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Course Syllabus

Title: Calculus for Teachers, I Credits: 3 Instructor: Susan Ojala (sojala@uvm.edu) 656-8186 Location: Rowell 118 Meeting dates and times: July 15 Aug 9, Class meets Monday-Friday, July 22-26 8:00-500 Course Description: This course builds upon prior courses in arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. It is designed to introduce teachers to the branch of mathematics known as calculus in a way that relates calculus to the mathematics taught in the K-8 classroom. Topics include the idea of a limit, the role limits play in K-8 mathematics, and the concept of instantaneous change. Course goals include reinforcing and extending arithmetic, algebra, and geometry knowledge and skills through problem solving involving calculus, and empowering teachers with a deep understanding of how capability in K-8 arithmetic and algebra is foundational for success in higher-level mathematics. Note: As in all VMI courses, attention will be given to effective K-8 mathematics practice. This includes ongoing classroom observation by a VMI field mentor, conducting a systemic inquiry into practice in collaboration with the VMI mentor, demonstrating willingness to receive and use feedback about instructional practices, developing lesson plans in the context of overall curriculum, and sharing work with and critiquing work of other VMI teachers.

Goals: All VMI teachers should take with them from their work on calculus: Appreciation of the importance of arithmetic as the gatekeeper for all higher mathematics An understanding of the idea of a limit, and the role that idea can play in K-8 teaching (e.g. in the study of area, division, rates and change, in the applications of area beyond geometry and in student enrichment) The understanding of instantaneous,; how we model instantaneous change mathematically, and the way in which the concept of a limit can be used to make sense of 0/0 The understanding of how to use the concept of a limit to calculate area of a region having a curved boundary. The important applications of area that go far beyond geometry into the nooks and crannies of everyday life

Learning Outcomes
Content

Classroom Connection

What participants will know and be able to do Recognize how arithmetic is the gatekeeper for higher mathematics Recognize how limits appear in K-6 mathematics

How they will learn it Use of arithmetic and algebra through out the course Presentations by VMI graduates, homework assignments Classroom examples and activities

Limits

Recognize when a real-life or mathematics problem involves a limit Approximate the area under a parabola by counting Calculate the area of a circle by the method of exhaustion by polygons Infinite series as limits

Slicing the Cake

Approximating the area of a circle

Painting the wall and other problems Making sense of 0/0 and various problem sets

Understand the distinction between average speed and instantaneous speed Use delta notation to describe average rates

Constant vs. nonconstant rates

Derivatives

Understand the derivative Classroom activities and of a function as the problem sets instantaneous rate of change of the function Picturing the Derivative Understand the derivative geometrically as the slope of a line tangent to the function Understand how the limit definition of a derivative corresponds to the geometric definition Use the limit definition to calculate derivatives Derive the power rule The derivative of a sum is the sum of the derivatives Apply the power rule to find the derivative of arbitrary polynomial functions

Pascals triangle Utilizing everyday intuition, and analyzing the limits The Snowball Problem

Applications to real-life problem solving

Find the minimum or maximum value of a function by utilizing its derivative

Problems sets

General Course Information

Course Policies As in all VMI courses, attention will be given to effective K-8 mathematics practice. This includes ongoing classroom observation by a VMI field mentor, conducting a systemic inquiry into practice in collaboration with the VMI mentor, demonstrating willingness to receive and use feedback about instructional practices, developing lesson plans in the context of overall curriculum, and sharing work with and critiquing work of other VMI teachers. Attendance Expectations: Full attendance is required. In the event of an emergency requiring an absence, the participant will arrange with the instructor to make up all work that was missed on the day of the absence. No grade will be issued until submission of completed assignments. Religious Observance:
The official policy for excused absences for religious holidays: Students have the right to practice the religion of their choice. Each semester students should submit in writing to their instructors by the end of the second full week of classes their documented religious holiday schedule for the semester. Faculty must permit students who miss work for the purpose of religious observance to make up this work.

Contributions in Class: All participants are expected to contribute to class discussions, to share ideas and questions, to help other participants when possible and to share solutions to class and homework problems. Academic Honesty & Professionalism:
All students are required to be familiar with and adhere to the Academic Honesty Policy Procedures delineated in the most recent edition of The Cats Tale. (http://www.uvm.edu/~dosa/handbook/).

Accommodations:
Accommodations will be provided to eligible students with disabilities. Please obtain an accommodation letter from the ACCESS office and see one of the instructors early in the course to discuss what accommodations will be necessary. If you are unfamiliar with ACCESS, visit their website at http://www.uvm.edu/access to learn more about the services they provide. ACESS: A-170 Living Learning Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405. PH: 802-656-7753, TTY: call 711 (relay), Fax: 802-656-0739, Email: access@uvm.edu, Instant Messenger: UVMaccess. General office hours: 8:30am 4:30pm Monday through Friday. Call to make an appointment.

Required and/or recommended readings:


1. Calculus for the K-8 Teacher; An Overview of Limits. 1999, Kenneth I. Gross & Herbert I. Gross.

2. Calculus text, readings and handouts written by Kenneth I. Gross-This represents all materials distributed in class.

Electronic Submissions/Internet Use:


N/A

Student Evaluation/Assessment
Grading: Grades will be based upon a combination of: 1. Content based homework to be completed before each session (See Instructional Sequence for details) 2. Work with a VMI Mentor 3. Attendance & promptness 4. Class Participation and helpfulness to colleagues

Format for Expected Work: All homework assignments should be organized, written up neatly and all work should be shown. All homework assignments should be photocopied before submitting the original copies to the instructor. Homework assignments should be revised and rewritten as necessary and retained for the participants portfolio. Scoring Rubrics: N/A Percentage Contribution of Each Assignment: Homework: 75% Work with VMI mentor: 10% Attendance & participation: 15% Instructional Sequence:

Date 7/22

7/23

Topic Review rates and functions Calculus in the K-6 classroom presentations by VMI Graduates Average Rate of Change and delta notation Temperature Estimates Average Speed Exercise 1: Warm up on Limits Exercise 2: Practice with limits Exercise 3: Making sense of 0/0 Pascals triangle and binomial expansions

Assignment 1. Begin Reading Calculus Module Due Date:7/23

1. More Pascals Triangle 2. Functions & Algebra Practice 3. Exercise 4: Division and Constant Rates

3. Finish reading Module Due Date: 7/24 7/24 Quotient and limit notation Constant vs. non-constant rates Exercise 5: Nonconstant rates Picturing the derivative Derivatives as instantaneous speed Using algebra to compute the derivative Derivative problems Presentations on problems Galileos Law The Snowball problem 1. Derivative Problems 2. Review definitions Due Date: 7/25

7/25

1. More Derivative Problems 2. The Field by Dog River Due Date: 7/26

7/26

Problem Solving (Beths Garden, Sparkys Fence) Review Calculus I Calculus Inventory More problem solving and individual instruction

End of Course homework due August 9th