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Intro to Formatting iBooks: Beyond the Template Syllabus

Credits: 2 Instructor: Mary Elizabeth email: mary.elizabeth@uvm.edu Meeting dates and times: Spring, 2013; Summer 2013 Location and Meeting Times To Be Determined Based on Student Schedules

Course Description:
Did you ever wish you (and your students, if youre an educator) could make your own iBooks? You can! iBooks can be an excellent tool for publishing your work, sharing with peers and colleagues, delivering or differentiating instruction, and publishing student work. This introduction to formatting documents for iBooks will help you learn the basics of creating or modifying documents to work well as iBooks in both fixed and flexible formats using Microsoft Word or Apple Pages on your own laptop. You'll leave with versions of your work in both fixed (PDF) and flexible (iBook) format and in possession of resources that will help you with future iBook formatting. As a preview, this syllabus is available in both PDF and iBook format, demonstrating some of the techniques that will be taught in the course. The instructor has extensive experience in writing with technology and design of Khigher ed. learning materials, and works as a formatting specialist for an eBook conversion service. Students must have a recent version of Microsoft Word for Mac (part of Microsoft Office, and available through the Campus licensing program http://darwin.uvm.edu/fmi/xsl/pricelists/ software_pricelist.xsl ) and Apple Pages 09 for Mac (part of Apple iWork 09 and available through the Apple Education store here: http://store.apple.com/us_edu_13781/product/MB942Z/A/iWork-09 ) and a computer on which to use it. Students must also have access to a device on which to view iBooks (iPhone, iPod, or iPad) for the duration of the class. Students should contact the instructor by email upon signing up to discuss the documents they wish to convert to iBook format as their Final Project. Students will be requested to bring extra material in case their formatting goes more quickly than anticipated.

Goals:
To introduce participants to the two main types of digital publications (fixed and flexible) and their limitations and possibilities To introduce the concept of considerate texts and the particular application of this concept to digital publications To introduce participants to the important differences between digital and print documents and digital and print document creation To provide participants with an understanding of the types of thoughtful control that can make documents more readable, better able to meet the needs of diverse audiences, and appropriate for digital format To help participants think through the process that will serve them best for creating a document that has both a print and a digital version To equip participants to format documents that will meet their expectations when they undergo eBook conversion To equip participants to prepare files to a high standard of quality for private/internal, public/ external, and/or commercial eBook publication. For course registrants to feel confident in using the course content in their work, coursework, classroom instruction, and other areas

Learning Objectives
Students will understand iBooks in terms of: the two main types of eBooks (flexible and fixed layout) the limitations and possibilities of eBook formats the similarities and differences between eBooks and print materials how to create a well-formatted iBook from a Word or Pages document how eBook creation might best be put to use in various venues, including classrooms and professional settings

Students will have the ability to perform the document formatting/technology skills of: creating well-organized and considerate texts bookmarking for creating internal document links

checking readability checking spelling and grammar choosing and applying fonts and styles to create attractive texts creating a document from an outline creating a structured document creating eBook-ready tables creating eBook-ready lists formatting eBook-ready stand-alone and wrapped images creating keyboard shortcuts hyperlinking to create both internal and external links versioning testing their iBook for quality

Students will work collaboratively to problem solve. Students will confidently adopt technological solutions for their publishing needs. Students will present their finished product and their plans for future eBooks to the class. Students who are educators will confidently addressat a minimumthe following Vermont Framework Communication Standards as applicable in their classrooms, incorporating insights, knowledge, and skills gained in this class: WRITING Writing Dimensions 1. 5 Students draft, revise, edit, and critique written products so that final drafts are appropriate in terms of the following dimensions: Purpose Intent is established and maintained within a given piece of writing. Organization The writing demonstrates order and coherence. IT Information Technology 1.17 Students use computers, telecommunications, and other tools of technology to research, to gather information and ideas, and to represent information and ideas accurately and appropriately.

Communication of Data 1.20 Students use graphs, charts, and other visual presentations to communicate data accurately and appropriately. Selection (applies to grades 5 12 only) 1.21 Students select appropriate technologies and applications to solve problems and to communicate with an audience.

Technology Requirements, Prerequisite Knowledge, and Competencies Hardware


You must have 1. a Macintosh computer with an Internet connection on which to access course readings perform formatting tasks access Dropbox SmallDog Electronics in S. Burlington rents Macs http://www.smalldog.com/ 2. an iPad, iPod on which you can read iBooks, or iPhonewhichever equipment you have, you will need to have continual access to through the duration of the course

Software
It is important that you have the designated software so that you will easily be able to participate in the class. MacPages 2009 for Mac (http://store.apple.com/us_edu_13781/product/MB942Z/A/ iWork-09 ) Microsoft Word for Mac 2011 Campus licensing program for Microsoft: http:// darwin.uvm.edu/fmi/xsl/pricelists/software_pricelist.xsl ) Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded for free from the app store or iTunes. Adobe Digital Editions, which can be downloaded from http://www.adobe.com/ap/ products/digitaleditions/ Dropbox, a free program for transferring large files https://www.dropbox.com/install iBooks, which can be downloaded for free from the app store or iTunes. If you already have iBooks, make sure that you have the most recent version that works on your

device, as well as the latest version of the device operating system, available by plugging your device into your computer with iTunes on it.

Files
When the course begins, the material you are planning to make into an iBook must be in either Microsoft Word or Pages format. Your choice must be discussed with the instructor prior to the course to make sure that it will work well. Keep in mind that your work will be shared with everyone in the class as you consider the document(s) you might prepare for conversion. Students should be aware of the UVM policies regarding Student Rights and Responsibilities as they apply to written material and interactions with others: http://www.uvm.edu/policies/student/studentcode.pdf

Competencies
Students must be readily familiar with operating the computer they will be using for the course, and well versed in the word processing program that they have chosen to use during the course. It is expected that students who either dont have Macs or have Macs but dont use Pages will not be familiar with Pages. Electronic Submissions/Internet Use: Students will use the Internet to: Stay in touch with the instructor and other students Access course readings Submit their projects to the instructor and access the instructors comments.

General Course Information Course Policies:


PREREQUISITE SKILLS Students are expected to have word processing skills. If anyone wishing to take this class does not have these skills, a pre-class meeting with the instructor may be arranged to familiarize the student with the necessary basics. If you are in this situation, please contact the instructor as soon as you sign up. Students should also familiarize themselves with the operation of Dropbox.There is a Getting Started pdf in your Dropbox folder. ATTENDANCE EXPECTATIONS Attendance at every class session is required. If a student has a valid excuse that keeps her or him from class, the class may be made up by one or more online meetings with the instructor.

CLASSROOM CONDUCT Students and faculty are expected to prepare for class, be ready to start on-time, and participate in all activities and discussions. They are expected to treat others with respect and to use their own knowledge and experience to expand upon, support, or (civilly) question others observations and insights, providing opportunities for crossdisciplinary fertilization. They are expected to maintain an atmosphere appropriate to an academic undertaking. ACADEMIC HONESTY AND PROFESSIONALISM The Code of Academic Integrity is in place to encourage everyone in the community to reach their highest potential and respect the work of others. Offenses against the Code of Academic Integrity are deemed serious and compromise the integrity of the entire academic community. Any suspected violations of the Code are taken very seriously and will be forwarded to the Center for Student Ethics & Standards for further intervention. Academic integrity as applied to iBook creation means that students will either be the creator of the material they put into an iBook, use work that is in the public domain (ideally, with documentation) or have the copyright holders permission in writing for the use of the material. To read the Code of Academic Integrity and learn more about the Center for Student Ethics and Standards, visit their website at: http://www.uvm.edu/ cses/?Page=ah.html&SM=ahmenu.html ACCOMMODATIONS Accommodations will be provided to eligible students with disabilities in accordance with the UVM Policy on Disability Certification and Support - Students: http://www.uvm.edu/ ~uvmppg/ppg/student/disability.pdf . Please obtain an accommodation letter from the ACCESS office and see one of the instructors prior to the course to discuss what accommodations will be necessary. If you are unfamiliar with ACCESS, visit their website at http://www.uvm.edu/access to learn more about the services they provide. ACESS: A-170 Living Learning Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405. PH: 802-656-7753, TTY: call 711 (relay), Fax: 802-656-0739, Email: access@uvm.edu, Instant Messenger: UVMaccess. General office hours: 8:30am 4:30pm Monday through Friday. Call to make an appointment. RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS Students have the right to practice their chosen religion. Students should contact the instructor prior to the beginning of the course to advise her of documented religious holidays that fall within the period of the course, and arrangements will be made for the student to make up the work. Students should be aware of the UVM policies regarding Student Rights and Responsibilities, found here: http://www.uvm.edu/policies/student/studentcode.pdf

Required readings:
N.B. Besides the instructional material created by the instructor, which will be used throughout the course, all the readings for the course are in digital form. These readings provide background for Day 1 and must be read prior to the beginning of the course. Students will be assigned to lead sections of the discussion on Day 1.
Preparatory Readings (Be prepared to discuss these on Monday.) eBooks vs. Print Books Cancio, C. (2011) Are e-readers making books obsolete? Coeus. (n.d.) eBooks Vs. Paper Books: The Pros and Cons McCaskey, C. (2011) E-Reader Pros & Cons Meyers, C. (2011) Linking in eBooks: How much is too much? Scott, H. (2011) Now You Can Doodle in Google eBooks Wasshuber, C. (n.d.) Pros and Cons of eBooks eBooks in Education ArtInstitutes.edu. (2011) The Pros and Cons of E-Textbooks Barbetta, P. M. and Spears-Bunton, L. A. (2007) Learning to Write: Technology for Students with Disabilities in Secondary Inclusive Classrooms Horowitz, A. (2011) Will the E-Book Kill the Footnote? Schuetze, C. F. (2011) Textbooks Finally Take a Big Leap to Digital Weber, C. L. and Cavanaugh, T. W. (2006) Promoting Reading: Using eBooks with Gifted and Advanced Readers McCleod, J. (n.d.) Pros & Cons of E-Books For Kids Abel, Scott (2012) Consumers Will Punish Publishers for Poor Quality eBooks Costa, D. (2011) Nook, Kindle, and The Perils of Lock-In Matte, E. (n.d.) The Pros and Cons of DRM in E-Books Anderson, T. H. and Armbruster, B. B. (1984) Content Area Textbooks Duarte, Nancy (2008) slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations - Placement of Elements Creates Meaning, Typsetting pp. 9293; 146149 Johnson, J. (2010) Designing with the Mind in Mind: Simple Guide to Understanding User Interface Design Rules - Reading is Unnatural pp. 3347 Lidwell, W., Holden K., and Butler J.(2003) Universal Principles of Design: 100 ways to Enhance Usability, Influence Perception, Increase Appeal, Make Better Design decisions, and Teach through Design - Hierarchy; Redundancy pp. 104105; 166167 Mary Elizabeth (2012) Painless Speaking, 2nd ed. How Texts Make Meaning pp. 106110 About.com-Desktop Publishing (n.d.) How to Choose an Ideal Line Length for Text and How Long Should a Line Be? Mary Elizabeth (1992). Seeing the UnseenImaging in the Reading Experience, pp. 623. Poe, E. A. (1847) Tale-Writing: A Review (of Nathaniel Hawthorne) http:// www.eldritchpress.org/nh/nhpoe2.html Virginia Libraries (2000) The Story of Read Aloud Virginia. PadWorx Digital Media versions of Dracula and A Christmas Carol http://www.mediabistro.com/appnewser/free-apps-dracula-and-a-christmascarol_b23743

eBooks and Children eBooks and Format

Considerate Texts Design

The Act of Reading

Sample Reading Experiences

Readings for Second Class Text Layout Reading and Rereading Cognitive Load Project Dyslexie (2012) Text Layout http://www.studiostudio.nl/tekstopmaak/ Nabokov, V. (published 1980) Good Readers and Good Writers from Lectures on LIterature. DeStefano, D., LeFevre, J. (2005) Cognitive load in hyptertext reading: A review in Computers in Human Behavior. [Read only Abstract and sections 1 and 4] Kallinen, K. (2002). Reading news from a pocket computer in a distracting environment: effects of the tempo of background music in Computers in Human Behavior. [Read only Abstract, 6.3, and 7] Lewis, C. S. (1961) On Myth from An Experiment in Criticism. Cambridge University Press. pp. 4043 Lemari, J., Eyrolle, H., Cellier, J-M. (2006). Visual signals in text comprehension: How to restore them when oralizing a text via a speech synthesis? in Computers in Human Behavior. [Read only Abstract, and sections 1 and 7]

Background Music

Myth Audio only

Student Evaluation/Assessment
GRADING: Each percentage contribution (see below) is equivalent to that number of points. (100% = 100 points) TOTAL POINTS: 100 94-100 points A 90-93 points A87-89 points B+ 84-86 points B 80-83 points B76-79 points C 70-75 points D below 70 points F FORMAT FOR EXPECTED WORK: Students will submit: the completed version of the Formatting Practice Documents, along with a pdf version and an EPUB (iBook) version and a presentation to the class on their exploration of an iPad book app with a rubric for actions/thoughts while reading. Through discussion, we may come up with refinements. will both count as part of in-class discussion/participation.

an original document or documents in Microsoft Word or Apple Pages format that has been prepared for eBook conversion, along with a pdf version and an ePUB version and a rationale for the choices made in treatment of the document a document in Pages, PDF, and ePUB that explains key points of making iBooks, with illustrative screenshots. PERCENTAGE CONTRIBUTION OF EACH ASSIGNMENT: Class Discussion and Participation (including iPad project report and practice document formatting) 33% Explanation of How to Make eBooks: Original Document, along with PDF and ePUB versions 33% Final Project: Original Document or Documents along with PDF and ePUB versions 33% The UVM Policy on Grade Appeals is available here: http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/ student/gradeappeals.pdf The UVM Policy on FERPA Rights Disclosure communicates the rights of students regarding access to, and privacy of, their student educational records as provided for in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act: http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/ ferpa.pdf

SCORING RUBRICS: CLASS DISCUSSION AND PARTICIPATION Class participation will make up 33% of your grade, and will be judged using the following criteria:
Category Readings Prepared and Thoughtfully Discussed Outside of Readings, Points Raised are Appropriate, Expressed Clearly, of Value to Community Finalized formatting of Sherlock and Ben Franklin documents (Wild Turkey and Sole Survivor for extra credit) 1 Point Readings not completed and the impact for practice not considered. 3 Points Readings rarely completed and/or impact for practice barely considered. 6 Points Readings sometimes completed and/or impact for practice somewhat considered. Sometimes raises pertinent issues and provides information to extend the classs understanding in a clear, respectful manner. The greater portion of the iBooks are geared for the reader, and the decisions of when and how to introduce elements that interrupt reading were mostly carefully thought out and analyzed for value. Self-observation moderately careful and somewhat completely analyzed. 8.25 Points Readings completed and integrated into practice.

Virtually never raises pertinent issues or provides information to extend the classs understanding in a clear, respectful manner. The iBooks do not demonstrate consideration for the reader and the decisions of when and how to introduce elements that interrupt reading were not carefully thought out and/or not analyzed for value.

Rarely raises pertinent issues or provides information to extend the classs understanding in a clear, respectful manner. The iBooks show some attempts to take the reader into account and the decisions of when and how to introduce elements that interrupt reading were somewhat carefully thought out and/or analyzed for value. Self-observation completed, but not carefully observed or analyzed.

Consistently raises pertinent issues and provides information to extend the classs understanding and does so in a clear, respectful manner.

The iBooks demonstrate a good understanding of ways in which the reader can be assisted by document formatting and interruptions are wellconsidered and.thoughtfully analyzed.

iPad Self-observation Presentation not completed.

Self-observation completed using careful observation, and thoroughly analyzed.

HOW TO MAKE iBOOKS DOCUMENT Your instructional document in 3 formats accounts for 33% of your grade and will be judged using the following criteria:
Element Contents 1 Point Document fails to cover the material taught in class. Fails to meet the assignment in serious ways. Many issues are not identified 4 Points Document covers only some points. 7 Points Document covers most points. 11 Points Every point is addressed. Every point is addressed. All issues are identified or formatting and content are impeccable, so there is nothing to remark on.

Formatting Instructions Followed iBook carefully checked

Only some points are Most points are addressed. addressed. Some issues are not identified. Most issues are identified.

FINAL PROJECT Your final project accounts for 33% of your grade and will be judged using the following criteria:
Element Formatting Instructions Followed iBook carefully checked 1 Point Fails to meet the assignment in serious ways. Many issues are not identified 4 Points 7 Points 11 Points Every point is addressed. All issues are identified or formatting and content are impeccable, so there is nothing to remark on. The iBook demonstrates a good understanding of ways in which the reader can be assisted by document formatting and interruptions are well-considered and.thoughtfully analyzed.

Only some points are Most points are addressed. addressed. Some issues are not identified. Most issues are identified.

Considerate Document and Insightful Analysis of Issues

The iBook does not demonstrate consideration for the reader and the decisions of when and how to introduce elements that interrupt reading were not carefully thought out and/or not analyzed for value.

The iBook shows some attempts to take the reader into account and the decisions of when and how to introduce elements that interrupt reading were somewhat carefully thought out and/or analyzed for value.

Most of the iBook is geared for the reader, and the decisions of when and how to introduce elements that interrupt reading were mostly carefully thought out and analyzed for value.

Instructional Sequence:
Date Topics

Day 1 eBooks, Their Capabilities and Limitations

eBooks vs. Print Books eBooks in Education eBooks and Children eBooks and Format Considerate Text Design The Act of Reading pt. 1

Day 2 Preparing Documents for iBook Conversion 1

The Act of Reading pt. 2 Efferent vs. Informational Text Human/Computer Interaction Literature vs. Myth Walk Through the Template - Apple Template Walk Through the Template - Class Template The 4 iBook Creation Methods Work on sample documents in Apple Pages and analyze the results in iBook. Presentations on iPad app analysis. Work on sample documents Apple Pages and analyze the results in iBook.

Day 3 Preparing Documents for iBook Conversion 2

Day 4 Preparing Documents for iBook Conversion 3 July Work on sample documents Apple Pages and analyze the results in iBook. Day 5 Preparing Document on iBook Conversion Day 6 Presentation of Projects

Work on document to record iBook Conversion Process.