Society, Stress & the Brain - 1

Syllabus
Course Number: Title: Credit Hours: Semester: Dates: Location: EDCI 200 Society, Stress & the Brain 3 credits Summer, 2013 May 20 – June 14 Online

2013

Instructor Name & Contact Information: Haley Woodside-Jiron, Ph. D. University of Vermont College of Education and Social Services 538 Waterman Building Burlington, VT 05405 Email: Haley.Woodside-Jiron@uvm.edu Office Hours: Please use my email address above for communications with me. You can expect a 24 hr turn around on email and discussion postings _____________________________________________________________ Course Summary and Goals Society, Stress and the Brain (EDCI 200) familiarizes students with brain development and the learning process in the context of complex social conditions such as poverty, instability, and fear. Throughout this course, students study the effects of stress on the learning process and consider methods of instruction and interaction that address the various developmental needs of children in diverse contexts (i.e. schools, families, and discursive contexts). This course is particularly relevant to those invested in the fields of education, counseling, psychology, and sociology as we explore different methods of interaction and discourse that relate to locus of control and agency.

Dr. Haley Woodside-Jiron, Summer 2012

Society, Stress & the Brain - 2 Course Learning Objectives Students in Society, Stress and the Brain (EDCI 200) will: • Acquire basic knowledge in how the brain is involved with learning and memory • • • Read and analyze the growing research documenting the specific effects of stress on brain development and the learning process. Understand theoretical and practical overviews of the role of dialogic learning in developing agency and locus of control in the individual Explore and develop interactive learning environments that foster locus of control and agency thus promoting more effective and generative learning experiences.

Required Texts / Materials • Jensen, E. (2005). Teaching With the Brain in Mind. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. • • • Johnston, P. H. (2004). Choice words: How our language affects children’s learning. Portland, ME: Stenhouse Publishers. Zull, J. E. (2002). The art of changing the brain: Enriching the practice of teaching by exploring the biology of learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus. Additional articles, chapters, and web based readings/videos will be posted online throughout the course as appropriate to our discussions.

Grading Criteria / Attendance Policy All students are expected to participate consistently throughout the course. Further details about participation expectations are listed below under expectations. Also, please see the UVM Grading Policy link at the end of the syllabus. Classroom Environment Expectations Students participating in this online course will:
• • • • •

Spend approximately 10-12 hours a week on this course. Read the assigned readings (articles or websites) for each module. Post to the discussion board as assigned throughout the course. Participate actively and consistently in all discussions. Check in and participate in the discussion boards at least 3-4 times a week.

Dr. Haley Woodside-Jiron, Summer 2012

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Discussion Board Expectations • Please participate in the online discussions for each of the assignments by answering questions posed and then extending the conversation. Part of this will involve responding to at least 2-3 colleague's posts each week. Remember, there is no "back of the classroom" in an online discussion. • Each module has assignments that include reading and then posting to the Discussion Board.

Communication Class Communication We will use the Announcements box on the course home page to communicate reminders, updates and special interests topics. Individual Communication & Response Turnaround Time Please use my email for communications with me. You can expect a 24 hr turn around on email and discussion postings. (Haley.Woodside-Jiron@uvm.edu) Technical Assistance Using Blackboard Please use the HELP tab in Blackboard if you are experiencing any difficulties. There you will find 27/7 assistance both by phone and by online chat. Course Schedule: Throughout this course you will be engaging with diverse readings exploring the relationship between brain development, stress, and the role of one’s environment in the learning process. The pace for readings and discussion will be intense given the nature of the 4-week design of the course. Please be sure to allot appropriate time in your schedule for readings and assignments that are due each week. You will submit two separate 5-7 page papers during weeks 2 and 3 of this course (double spaced, 12 pt font, 1.25” margins). In addition to the 5-7 pages of text you will also include a “Works Cited” page. These papers will demonstrate a command of course content and your own inquiry. It is essential that you are able to integrate course research, readings, and discussions with your writing and that you “bring yourself to the table.” These papers are not simply a review of the literature but go further to include your own arguments, questions, and hypotheses. In addition to these two papers you will also contribute to a group presentation during the last week of class. Here you will work with 2-3 of your peers from class to develop a powerpoint presentation that will be shared with the class. This presentation will represent your active application of the principles that you learn throughout the course.

Dr. Haley Woodside-Jiron, Summer 2012

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The topics we will cover as well as the timetable for completion of readings and your research project are listed below. Complete descriptions of the assignments and evaluation tools will be made available as we progress through the course.

Topic for Week #1 This week we will focus on acquiring basic knowledge in brain development research. Week #1 Readings: Zull, J. E. (2002). The art of changing the brain: Enriching the practice of teaching by exploring the biology of learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus. Due ___ – Zull chapters 1-5 and Summary of Part I Due ___ – Zull chapters 6-7 and Summary of Part II Week #1 Discussions Due ___ - Initial response to Zull chapters 1-5 and Summary Part I (Discussion Board: Zull Part I) Due ___ – Response to 1-2 colleagues Due ___ – Initial response to Zull chapters 6-7 and Summary Part II (Discussion Board: Zull Part II) Due ___ Response to colleagues Week #1 Assignment (10% of your grade) Due ___ by 5:00 pm – Learning Contract due (This brief form that you will fill out for me explains your own background / discipline, what questions you have about the brain and learning given that particular context, and a plan for your own learning throughout this course)

Topic for Week #2 This week we will focus on the growing research documenting the specific effects of stress on brain development and the learning process. Week #2 Readings: Zull, J. E. (2002). The art of changing the brain: Enriching the practice of teaching by exploring the biology of learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus. Jensen, E. (2005). Teaching With the Brain in Mind. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Due ___ – Zull chapters 8-12 and Summary of Part III; Jensen Intro and chapters 1-3 Due ___ – Jensen chapters 4-11 Week #2 Discussions Due ___ - Initial response to Zull chapters 8-12 and Summary Part III; Jensen Intro and chapters 1-3 (Discussion Board: Zull Part III and Jensen Intro.) -contiuned-

Dr. Haley Woodside-Jiron, Summer 2012

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Due ___ – Response to 1-2 colleagues Due ___ – Initial response to Jensen chapters 4-11 (Discussion Board: Jensen) Due ___ Response to colleagues Week #2 Assignment (30% of your grade) Due ___ by 5:00 pm – Paper I due

Topic for Week #3 This we will focus on interactive learning environments that foster locus of control and agency thus promoting more effective and generative learning experiences. Week #3 Readings Johnston, P. H. (2004). Choice words: How our language affects children’s learning. Portland, ME: Stenhouse Publishers. Due ___ – Johnston chapters 1-4 Due ___ – Johnston chapters 5-8 Week #3 Discussions Due ___ - Initial response to Johnston chapters 1-4 (Discussion Board: Johnston Ch. 1-4) Due ___ – Response to 1-2 colleagues Due ___ – Initial response to Johnston chapters 5-8 (Discussion Board: Johnston Ch. 5-8) Due ___ Response to colleagues Week #3 Assignment (30% of your grade) Due 6/11/11 by 5:00 pm – Paper II due

Topic for Week #4 This week we will focus on understanding theoretical and practical overviews of the role of discourse in developing agency and locus of control in the individual. Week #4 Readings This weeks readings will be selected based on your contributions and questions throughout the course. These readings will be provided online and will also include web readings . Week #4 Discussions Due ___ - Initial response to readings (Discussion Board: Agency in Learning) Due ___ – Final reflection discussion prompt (Discussion Board: Final Reflections) Week #4 Assignment (20% of your grade) Due ___ by 5:00 pm – Group presentations posted online for peer review

** 20% of your grade for the course is earned through active participation and consistent attendance in the online discussions. This necessarily

Dr. Haley Woodside-Jiron, Summer 2012

Society, Stress & the Brain - 6 requires that you have done the readings on time, have thought critically about your own response to the readings, and are actively able to integrate this thinking across topics as you engage with and respond to your peers’ postings. See also Expectations section above.**

Dr. Haley Woodside-Jiron, Summer 2012

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Student Rights and Responsibilities Student Learning Accommodations: In keeping with University policy, any student with a documented disability interested in utilizing accommodations should contact ACCESS, the office of Disability Services on campus. ACCESS works with students to create reasonable and appropriate accommodations via an accommodation letter to their professors as early as possible each semester. Contact ACCESS: A170 Living/Learning Center; 802-656-7753; access@uvm.edu; www.uvm.edu/access UVM’s policy on disability certification and student support: www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/disability.pdf Religious Holidays: Students have the right to practice the religion of their choice. If you need to miss class to observe a religious holiday, please submit the dates of your absence to me in writing by the end of the second full week of classes. You will be permitted to make up work within a mutually agreed-upon time. Academic Integrity: The policy addresses plagiarism, fabrication, collusion, and cheating. www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/acadintegrity.pdf Grade Appeals: If you would like to contest a grade, please follow the procedures outlined in this policy: www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/gradeappeals.pdf Grading: For information on grading and GPA calculation, go to www.uvm.edu/academics/catalogue and click on Policies for an A-Z listing. Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities: www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/studentcode.pdf FERPA Rights Disclosure: The purpose of this policy is to communicate the rights of students regarding access to, and privacy of their student educational records as provided for in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/ferpa.pdf Final exam policy: The University final exam policy outlines expectations during final exams and explains timing and process of examination period. www.uvm.edu/academics/catalogue201011/?Page=allpolicies.php&SM=policymenu.html&policy=Examinations

Dr. Haley Woodside-Jiron, Summer 2012

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