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Gluten-Free Certification Backgrounder

Responding to profound growth and both consumer and industry demand, a science-based gluten-free certification program is available from the leading organic certifier Quality Assurance International (QAI). In a sea of unsubstantiated claims, seals and logos, consumers need a certification that is science-based and verified through inspections and product testing. The triple-verified gluten-free label provides transparency and trust to people who need gluten-free foods as part of maintaining their health and fills the gap between unsubstantiated claims and consumer demand for bona fide gluten-free products. QAI, with its parent company NSF International, an independent public health and safety organization, brings nearly 70 years of food safety auditing and certification, and 20 years of organic auditing and certification experience, to the gluten-free marketplace. Together, QAI and NSF ensure integrity and rigor with a gluten-free certification program that requires sensitive testing procedures, plus stringent auditing and independent application review processes. The program uses feedback from consumers, manufacturers and retailers and includes: Product review Onsite inspection Testing to ensure compliance to 10 parts per million (ppm) or less Ongoing compliance including random product testing

Widespread cross-contamination of source ingredients means that even manufacturers who singularly produce gluten-free products must incorporate adequate testing and verification protocols into their operating procedures. The stringent nature of the NSF certification protocols ensures prevention of contamination and co-mingling, critically important for those with allergies to gluten and gluten intolerance. The NSF gluten-free certification program requires companies to produce products at less than 10 ppm of gluten to receive certification. QAI helps save both time and money for manufacturers and retailers by coupling its gluten-free certification with other programs such as organic certification, as well as food safety certification programs through QAIs parent company, NSF International.

Contact Greta Houlahan | Senior Communications Manager houlahan@nsf.org | p: 734-913-5723


Updated 2/27/2013

Gluten-Free Certification FAQ


Why did NSF develop a gluten-free certification program? Gluten-free foods industry reached $4.2 billion in 2012 and is expected to exceed more than $6.6 billion by 2017 (Packaged Facts, 2012). Manufacturers and retailers are seeking solutions to meet the gluten-free consumer demand. In a sea of unsubstantiated claims, seals and logos, consumers need a certification that is science-based and verified through inspections and product testing. NSF International, an independent public health and safety organization with nearly 70 years of food safety auditing and certification expertise developed the gluten-free certification program to provide a credible, verified and science-based label consumers can trust. QAI, an NSF International company with over 20 years of organic auditing and certification experience, provides certification to the program. The triple-verified gluten-free label provides transparency and trust to people who need gluten-free foods as part of maintaining their health and fills the gap between unsubstantiated claims and consumer demand for bona fide gluten-free products. The U.S. FDA has been working on a definition for gluten-free for some time as it too sees this increasing consumer demand. Ideally, a time will come when there is a federal law governing the production and labeling of gluten-free foods. Until that happens, the NSF gluten-free certification program is an excellent step for a company to take to prove it took extra assurance steps. Gluten-free consumers rely on gluten-free food to restore their health. For them, the integrity of a gluten-free claim demonstrates food safety. One of the many benefits of this program is QAIs ability to help customers save time and money by bundling the glutenfree certification program with USDA National Organic Program certification in addition to food safety certifications such as Safe Quality Foods (SQF) and the British Retail Consortium (BRC). QAI is a one-stop shop for food manufacturers with gluten-free, organic and food safety certification needs. Why was 10 parts per million (ppm) chosen as a threshold instead of the WHO approved and FDA proposed threshold of 20 ppm? QAI takes its role as a gluten-free certifier very seriously, with the goal of ensuring long-term consumer trust in the NSF gluten-free label and the NSF certified gluten-free manufacturer. The NSF gluten-free program doesn't allow manufacturers to formulate with ingredients that knowingly contain gluten. With that in mind, it is a matter of making sure that a gluten-free manufacturing plant has the quality systems in place to ensure that it maintains product integrity and that gluten-free products aren't contaminated or co-mingled with gluten-containing products. Therefore, to achieve less than 10 ppm, an operation needs robust quality systems to control the gluten-free integrity of its supply chain and the risk of contamination within the manufacturing plant, as well as provide the necessary ongoing education and training to the production team. Further, QAI considers the WHO and FDA 20 ppm level an important threshold. To ensure consumer trust and manufacturer brand protection, QAI sets the tolerance level lower by recognizing the inherent variability of batches and production lots. If a product came back at higher than 20 ppm, QAI would encourage the manufacturer to call back that product.

Do you think reading labels is no longer sufficient to determine if a food contains gluten? The challenge that gluten-free shoppers have is that while a product's label may not make reference to a glutencontaining ingredient, without third-party testing and inspection, a shopper can't be sure that those ingredients weren't contaminated during the manufacturing process. In fact, an independent survey conducted on behalf of NSF International found that 53 percent of safety-conscious consumers 1 are concerned about food allergies. At this point, cooperation with the certification program is voluntary on the part of manufacturers, correct? Correct. There is currently only a draft FDA definition for gluten-free and that is 20 ppm. However, recent surveys and studies have found that gluten-free certification is something that gluten-free shoppers are looking for. For them, food safety is mandatory. An August 2012 consumer survey by Packaged Facts shows that 18 percent of adults are buying or consuming foods products tagged as gluten-free, up from 15 percent in October 2010. How will the testing work? Does someone from QAI do initial testing when a company applies for certification? There are several requirements when it comes to testing. First, a company must have processes in place to ensure the gluten-free integrity of its supply chain. A manufacturer may accomplish this in many ways such as testing incoming raw ingredients, requiring their suppliers to provide testing reports or allergen affidavits for their ingredients. Second, after the company formulates its product and begins a production run, it must test the first product of sellable quality off the line. This finished product-testing step ensures that the product has maintained gluten-free integrity during the entire manufacturing process. In addition, QAI will conduct at least one annual inspection at the production facility. These inspection audits may be announced or unannounced. When the inspector is visiting the facility, he/she will randomly select products to send back to QAI for independent gluten-free testing. Will the random tests of product be done by QAI? The random tests will be conducted by QAIs parent company and developer of the gluten-free certification program NSF International. What tests will be used? An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay will be used. In non-scientific terms, it is a biochemical technique used to detect a gluten protein (gliadin) in a sample. How will results be verified? Will an independent lab do the testing or does QAI have a testing lab? Test results/reports for both the incoming ingredients and finished products will be reviewed at the annual inspection and may be requested throughout the year by QAI. This enables QAI to confirm that 1) the manufacturer is diligent in ensuring the gluten-free integrity of its supply chain and in performing testing on finished products, and 2) the results are in compliance with the gluten-free program. In addition, QAI utilizes NSF Internationals laboratory to conduct independent random tests to check for gluten.

Safety conscious consumers are defined as consumers between the ages of 25 and 54 years old and who qualify on at least three of the four following criteria: 1) consume dietary supplements, 2) consume bottled or filtered water, 3) read product labels, 4) use certification organizations for product information.

Will each product have to be certified individually or will certification be given for all products made in a particular plant? The first step in NSF gluten-free certification is to ensure gluten-free integrity of the ingredient suppliers. This step ensures that the raw ingredients that go into ANY product meet the requirements of the gluten-free certification program. Simply monitoring what is done at the facility will only ensure contamination doesn't occur within the facility. Therefore, the certification is individual and product based. How is NSFs certification program different from GIG's and CSA's? Consumers choose gluten-free foods to restore and maintain their health, so for them food safety is very important. QAI's parent company, NSF International, is known as the most trusted name in food safety with nearly 70 years of experience in developing science-based testing and certification programs. NSFs certification program is different from other gluten-free labels because it is science based and the most rigorous. NSFs gluten-free certification program utilizes sensitive testing procedures, stringent auditing processes, on-site, annual inspections and an independent application review process - all to ensure the integrity of the gluten-free certification seal. QAI also employs expert auditors that average 20 years of experience in food safety, including experience internationally recognized food safety systems such as Safe Quality Food (SQF), British Retail Consortium (BRC) and other standards recognized under the Global Food Safety Initiative. Some very large gluten-free companies do their own testing. Are you saying this type of testing is not adequate? This shows that they take their product claims very seriously. NSF gluten-free certification requires this exact type of ongoing testing and is an integral part of ensuring a high-quality gluten-free system. The NSF certification program does additional independent testing by a third party to truly validate those claims in addition to providing a seal to show that a company took extra assurance steps. How much will it cost companies to get certification? The cost of certification varies depending on the number of products certified. One of the many benefits of this program is QAIs ability to bundle gluten-free certification with USDA National Organic Program certification in addition to food safety certifications such as Safe Quality Foods (SQF) and the British Retail Consortium (BRC). QAI is a one-stop shop for food manufacturers with gluten-free, organic and food safety certification needs. Will this cost be passed onto consumers? When a manufacturer examines its own internal practices to prevent the contamination or co-mingling of gluten-free products with gluten-containing products, there are food safety lessons to be learned. Facilities must examine what types of procedures are in place to ensure gluten-free integrity is being maintained throughout the overall food safety system. This additional assurance in food safety should be viewed as an investment in the overall food safety program, a commitment to the health and wellness of your consumers, as well as brand protection.

Contact Greta Houlahan | Senior Communications Manager houlahan@nsf.org | p: 734-913-5723

NSF/ANSI 305 Personal Care Products Containing Organic Ingredients FAQ


NSF International published a new American National Standard for personal care products containing organic ingredients. Here are some questions and answers about the standard and certification to the standard. What is this standard? NSF/ANSI 305: Personal Care Products Containing Organic Ingredients is a new American National Standard that defines labeling and marketing requirements for personal care products that contain organic ingredients. How was the standard developed and who developed it? The American National Standard was developed in accordance with the requirements set forth by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), a private, non-profit organization that administers and coordinates the U.S. voluntary standardization and conformity assessment system. ANSI standards are developed based on the principles of dueprocess, participation and consensus. NSF/ANSI 305 was developed through involvement of those who are directly and materially affected by the scope of the standard. This process ensures balanced input from public health/regulatory officials, users/consumer representatives and industry representatives. Organic personal care manufacturers, trade associations, regulators, organic program administrators, organic product retailers, and other stakeholders from the organic products community participated in the development of the new contains organic ingredients personal care standard. If down the road, the USDA or NOP decide to engage organic personal care products, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) circular A-119 would encourage them to rely on the consensus national standard, which in this case is NSF/ANSI 305. Why was it developed? NSF/ANSI 305 establishes a level playing field by setting requirements for organizations choosing to comply with an American National Standard for personal care products that contain organic ingredients. This is an important step for manufacturers and retailers that produce and sell organic non-food products, as well as for consumers interested in protecting the environment who choose to purchase certified organic products. Now that the standard has been adopted, this means that companies producing products that comply with the standard can be certified to it demonstrating that they meet the stringent requirements of the standard. This should provide a competitive advantage to those certified products, compared to products who simply claim they are organic without complying with and being certified to the American National Standard. What are the requirements for NSF/ANSI 305? NSF/ANSI 305 defines labeling and marketing requirements for personal care products that contain organic ingredients. The voluntary standard allows the contains organic ingredients designation for products with organic content of 70 percent (O70) or more that comply with all other requirements of the standard. To consider the intricacies of personal care product formulations and eliminate consumer confusion, the NSF standard is designed only for contains organic ingredients claims and allows for limited chemical processes that are typical for personal care products but would not be allowed for food products. NSF/ANSI 305 also requires companies to state the exact percentage of organic content based on the requirements of the standard.

Updated 2/27/2013

How does this new contains organic ingredients standard compare to the USDA standard? NSF/ANSI 305 is a voluntary standard, which allows the contains organic ingredients designation for products with organic content of 70 percent (O70) or more that comply with all other requirements of the standard. Products with an organic content claim of 100% are addressed by the USDA NOP and can comply with the USDA standard. Like the USDA National Organic Program (NOP) regulations, the NSF standard includes requirements on organic ingredients, material, process and production specifications and labeling. The NSF standard also requires that NOP certified ingredients be used. However, it allows for these organic ingredients to undergo certain chemical processes methods considered synthetic under the NOP. Are any other contains organic ingredients standards accepted as national standards? No, NSF/ANSI 305 is the only American National Standard that allows labeling and marketing requirements for contains organic ingredients personal care products. There are other standards that enable organizations to become certified to their private standard, but NSF/ANSI 305 is the first consensus standard for contains organic ingredients personal care products in which all materially affected stakeholders academia, regulatory, industry, and consumers have discussed their expectations. It is also the only U.S.-based standard that allows certification by any certifying organization, rather than limiting that certification to the standard owner. What products are covered by the standard? Products covered by this standard include, but are not limited to: cosmetic products; rinse-off and leave-on personal care products; oral care products; and personal hygiene products. These products may be applied to or used externally on any part of the body (e.g. hair, face, hands and feet). For the purposes of this standard, cosmetics are considered personal care products. Is this new standard the answer to one harmonized standard for organic personal care products? Yes, this standard is a step in the right direction, and because it was designed through a balanced group of stakeholders, this standard should achieve strong market acceptance in the North American Market. Third-party certifiers can now compare this standard with the European standards and determine, by meeting the U.S. American National Standard, if those products also meet other international standards. Quality Assurance International (QAI), a USDA-accredited organic certifier, has finalized an agreement with NaTrue, one of the European Standards Owners, on how to streamline the certification process for companies interested in pursuing certification to both standards. Under the agreement between QAI and NaTrue, companies certified to NSF/ANSI 305 in the U.S. now have the option to simultaneously garner NaTrue certification in the EU. NaTrue, a Brussels-based international association of natural and organic cosmetics manufacturers, is dedicated to safeguarding the highest possible standards for natural cosmetics. The mutual agreement is expected to open up new growth opportunities in the EU for personal care companies whose products contain organic ingredients. Who is NSF International? NSF International is a global independent standards development and testing/certification organization. For over 65 years, NSFs mission has been to protect and improve public health by certifying products and writing standards for food, water and consumer goods. Headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan, NSF has offices located throughout North America, Europe, Asia and South America. How is NSF involved? In addition to helping develop NSF/ANSI 305: Personal Care Products Containing Organic Ingredients, NSF has developed over 80 other public health and safety standards and protocols, and annually tests and certifies over 350,000 products in 150 countries. NSFs standards are accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the company is accredited by the International Accreditation Service (IAS) and the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), among others.
Updated 2/27/2013

Who can certify to the new standard? Any interested organic certifying agents can certify to the standard. This is unlike private standards that limit who can certify to them. What does the certification process entail? Certification includes meeting all of the requirements of the standard (see response to question #4 under the standard section) in addition to completing the following steps to verify compliance: Application On-site Inspection (annual inspections will verify ongoing compliance) Technical Review Resolution & Notification Certification This process provides the consumer with confidence in the products they choose to purchase. Testing is not required to determine whether a product is organic or meets this standard, as the organic claim is a process claim, not a product claim. How do you know if a product has been certified to NSF/ANSI 305? The NSF 305 personal care logo will identify personal care products that have achieved certification to the standard.

Contact Greta Houlahan | Senior Communications Manager houlahan@nsf.org | p: 734-913-5723


Updated 2/27/2013

Jaclyn Bowen, MPH, MS General Manager, Quality Assurance International


Jaclyn Bowen is the General Manager of Quality Assurance International (QAI), a leading advocate for organics and provider of organic certification for more than 20 years. Jaclyn oversees QAIs organic certification programs, which include certification to the USDAs National Organic Program (NOP), as well as to international organic programs. In addition, QAI also offers gluten-free, nonGMO, kosher, eco-social and organic personal care certification, as well as certification to Global Food Safety Initiative-benchmarked standards through QAIs parent company NSF International. Prior to joining QAI in 2007, Jaclyn worked for NSF International, collaborating with global public health officials and professionals to help develop and write American National Standards for food, drinking water and sustainability. Under Jaclyns leadership, QAI launched the NSF/ANSI 305 "contains organic ingredients" certification program for personal care products with a minimum organic content of 70 percent (070). This certification program has gained significant momentum, is considered a personal care best practice by the Organic Trade Association and is a requirement to sell organic products within some major retailers. Jaclyn also helped to develop a credible, verified and science-based gluten-free certification program with a label consumers can trust. QAI and parent company NSF International utilize sensitive testing procedures, a stringent auditing process, on-site annual inspections and an independent application review process to ensure the integrity of gluten-free products. Jaclyn also has helped launch QAI organic programs globally to help companies demonstrate compliance with USDA NOP and other international organic standards, which include European, Canadian and Japanese organic programs. She led the development and certification of QAIs environmental management system (to ISO 14001), which continues to reduce QAIs energy and raw material use. Jaclyn earned a master's degree in management and policy from the University of Michigan, a master's degree in quality from Eastern Michigan University's College of Engineering Technology and a bachelor's degree in environmental biology from Michigan State University.

Contact Greta Houlahan | Senior Communications Manager houlahan@nsf.org | p: 734-913-5723


Updated 2/27/2013

QAI Backgrounder
Quality Assurance International (QAI), an organic industry pioneer founded in 1989 and headquartered in San Diego, Calif., is the leading provider of organic certification services worldwide. Additional certification services include glutenfree, kosher, non-GMO, social responsibility and natural ingredients for personal care products. Accredited by multiple organizations, QAIs programs verify organic integrity at each link of the supply chain. The company has grown to include operations in the U.S., Canada, Japan and the European Union. QAI, part of the NSF International family of companies, remains dedicated to fostering sustainable agriculture and a healthier planet, while providing educational outreach to the organic community and consumers. For more information, visit www.qai-inc.com. About Organic Certification Independent, third-party certification of organic food systems is the foundation of domestic and international organic food trade. Our job at QAI is to verify that the organic integrity is maintained. QAI certification programs are designed to certify every step of the organic chain: from the land on which the product is grown; to the producers growing the product; to the post-harvest facilities preparing the product; to the processing and handling facilities transforming the product. QAI certifies at the following levels: Land Post harvest Distributors Private label Producers Processors Restaurants Retailers

Since 1989, QAI's diligence in certification at every link in the organic production chain provides assurance to producers and consumers that the product bound for the market is indeed organic. For more details on the organic certification process, please see the Organic Certification Process Chart at the end of the press kit. QAI is committed to the ongoing education of the organic community and consumers. Our experienced QAI staff members participate in national organic policy meetings and are often asked to present information on organic certification to various industry groups. We welcome the opportunity to collaborate with our clients and industry groups through presentations or by providing published materials on organic issues. Mission Statement QAI is committed to fostering increased consumer trust in the organic label by: Verifying organic integrity to meet strict standards Certifying organic growers, processors, traders and distributors in an efficient, timely manner Certifying to federal standards under the National Organic Program (NOP) and to other international organic standards Simplifying client certification through a streamlined step-by-step application process Providing superior, professional assistance and support for expeditious certification renewal Fostering sustainable agriculture/a sustainable environment Promoting a healthy planet Contact Greta Houlahan | Senior Communications Manager houlahan@nsf.org | p: 734-913-5723
Updated 2/27/2013

Complementary Certification Services Offered by Quality Assurance International


QAI (Quality Assurance International, Inc.) is a leading provider of organic certification services verifying organic integrity throughout the supply chain, but organic certification is not the only certification it offers. Additional QAI certification services include gluten-free, non-GMO, kosher, eco-social, food safety and personal care. Below is more information on these services, several of which can be combined so audits can be performed simultaneously to earn multiple certifications. Food Audits and Certification Programs NSF Gluten-Free Certification: QAI provides a credible, verified and science-based gluten-free certification program with a label consumers can trust. Created by NSF International, QAIs parent company and global public health organization with nearly 70 years of food safety expertise, the gluten-free certification program utilizes sensitive testing procedures, a stringent auditing process, on-site annual inspections and an independent application review process to ensure the integrity of gluten-free products. The stringent nature of the NSF certification protocols ensures prevention of contamination and co-mingling, critically important for those with allergies to gluten or gluten intolerance. Kosher: QAI, in partnership with STAR-K, provides a joint kosher and organic auditing program. Through rabbinical supervision, products can be certified to both kosher certification requirements and to the USDA National Organic Program standards for organic certification. Earning both kosher and USDA organic certification for your products provides added value and the joint auditing program streamlines the auditing process by auditing against organic and kosher standards. Eco-Social: Social, environmental and organic certification in a new unified verification program is now available to organic businesses in the United States. In the past, companies interested in multiple certifications on their packaging have only had separate program options. QAI, in partnership with international and accredited certifier IBD, provides a joint eco-social and organic auditing program. This joint auditing initiative streamlines the auditing process, reducing certification costs to companies opting for both organic and eco-social certification, including Fair Trade. The eco-social certification program requires the use of specific tools to audit and verify social and environmental practices such as: emphasis on farmers or workers capacity to identify their problems and propose solutions and participatory planning of the investments related to eco-social premium. Food Safety: QAI is a member of the NSF International family of companies and can add a food safety audit to any certification. NSF International, a public health and safety organization with 65+ years of food safety expertise, enables QAI to assist organic producers with their food safety
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needs. NSF's food safety services include Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) certification to benchmarked standards such as SQF (Safe Quality Food) and BRC (British Retail Consortium). Food safety training can also be provided to your team through NSF Training and Education. Non-GMO: QAI has partnered with the Non-GMO (genetically modified organisms) Project to offer this certification to customers through the projects non-GMO testing and verification program. QAI auditors are cross-trained to perform non-GMO certification inspections for both organic and conventional products. A joint inspection audit is facilitated by a QAI trained auditor to conduct the organic and non-GMO audits at the same time. QAI conducts the inspection on behalf of the Non-GMO Project, which then reviews the information to determine if the seal can be awarded.

Personal Care Audits and Certification Programs Organic Personal Care: QAI can certify personal care products to the National Organic Program guidelines for personal care as well as the NSF/ANSI 305 Standard for Personal Care Products that "contain organic ingredients." This American National Standard defines organic labeling and marketing requirements for personal care products such as cosmetics, oral care and personal hygiene products that contain organic ingredients. Products with a minimum organic content of 70 percent that meet the requirements can make the organic label and marketing claim of "contains organic ingredients" and bear the unique NSF/ANSI 305 mark. This certification program is considered a personal care best practice by the Organic Trade Association and is a requirement to sell organic products within some major retailers.

Contact Greta Houlahan | Senior Communications Manager houlahan@nsf.org | p: 734-913-5723


Updated 2/27/2013

The Organic Certification Process


The organic certification process was defined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and is monitored by the National Organic Program (NOP). At Quality Assurance International (QAI), our certification program is designed to certify every step of the organic chain, in strict accordance with NOP guidelines. From the land on which the product is grown, to the producers growing the product, from the post-harvest facilities preparing the product, to the processing and handling facilities transforming the product, our job at QAI is to verify that organic integrity is maintained. We work with other certifiers to help ensure that your organic food is truly organic. Some of the certifiers are located abroad, and some are here in the U.S. From farm to fork, we all work together under USDA oversight. Heres how the process works.

Farming
Improving the quality of the soil is the basis for organic. The farms soil must be free of prohibited substances for a minimum of three years prior to harvesting crops that will be labeled as organic. The National Organic Program (NOP) encourages farmers to improve soil fertility and rotate crops to naturally increase crop yields and disease resistance.

Harvesting
Organic crops are picked, cut, and cleaned in the field. To ensure organic integrity, certifying these operations through inspections and records evaluation is necessary. Equipment used for harvesting and processing must be cleaned and sanitized in accordance with NOP requirements.

Packaging
Packaging may occur in the field, at a facility or where a product is cleaned, canned or bagged, and given a product label, name or an identification number such as a UPC code. Through inspection and records evaluation, organic products are verified to make sure organic integrity has been maintained through the packaging process.

Processing
Organic crops can be processed further with other organic crops or spices. To ensure the organic integrity of a product has been maintained, a USDA-accredited certifying agent, such as QAI, must inspect these operations to ensure that they are operating according to the NOP and certify their compliance.

Labeling
Labeling is a very important part of the NOP, as labels help consumers understand what theyre buying. How agricultural products have been handled, processed, and combined with other ingredients determines how it can be labeled organic. QAI verifies that organic products are accurately labeled from one of the three following categories. 100% Organic = 100% organic ingredients and processing aids Organic = At least 95% organically produced ingredients, with the remaining % from the National List of allowed ingredients Made with Organic Ingredients = Minimum of 70% organic content with the remaining % of allowed ingredients

Shipping/ Transportation
Products are shipped to distributors or to retail stores. To ensure ongoing organic integrity, products must be protected from contamination by non-organic products. Prior to loading and unloading, trucks are verified for shipping practices that maintain this integrity, such as the prevention of commingling of organic and nonorganic products and impermeable packaging.

Distribution
Products are compiled from farms, processors, or other distributors to one central location in order to distribute products. If a organic product is repackaged, perhaps to smaller sizes, QAI holds inspections to confirm that organic integrity has been maintained.

Retail
By selecting products that carry the USDAs organic seal and a certifiers mark, such as QAIs mark, consumers can rest assured that each step in that products entire organic supply chain meets the NOP guidelines.

For more information on organic certification, visit www.qai-inc.com, call 858.792.3531 or email qai@qai-inc.com.

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