6

Homemade Biodiesel 
This booklet is free and can be freely distributed 

Darren Wood  Friday, 5 May 2006 

T able of Contents 
Introduction  Golden Rules  Get stuck in “The old Blender Method”  Biodiesel Facts  Three Choices  Using Biodiesel  How to build your first Biodiesel reactor  Making Biodiesel  Finally  1  2  3  5  8  13  15  29  39

ii 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S

Introduction 
This is a quick description of the purpose of this  booklet and why I’ve prepared it. 
The purpose of booklet is to outline some of the procedures and equipment needed for  home  biofuel  production  and  usage.  It  is  a  compilation  of  information  readily  available  from the  web in a compressed form. You’re basically getting all the juicy bits it’s taken  me  a  while  to  find  on  the  web.  All  content  is  published  with  open  source  or  by  the  author’s direct  consent.  If  you  do  chose  to  pass  this information  on please  make  sure  you maintain any author’s references.  Mr.  Rudolf  Diesel  at  the  1898  Paris  Exhibition  showed  a  compression  ignition  engine  designed by him that ran on peanut oil, his vision was one of regular people producing  their own fuel from biomass (like vege oil) as a source of power for transportation, thus  removing their reliance on large companies for fuel. (Ah, if only!!)  In  a later 1912  speech,  Rudolf  Diesel  said,  "the  use  of  vegetable  oils  for  engine  fuels  may  seem  insignificant  today,  but  such  oils  may  become,  in  the  course  of  time,  as  important as petroleum and the coal­tar products of the present time."  Seem a little prophetic? With the cost of pump diesel at around $1.23 this seems like an  attractive option.  Today in New Zealand this could be a workable reality. Co­operatives are the way to go  and mostly rural NZ could really benefit from this.  The information contained in this booklet is compiled from a variety of sources all of it is  free  information  and  there  are  no  secrets  in  biodiesel  production  as  the  basic  transesterification process has been known for years.  The following processes are straight forward and relatively easy, but there are 3 things to  remember when doing any of the small processes below; 

Safety     Safety    Safety 
OK copy in this booklet is either copied from free websites or my own so no copyrights  here!!!

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Golden Rules (never to be broken) 
Always wear your safety equipment  Never have Children or Pets nearby  Always have proper ventilation for your  experiments  Never Breath the fumes  Always have a tap with running water nearby or a  hose pipe  If you spill anything stop what you are doing and  turn everything off and clean it up  Wash any chemicals that come into contact with  your skin immediately  Always apply common sense when using these  highly corrosive chemicals, take care of you and  yours.  If you are worried and think anything is unsafe  then don’t do it.

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Old Blender Method 
Sounds  silly  I  know  but  this  is  probably  the  best  demonstration  of  how  the  process  works, you will need the following  1.  1.5 litre used glass blender with lid (cannot be used for food afterwards EVER!)  2.  1 pair of full length safety gloves  3.  1 Pair of safety goggles  4.  1 litre of fresh cooking oil (Canola is my favorite)  5.  200ml of pure Methanol  6.  3.5grams of Caustic soda (Sodium hydroxide RD1 sell it but keep it sealed until  you need it)  7.  Thermometer (again not to be used for anything else again)  Right then All set? Got everything ? Good then lets get cracking (do this in your garage  or workshop as you don’t want the kids or Pets anywhere near these chemicals)  Put on your gloves and safety goggles.  Warm  the  oil  to  50  degrees  Celsius  (Check  with  thermometer  this  won’t  take  long  so  watch it)  Whilst warming the oil put the Methanol in the blender and add the Caustic soda (only  3.5 GRAMS) do this quickly as caustic soda tends to absorb moisture very quickly and  mix on a low speed for 2 minutes or so. This reaction produces heat so make sure the  blender is a glass one.  Add the oil to the blender with the methanol caustic soda mix in it.  Blend on a medium speed (Remember we don’t want any spillage) for about 15mins or  so.  You can then leave the solution to settle in the blender (It shouldn’t take more than an  hour)

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

You should end up with to different colored liquids a light on top the other darker and at  the bottom. If you did

well done! you just made biodiesel!!! (the top lighter bit)

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Biodiesel Facts 
The following is taken form the Journey to forever site and I have left the links to that site  intact in the word (.doc) form of this document  “Biodiesel is much cleaner than fossil­fuel diesel ("dinodiesel"). It can be used in any  diesel engine with no need for modifications ­­ in fact diesel engines run better and  last longer with biodiesel. And it can easily be made from a common waste product ­  ­ used cooking oil.
· · · · · · ·

· · · ·

·

·

·

Biodiesel fuel burns up to 75% cleaner than conventional diesel fuel made  from fossil fuels Biodiesel substantially reduces unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide  and particulate matter in exhaust fumes Sulphur dioxide emissions are eliminated (biodiesel contains no sulphur) Biodiesel is plant­based and adds no CO2 to the atmosphere The ozone­forming potential of biodiesel emissions is nearly 50% less than  conventional diesel fuel Nitrous oxide (NOx) emissions may increase or decrease but can be reduced  to well below conventional diesel fuel levels by adjusting engine timing Biodiesel exhaust is not offensive and doesn't cause eye irritation (it smells  like French fries!) (Or donuts or sausages depends on the source really had  KFC once!) Biodiesel is environmentally friendly: it is renewable, "more biodegradable  than sugar and less toxic than table salt" (US National Biodiesel Board) Biodiesel can be used in any diesel engine Fuel economy is the same as conventional diesel fuel Biodiesel is a much better lubricant than conventional diesel fuel and extends  engine life ­­ a German truck won an entry in the Guinness Book of Records  by travelling more than 1.25 million km (780,000 miles) on biodiesel with its  original engine (this is an important bit to remember) Biodiesel has a high cetane rating, which improves engine performance: 20%  biodiesel added to conventional diesel fuel improves the cetane rating 3  points, making it a Premium fuel Biodiesel can be mixed with ordinary diesel fuel in any proportion ­­ even a  small amount of biodiesel means cleaner emissions and better engine  lubrication: 1% biodiesel will increase lubricity by 65%  (Another important  one) Biodiesel can be produced from any fat or vegetable oil, including waste  cooking oil. 

See the National Biodiesel Board's complete evaluation of biodiesel emissions and  potential health effects, in accordance with the most stringent emissions testing  protocols ever required by the US EPA (Acrobat file, 40 kb):

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

http://www.biodiesel.org/pdf_files/emissions.PDF  Summary:
· · · · ·

The overall ozone (smog) forming potential of biodiesel is almost 50% less  than diesel fuel. Sulfur emissions are eliminated. Substantial reductions of unburned hydrocarbons (­93%), carbon monoxide (­  50%), and particulate matter (­30%). Biodiesel NOx emissions can be efficiently eliminated as a concern. Substantial reductions of cancer­causing PAH (­80%) and nitrited PAH  compounds (­90%). 

Diesel emissions and cancer 
According to a U.S. Department of Energy study completed at the University of  California at Davis, the use of pure biodiesel instead of petroleum­based diesel fuel  could offer a 93.6% reduction in cancer risks from exhaust emissions exposure.  The study, "Chemical and Bioassay Analyses of Diesel and Biodiesel Particulate  Matter", 1996, used a 1995 Dodge 3/4 ton pickup truck with a 5.9­litre Cummins B  Turbo diesel and tested 100% ethyl ester of rapeseed oil (REE), 100% diesel 2­D  low­sulfur fuel and blends of 20% REE and 50% REE with the 2­D diesel fuel. An  EPA test cycle was followed throughout. In test after test the study found the highest  risk came from 100% diesel fuel, followed by the 20% REE blend, the 50% REE  blend and, lowest risk, the pure biodiesel.  "Use of the 100% REE fuel produced the lowest genotoxic (DNA­damaging) activity  in the tests. Blended fuels in the non­catalyst­equipped engine produced less  emissions than emissions than the 100% diesel fuel... The use of the 100% REE fuel  resulted in the lowest emissions compared to the REE blends and 100% diesel fuels.  "The highest relative specific mass mutagenic activity collected during either the hot  or cold test cycles was the particulate matter collected from the 100% diesel fuel  emissions... The lowest relative specific mass mutagenic activity was from the  particulate matter collected from emissions of l00% REE fuel."  NOTE: There's nothing special about ethyl ester of rapeseed oil biodiesel, other  types of biodiesel have similar results.

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Chemical and Bioassay Analyses of Diesel and Biodiesel Particulate Matter:  Pilot Study ­­ Final Report by Norman Y. Kado, Robert A. Okamoto and Paul A.  Kuzmicky, Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis,  California, November 1996. Acrobat file, 3.1Mb.  UC Davis biodiesel study ­­ summary: the Summary, Results and Discussion  sections of the report, in html format. 

Greenhouse effect 
Using vegetable oils or animal fats as fuel for motor vehicles is in effect running them  on solar energy. All biofuels, including ethanol, are derived from the conversion of  sunlight to energy (carbohydrates) that takes place in the green leaves of plants.  Plants take up carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere; burning plant (or animal)  products in an engine releases the CO2 uptake back into the atmosphere, to be  taken up again by other plants. The CO2 is recycled, atmospheric CO2 levels remain  constant. Thus biofuels do not increase the Greenhouse Effect ­­ unlike fossil fuels,  which release large amounts of new (or rather very old) CO2 which has been locked  away from the atmosphere for aeons.  In fact biodiesel can actually reduce CO2 levels in the atmosphere: growing  soybeans consumes nearly four times as much CO2 as the amount of CO2  produced in the exhaust from soybean oil biodiesel. 

Energy efficiency 
According to a comparative life­cycle study by the US Department of Energy's  National Renewable Energy Laboratory, biodiesel requires only 0.31 units of fossil  energy to make 1 unit of fuel.  (An Overview of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Life Cycles)  http://www.ott.doe.gov/biofuels/docs/lifecycle.html  "By contrast, it takes 1.2 units of fossil resources to produce 1 unit of petroleum  diesel," the study says.  We wonder what the energy efficiency figures for biodiesel would be if fossil fuels  were eliminated from the equation and the entire production process powered by  biofuels, from planting the seeds to filling the tank?

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Three choices 
There are at least three ways to run a diesel engine on bio­power, using vegetable  oils, animal fats or both. All three work with both fresh and used oils.
· · ·

Use the waste oill just as it is ­­ usually called SVO fuel (straight vegetable  oil); (means converting your car) Mix it with kerosene (paraffin) or diesel fuel, or with biodiesel; (can still clog  injectors) Convert it to biodiesel. (Best choice and has worked for me for over 12  months) 

The first two methods sound easiest, but, as so often in life, it's not quite that simple. 

Biodiesel 
Biodiesel has some clear advantages over SVO: it works in any diesel, without any  conversion or modifications to the engine or the fuel system ­­ just put it in and go. It  also has better cold­weather properties than SVO (but not as good as petro­diesel ­­  see Using biodiesel in winter). And, unlike SVO, it's backed by many long­term  tests in many countries, including millions of miles on the road.  Biodiesel is a clean, safe, ready­to­use, alternative fuel, whereas it's fair to say that  SVO systems are mostly still experimental and need further development.  On the other hand, biodiesel can be more expensive, depending what you make it  from and whether you're comparing it with new or used oil (and where you live). And,  unlike SVO, it has to be processed ­­ you have to make it. But the large and rapidly  growing worldwide band of homebrewers don't seem to mind ­­ they make a supply  every week or once a month and soon get used to it. Many have been doing it for  years.  And anyway, you have to process SVO too, especially WVO (waste vegetable oil,  used, cooked), which many people with SVO systems use because it's cheap or free  for the taking. WVO has to be filtered and dewatered, and probably should be  deacidified.  Biodieselers say, "Well, if I'm going to have to do all that I might just as well make  biodiesel instead." But SVO types scoff at that ­­ it's much less processing than  making biodiesel, they say. To each his own I prefer the fact that I can run it in my  engine without modifying my vehicle.  x  Needs  Guaranteed  Engine  Cheaper processing trouble­free conversion 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Biodiesel  SVO/WVO 

Yes  Less 

Yes  No 

No  Yes 

Sometimes  Usually 

Costs and prices: Biodieselers using waste oil feedstock say they can make  biodiesel for 60 cents US per gallon or less. Most people use about 600 gallons of  fuel a year (about 10 gallons a week) ­­ say US$360 a year. An SVO system costs  from $300 to $1,200 or more. So with an SVO system you'll be ahead in a year or  two, which is not a long time in the life of a diesel motor. But will it last as long with  SVO? Too soon to tell. Probably, if you use a good system. 

Biodiesel 
Converting the oil to biodiesel is probably the best of the three options (or we think  so anyway).  Most major European vehicle manufacturers now provide vehicle warranties  covering the use of pure biodiesel ­­ though that might not be just any biodiesel.  Some insist on "RME", rapeseed methyl esters, and won't cover soy biodiesel in the  US, but this seems to be more a trade­related issue than a quality­control one.  Germany has more than 1,500 filling stations supplying biodiesel, and it's cheaper  than ordinary diesel fuel. It's widely used in France, the world's largest producer.  Virtually all fossil diesel fuel sold in France contains between 2% and 5% biodiesel.  New EU laws will soon require this Europe­wide. Some states in the US are  legislating similar requirements. There's a growing number of US suppliers.  Biodiesel is more expensive than ordinary diesel in the US but sales are rising very  fast and prices will drop in time. In the UK biodiesel is taxed less than petrodiesel  and it's available commercially.  But there's a lot to be said for the GREAT feeling of independence you'll get from  making your own fuel (and it's more than just a feeling ­­ it's real!).  If you want to make it yourself, there are several good recipes available for making  high­quality biodiesel, and they all say what we also say: some of these chemicals  are dangerous, take full safety precautions, and if you burn/maim/blind/kill yourself or  anyone else, that will make us very sad, but not liable ­­ we don't recommend  anything, it's nobody's responsibility but your own.  On the other hand, a lot of people are doing it ­­ it's safe if you're careful and  sensible. "Sensible" also mean not over­reacting, as some people do: "I'd like to  make biodiesel but I'm frightened of all those terrible poisons." In fact they're  common enough household chemicals. Lye is sold in supermarkets and hardware  stores as a drain­cleaner, there's probably a can of it under the sink in most  households. Methanol is the main or only ingredient in barbecue fuel or fondue fuel,

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

sold in supermarkets and chain stores as "stove fuel" and used at the dinner table;  it's also the main ingredient in the fuel kids use in their model aero engines. So get it  in perspective, no need to be frightened. See Safety for further information. Learn as  much as you can first ­­ lots of information is available. Make small test batches  before you try large batches (see also Test­batch mini­processor). Make it with  fresh oil before you try waste oil. 

What's next? 
Learn. You have some decisions to make. It's all quite simple really, thousands of  people are doing it, very few of them are chemists or technicians, and there's  nothing a layman can't understand, and do, and do it well. But there is quite a lot to  learn. You should find everything you need to know on the web or at this address  http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel_make.html#biodnew#biodnew  Start off with the simplest process that has the best chance of success and move on  step by step in a logical progression, adding more advanced features 

The Process 
Vegetable oils and animal fats are triglycerides, containing glycerine. The biodiesel  process turns the oils into esters, separating out the glycerine. The glycerine sinks to  the bottom and the biodiesel floats on top and can be syphoned off.  The process is called transesterification, which substitutes alcohol for the glycerine  in a chemical reaction, using lye as a catalyst.  We use methanol to make methyl esters. We'd rather use ethanol because most  methanol comes from fossil fuels (though it can also be made from biomass, such as  wood), while ethanol is plant­based and you can distill it yourself, but the biodiesel  process is more complicated with ethanol. (See Ethyl esters.)  Ethanol (or ethyl alcohol, grain alcohol ­­ EtOH, C2H5OH) also goes by various other  well­known names, such as whisky, vodka, gin, and so on, but methanol is a deadly  poison: first it blinds you, then it kills you, and it doesn't take very much of it. It takes  a couple of hours, and if you can get treatment fast enough you might survive. (But  don't be put off ­­ it's easy to do this safely. Safety is built­in to everything you'll read  here.)  Methanol is also called methyl alcohol, wood alcohol, wood naphtha, wood spirits,  methyl hydrate (or "stove fuel"), carbinol, colonial spirits, Columbian spirits,  Manhattan spirits, methylol, methyl hydroxide, hydroxymethane,  monohydroxymethane, pyroxylic spirit, or MeOH (CH3OH or CH4O) ­­ all the same
10 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

thing. (But, confusingly, "methylcarbinol" or "methyl carbinol" is used for both  methanol and ethanol.) In the US you can usually get it at race tracks.  Methylated spirits (denatured alcohol) doesn't work; isopropyl alcohol (rubbing  alcohol) also doesn't work.  The lye catalyst can be either sodium hydroxide (caustic soda, NaOH) or potassium  hydroxide (KOH), which is easier to use, and it can provide a potash fertilizer as a  by­product. Sodium hydroxide is often easier to get and it's cheaper to use. If you  use potassium hydroxide, the process is the same, but you need to use 1.4 times as  much. (See More about lye.) You can get KOH from soapmakers' suppliers and  from chemicals suppliers. Other chemicals, such as isopropyl alcohol (isopropanol)  for titration, are available from chemicals suppliers. 
CAUTION: 

Lye (both NaOH and KOH) is dangerous ­­ don't get it on your skin or in your eyes,  don't breathe any fumes, keep the whole process away from food, and right away  from children. Lye reacts with aluminum, tin and zinc. Use glass, enamel, stainless  steel or HDPE (High­Density Polyethylene) containers for methoxide. (See  Identifying plastics.) 

Biodiesel from waste oil 
This is the most appealing answer but is more difficult. 

First, check for water content. Used oil often has some water in it, and water in the  oil will interfere with the lye, especially if you use too much lye, and you'll end up with  jelly. Test first for water content ­­ heat half a litre or so in a saucepan on the stove  and monitor the temperature with a thermometer. If there's water in it it will start to  "snap, crackle and pop" by 50 deg C (120 deg F) or less. If it's still not crackling by  60 deg C (140 deg F) there's no need to dewater it.  Waste oil needs more catalyst than new oil to neutralize the Free Fatty Acids (FFAs)  formed in cooking the oil, which interfere with the transesterification process.  You have to titrate the oil to determine the FFA content and how much lye will be  required to neutralize it. This means determining the pH ­­ the acid­alkaline level  (pH7 is neutral, lower values are increasingly acidic, higher than 7 is alkaline). An  electronic pH meter is best, but you can also use pH test strips (or litmus paper), or  phenolphthalein solution (from a chemicals supplier).  Dissolve 1 gm of lye in 1 litre of distilled water (0.1% lye solution). In a smaller
11 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

beaker, dissolve 1 ml of the cooled oil in 10 ml of pure isopropyl alcohol. Warm the  beaker gently by standing it in some hot water, stir until all the oil dissolves in the  alcohol and turns clear. Add 2 drops of phenolphthalein solution.  Using a graduated syringe, add 0.1% lye solution drop by drop to the oil­alcohol­  phenolphthalein solution, stirring all the time, until the solution starts to turn pink and  stays that way for 10 seconds. Take the number of millilitres of 0.1% lye solution you  used and add 3.5. This is the number of grams of lye you'll need per litre of oil. 

First titration took 6 ml of 0.1% lye solution(not very good oil), so we used 6 + 3.5 =  9.5 grams of lye per litre of oil: 95 grams for 10 litres.  Then proceed as with new oil: measure out the lye and mix it with the methanol to  make sodium methoxide ­­ it will get even hotter and take longer to mix, as there's  more lye this time. Make sure the lye is completely dissolved in the methanol.  Carefully add the sodium methoxide to the warmed oil while stirring, and mix for an  hour. Settle overnight, then syphon off the biodiesel. 

Washing 
Biodiesel should be washed to remove soap, catalyst and other impurities. Some  people insist on it, others don't and argue that the small amounts of impurities cause  no engine damage.  We recommend washing it. In fact we insist on it ­­ good­quality biodiesel must be  washed.”  Right this is where I’m going to jump in, water washing is a 2 edged sword if you use  water washing firstly you are removing soaps etc which is good but you are adding  time and moisture to your fuel which is bad and a pain as you have to then dry it by  gentle heating or settling for a long time.  Personally I use it unwashed and have had no issues as it filtered down to one  micron before it goes in my tank. I’m currently playing with dry washing and water  washing in combination and this is producing some excellent result buts but more  about that on the www.gobionz.com website when it’s finished.  http://www.gobionz.com

12 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Using biodiesel 
You don't have to convert the engine to run it on biodiesel, but you do need to make  some adjustments and check a few things.  Petro­diesel leaves a lot of dirt in the tank and the fuel system. Biodiesel is a good  solvent ­­ it tends to free the dirt and clean it out. Be sure to check the fuel filters  regularly at first. Start off with a new fuel filter.  Check there are no natural rubber parts in the fuel system. If there are, replace  them. Viton is best.  See Biodiesel and your vehicle 

Safety 
Wear proper protective gloves, apron, and eye protection and do not inhale any  vapors. Methanol can cause blindness and death, and you don't even have to drink  it, it's absorbed through the skin. Sodium hydroxide can cause severe burns and  death. Together these two chemicals form sodium methoxide. This is an extremely  caustic chemical. These are dangerous chemicals ­­ treat them as such! Gloves  should be chemical­proof with cuffs that can be pulled up over long sleeves ­­ no  shorts or sandals. Always have running water handy when working with them. The  workspace must be thoroughly ventilated. No children or pets allowed.  Organic vapor cartridge respirators are more or less useless against methanol  vapors. Professional advice is not to use organic vapor cartridges for longer than a  few hours maximum, or not to use them at all. Only a supplied­air system will do  (SCBA ­­ Self­Contained Breathing Apparatus).  The best advice is not to expose yourself to the fumes in the first place. The main  danger is when the methanol is hot ­­ when it's cold or at "room temperature" it  fumes very little, and this is easily avoided. Don't use "open" reactors ­­ biodiesel  processors should be closed to the atmosphere, with no fumes escaping. All  methanol containers should be kept tightly closed anyway to prevent water  absorption from the air.  We transfer methanol from its container to the methoxide mixing container by  pumping it, with no exposure at all. This is easily arranged, and an ordinary  aquarium air­pump will do (the same one you use for washing the biodiesel). The  methoxide is mixed like this ­­ Methoxide the easy way, which also happens to be  the safe way. The mixture gets quite hot at first, but the container is kept closed and  no fumes escape. When mixed, the methoxide is again pumped into the (closed)

13 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

biodiesel processor with the aquarium air­pump ­­ there's no exposure to fumes, and  it's added slowly, which is optimal for the process and also for safety. 

Once again, making biodiesel is safe if you're careful and sensible. "Sensible" also  mean not over­reacting, as some people do: "I'd like to make biodiesel but I'm  frightened of all those terrible poisons." In fact they're common enough household  chemicals. Lye is sold in supermarkets and hardware stores as a drain­cleaner,  there's probably a can of it under the sink in most households. Methanol is the main  or only ingredient in barbecue fuel or fondue fuel, sold in supermarkets and chain  stores as "stove fuel" and used at the dinner table; it's also the main ingredient in the  fuel kids use in their model aero engines. So get it in perspective: be careful with  these chemicals ­­ with ALL chemicals ­­ but there's no need to be frightened of  them.”  OK had enough reading? The next part I’ll cover the “Building a Reactor” part and list  some of the things I have done and where I’m planning to go with my reactor.

14 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

How to build your first Biodiesel reactor 
OK now the really fun bit 
Right, there are many ways to approach this but there are 2 designs that stand out  for simplicity and the first (and my favorite as it recycles old drums) is this one.  These specs for reactors are guidelines as everyone has there own ideas. So take  what you need from them and add them to your own designs.  I did I have a very weird set­up that is similar but again different from both. It  depends on what you have at hand and how much time and  money you can invest!  Read this first  http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel_processor.html#intro 

“How to make a cone­bottomed processor” 
Maybe the best thing (the only good thing?) about fossil­fuel  petroleum is that it comes in 55­gallon oil drums, which duly  become empty, and magically transform themselves into the  worldwide mainstay of appropriate technology and do­it­  yourself tinkering. And of backyard biodiesel­making ­­ the  perfect mixing vessel.  Well, almost perfect. They need a bottom drain, and for  perfection the drain should be at the end of a cone, replacing  the flat bottom of the drum.  Here's how to make a cone bottom for your 55­gal oil drum  biodiesel mixer. 

Mike Pelly's cone­bottomed  55­gal drum reactor

You need cutting gear to cut out the drum bottom and cut the cone to shape from a  piece of flat steel sheeting, and welding equipment to join up the cone and weld it to  the bottom edge of the drum.  The problems tend to arise when drawing out the shape of the cone­to­be on flat  steel. Trial­and­error doesn't work very well, usually leading to a lot of annoying  grinding to make it fit, or a botched job, wasted steel and wasted time and effort.  This is how to get it right.  You'll also need a calculator and a big compass. 
15 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

If you don't have a compass big enough to draw the circle you'll need, you can  improvise one from a steel nail, a felt­tip marker pen and some cord that won't  stretch, or better, thin wire. Coil the wire tightly round the nail at one end and round  the pen at the other, close to the point in both cases, with the length of wire between  them equal to the radius of the circle you're going to draw. Take some trouble trying  to get it precisely the right length ­­ holding it all in place then turning the pen so that  you coil a little more or a little less wire round it works well. Make a little dent with a  centre­punch in the centre of the steel sheeting for the point of the nail, then carefully  draw your circle, holding both pen and nail firmly vertical.  Use 16­ or 18­gauge flat steel for the cone. A 3/4", 7/8" or 1" valve will be fine. 

(Drawing not to scale.) 

You can adapt this method to any size of drum just by changing the measurements  and calculating accordingly.  The outer­edge diameter of a standard 55­gallon drum is 22­3/4 inches ­­ check it,
16 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

this is the critical measurement.  How deep do you want your cone? The deeper the better, because the deeper it is  the steeper will be the sides, and the better it will drain. If it's 12" deep, the sides of  the cone will have a slope of just over 45 degrees, not very steep. At 15" deep the  slope is about 52 degrees, steeper. But deeper and steeper also means the whole  contraption will be higher. The drum is nearly 3ft high, plus 15" for the cone, plus  another couple of inches for the valve, a couple more for a hose connection, and you  need enough space to put a bucket underneath ­­ another 12" at least... that's 65"  already, up to your chin if you're a six­footer.  So we've taken a 12"­deep cone as an example. That's the second critical  measurement.  In the diagram, "r" is the radius of the oil drum bottom, measured to the outer edge ­­  that's half the diameter, 22.75 ÷ 2 = 11.375".  h = 12" ­­ "h" is the height (depth) of the cone.  sh = 16.535" ­­ "sh" is the "slant height" of the cone, the length of the sloping side.  You calculate this by Pythagoras's theorem, which states that the square on the  hypotenuse of a right­angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares on the other  two sides.  If you're among the math­challenged, relax, it's easy ­­ your calculator will do the  work for you.  The red triangle in the diagram is a right­angled triangle ­­ the angle between the two  sides "r" and "h" is a right­angle, 90 degrees. The side opposite the right angle is  "sh", the slant height of the cone, and that's the hypotenuse. To calculate its length,  square the other two sides. That means multiply 12 x 12 = 144; multiply 11.375 x  11.375 = 129.390625. Add the two answers together: 144 + 129.390625 =  273.390625. That's the "sum of the squares on the other two sides", which equals  the square on the hypotenuse. So the square root ­­  on the calculator ­­ of  273.390625 is the length of the hypotenuse:  273.390625 = 16.53452827. Shorten  it to three decimal places (add one if the fourth figure is 5 or more) = 16.535". That's  the slant height of your 12" deep cone ­­ the third critical measurement.  To make a cone all you have to do is draw a circle on something flat, cut a pie­slice  out of it and join up the two straight edges. But if you want the bottom of the cone to  fit something specific, and for it to be a particular height, you have to know how big  to draw the circle, and how big to make the pie­slice.  The radius of the cone circle you have to draw is the same as the slant height of the
17 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

cone ­­ sh, 16.535".  So now you know the size of the piece of flat steel sheeting you'll need: 16.535 x 2 =  33.07" square. So make it 3ft square.  Take a long rule, or anything with a straight edge that's long enough, and draw a line  across the plate from one corner to the opposite corner, and a second line joining  the other two corners. Where they cross is the centre of the plate. Draw your circle  from that point, radius 16.535". Okay, so you can't measure .535" on your ruler. It  comes to 17/32", but 9/16" will do; 5/8" will also do, or make it 16­11/16", which will  give you a small margin of error. 

Parts of a circle 

Now you need to know how big to make the pie­slice cut­out.  The edge of the cone must fit the drum. So the cone circle minus the pie­slice must  match the circumference of the outer edge of the bottom of the drum. Circumference  = diameter x pie ­­ that's  on your calculator, or just multiply by 22 and divide the  answer by 7.  The diameter of the drum is 22.75", circumference is 22.75 x  = 71.5".  The diameter of the cone circle is 16.535 x 2 = 33.07, circumference is 33.07 x  =  103.934".  The arc (a section of the circumference) of the cut­out pie­slice sector is 103.934 ­  71.5 = 32.434".  Now you need to know the angle of the cut­out sector so you can measure it off with  a protractor. Divide the arc by the circumference and multiply by 360: 32.434 ÷  103.934 x 360 = 112.34 degrees. Make it 112­1/3 degrees.  Now you can draw in your pie­slice that you're going to cut out. Here's a protractor  you can print out if you don't have one.
18 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Useful to know: the volume of a cone is 1/3  r  h. For a 12" cone on a 55­gal drum,  that's 7 gallons (US).  Two more things to consider: first, you might want to leave a tab for some overlap  when welding the two edges of the cone together, as marked by the dotted line on  one edge of the pie­slice in the diagram.  Second, you might want to pre­cut a hole for the valve, as in the diagram. Or just  saw off the point of the cone at the right height after it's assembled. Depending on  what kind of valve you get, you'll either weld the valve on direct, or it will screw onto  a short length of steel pipe, and you'll weld the steel pipe on. Whichever, stand the  valve or pipe on top of the cone, straight up, and draw a line under it around the top  of the cone where you'll make the cut. Make sure the hole is narrower than the  outside diameter of the pipe/valve so you'll have something to weld it onto.  If you'd rather pre­cut the hole, measure the ID (inside diameter) of the pipe or valve,  add half the thickness of the pipe or valve wall. Say the answer is 7/8". All the angles  are the same as for calculating the cone, so you can do it proportionately: 7/8" is the  diameter of the hole, divide by 2 for the radius: 7/16 = 0.4375. It's the slant height  you want: 16.535 x 0.4375 ÷ 11.375 = 0.636", which is slightly more than 5/8", so  make it 5/8". Draw the circle for the pre­cut hole for the valve with a radius of 5/8".  Before you start cutting and welding, double­check all your calculations and  measurements. When you're satisfied, make your cuts, then weld it all up and you're  done. You'll find it a lot easier to bend the cone evenly to shape if you use a roller of  some kind. This is actually a good reason for pre­cutting the valve hole because the  roller can fit through the hole while you're rolling it. Try a piece of 7/8" steel  waterpipe about two feet long or more.  You'll also need a stand for it. Steel piping or angle iron will do, four legs, firmly  welded to the sides of the oil drum and joined by cross­struts just above the level of  the valve. Make it strong ­­ a full processor will weigh more than 400 lbs.  A useful refinement is a sight­tube, leading from near the bottom of the cone  vertically up the side to near the top of the drum. Use translucent PEX tubing  (crosslinked polyethylene) or high­density polyethylene (HDPE), thin­walled for  better visibility, both of which are heat­ and chemical­resistant; 1/2" or more ID,  preferably more. Get right­angled plumbing fittings, drill holes for them and weld  them in. Use strong stainless­steel gem clips to connect the hose to the fittings, a  good idea to use two clips at each end, with heat­ and chemical­proof silicon sealer  as a gasket compound.”

19 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Once you’ve done all this just add you circulating/ mixing pump and extra pipes to  give you a closed mixing system. I prefer pumps to mechanical mixing but it’s your  reactor.  This next one is very similar to my current reactor but with some mods of my own. I  used a double skinned plastic 44 Gallon drum as it was easier to work with than  steel and has proved to be tough and reliable. I’ll put pictures on the website soon  www.gobionz.com  The next one is from the http://www.biodieselcommunity.org/gettingstarted/ website  remember this design shouldn’t be done as is , just use it as a general outline for  your own ideas. This could be better if the draw was from the bottom and a better  pump was used but again it’s up to you to try what works.  This design is also “Open Source” so please make sure if you copy the text below  you include the authors details. 

An old water heater tank can be adapted to make a safe and inexpensive biodiesel  homebrewing apparatus. An HDPE carboy (white jug in photo) or other tank can  become a passive small­scale methanol­catalyst mixer, and an inexpensive  centrifugal pump (blue motor in photo) from Harbor Freight tools mixes the two  liquids to enable the biodiesel reaction to take place. After a day of settling, the  glycerol byproduct can be drained out fairly well­ the tanks have a wine­bottle­bottom
20 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

profile, with a drain at the 'pointed' edge, so separation of two liquids can be  reasonably clean. The processor costs about $150 in plumbing and electrical, and  about a day or less of work. The tank can be an ancient lime­crusted one scavenged  from a dump, or can be bought new for about $200 more.  After draining off glycerol, the same mixing pump can transfer the biodiesel to a  'wash tank' for a water wash to remove methanol and water­soluble impurities.  There's an extremely simple 'standpipe' design which requires no welding, which  makes a nice minimal tank, the Sean Parks' Standpipe Wash Tank. The standpipe  wash tank costs about $30 in plumbing to build. People have built variations which  include heating, ways to use plastic barrels, and build­in mistwash heads (which only  works for smaller batches).  This system has developed a huge following in the biodiesel community, and there  are hundreds of homebrewers who have built or built and modified theirs.  below: Sean Parks' Standpipe Wash Tank 

Plans for building the Appleseed:  there are many possible plumbing variations. Here's the bare­bones original and a  parts list, and several variations. Please note that until recently I had an outdated
21 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

diagram here which you may still find references to on the Web. It's now corrected  and so is the parts list: 

simplest  plans

22 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Here's how I  now build  these, to  wrap around  the tank  slightly  (temperature  gauge not  shown)

23 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

To the right  and below  are a couple  of variations:  separate  sight tube  and extra  valves on  each tube (I  now consider  these valves  unnecessary) 

here is the  plumbing for  my 'bells and  whistles'  variation,  with the  temperature  gauge shown  in original  packaging.  Temperature  gauge  numbers  MUST start  at 100F or  lower, not  130F.

24 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

I purchase the valves at Harbor Freight Tools, where they cost considerably less  than Home Depot and other places. Lowes' is my preferred big box hardware for the  plumbing. Local stores like Ace or True Value can be cheap or can be very  expensive for plumbing, at random. Home Depot is my last choice­ their plumbing  section is usually very disorganized and prices are high. Avoid at all costs.  Harbor Freight runs sales on their online or retail stores every few months­ so pumps  may end up costing about $25 and 3/4" ball valves can be $2 when on sale. valves  will bankrupt you on this project­ shop around. They range from $6 at Lowes to $12  at some local stores I"ve patronized, and you'll need lots of them. 

Shopping List and General Instructions:  (note: all plumbing 3/4 inch unless otherwise noted. All plumbing black iron threaded  pipe if possible­ galvanized is sometimes the only choice for some fittings but is not  preferred due to zinc content):  The modifications needed to an electric water heater are:  Remove dip tube (?) from the top cold water inlet. Dip tubes are underneath any  pipes or pipe nipples threaded into the heater. This is the worst part of the operation­  undoing any old piping. If it is a two­heating element water heater you might also  need to disable the upper element and thermostat­ the upper element is usually  above the level of the oil you are heating, and would burn out if heated without being  covered by liquid. You will also probably also want to mount the water heater on a  stand­ I use two milk crates stacked together­ and strap it to the wall studs for  earthquake safety in earthquake country.  I usually disable the upper heating element and thermostat in a two­thermostat water  heater processor­ because the upper heating element will be above the level of the  oil you’re heating.  Parts List:  All plumbing 3/4 inch unless otherwise noted. All plumbing black iron threaded  pipe if possible­ galvanized is sometimes the only choice for some fittings but is not  preferred due to zinc content:  A. 3" pipe nipple  B. 3/4" x 3/4" x 1/2" tee  C close nipples ­ you'll need 7 of them  D ball valves (3/4")­ buy 5 of them (very cheap at Harbor Freight, more expensive  elsewhere)  E cross fitting (a sort of four­way tee, available at Lowes' but not at all other  hardware stores. Substitute a pair of tees and some close nipples if you cant' find
25 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

one)  F. Bushing: 3/4" by 1/2"­ buy 2  G. 1/2" close nipple­ 2  H 1/2" ball valve  H2 1/2" swing check valve  I. Nylon or Brass 90degree thread­to­barb fitting: male thread end is 1/2" thread,  hose barb end is 3/8" barb, plus hose clamp  J. Length of 3/8" vinyl tubing­ 3 or 4 feet.  K. straight or 90 degree 1/2 inch threaded to 3/8 inch barbed nylon or brass fitting,  and hose clamp  L. 3/4" Hose Barb (I use plastic grey PVC ones that are sometimes in irrigation  departments for about 30 cents each)  M. 1 or 2 feet of vinyl tubing as a drain/filler tube. Make this clear rather than braided  hose so you can see through it well.  N. Union (3/4" of course)  O 1" by 3/4" bushings­ 2 . Thread these into the pump with TONS of thread tape or  pipe dope­ more than you would normally use. The pump threads are straight thread  rather than tapered American pipe thread, so they need extra help to prevent leaks.  P. Length of BRAIDED 3/4" vinyl hose. Do not use unreinforced nonbraided hose  here. Prepare to replace this hose every few months as it deteriorates with heat and  biodiesel.  Q 90degree elbows­2  R. length of pipe nipple approx 12"­ 18" (purchase correct size after assembling  everything else)  S. 2" long pipe nipple­ 2  T Automotive mechanical temperature gauge (not 12V electrical type). I prefer the  heavy­duty Sunpro one from Pep Boys over the other brands/stores. It should be  $15ish. The numbers should start at 100F or lower instead of 130F (the other option  at these stores). The biodiesel homebrew supply stores sell some alternatives.  U. Proper plumbing to attach to water heater's pressure relief vent and direct any  fumes outside if using a pressure relief.  V. Water heater strapping, or other earthquake strapping for attaching the processor  to your wall studs. I use webbing strapping.  W.  Pump:  This is a '1" Clear Water Pump from Harbor Freight Tools or Northern  Tool­ $35 part number 1479. This centrifugal pump also allows your 3/4" hose  become sight tube (so you know how high the oil level is when filling the processor).  Non­centrifugal pumps won't give you this feature, in which case you will need to  instead add a tee and another tube as sight tube Give the sight tube a shutoff valve  so you don't drain unreacted oil into your biodiesel when emptying the processor.  See other plans elsewhere in this book for more details on how this works.  You will need to buy a grounded plug and a length of 14gauge power tool cord to  wire up the pump as well.  X  Heating elements and thermostats:  Disable the upper heating element and  thermostat.
26 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Disconnect power from the water heater before opening it’s electrical panels! I turn  220Volt water heaters into 110 volts and add a heavy­duty 110V plug on a 12 or 10  gauge cord, because we don t usually have 220V outlets easily accessible at the  sites where I work. A 220V heating element operated at 110V will put out 1/4 the  power output (watts). In practice this usually means that the lower element will heat  far too slowly on 110. I purchase a 110V replacement element instead. Thermostats  will work at either voltage  (c) design 2003 Maria Alovert, published in Biodiesel Homebrew Guide, Nov 2003  edition  This is my favorite at http://home.swbell.net/scrof/Biod_Proc.html  It includes filters and vacuum filling through the filters and methanol collection, very  efficient. I think this is the way to go. Automate this and you’re on a winner. 

Once you get going it’s really only limited to your imagination and budget but once you  have  got  your  head  around  the  process  requirements  then  the  more  innovative  the  better.

27 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

If  you  want  to  really  go  for  it  then  OFR  or  Oscillatory  Flow  Reactors  are  the  key  and  mean you can process to your hearts content with a constant flow reactor meaning that  is just keeps producing as long as you feed it ingredients. 

Oscillatory  Flow  Mixing  (OFM)  provides  highly  effective  mixing  in  tube  reactors  by  the  combination  of  fluid  oscillations  and  baffle  inserts  ...  OFM  is  particularly  suited  to  continuous  processing.  How  it  works,  Research,  Technology,  Publications,  and  more,  with  diagrams  and  photographs.  http://www.cheng.cam.ac.uk/  research/groups/polymer/OFM/ 

Solid Catalyst reactors are coming to the fore recently and some more info can be found  here.  http://www.greencarcongress.com/2005/08/new_biodiesel_p.html  This is an interesting story about a credit card reactor needing no catalyst just alcohol  http://www.tbo.com/news/money/MGBWHTJE8ME.html

28 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Making Biodiesel  Ingredients  SAFETY  SAFETY  SAFETY 
Wear proper protective gloves, apron, and eye protection and do not inhale any  vapors. Methanol can cause blindness and death, and you don't even have to drink  it, it's absorbed through the skin. Sodium hydroxide can cause severe burns and  death. Together these two chemicals form sodium methoxide. This is an extremely  caustic chemical. These are dangerous chemicals ­­ treat them as such!  Always have a hose running when working with them. The workspace must be  thoroughly ventilated. No children or pets allowed.  Mixture:  Waste vegetable oil (WVO) ­­ used cooking oil, fryer grease, animal fats, lard  Methanol (CH3OH) ­­ 99%+ pure  Sodium hydroxide (NaOH ­­ caustic soda, lye) ­­ must be dry  Titration:  Isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol) ­­ 99%+ pure  Distilled water  Phenolphthalein solution (not more than a year old, kept protected from strong light)  ­­ "Phenol" or "Phenol Red" from swimming pool or hot tub supply stores may not be  the same as phenolphthalein; it can be used but the directions for use may be  different  Washing:  Vinegar  Water (Or Dry wash with more research)

29 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Procedure  1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  Filter WVO to remove any food scraps or solid particles.  Heat WVO to remove any water content (optional).  Perform titration to determine how much catalyst is needed.  Prepare sodium methoxide.  Heat WVO, mix in the sodium methoxide while stirring.  Allow to settle, remove the glycerine.  Wash and dry. (this is optional in my opinion as long as you filter and stand  for long enough but it’s up to you)  8.  Check quality.  This procedure is called transesterification, similar to saponification. Sound familiar?  Saponification is soap making. To make soap you take a transfatty acid or  triglyceride (oil or kitchen grease) and blend it with a solution of sodium hydroxide  (NaOH, caustic soda or lye) and water. This reaction causes the ester chains to  separate from the glycerine. These ester chains are what becomes the soap.  They're also called lipids. Their unique characteristic of being attracted to polar  molecules such as water on one end and to non­polar molecules like oil on the other  end is what makes them effective as soap.  In transesterification, lye and methanol are mixed to create sodium methoxide (Na+  CH3O­). When mixed in with the WVO this strong polar­bonded chemical breaks  the transfatty acid into glycerine and also ester chains (biodiesel), along with some  soap if you're not careful (more on that later). The esters become methyl esters.  They would be ethyl esters if reacted with booze (ethanol) instead of methanol.  Figures 1­3 show these two reactions. The zigzag lines in the triglyceride diagram  (Figure 1) are shorthand for carbon chains. At both ends of each line segment is a  carbon atom. 

Figure 1 

In Figures 2 and 3 these zigzags are shorthanded as R1, 2 and 3.

30 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Figure 2 

Figure 3 

1. Filtering 
Filter the WVO to remove food particles. You may have to warm it up a bit first to get  it to run freely, 95 deg F (35 deg C) should be enough. Use a double layer of  cheesecloth in a funnel, or a restaurant or canteen­type coffee filter.  (The better you can filter it now the better your reaction will be later) 

2. Removing the water 
Many people heat the WVO first to remove any water content. Waste oil will probably  contain water, which can slow down the reaction and cause saponification (soap  formation). The less water in the WVO the better.  This is how they do it. Raise the temperature to 212 deg F (100 deg C), hold it there  and allow any water to boil off. Use the mixer to avoid steam pockets forming below  the oil and exploding, splashing hot oil out of the container. Or drain water puddles  out from the bottom as they form ­­ you can save any oil that comes out with the  water later. (I’m more on the side of 70 or less as this will still remove water without  creating to many more FFA’s)  When boiling slows, raise the temperature to 265 deg F (130 deg C) for 10 minutes.  Remove heat and allow to cool.  You may be lucky and find a regular source of WVO that doesn't need to have the  water boiled off, in which case don't do it ­­ boiling means extra energy and time.
31 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Personally I don't boil off the water first, I'd rather avoid the extra step in the process  and save the energy it uses. But unless you're sure, it may be better to be on the  safe side. 

3. Titration 
To determine the correct amount of lye required, a titration must be performed on the  oil being transesterified. This is the most difficult step in the process, and the most  critical ­­ make your titration as accurate as possible.  IMPORTANT: The lye must be dry ­­ keep it away from water, store it in an airtight  container.  Make up a solution of one gram of lye to one liter of distilled water. Make sure it  dissolves completely. This sample is then used as a reference tester for the titration  process. It's important not to let the sample get contaminated, it can be used for  many titrations.  Mix 10 milliliters of isopropyl alcohol in a small container with a 1 milliliter sample of  WVO ­­ make sure it's exactly 1 milliliter. Take the WVO titration sample from the  reaction vessel (Figure 5 #1) after it's been warmed up and stirred.  Add to this solution 2 drops of phenolphthalein, an acid­base indicator that's  colorless in acid and red in base.  IMPORTANT: Phenolphthalein has a shelf life of about a year, it is very sensitive to  degradation by light so after a while it will start giving erroneous readings.  Using a graduated eye dropper (with increments marked in tenths of milliliters) or  some other calibrated instrument (from medical supply outlets), while carefully  keeping track of the amounts, drop measured amounts of the lye/water solution a  couple of tenths of milliliters at a time into the WVO/isopropyl/phenolphthalein  solution.  Follow each drop with vigorous stirring of the solution. In cold weather the WVO  might congeal and not work so you might need to do the titration in a heated room. If  conditions are right eventually the solution turns pink (magenta), and stays pink for  10 seconds. This is the indicator color for a pH range of 8­9 (see the photograph in  the left column of this page, "Color of titrated liquid sample when at the correct pH").  It's important to find the exact amount, to just reach this pH without dropping in too  much!  It's a good idea to do this entire process more than once to ensure that your number  is correct. I've found that depending on the type of WVO, how hot it got in the fryer,  what was cooked in it and how long it was used, the amount of lye/water solution
32 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

needed to titrate it is usually 1.5 to 3 milliliters. You can also use litmus paper or a  digital pH tester instead of the phenolphthalein. Try it with fresh cooking oil from your  kitchen too, it should need much less lye to reach pH 8­9. 
The calculation 

The next step is to determine the amount of lye needed for the reaction. Take the  number of milliliters derived from the titration and multiply by the number of liters of  WVO to be transesterified.  There is one more thing to be included in the calculation. Every liter of neat  vegetable oil (fresh ­­ never been cooked) needs 3.5 grams of lye for the reaction.  So for every liter of WVO to be transesterified add an additional 3.5 grams of lye.  Example: The titration determined that it took 2.4 milliliters to reach pH 8­9 and you'll  be transesterifying 150 liters of oil.  2.4 grams times 150 liters equals 360 grams lye  Plus 3.5 grams times 150 liters equals 525 grams lye  360 + 525 = 885 grams lye  If the titration result was 1.8 milliliters to reach pH 8­9, the final amount of lye needed  for the reaction would be 795 grams.  I've found over time that the number of grams of lye needed per liter of WVO has  generally been between 6 and 7. 

Test batches (REALLY IMPORTANT)make sure you do  test batches first. 
The first few times you do this process or if you're planning on transesterifying a lot  of WVO it is a good practice to first try out your lye amounts on a 1 liter batch in a  kitchen blender.(Remember the one from earlierJ) This works really well and you  don't need to heat up the WVO too much, just enough so it will spin well in the  blender. Blenders are very thorough at mixing the ingredients so heating is not as  critical.  Start by mixing up the lye and methanol in a blender (one that will never be used for  food again). First make sure the blender and all utensils used are dry. Forming the  exothermal sodium methoxide polar molecule will heat up the blender container a bit.  Keep mixing until all the lye has been dissolved.

33 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Once the sodium methoxide is prepared, add to the blender 1 liter of WVO. Make  certain all your weights and volumes are precise. If you're unsure of the titration  result numbers then use 6­6.25 grams of lye per liter of used WVO, or 3.5 grams for  fresh vegetable oil. Blender batches need only be run for about 15­20 minutes for  separation to be completed before switching off. The settling takes some time to  complete. The solution can be poured from the blender into another container right  after switching off the blender.  It is good to do a few batches with varying amounts of lye recorded so later when  checking results one can choose the lye quantity that did the best job.  When too much lye is used the result can be a troublesome gel that is tough to do  anything with. (See Glop soap This can be recovered but it’s a only worth it if you  end up with alot.) When not enough lye is used the reaction does not go far enough  so some unreacted WVO will be mixed with the biodiesel and glycerine. This will  form three levels with biodiesel on top above unreacted WVO with glycerine on the  bottom. If there is too much water in the WVO it will form soaps and settle right  above the glycerine forming a fourth level in the container. This layer is not too easy  to separate from the unreacted WVO and glycerine layers. 

4. Preparing the sodium methoxide 
Generally the amount of methanol needed is 20% of the WVO by mass. The  densities of these two liquids are fairly close so measuring 20% of methanol by  volume should be about right. To be completely sure, measure out a half­liter of both  fluids, weigh, and calculate exactly what 20% by mass is. Different WVOs can have  different densities depending on what type of oil it originally was and how long it was  used in the deep fryer.  Example: When transesterifying 100 liters of WVO, use 20 liters of methanol.  The methanol is mixed into a solution with the sodium hydroxide (lye), creating  sodium methoxide in an exothermic reaction (ie it gets warm from bonds forming).  Keep all utensils the lye comes in contact with as dry as possible.  CAUTION:  Treat sodium methoxide with extreme caution! Do not inhale any vapors! If any  sodium methoxide gets splashed on your skin, it will burn you without your feeling it  (killing the nerves) ­­ wash immediately with lots of water. Always have a hose  running when working with sodium methoxide.  Sodium methoxide is also very corrosive to paints. Lye reacts with aluminum, tin and  zinc. Use glass, enamel or stainless steel containers ­­ stainless steel is best. Used  restaurant equipment supply stores and scrap metal recycling yards are two good
34 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

places to look for this type of equipment. Braze on plumbing fittings for drains, etc.  where needed. 

5. Heating and mixing 
Pre­heat waste vegetable oil reclaimed from a restaurant's waste grease barrel to  120­130 deg F (48­54 deg C).  A propeller or paint stirrer coupled to a 1/2­inch electric drill held securely in a jig  works fine as a mixer.  Too much agitation causes splashing and bubbles through vortexing and reduces  mix efficiency. There should be a vortex just appearing on the surface. Adjust the  speed, or the pitch or size of the stirrer to get the right effect.  If you want a quieter processor, an electric pump plumbed to form a mixing loop for  stirring the WVO would do a nice job. Mount the pump above the level that glycerine  will gel at to prevent clogging up the pump (see below).  Add the sodium methoxide to the WVO while stirring; stir the mixture for 50 minutes  to an hour. The reaction is often complete in 30 minutes, but longer is better.  The transesterification process separates the methyl esters from the glycerine. The  CH3O of the methanol then caps off the ester chains and OH from the NaOH (lye)  stabilizes the glycerine. 

6. Settling and separation 
Allow the solution to sit and cool for at least eight hours, preferably longer. The  methyl esters ­­ biodiesel ­­ will be floating on top while the denser glycerine will  have congealed on the bottom of the container forming a hard gelatinous mass (the  mixing pump must be mounted above this level).  An alternative method is to allow the reactants to sit for at least an hour after mixing  while keeping the brew above 100 deg F (38 deg C), which keeps the glycerine  semi­liquid (it solidifies below 100 deg F). Then carefully decant the biodiesel.  This can be done by draining the reactants out of the bottom of the container through  a transparent hose. The semi­liquid glycerine has a dark brown color; the biodiesel is  honey­colored. Keep a watch on what flows through the sight tube: when the lighter­  colored biodiesel appears divert it to a separate container. If any biodiesel stays with  the glycerine it is easy to retrieve it later once the glycerine has solidified.  If you left the mixture in the tank until the glycerine gelled, reheat the tank just
35 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

enough to liquify the glycerine again. Don't stir it! Then decant it out as above. 
Figure 6

A proposed alternative using very little electricity is illustrated  in Figure 6. This system would use a furnace­type burner run  on reclaimed esters to heat its reaction vessel. The vessel's  stirring action is created by thermo inversion currents  generated by the vessel's external cooling tubes and a baffled  exhaust vent that runs up through its center.  Figure 5 also shows a blender (#3) used to mix up the sodium  methoxide. When making 16 liter (5 gal) batches, I use a yard­  sale glass blender for the sodium methoxide solution (and for  nothing else!), but I can't fit it all in at once, so I measure out  three separate portions. 

Glycerine 
The glycerine from WVO is brown and usually turns to a solid below about 100 deg F  (38 deg C). Glycerine from fresh oil often stays a liquid at lower temperatures.  Reclaimed glycerine can be composted after being vented for three weeks to allow  residual methanol to evaporate off or after heating it to 150 deg F (66 deg C) to boil  off any methanol content (the boiling point of methanol is 148.5 deg F, 64.7 deg C).  The excess methanol can be recovered for re­use when boiled off if you run the  vapors through a condenser.  Another way of disposing of the glycerine, though a great bit more complicated,  would be to separate its components, mostly methanol, pure glycerine (a valuable  product for medicines, tinctures, hand lotions, dried plant arrangements and many  other uses ­­ see Glycerine) and wax. This is often accomplished by distilling it, but  glycerine has a high boiling point even under high vacuum so this method is difficult.  I was able to find someone who could use my glycerine (for dried flower  arrangements) through the Industrial Materials Exchange (IMEX) in Seattle. IMEX  has a publication that comes out every other month with listings, looking for and  offering all types of surplus industrial materials. Many areas have similar exchanges.  http://www.metrokc.gov/hazwaste/imex/  The glycerine by­product makes an excellent industrial­type degreaser/soap. One  way to purify it is heat it to 150 deg F (65.5 deg C) to boil off excess methanol,  making it safe for skin contact (take precautions with fumes). Once the glycerine is 
36 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

back to a liquid the impurities sink to the bottom and the color will become a more  uniform dark brown. This can be cut with water leaving it a tan color, less  concentrated and softer and easier to handle when washing hands. Produced this  way the degreaser could be sold in squeeze or pump dispensers.  Other ideas for disposing of the glycerine are breaking it down to usable methane  gas, with a methane digester or, for a much wilder idea, it could be broken down with  pyrolisis. Pyrolisis was used extensively to run cars on firewood in oil­scarce Europe  and elsewhere during World War 2. The processor has a heat source that heats the  fuel (wood or glycerine) in an airtight box without oxygen. This allows the fuel to  release its methane while not allowing it to burn. The methane is trapped in an  inflatable storage container or compressed into a tank. This is an area of biodiesel  development that warrants further work. 

Soap residue 
Suspended in the biodiesel will also be some soapy residues. These are the result of  Na+ ions from the sodium hydroxide (NaOH) reacting with water created when the  methanol bonds with the ester chains along with any other water that was  suspended in the WVO.  If the reaction produces more than the usual amount of soap, this happens when lye  comes into contact with water before it has a chance to react with the WVO ­­ in this  case the excess water should have been boiled off first. (See Step 2, above,  Removing the water.)  The part of the process where it's vital to keep all water out of the reaction is when  making the sodium methoxide. Keep the blender and all utensils the lye comes in  contact with as dry as possible. The chances of a good clean splitting of esters from  glycerine with little soap by­product are much better on a warm dry summer day than  on a damp winter day. 

7. Washing and drying 
There is more than one school of thought on getting the biodiesel from this stage to  the fuel tank. One is to let it sit for a while (about a week), allowing the majority of the  soap residues to settle before running the biodiesel through a filtration system then  into the vehicle/home fuel tank.  Another method is to wash the soaps out of the fuel with water, one or more times.  When washing biodiesel the first time it's best to add a small amount of acetic acid  (vinegar) before adding the water. The acetic acid brings the pH of the solution  closer to neutral because it neutralizes and drops out any lye suspended in the  biodiesel.
37 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Figure 7 shows a simple way of washing using a translucent PVC  type container with a valve 3­4 inches from bottom. For 5 gallon  batches use those 5­7 gallon buckets found everywhere these days.  If a translucent container can't be found one fabricated with a sight  tube (#6) ought to work.  Fill with water until it is halfway between the container's bottom and  the valve, then fill up with the biodiesel to be washed. After a gentle  stirring (keep it gentle, you don't want to agitate up soaps) followed  by 12­24 hours of settling, the oil and water will separate, the cleaned  oil can be decanted out the valve, leaving the denser soapy water to  be drained out the bottom (#5). 

Figure 7 

This process might have to be repeated two or three times to remove close to 100%  of soaps. The second and third washings can be done with water  alone. After the third washing any remaining water gets removed by  re­heating the oil slowly (Figure 8), the water and other impurities  sink to bottom. The finished product should be pH 7, checked with  litmus paper or with a digital pH tester. 

The water from the third wash can be used for the first or second  washes for the next batch. The impurities can be left in the re­heater  for the next batch and removed when it accumulates. The soaps can  Figure 8 be concentrated, left­over biodiesel can be decanted out and what's  left is a biodegradable soap good for many industrial­type uses (degreasers etc.).  I had some success with trapping the concentrated very hydrated sodium from this  soap. The way I did this was by pouring the soap onto a stretched cheese cloth and  allowing the water to run through leaving the sodium on the cloth. This is as far as  I've gone with this so far but it seems one could press much of the water from the  sodium then vacuum dessicate this saturated sodium under dry conditions back to a  usable sodium hydroxide.  Transesterified and washed biodiesel will become clearer over time as any  remaining soaps drop out of the solution. 

38 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Finally 
Whoa  a  lot  of  information  in  there  I  know,  but  even  if  it  sparks  your  interest  to  start  playing around or even trying biofuel in your vehicle then it has served it’s purpose.  Right then testing your fuel for quality is the biggy. Put your “biodiesel” in a glass jar  with some water.(after you’ve drywash, water washed, filtered ,settled or don’t care  etc. and shake it for 10 seconds. If it then separates to Biodiesel at the top and water  at the bottom you’re on a winner, put it in your tank and go for a drive.  If it turns into mussy white emulsion then you need to work on your washing , filtering  whathaveyou.  I’m happy to receive any questions by email and I’ll be publishing a Biodiesel site  with forum very shortly so maybe save them for then. 

www.GOBIO.co.nz  please register on the forum. 
Now some background on me and my truck.  I’m from England and love NZ with a passion, I work in the computer  industry and 4 wheel driving is a hobby along with several other forms of motor sport  so I’m no tree hugging environmentalist. Shooting and fishing are also some of my  favorite pastimes but I never seem to get round to doing them as often as I would  like. (Which no doubt goes for all of us)  I do have kids and believe we are responsible for providing a clean environment for  our little ones to grow up in. (a real perk to biodiesel is the reduction in particulates  that can cause asthma and chest complaints etc.) Along with making sure we don’t  turn over a potential bag of environmental worms to our grandkids.  Fossil fuels are running out and with some lateral thinking NZ could adopt a wider  reaching biofuels program with the buy in of the rural industries.  Most of this is down to providing the information to the correct people. That’s you the  person reading this right now. We can use biofuel technology to set an example to  the world but only if we take the bull by the horns now.  There are interesting developments taking place in the biofuels arena at the  moment, technologies like algae co2 filtering for power plants which produce a  constant source of algae for production into algal based biodiesel.

39 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

Check out http://www.greenfuelonline.com/emissions_to_biofuels.htm for more info  on this.  This would be great for the new Helensville Gas power station!  Maybe a biofueled generator with its emissions run­through facility like this with  sunlight and you could be close to self sufficient.  Or growing oil palms as listing in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biodiesel  on your own  land to supply you with your own biodiesel!  My old landcruiser is a 91 80 series VX ltd 4.2 turbo diesel. It’s an auto and I have  run it on unwashed homemade biodiesel for over a year now with no issues.  (Apart from having to drain the tank once as I got my taps mixed up and put glycerin  in the tank!!)  The engine is quieter when run on biodiesel and I’ll put a .wav file on the website  when it’s ready comparing the 2 fuels (Bio and Dino) on vibration and noise alone.  The extra power is noticeable when driving and comes in handy for those especially  sticky mud holes!  Right hope you enjoyed that and I’ll sign off before I start rambling to much.  Feel free to point out any mistakes or errors and I’ll gladly correct them.  Forum and website to follow soon 

Biodiesel Break down  B100 = 100% Biodiesel (My mix of preference in my car)  B20 = 20% Biodiesel blend with normal Dinodiesel (the highest mix your likely to 
see commercially at the pump) 

B5 = 5% Biodiesel blend with Dinomuck (This is the “Enforced” biodiesel standard 
for blend by the government for introduction by 2008 as an alternative and will  probably be more expensive too!)  Useful links  http://www.gobionz.com Get it?  (Kiwi owned and run for kiwi biodieselers)  http://www.gobio.co.nz
40 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel.html  http://www.biodieselcommunity.org/gettingstarted/  http://biodiesel.infopop.cc 

The National Biodiesel Board's Biodiesel Fuel Fact Sheets (Acrobat files)  http://www.biodiesel.org/resources/fuelfactsheets/  The Biodiesel Association of Australia FAQ ­­ see "Biodiesel Fact Sheets" and  "Public FAQ"  http://www.biodiesel.org.au/  Or just www.google.co.nz  Biodiesel home production 

Biodiesel facts NZS 7500:2005 NZ Standard 

Ow if your still reading the picture in the frames is a small island of the cost of North  Wales in the UK called Bardsey or Ynys Enlli (If you be from Wales boyo) it’s  pronounced “Ennis enthly” And it’s one of the most serene and beautiful places in the  world. And I’d like it to stay that way.  http://www.bardsey.org/english/bardsey/welcome.asp?pid=1 

Darren Wood  Friday, 5 May 2006

41 

H O M E M A D E

B I O D I E S E L

F A C T S 

42

43