbles.
Perform a toy test:
Does your pet
respond
b e s t
to a
plush toy, a ball or an interactive food toy?
On his website Cesarsway.com, dog behav-
ior specialist and TV show host Cesar Millan
advises that toys can help a dog learn not to
bite. With puppies, introduce toys quickly as
substitutes for hands.
Wells suggests some easy-to-
make homemade toys. Poke
holes
in a 2-liter
soda bottle and fill it with a few kibbles:
Pawing the bottle will randomly release the
treats.
A popular treat at shelters is a savory ice pop.
“We put some treats in deli or carry-out con-
tainers, then fill them with water or chicken
stock” and freeze them, she says.
Caregivers also scent objects with cinnamon,
clove or lavender at different times of day, she
says, depending on whether they want to ener-
gize or soothe their furry charges.
When you leave the house for a long period,
Wells say, “limit the number of toys you leave
out. Just like children, pets get bored if their
entire toy box is available to them every day.”
CATS
Cats appreciate an interesting toy as much as
dogs do. Kitty condos, which often have sever-
al elevations and platforms to climb, sit on and
hide in, are excellent choices.
“Vertical hiding places and sanctuaries are
very important to cats,” notes Wells, since they
seek these out in the wild.
Look for upholstered versions in kneadable
micro plush, or carpet remnants.
Scratching posts made of sturdy jute will
save your furniture, and can be purchased or
made at home. A feline version of the mouse
exercise wheel is available at
Catwheelcompany.com.
Other homemade cat toys
include toilet paper rolls filled
with catnip or treats,
which the
c a t s
release by bat-
ting the toy
around, and
wands made out of
rulers, rubber bands and feathers, Wells says.
Cats get their own version of the ice pop, she
says: 3-ounce drink cups filled with cat food
and chicken or beef stock, and then frozen.
A fun interactive family toy might be the
Abo Cat Tunnel: Kids and pets chase each
other through a nylon tube. The Bergan Catnip
Cyclone involves a circular track on which a
cat spins a ball filled with catnip; the more
twirls, the more catnip aroma released. A feath-
ery teaser can be attached. The Cataction
Magneticat provides a magnetized bug on the
end of a wand that bobbles around while your
cat tries to catch it. (www.petco.com)
The Ba Da Beam Rotating Laser Cat Toy
features a battery-operated laser. (www.drsfos-
tersmith.com)
At Catchannel.com, find tips on making your
own versions of wand, tug and climbing toys
out of boxes, paper bags and other household
items.
Games and toys to keep pets happy
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, FEB. 28
Chinese New Year Celebration:
Traditional Chinese Dance
Performance and Catered Chinese
Lunch. 11:15 a.m. The San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. No tickets required.
For more information call 616-7150.
Drop-In eBook Program. 6 p.m. to
7 p.m. South San Francisco Public
Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. Library staff will
have information on the library’s
eBook collections and show patrons
how to download eBooks to their
electronic devices. Patrons are
encouraged to bring their eReaders
and tablet computers to the event.
For more information call 829-3860.
Bootcamp Series: Pitching Session.
6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sofitel, 223 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Redwood City. $15
members and $30 non-members by
the earlybird deadline of Feb. 21. $20
regular admission for members and
$35 non-members. $50 at the door.
Join the German American Business
Association to get some insight into
how pitching works. For more
information contact
nancytubbs@fullcalendar.com.
North Star Academy Presents Guys
and Dolls Jr. 7 p.m. McKinley
Auditorium, 400 Duane St., Redwood
City. $8 youth and seniors, $12 for
adults online or $14 at the door. For
tickets and more information go to
www.northstartix.com.
People in Glass Houses: The
Legacy of Joseph Eichler. 7 p.m.
Lane Community Room, Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Monique Lombardelli
will present a lecture on the homes
of Joseph Eichler. The lecture is
sponsored by the Burlingame
Historical Society and funded by the
Burlingame Library Foundation. Free.
For more information call 558-7444,
ext. 2.
Pear Theatre Presents: The Apple
Never Falls. 8 p.m. Pear Avenue
Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain
View. Tickets are $10-$30. The world
premiere of this play written by Paul
Bracerman will run from Feb. 22 until
March 10, with performances every
Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 8
p.m. and every Sunday at 2 p.m. For
more information and to purchase
tickets call 254-1148.
FRIDAY, MARCH 1
Free Tax Preparation. Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from Jan.
14 to April 5. 9 a.m. to noon and 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. Samaritan House, 4031
Pacific Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more
information call 523-0804.
‘Free First Fridays’ program. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. At 11 a.m., preschool children
will be invited to learn about trains.
At 2 p.m., museum docents will lead
tours of the Museum for adults. Free.
For more information call 299-0104.
Bingo, Bunko and Bridge. 11:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. Veterans Memorial
Senior Center, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. Proceeds from this
event will go to support families of
veterans in recovery at Fisher House
in Palo Alto. Lunch served from 11:30
a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Deadline to
purchase tickets was Feb. 20. $35 per
person. For more information call
780-7264.
The Annual Member’s Show. Noon
to 5 p.m. The Coastal Arts League
Museum, 300 Main St., Half Moon
Bay. This annual event allows every
dues paying member of the Coastal
Arts League to bring at least one
piece of their own work to the show.
Wall space will be an important
criterion as to how many pieces will
be accepted. Come see what some
of your neighbors are up to. Gallery
open Friday through Monday at
same hours. Reception March 15
from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Closes March
31. For more information visit
coastalartsleague.com.
North Star Academy Presents Guys
and Dolls Jr. 7 p.m. McKinley
Auditorium, 400 Duane St., Redwood
City. $12 online or $14 at the door.
For tickets and more information go
to www.northstartix.com.
V-Day: A Memory, a Monologue, a
Rant and a Prayer Performance. 7
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sofia University,
1069 E. Meadow Circle, Palo Alto. $25
for general admission, $15 for faculty,
staff and alumni, $2 for students. For
more information go to
theartofyogaproject.org.tommattusc
h@comcast.net.
The Sound of Music. 7:30 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur University, NDNU
Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
$25 for general admission. $15 for
students and seniors. For more
information and for tickets call (800)
838-3006 or go to
www.BrownPaperTickets.com.
Coastal Repertory Theatre
Presents: Tomfoolery. 8 p.m. 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. Tickets are
$27-$45. This energetic music hall-
style revue features 28 of Tom
Lehrer’s wickedly witty and
sometimes naughty songs that
satirize social ills in a sassy way. The
show runs until March 2. For more
information and to purchase tickets
call 569-3266.
Pear Theatre Presents: The Apple
Never Falls. 8 p.m. Pear Avenue
Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain
View. Tickets are $10-$30. The world
premiere of this play written by Paul
Bracerman will run from Feb. 22 until
March 10, with performances every
Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 8
p.m. and every Sunday at 2 p.m. For
more information and to purchase
tickets call 254-1148.
World Wide Dance Party! 8:30 p.m.
to 12:30 a.m. Club Fox, 2223
Broadway, Redwood City. For ages 21
and over. Will Magid Trio (feat. Baba
Ken Okulolo) and Rafa will perform.
$15. For more information go to
clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, MARCH 2
Friends of the Menlo park Library
Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Arrillaga
Family Recreation Center, 700 Alma
St., Menlo Park. 50 cents for mass
market paperbacks and $1 for trade
and hardcover titles. For more
information call 330-2521.
Lion Dance. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., U.S.
Bank parking lot at the corner of San
Mateo and Third avenues, San Mateo.
The Downtown San Mateo
Association and Self Help for the
Elderly present the fourth annual lion
dance featuring performances from
cultural groups. Vendor booths and
activities. Fun for the entire family.
For more information go to
www.dsma.org.
‘Sister Samms and Sister Johnson,
The Neighborhood’ with author
Claire Mack. 11 a.m. Menlo Park City
Council Chambers, 701 Laurel St.,
Menlo Park. Former San Mateo Mayor
Claire Mack discusses her life and
new book. Free. For more information
call 330-2512.
Bird Drawing and Sketching
Workshop. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Environmental Volunteers’ EcoCenter,
2560 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto.
Bring your own supplies because
provided supplies are limited. Ages
14 and up. Reservations
recommended especially if you need
materials. Free. For more information
or to RSVP, call 493-8000 ext. 345 or
email Education@Evols.org.
EReading for Everyone. Noon to 3
p.m. Menlo Park Library, 800 Alma St.,
Menlo Park. See what’s new in
eBooks for adults and kids. Get one-
on-one demos and learn how to
download and read thousands of
eBooks and listen to audio books on
your mobile device or laptop. Popular
author and Silicon Valley legend Guy
Kawasaki speaks about his latest
book ‘APE: Author, Publisher,
Entrepreneur!’ from noon to 1 p.m.
Two lucky people who attend the
event will win a brand new Kindle.
For more information call 330-2520.
Midpeninsula Regional Open
Space District: Book signing and
public outreach. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Kepler’s Books, 1010 El Camino Real,
Menlo Park. Celebrates the District’s
40th Anniversary and the publication
of its new coffee table book entitled
‘Room to Breathe: The Wild Heart of
San Francisco Peninsula.’ Free. For
more information call 691-1200.
Drop-In eBook Program. 2 p.m. to
3 p.m. South San Francisco Public
Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. Library staff will
have information on the library’s
eBook collections and show patrons
how to download eBooks to their
electronic devices. Patrons are
encouraged to bring their eReaders
and tablet computers to the event.
For more information call 829-3860.
Modern Primitive-One Person
Show Reception. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. The
Studio Shop, 244 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Show continues through
March 16. Free. For more information
call 344-1378.
Peninsula Youth Theater Presents
Fiddler on the Roof. 2 p.m. and 7:30
p.m. 500 Castro St., Mountain View.
$20 adults, $16 seniors and children
12 and under, $10 weekday shows
and $7 per ticket for groups of 10 or
more. For more information and to
order tickets call 903-6000.
Menlo Park Library’s Teen Book
Club meeting. 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. For
ages 12 to 18. Free. For more
information call 330-2530 or to
register for the book club email
atajar@plsinfo.org.
Opening Reception for HEADS
Exhibit. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Gallerie Citi,
1115 Howard Ave., Burlingame. For
more information call 577-3799.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
approached the city with the idea and the
city’s Parks and Recreation Committee
is set to hold a public hearing April 3 to
hear more details on the proposal and
other ideas for Werder and Destination
parks.
Ice Center manager Chris Hathaway
told the Daily Journal yesterday that the
Sustainable Foster City Plan calls for
revenue-generating recreational ameni-
ties in the city.
“If you look at the plan, it basically
says ‘insert ice rink here,’” Hathaway
said.
Ice Center officials have also looked at
other locations on the Peninsula for a
new facility but prefer the Foster City
location so far, Hathaway said.
The ice rinks lease expires at the end
of May and Bridgepointe management
has said it has no intent to renew it,
choosing instead to replace the ice rink
with retail uses.
But the shopping center’s master lease
calls for it to provide a recreational
amenity for San Mateo residents and the
property owner has proposed to replace
one of the city’s park fields into an all-
weather turfed athletic field. Those
negotiations are ongoing.
However, Hathaway is still not con-
vinced the rink will actually close at the
end of May.
The Ice Center will seek an extension
to find another facility, he said.
“We want to be somewhere we are
welcome and wanted,” Hathaway said.
Most of the Ice Center’s users reside
in San Mateo and Foster City, he said.
An ice rink at Werder Park, he said,
would be used by a much broader audi-
ence than an ordinary park would, he
said.
Councilmen Art Kiesel and Herb
Perez like the idea of generating revenue
out of the newly-acquired land.
Perez also said he liked the idea of an
ice rink for the property and Parks and
Recreation Director Kevin Miller told
the Daily Journal that an ice rink “would
be an awesome facility for Foster City to
have.”
Miller said, however, he is not sure a
large facility will work at Werder Park.
The department will put together a
pro-con analysis on many proposals for
the site and present them to the advisory
committee in April, Miller said.
The city is also seeking input for
Destination Park, the triangular-shaped
parcel owned by the city at the terminus
of Halibut Street at Beach Park
Boulevard once eyed by the San Mateo-
Foster City Elementary School District
for a proposed fourth elementary school.
Proposals so far include keeping both
parks as open space; adding more picnic
tables and benches; a community gar-
den; and interpretive bird and wildlife
signage.
Vendor opportunities and the ice rink
are proposed just for Werder Park.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
RINK
O’Connell requested the city push for
funding to accompany any new state or
national rules so the city can actually
enforce them.
“There are over 300 federal laws regu-
lating guns on the books, but I know for
a fact that the funding to have the people
regulating those has been cut over 50
percent in the last eight years,” she said.
More locally, San Francisco Mayor Ed
Lee sent a note requesting that San
Bruno follow its lead by adopting two
new laws banning the sale and posses-
sion of hollow-point ammunition and
requiring gun dealers report individual
purchases of 500 rounds of ammunition
or more to the local police department.
The conversation also includes other
measures related to gun violence that the
city could consider such as prohibiting
or limiting new shops that sell guns or
ammunition.
The council majority supported these
ideas but also had a lot of questions.
Councilman Michael Salazar wanted
to know more about the number 500 —
such as the reason behind it and if the
city could really follow up on such
reports. Police Chief Neil Telford could-
n’t address the number but said the
report would be like an early-warning
system for police who could research to
see if there should be a reason to worry.
On the other hand, resident Ryan
Mahoney said an avid shooter who plans
to spend a few hours at a range could
easily go through 500 rounds. Also, such
a purchase, he said, wouldn’t be made at
the local stores. Instead, Mahoney said it
would be purchased either online or at a
gun show for a lower cost. Such a pur-
chase wouldn’t be reported.
Telford said a mechanism to track
such purchases may be needed in the
future. O’Connell also wondered if there
could be a regional effort to share infor-
mation about such sales.
The council was supportive of staff
researching a number of options includ-
ing a change to the permit process for
such businesses to include stricter rules
about security and storage of guns and
ammunition along with possible zoning
changes.
“I would like to see the expected ben-
efit of limiting such stores. I’d like there
to be some benefit to anything else that
we might do,” said Salazar.
Councilman Rico Medina agreed,
adding whatever moves the city makes it
needs to be something that will make a
positive impact and can be enforced.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
RULES
By Anthony McCartney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Lindsay Lohan is
committed to turning her life around and
wants to record public service announce-
ments on the dangers of domestic vio-
lence, alcohol abuse and drunken driv-
ing, her attorney said Wednesday.
Mark Heller told the Associated Press
that the actress’ plans are independent of
a criminal case that could return her to
jail on charges that she lied to police
about being a passenger in her car when
it slammed into a dump truck in June.
The “Liz & Dick” star has been
repeatedly sentenced to jail, rehab, and
community service
since her first pair of
arrests for driving
under the influence
in 2007. She spent
several months in
court-ordered psy-
chotherapy until a
judge released her
from supervised pro-
bation in March
2012.
As part of the intense psychotherapy
sessions, Lohan is in the beginning
stages of trying to become an inspira-
tional speaker to young people, he said.
“I think she suddenly woke up one
morning and had an epiphany and she
suddenly realized and appreciated the
seriousness of the events that led to her
being in court,” Heller said.
“She’s going to try to inspire hope in
people,” he said. “I think it will be good
for her. It certainly won’t hurt others.”
Heller mentioned Lohan’s intent to
become an inspirational speaker in a let-
ter to prosecutors and a judge that was
obtained Tuesday. He said he will meet
with prosecutors on Friday to try to
reach a resolution in Lohan’s newest
case, which includes misdemeanor
charges of reckless driving and obstruct-
ing officers from performing their
duties.
Lawyer says Lohan committed to turning life around
Lindsay Lohan
COMICS/GAMES
2-28-13
wednesday’s PUZZLe sOLVed
PreViOUs
sUdOkU
answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
3
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
2
-
2
8
-
1
3
aCrOss
1 Intuitions
6 Predicaments
11 Run off to wed
12 Actress Dern
13 Makes fun of
15 Small fowl
16 High standards
18 Sault -- Marie
19 Winner’s take
21 Cassius Clay
22 Farm structure
23 Med. staffers
25 Candle drippings
28 Fridge maker
30 Ventilate
31 “Ben- --”
32 Moon buggy
33 “SNL” network
35 Game setting
37 Crumpet companion
38 Voyage
40 Bohemian
41 Yoko --
42 “Scream” director Craven
43 Blue
46 Gazed at
48 Did a chore
50 Free from liability
54 Blacktops
55 Military chaplain
56 Frozen rain
57 Merlin of the NFL
dOwn
1 Zoo doc
2 Percent ending
3 Glamorous wrap
4 Greek vowel
5 Kind of pearl
6 “Gil --”
7 John, in Glasgow
8 Brownie morsels
9 “Heck!”
10 Identical
14 Whiskery animal
15 Thin pancakes
17 “Scarface” actor (2 wds.)
19 Singer -- Mann
20 Camel kin
22 Pretzel topping
24 Tijuana Mrs.
25 Question of location
26 Em, Bee and Polly
27 Cavity detector (hyph.)
29 Formic acid producer
34 Worry
36 Inequity (2 wds.)
39 Jab
43 Cosmetic target
44 Ph.D. exam
45 Intertwined
46 For fear that
47 World’s fair
49 Before marriage
51 JAMA subscribers
52 Before, in combos
53 Countdown start
diLBerT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLe
fUTUre sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre swine®
GeT fUZZy®
THUrsday, feBrUary 28, 2013
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Even though any
rewards you reap will be due more to the efforts
of others than your own, your prospects look
exceptionally good. Later, you’ll fnd a way to
balance the account.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Do your best to keep
all of your involvements in good, proper balance.
Don’t attempt to take on more than you can
manage, but by the same token, don’t idle your time
away, either.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- When working on
something you deem to be a labor of love, positive
results are inevitable. Without question, the secret
to your success is enjoying what you are doing.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Seek out activities
devoid of competition that bring you together with
friends whose company you enjoy. You need to
relax, not vie with rivals.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- This could a
particularly good time to invite friends over to your
place for a little tete-a-tete. Most of the time, these
impromptu get-togethers turn out great.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You’re likely to be
exceptionally competent with projects that are more
mental than physical in nature. You won’t fnd a
better day to rest your muscle and give your brain a
workout.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Material increases
are indicated if you operate along traditional lines.
However, the picture could suddenly change if out of
the blue, you decide to take a risk on something.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Although you have
excellent leadership qualities, they will remain
dormant unless there is something specifc that you
decide to do. Whatever your aim, it will require tact
and grace.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You could fnd yourself
involved in something that affects others more than
you. Rather than get deeply drawn in, keep a safe
and respectful distance.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You have a
wonderful faculty of being able to enjoy yourself
regardless of the hand that is dealt you. You’ll
capitalize on this gift in two separate situations.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Even though you
might not be aware of it, you are apt to be the center
of attention in at least one gathering. It’ll be your
convivial conduct that enhances these conditions.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- One of your best
assets is being able to make friends with people
from all walks of life. This wonderful quality will be
in good working order -- use it to your advantage.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday• Feb. 28, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CHILDCARE/HOUSEKEEPER LIVE-IN
position (private room, bath, TV) female
only, English speaking, good salary, San
Mateo, (650)678-6737
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
NOW HIRING COOKS - FT & PT, Good
Pay, D.O.E., Short Order Cooks, Apply in
Person @ Neal’s Coffee Shop, 114
DeAnza Blvd., San Mateo,
(650)581-1754
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254065
The following person is doing business
as: Sandwich Monkey, 1151 Triton Dr.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: J & N Qual-
ity Enterprisesm, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Nick Fanourgiakis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/07/13, 02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254066
The following person is doing business
as: Penelopes’s Coffee and Tea, 1151
Triton Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
J & N Quality Enterprisesm, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Nick Fanourgiakis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/07/13, 02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254279
The following person is doing business
as: St. Francis Opthalmology Group,
1440 Southgate Ave., DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Jerold C. Bocci, MD, 2998
Jackson St. Apt. 3, San Francisco and
Paul R. Holland MD., 339 Chesham Ave.
San Carlos, CA 94070. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Jerold C. Bocci /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/31/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/07/13, 02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254306
The following person is doing business
as: Panda Dumpling, 1195 Laurel St.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Hua
Dai, Hua Dai 156 Bepler St., San Fran-
cisco, CA . The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Hua Dai /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/07/13, 02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254130
The following person is doing business
as: Petals Florist, 1600 South El Camino
Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Arca-
dia Lima, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Arcadia Lima /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/07/13, 02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254239
The following person is doing business
as: Kate’s Family Daycare, 2425 West-
chester Ct., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Ekaterina Tehnov and
Vladslav Temnov 111 Elm St., #2, San
Mateo, CA 94401. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple . The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Vladslav Temnov /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/07/13, 02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254401
The following person is doing business
as: Team Gymography, 145 N. El Cami-
no Real, #108, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Ron Scheldrup, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Ron Scheldrup /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254209
The following person is doing business
as: Climbing Kids OT, 554 Kelmore St.,
MOSS BEACH, CA 94038 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Joanie
Hooper, OTR/L, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/25/2013
/s/ Joanie Hooper /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254355
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Mobility Works, 2) Mobilityworks
890 Cowan Rd., Ste. B, BURLINGAME,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Moblity Works of Califor-
nia, Inc, CA. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Gerhard Schmidt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254335
The following person is doing business
as: Wally’s Repairs, 865 Douglas Ave.,
Redwood City, CA 94063 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Paul Wat-
son, 322 Cuardo Ave., Millbrae, CA
94030. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Paul Watson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254380
The following person is doing business
as: Bellissima, 4060 South El Camino
Real #15, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Camila Rose Rodondi, 7216 Shelter
Creek Lane, #7, San Bruno, CA 94066.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
02/16/2013.
/s/ Camila Rodondi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13).
23 Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
2012-13 Light Poles Purchase
The City of San Bruno is accepting bids subject to the specifi-
cations and conditions as stated in Bid No. C13-4110-01. Bids
must be submitted to San Bruno City Clerk’s Office, Attn:
Carol Bonner, 2012-13 Light Poles Purchase (Bid C13-
4110-01), City Hall, 567 El Camino Real, San Bruno 94066
by 3:00 p.m., March 12, 2013, at which time they will be public-
ly opened and read.
For more information or to obtain a copy of the bid documents,
please visit our website:
www.sanbruno.ca.gov/finance_biddingopp.html or contact the
Finance Department at 650-616-7031.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
February 26, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, February 28, 2013
and March 6, 2013.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254519
The following person is doing business
as: Pix, 966 Peninsula Ave., #103, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Daniel Hoeck,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/18/2013.
/s/ Daniel Hoeck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254103
The following person is doing business
as: QM Nails & Spa, 860 Maple St.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mi-
chelle Le, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Michelle Le /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254595
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Awesome Nu You, 751 Celes-
tial Lane, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: David R. Fast and Ronda S. Fast,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2013
/s/ David Fast /
/s/ Ronda Fast /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254356
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Apolon West Catering, 1480
Crestwood Dr., Apt. 1, SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94128 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Roberto Jose Lo-
pez, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Roberto J. Lopez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254582
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Masson Veterinary Hospital,
805 Masson Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Masson Veterinary Hospital,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
03/01/1990.
/s/ Brenda L. Conkling /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #2545646
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Infinity Fitness, 965 Brewster
Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Ayelette Robinson, 447 Hillcrest Rd.,
San Carlos, CA 94070. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/10/2013.
/s/ Ayelette Robison /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254651
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sunset Machine Shop, 1160
San Mateo Ave., SOUTH SAN FRAN-
CISCO, CA, 94080 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Elisabeth Niel-
sen, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ Elisabeth Nielsen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-250710
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Ten
Little Fingers, 554 Kelmore St., MOSS
BEACH, CA 94038. The fictitious busi-
ness name referred to above was filed in
County on 01/25/2013. The business
was conducted by: Joanie Hooper, same
address.
/s/ Joanie Hooper /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 01/29/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 02/14/13,
02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., (650)270-8113
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., (650)270-8113
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
L6 WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
MICROWAVE OVEN - Sharp, 1.5 cubic
feet, 1100 watts, one year old, SOLD!
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER - DeLonghi, 1500
watts, oil filled, almost new, $30.,
(650)315-5902
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
T.V. 19" Color3000, RCA, w/remote
SOLD!
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
296 Appliances
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99
(650)365-3987
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80’s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
BRASS TROPHY Cup, Mounted on wal-
nut base. $35 (650)341-8342
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all SOLD!
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, SOLD!
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
DELL 17” Flat screen monitor, used 1
year $40, (650)290-1960
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
CHILDREN’S VHS Disney movies, (4),
all $30., (650)518-0813
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. SOLD!
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
VINTAGE HAND Carved mallard duck
beautiful in a decoy $55., (650)341-8342
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PANASONIC CAMCORDER- VHSC
Rarely used, SOLD!
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers SOLD!
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
304 Furniture
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
lead crystal, with 24 carot guilding, model
# B8640, beautiful, $50., (650)315-5902
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM Cabinet (Like New),
$150 (650)593-9162
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - Medium brown, 50” x 39”,
two swinging doors plus 6 deep drawers,
SOLD!
DRESSER 6 Drawers $20
(650)341-2397
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 6’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, SOLD!
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
306 Housewares
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SHOPSMITH, FOUR power tools and
one roll away unit, SOLD!
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
DRAFTING TABLE - 60” x 40” tilt top,
with 3 full sets of professional ruling
arms, great deal, $50. all, (650)315-5902
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
24
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Send with an
email
7 With 22-, 37- or
48-Across,
familiar line
14 It has its
charms
15 Password
accompaniment
17 Mail for King
Arthur
18 “Pull it together”
19 Fed.
management and
support agency
21 Fabric
22 See 7-Across
29 Ken and Lena of
Hollywood
30 Tell-all account
31 Mosquito-borne
fever
33 Islet
34 Preschool
downtime
37 See 7-Across
41 Disapproving
sound
42 Ballpark fig.
43 Two-__
44 Shrill laugh
47 Bookkeeper’s
deduction
48 See 7-Across
50 Literature Nobelist
__ Bashevis
Singer
52 __ Lanka
53 Words often said
with a fist pump
57 Easy pill to
swallow
62 Where a
shopping list may
be jotted down
63 Word of
exasperation
64 Probable
response to
7-/22-, 7-/37- or
7-/48-Across
65 Saved
DOWN
1 Gardner of “The
Killers”
2 NYY opponent,
on scoreboards
3 Cat on the prowl
4 Excitement
5 Forks over
reluctantly
6 __ trade
7 An O may
symbolize one
8 Odessa-to-Austin
dir.
9 To this point
10 Leaflike parts
11 “Life of Pi” director
12 Unseen “Red”
character in
“Peanuts”
13 Give off
16 N.T. book
20 “All bets __ off”
22 Buffalo Bill and
the Wyoming city
named for him
23 Kitchen spreads
24 Frigid forecast
word
25 Tech sch. grad
26 “Bingo!”
27 Andy’s TV son
28 Pics
32 To-be, in politics
34 Capone associate
35 Words after crack
or fry
36 1996 role for
Madonna or
Jonathan Pryce
38 Sets a price of
39 Adjust, as to a
new situation
40 Prey for a
Hauskatze
44 Alpine dwelling
45 Battery not
included,
perhaps
46 Aurora, to the
Greeks
48 Refrain from
claiming
49 Prods
50 Like Vivaldi’s
“Spring”
51 Joined the choir
54 Scooby-__
55 Tape speed unit:
Abbr.
56 Hanoi holiday
58 John of London
59 Nasty mutt
60 Birthday candle
number
61 Prof’s deg.
By Steven J. St. John
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
02/28/13
02/28/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
310 Misc. For Sale
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CEILING FAN - 42”, color of blades
chalk, in perfect condition, $40.,
(650)349-9261
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30
(650)290-1960
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10.,SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
310 Misc. For Sale
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOME WINDOWair conditioner, SOLD!
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JACK LALANE juicer - never used,
$20., SOLD!
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., SOLD!
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PET MATE Vari dog kennel large brand
new $99 firm 28" high 24" wide & 36"
length SOLD!
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
310 Misc. For Sale
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SET OF MIRRORS (2) - 33” x 50”, no
border, plain mirrors, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
FOUND!
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
X BOX with case - 4 games, all $60.,
(650)518-0813
310 Misc. For Sale
WICKER DOG Bed excellent condition
34" long 26"wide and 10" deep $25
SOLD!
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WOOL YARN - 12 skeins, Stahlwolle,
Serenade, mauve, all $30., (650)518-
0813
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BABY CLOTHES boys winter jackets
and clothes, 1 box, $20. Gina
SOLD!
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
316 Clothes
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COAT - Size 6/8, Ladies, Red, Jones
New York, cute, like new, lightweight
down, above knee length, $35.,
(650)345-3277
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
Reversible. Outside: weatherproof tan
color. Inside: Navy plush. Zipper clo-
sure, elastic cuffs. $15 (650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WINTER coat - knee length,
size 14, rust color, $25., (650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor label.
Excellent condition. $18.00
(650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2011 SCATTANTE CFR SPORT ROAD-
BIKE - Carbon, Shimano hardware,
$1400 new, now $700., SOLD!
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$50.(650)368-0748.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CART (bag boy express model) 3
wheeler, duel brakes $39., (650)365-
1797
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
KR SKATES arm and knee pads, in box,
$15 (650)515-2605
25 Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
318 Sports Equipment
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
319 Firewood
FIREWOOD ALL KINDS- from 4” by 4”
inches to 1” by 8”. All 12” to 24” in length.
Over 1 cord. $50, (650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
Tools,
Household items,
and much more!
Sat., Sun., & Mon.
March 2, 3, & 4
450 Park St.
REDWOOD CITY
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard.
Clean in and out.
Under $600K.
(650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-8418 or (650)344-8418
450 Homes for Rent
RENTERS
Stop Paying Your
Landlord’s
Mortgage.
Free Report reveals
How Easy it is to Buy
Your Own Home.
BuySanMateoHome.com
Free recorded message
1-800-231-0064
ID# 1001
JM Sun Team # 00981193 Re/Max
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1993 HONDA Civic, sun roof, electric
windows, immaculate in and out, low mi-
lage, $3,400 obo, (650)368-6674
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVY ‘03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$18500. obo, (650)465-6056
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
‘95 HARLEY DAVIDSON very clean
bike, asking $3000, (650)291-5156
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
FORD F150 front grill - fits 2002 and
other years. $20 SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
670 Auto Parts
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Building/Remodeling
DRAFTING SERVICES
for
Remodels, Additions,
and
New Construction
(650)343-4340
Cabinetry
Cleaning
HOUSE CLEANING
Homes, apartments,
condos, offices.
Call
Clean Superstar
(650)576-7794
Concrete
Construction
(650) 580-2566
Tacktookconstruction
@yahoo.com
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)280-9240
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
26
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
FULL
HOME REPAIR
SERVICE
Painting - Interior/Exterior
Plumbing, Electrical, Flooring,
Decks, Fence, Tile, Pressure
Wash, Crown Moulding, Doors,
Windows, Roofing, and More!
Juan (650)274-8387
Henry, (650)520-4739
FREE ESTIMATES
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
FREE DUMPING
Bricks, Blocks
&Trees
(650)873-8025
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
TRUSTS & DIVORCE
Attorney Fees Reduced
For New March Clients.
HarrisZelnigherLaw.com
Ira Harris:
(650)342-3777
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo -
(650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco
-(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
COMING SOON!
AMAZING MASSAGE
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
Opening in March!
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
27 Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Massage Therapy
Seniors
28
Thursday • Feb. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY‡BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 3/31/13
WEBUY
$â0 $â0
OFF
Established 1979

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful