Growing support

Eat Local,
Buy California
Grown Day
A look at 2012
farm bill priorities
What California farmers
are saying and the chance
to share your ideas
This month's cover was taken on a table grape vineyard in the southern San Joaquin Valley and provided by the California Table Grape Commission.
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
Peaches see
a marginally
beter year




» page 14
New Center for
Produce Safety
chairman has
vision for food
safety


» page 11
H.R. 2584
blocks EPA
from stifling
economic
growth


» page 10
Small busi-
ness owners
optimistic on
hiring, profits
and capital
spending

» page 5
V O L U M E T W E N T Y – S E V E N N U M B E R N I N E S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 1
T H E G R O W E R ’ S S O U R C E F O R N E W S , I D E A S , I N N O V A T I O N A N D T E C H N O L O G Y
The best time to nutritionally impact next years almond crop is Hull Split or Post Harvest application
timing. Post harvest foliar applications, while leaves are in good condition, is best. Many almond
growers with late varieties or early leaf drop and/or who rely on custom spray application often find post
harvest applications difficult logistically. Now growers have new nutritional tools to make the Hull Split
application almost as effective as the post harvest.
Highly penetrating, systemically transported Sysstem-ZN
®
applied at hull split with other early season
peak demand nutrients needed to build bud strength (potassium, phosphate, boron, magnesium) make
it possible to get these critical nutrients into next year’s buds so they are available when the tree breaks
dormancy in the spring. Building nutrient levels in the buds this year, leads to more uniform bud break,
faster early growth with larger leaves that have more photosynthetic capability and stronger flower buds
for better set. The end result… higher yields, larger and heavier nuts in 2012.
Building nutrient levels this year sends trees and buds into winter with more strength and energy
reserves that will be available to the tree next spring at bud break when soil nutrient availability is
limited. Applying Sysstem-ZN with P, Mg, B & K at hull split or post harvest will ensure the tree has zinc
and these other critical early nutrients ahead of spring peak demand timing to support leaf and root
development. By beginning to manage next year’s nutrient needs at hull split or post harvest, Sysstem-
ZN helps prepare your trees for the race to higher yields – with larger, higher quality nuts, while also
minimizing alternate bearing issues.
Sysstem-ZN is compatible with most pesticides and foliar nutrient tank mixes.
For more information, call
800-328-2418, visit www.agro-k.
com, or email info@agro-k.com.
Your PCA and Agro-K products
distributor can provide guidance on the
Sysstem

Series products you need.
S
Y
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AGRO-K CORPORATION
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Increased Almond Yield In 2012?
Hull Split or Post Harvest? You Decide!
Sysstem
®
Series Late Season NutBuilder Nutrient Program.
Sysstem-ZN

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For local information and product availability please
contact: Mid-Valley Ag Service, Tremont Group,
Lyman Ag, Buttonwillow, Colusa County Farm
Supply, Bear River Farm Supply and Big Valley.
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stores. Just mention or bring in this ad. On line,
Enter discount code J611425678 (good through 12-31-11)
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Fresno
2691 So. East Ave.
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Fax 559-268-0710
Merced
1429 Motel Drive, Suite “A”
Merced CA 95340
209-383-6647
Fax 209-722-9333
Modesto
1536 Princeton Ave
Modesto CA 95350
209-529-0835
800-606-0735
Fax 209-529-0298
Rancho Cordova
3190 Luyung Dr.
Rancho Cordova CA 95742
916-852-4130
800-758-1124
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How to reduce your Ex
Mod— Fundamentals
A Discussion on the CA Workers
Compensation Experience Rating System
If you need a fundamental knowl-
edge of the workers’ compensation
experience rating system, plan to attend
this seminar. “How to Reduce your
Ex Mod... Fundamentals” provides a
foundation for understanding how your
Ex Mod is calculated. Te WCRIB has
made changes to the way they calculate
your 2011 and 2012 Ex Mods. You
need to know the new rules because it’s
now tougher to get your Ex Mod down!
Limited time oner:
t FREE: Registration for the nrst
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t FREE: Important New WCRIB
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t FREE: Calendar of Health Care
Reform Laws for 2011, 2012,
2013, 2014 will be presented to
all Participants.
For more information or a sched-
ule of the seminar, visit www.ccisinsur-
ance.com or call 1-800-997-3499.
Fresh Persimmon
imports from South
Africa authorized
According to a notice from the
Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service, USDA, a recent decision
authorized the importation of fresh
persimmon from the republic of
South Africa. “We are advising the
public of our decision to authorize
the importation into the continental
United States of fresh persimmon
fruit from the Republic of South
Africa. Based on the nndings of a
pest risk analysis, which we made
available to the public for review and
comment through a previous notice,
we believe that the application of
one or more designated phytosani-
tary measures will be sumcient to
mitigate the risks of introducing or
disseminating plant pests or noxious
weeds via the importation of fresh
persimmon fruit from South Africa.”
Te full notice is available at www.
myfreshfruit.com.
– e Register
Lemons ride a
roller coaster
After several years of nuctuating
supplies and prices, lemon growers
say they’re looking forward to a better
year. Crop forecasters say California
farms should produce 8 percent more
lemons than a year ago. Farmers
are currently packing lemons, and
say harvest conditions have improved
after a slow start. Most lemons are
sold to restaurants and other food
service businesses, and California
supplies nearly 90 percent of lemons
grown in the U-S.
– California Farm Bureau
Federation
Large orange crop
awaits harvest
Another large crop of navel
oranges is awaiting harvest in the
Central Valley. Enough oranges to
fill 85 million cartons are hanging
on trees in the valley, according to
U-S Agriculture Department esti-
mates. That would be slightly fewer
navel oranges than harvested last
season but, if realized, would still
be the third-largest crop in the past
25 years. More than 96 percent
of California’s navel oranges are
grown in the Central Valley.
Light Brown Apple Moth
quarantine removed
According to a federal order
released on July 25, the Light Brown
Apple Moth quarantine was updat-
ed to include the following:
1) By removing Santa Barbara
County from the quarantined area
(in A.a.);
2) By adding Opuntia spp.
(fruit and pad), green hay, and
dormant frozen strawberry nursery
stock grown by State certined pro-
ducers to the exempted host list (in
C.1.); and
By removing trapping require-
ments for producers of regulated arti-
cles (in D.(1)e.).
Visit www.myfreshfruit.com for
more information. ■
News on the go
4 N E WS O N T H E G O S E P T E MB E R 2 0 1 1
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
Published monthly for the grape, citrus
and deciduous fruit industries in California
and sent by controlled mailing to 10,000
addresses monthly.
iuniisuii:
John Van Nortwick 1975-2010
ioiroi:
Tom Van Nortwick
editor@myagribusiness.com
associari ioiroi:
Leah Bigham
aoviirisixc associaris:
Paul Einerson, Mandy Critchley,
Ken Hockersmith and Cal Roberts
win siri:
www.myfreshfruit.com
sunsciiirioxs:
subscriber@myagribusiness.com
Fresh Fruit & Raisin
News is published
monthly by Agribusiness
Publications,
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of publisher or staff of Agribusiness Publications. Acceptance of
advertisement and some advertising editorial does not constitute
an endorsement by Agribusiness Publications or its Associates.
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News on the go News on the go News on the go News on the go News on the go News on the go News on the go News on the go News on the go A few complaints, accompanied by a few
great ideas to get us out of this mess
What do cutting regulations, flushing the train, investing in water infrastructure and
harnessing solar power have in common? They could fix what ails us.
A
s an industry we are way too
quiet on the water issues that
still face the state of California. Yes,
we realize everyone is focused four-
square on the work of the harvest,
but we cannot anord to wait until
the snow reports in January through
April to see how Agriculture and
the whole state will fare from the
winter’s storms.
We will continue to bring for-
ward the need for stronger and
more dedicated leadership from
every industry in the state, espe-
cially from our governor and leg-
islative branches. We all have an
overwhelming responsibility to
devise and implement plans that
will rebuild our broken state. We
must nnd and properly utilize the
needed revenues to not only revital-
ize the economy of the once Golden
State, but to literally rebuild its
infrastructure. From roads to water;
from business environment to gov-
ernment regulations.
We, again make the call to
stop the madness that is the drive
to build a high-speed rail system in
this state. It is fool hardy for a fam-
ily who is being evicted from their
home to arrange the needed nnanc-
ing for a luxury eight passenger
Lear Jet so they travel faster to their
desired destinations.
Why don’t the governor and
the state legislators stop what will
surely be one of the most costly
boondoggles in the state’s history?
Why don’t we taxpayers understand
the foolishness of this plan? What a
joke that we start in the least popu-
lated part of the state to acquire and
build the nrst phases.
Don’t you get that the acquisi-
tion is easer here than anywhere?
Wouldn’t you wait until you had all
the property bought and secured;
a route established? Financing
secure, operation cost covered, with
a knowledge of what it is going to
cost before we spend another dollar?
President Obama will be out of
omce in 18 months. What do you
suppose is going to happen to those
monies when that occurs? Fiscally,
intelligent people are going to stop
any and all nnancing for this disas-
ter and we will be left holding an
empty plate with egg on our face.
But complain only, we will
not. We oner this plan as a means
continued on page 9
C A L I F O R N I A F R E S H F R U I T P U B L I S H E R ' S P E R S P E C T I V E 5
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
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Union Bank’s annual Small Business Economic
Survey shows small business owners optimistic
on hiring, profits and capital spending
Small Business Jobs Act motivated just six percent of owners to apply for a loan; 96
percent of business owners surveyed do not expect layoffs in 2011
A
fter experiencing increased
sales and fewer layoffs in 2010,
more California small business
owners report an improved out-
look on profits, hiring and capital
expenditures in 2011. However,
business owners are balancing their
increased optimism with conser-
vative measures to protect their
business, according to Union
Bank’s 11th Annual Small Business
Economic Survey released today.
Te survey - the largest to
date with nearly 3,000 participants
statewide - found that a full 60
percent of small business owners
believe 2011 will be a better year
in terms of prontability, a nine
percent increase from last year and
a 26 percent increase from 2009.
Tis is the most optimistic owners
have been since 2007, when 67 per-
cent of owners statewide anticipated
improved prontability.
“After years of belt-tightening,
careful spending and trying to hold
the line on stamng levels, small
business owners are growing weary
of just ‘hanging on,’ and they’re
ready to return to prontability,”
said Executive Vice President Todd
Hollander, head of Union Bank’s
Business Banking group. “Te prof-
itability point is the most positive
development from our survey, and
it proves again why small busi-
nesses are truly the backbone of the
U.S. economy – and the specinc
insight and feedback we’ve gained
from this comprehensive survey has
national implications as California
small business owners are a catalyst
for the nation’s economic recovery.”
Improving Outlook
Te improving pront expecta-
tions follow a year of increased
sales for business owners, with 42
percent of respondents reporting
greater sales in 2010 compared
with 2009, up 14 percent from last
year’s survey. Te survey data also
show that fewer owners (17 percent)
incurred layons in 2010 than 2009
(24 percent) and 96 percent of own-
ers do not anticipate layons in 2011.
Planned increases in hiring
and capital spending add to the
optimism. Twenty-four percent of
owners expect to increase staffing
levels this year, up three percent
from last year and up nine per-
cent from 2009—when anticipa-
tion for job growth was at its
lowest level (15 percent) in the
survey’s history. Twenty-seven per-
cent of owners plan to increase
their capital expenditures this year,
up six percent from last year and
up 10 percent from 2009. Still,
most owners show restrained opti-
mism with 70 percent expecting
to maintain the same staffing lev-
els, 63 percent expecting to keep
capital expenditures similar to last
year, and 40 percent anticipating
continued vendor negotiations for
lower costs.
“After weathering substantial
challenges during the economic
downturn of the last few years, it’s
understandable that while small
business owners are increasingly
hopeful, most remain conservative
in their planned expenditures,” said
Hollander. “Te good news is that
optimism continues to edge up in
terms of prontability, hiring and
capital expenditures. Many small
business owners are waiting to see
what 2011 brings before concen-
trating on growth.”
While the majority of busi-
ness owners (57 percent) believe
that their business or industry will
have experienced a recovery by the
end of 2011, one in four business
owners believe they have already
experienced an economic recovery,
an eight percent increase from last
year. Forty-three percent anticipate
a recovery in 2012 and beyond.
Government Assistance
With 54 percent of owners
cutting their operating costs last
year, 41 percent reducing their
debt and 46 percent negotiating
with vendors for lower costs, busi-
ness owners are seeking govern-
ment assistance in the same areas
as the previous year. Sixty-one
percent of owners would like to see
the government focus more on tax
cuts for small businesses, 37 per-
cent favor temporary tax incentives
to encourage small businesses to
invest in jobs and 33 percent would
like lower health care costs to ease
the burden for small businesses.
Despite the passage of the
Small Business Jobs Act of 2010—
legislation providing small banks
with $30 billion to encourage lend-
ing to small businesses, $12 billion
in tax incentives, and expanded
Small Business Administration
(SBA) loan programs—only six
percent of owners were strongly
Annual Small Business Economic Survey
California economy
State and local business taxes
State and local regulations
0% 15% 30% 45% 60%
25%
30%
55%
26%
38%
60%
29%
37%
44%
2011
2010
2009
Top Challenges in Running a Business
Source: Union Bank research January 2011
Thursday, September 1, 2011
Top challenges in running a business
6 B U S I N E S S MA N A G E ME N T S E P T E MB E R 2 0 1 1
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
motivated to apply for these loans
or credit.
“For many small business own-
ers who have struggled with debt
over the past few years or who think
that banks aren’t lending, it will take
some time to return to a mindset of
applying for loans,” said Senior Vice
President Heather Endresen, man-
ager of Union Bank’s SBA govern-
ment lending. “At Union Bank, we
have credit available for qualined
candidates, continuing our nearly
150-year legacy of lending to small
businesses. We’re proud to be one of
the most active small business lend-
ers in the western U.S.”
According to the survey results,
the Jobs Act also had little impact
on owners’ plans for hiring. Eighty-
nine percent of owners planning
to add stan this year said their
planned increases have nothing to
do with the legislation. Only four
percent said their hiring plans are
directly attributed to the legislation.
Most small business owners, while
remaining somewhat cautious, are
tenacious and want to return to
hiring and growing their business-
es, according to Aida Alvarez, the
former head of the Small Business
Administration during the Clinton
Administration and a member of
UnionBanCal Corporation’s board
of directors.
Biggest Challenges
Since 2008, California small
business owners have continued to
identify the state’s economy as the
top challenge in running a business
in California. Forty-four percent
of owners list this factor as their
primary concern, down 16 percent
from last year. Tis renects another
part of the survey which found that
the majority of business owners (55
percent) feel that the state’s budget
crisis had a moderate or signincant
impact on their business.
For the second consecutive
year, state and local business taxes
remain the second biggest chal-
lenge for California business own-
ers. This is the primary concern
for 37 percent of owners. State
and local business regulations are
the third biggest challenge as the
primary challenge for 29 percent
of owners.
This is the first year since 2004
that workers’ compensation costs
did not rank among the top three
challenges. Concern about work-
ers’ compensation costs dropped
from 29 percent last year to 27
percent this year, ranking it as the
fifth biggest challenge to doing
business statewide. The majority
of business owners (69 percent)
reported no change in their 2010
workers’ compensation insurance
premium from the previous year.
As in last year’s survey, 26 percent
of owners reported an increase in
their premium. On average, their
premium increased 13 percent.
Other Survey Highlights
t 23 percent of business own-
ers applied for a business loan
or access to credit in 2010.
Of these business owners, 37
percent were denied a loan
or access to credit. Of those
denied, 74 percent were unable
to find alternate financing.
t 43 percent do not have a busi-
ness line of credit, up eight per-
cent from last year.
t 44 percent reported no change
in their pricing of products or
services in 2010. Twenty-nve
percent raised some prices and
lowered others in 2010.
t 41 percent offer health care cov-
erage to their employees, down
four percent from the previous
year. Apart from a slight rise in
2009, the number of business
owners offering health care cov-
erage has slowly declined since
2003 .
t 10 percent said social networking
Web sites signincantly changed
their communication with cus-
tomers or the way they promoted
their business.
t 10 percent plan to make changes
in their ownership structure. Of
these, 21 percent plan to take on
a partner and another 21 percent
plan on transferring all or part of
the ownership.
t 48 percent oner paid vacation
benents, down 14 percent since
2008.
t 42 percent are communicating
more with employees and 30
percent are onering more nex
time and part-time schedules to
keep employees motivated during
these tough nnancial times.
About the Survey
Union Bank surveyed 2,892
small business owners throughout
California from January 10-28,
2011. The businesses, defined for
the survey as having $5 million
or less in annual sales, included a
mix of bank customers and non-
customers. Business owners sur-
veyed employed an average of 13
people and have been in business
an average of 16 years. Based on
the sampling size, survey results
ref lect a +/- 2 percent margin of
error 95 percent of the time.
To view results of the survey, or
to listen to a podcast with the Head
of Business Banking for Union Bank,
visit www.myfreshfruit.com. ■
C A L I F O R N I A F R E S H F R U I T B U S I N E S S MA N A G E ME N T 7
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
USDA expands export opportunities
for American cherry producers
Cherries first U.S.
Fresh Fruit to gain
access to Western
Australia market
T
he U.S. Department of
Agriculture announced that after
10 years of negotiations, U.S. cher-
ries can now be exported to Western
Australia, making cherries the nrst
U.S. fresh fruit to gain access to that
market. Te market opening positions
Australia as the seventh most valuable
export market for U.S. cherries.
“Te market opening in Western
Australia is great news for American
sweet cherry producers of the Northwest
and even better news for American
agricultural exports, which are fore-
cast to set records this year and next
thanks to the dedication of American
producers,” said Michael Scuse, Acting
Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign
Agricultural Services. “In fact, U.S.
horticultural exports are expected to
surge going into 2012 thanks to the
high-quality of American-grown fruits
and vegetables.”
U.S. cherries from California
have had access to the eastern states
of Australia since the late 1990s
and Washington and Oregon have
been permitted to export to the
eastern Australian states since 2001.
Since that time, negotiations have
been ongoing between Biosecurity
Australia and USDA to gain access
for U.S. cherries to Western Australia,
which maintains its own regulations.
A nnal push by importers in Western
Australia resulted in the nrst cherry
import into that Australian State
last month, and Washington State
Fruit Commission/Northwest Cherry
Growers used USDA Market Access
Program funds to showcase the prod-
ucts as they arrived in Perth, in
Western Australia.
Te Australian market is a rap-
idly growing market for U.S. cher-
ries. In 2009, a record 2,334 metric
tons of cherries valued at $15.6 million
were shipped to the Australian market,
compared with $1.4 million in 1999
when the market nrst opened. Over
the years, USDA and the California
and Pacinc Northwest cherry industries
have worked together to develop the
scientinc research needed to support
the phytosanitary negotiations between
USDA and Biosecurity Australia. Tese
enorts, along with strong industry mar-
ket development, have nurtured and
maintained exports to this market.
U.S. cherries are sold in Australia
at a competitive price close to that of
Australian product, as the Australian
dollar has strengthened considerably
in the last two years, making imports
more anordable. Since U.S. cherries
are counter-seasonal to the Australian
crop, the products do not compete
directly in the marketplace.
USDA recently forecast nscal
year 2011 and 2012 exports will reach
a record $137 billion, $22 billion
higher than the previous record set
in 2008 and $28 billion above 2010.
Strong agricultural exports contribute
to the positive U.S. trade balance, cre-
ate jobs, boost economic growth and
support President Obama’s National
Export Initiative goal of doubling all
U.S. exports by the end of 2014. ■
Fresh Bing cherries. Photo by Peggy Greb
8 E X P O R T S S E P T E MB E R 2 0 1 1
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
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for Governor Brown to immedi-
ately stimulate the economy of
California.
Put the Obama stimulus money
to work in this state by utilizing it
as it should be utilized. By mak-
ing something happen that actually
stimulates the core economy of this
state, while reducing its overhead
the tax liabilities that will be placed
on the voters if you move ahead
with the high-speed rail nasco.
Immediately implement a fast-
track review process for each and
every state regulation currently
imposed on the businesses in this
state. Delete, under executive order
as many unnecessary regulations as
possible. In studies done as recently
as 2009, California’s business regu-
lations burden every small business
in this state as much as $14,000 per
year. Enough money for each busi-
ness in the state to hire one more
person. As many as 4 million new
jobs could be created short-term.
Ten use that same fast-track
review process to determine if we
need the bureaucracy that support-
ed and tracked all of those regula-
tions. It’s not the services we pro-
vide that are killing the goose that
lays the golden eggs. It’s the cost of
delivering those services. “Can we
get by with less or fewer,” needs to
be the battle cry.
Next take the funds that you
would nush down the drain on the
train and divide those funds into
two parts. One to improve and
grow the water infrastructure of the
state, with emphasis on water stor-
age, transportation and utilization.
Te other half is to be invested
in solar power with the goal of
nrst eliminating the monthly cost
of electricity for the tax payers
of California, the power used to
power the buildings and operations
of the state of California. With the
secondary goal of taking half of
the savings, investing in more solar
power production at the business
and residential levels of our state so
as to eventually reduce reliance on
other forms of power by 70 percent.
Te sun is truly free. We need to
utilize it better than ever before.
Two huge benents are derived.
First, you send all the right signals.
A signal to agriculture, a positive
signal to all business that you are
serious about nxing what is wrong
and that California is the place to
come, to stay and to invest. When
you show long-term support for
developing the means to capture
and distribute one of our great-
est natural resources and provide
a predictable means of long-term
sustainability for growing food and
nber as well as the needs of a thirsty
populous, then the business cli-
mate changes. Businesses like pre-
dictability. Tey like leadership. It
won’t always be peaches and cream,
but if they can have and count
on predictability then that changes
everything.
The side benefit of securing
long-term sustainability for farm-
ing in this state is that it will gener-
ate unmatched wealth for the state,
because it utilizes the benefits of
Raw Material Economics. Nothing
government can do will do more
than if you give the producers
of this state who are engaged in
Raw Material Economics the green
light to produce and grow. Their
efforts and wealth is multiplied
seven times their own contribu-
tion, a stimulus that could easily
reach $3.5 trillion per year if it
were implemented not only state-
wide buy nationwide.
Te second and most compel-
ling benent is when we invest in
solar with the initial goal of cutting
costs, and reinvesting the savings
you do what government has never
done before. Use common sense to
accomplish what could not be done
otherwise. How would the state
government feel about being paid
money to solve the most severe eco-
nomic crisis in its history? Tat is
what these good and right decisions
would do for our state.
Do we have the guts to make
the call? I hope so. Te solutions are
here. We just need to get up on the
noor and get started. ■
continued from page 5
C A L I F O R N I A F R E S H F R U I T P U B L I S H E R ' S P E R S P E C T I V E 9
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
W
e

su
p
p
o
rt
our local
farm
ers!
H.R. 2584 blocks EPA from stifling economic growth
I
n his address on e Ag Minute,
Chairman Frank Lucas recent-
ly discussessed H.R. 2584, the
Interior, Environment and Related
Appropriations Act of nscal year
2012. Tere are provisions in the bill
that would block the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) from
exceeding its authority and stining
economic growth with unnecessary
and costly regulations.
Read the transcript below, and
visit at www.myfreshfruit.com to
review a copy of the bill.
“Republicans in the U.S. House
of Representatives are committed to
getting our economy back on track.
“Specincally, the Agriculture
Committee has been working with
other Congressional Committees to
expose regulatory actions that threat-
en the economic viability of produc-
tion agriculture and rural economies.
“An example of these enorts is
H.R. 2584, which the House is con-
sidering this week.
“Tis bill contains critical amend-
ments to rein in the aggressive enorts
by the Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) to expand its authority
over American agriculture.
“H.R. 2584 blocks the EPA from
imposing tighter farm dust standards
and from imposing what amounts
to a cow tax on livestock producers.
Tese are unnecessary regulations
that could drive agricultural produc-
ers out of business.
“Additionally, H.R. 2584 would
eliminate a double permitting require-
ment for pesticide applications that
are already regulated. Without a leg-
islative nx, this requirement threatens
the livelihood of every farmer.
“My Republican colleagues and
I understand that our economy needs
more jobs, not more regulations. HR.
2584 blocks the EPA from exceeding
its authority and stining economic
growth along the way.”
e Ag Minute is Chairman
Lucas’s weekly radio address that is
released from the House Agriculture
Committee. To view H.R. 2584, visit
www.myfreshfruit.com. ■
Chairman of the House Committee on Agriculture, Frank Lucas
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New Center for Produce Safety chairman
has vision for food safety
A
s Steve Patricio assumes his respon-
sibilities as the new chairman of the
Center for Produce Safety and takes the
reins of this groundbreaking enort to
provide research the produce industry
can use to prevent foodborne illnesses,
he wants to assure everyone of one thing
– this is not his nrst rodeo.
Patricio is President and CEO of
Westside Produce, a major shipper of
fresh California and Arizona melons.
He has served as Chairman of the Food
Safety Committee of the California
Cantaloupe Advisory Board since its
inception in 1990. During his tenure,
Patricio weathered one of the produce
industry’s earliest known foodborne ill-
ness outbreaks. Although, the outbreak
was eventually linked to cantaloupes
produced in Mexico, for several weeks in
the middle of Central California’s major
production period for melons, sales of all
cantaloupes stopped dead in their tracks.
“It was my job to send 800 seasonal
melon workers home because of an event
that had happened two months prior
in another country,” said Patricio. “We
quickly came to the realization that it
didn’t matter if we were responsible for
making people sick – we needed to do
something about it. We needed to assure
consumers our product was safe; we
needed to better understand the science
behind our product and these patho-
gens. More importantly, we needed to
fund science-based research into how
this incident happened in the nrst place
and to make sure it never happened on
our farms.”
With that thought in mind, Patricio
became the leader of the melon industry’s
nrst mandatory food safety program.
“Our Central California canta-
loupe industry was the nrst to imple-
ment mandatory trace-back on every
carton shipped from our district, way
ahead of any government or customer
mandate,” explains Patricio. “We are
proud of what we do and how we do
it. Our families, our workers and their
families rely on the assurance that we are
producing a safe product.”
Today Patricio is still leading the
charge for cantaloupes and with his new
duties as chairman of CPS, that role
will now expand well beyond the melon
nelds of California.
“Like most of us in the produce
industry, the product we grow and ship
has never been associated with a food-
borne illness outbreak,” said Patricio.
“But we know nrsthand the damage an
outbreak can cause to the many people
who make a living bringing that healthy
product to market, as well as to the repu-
tation and sales of an entire commodity.”
As its new chairman, Patricio’s
overarching goal for CPS is to foster
wide collaboration among all produce
groups in all production areas.
“Science based research is the key to
solving food safety problems for produce
and it doesn’t matter what fruits or veg-
etables you grow – this is something we
all need to pay attention to,” said Patricio.
“Te only way we can truly prevent
foodborne illness in produce from ever
happening is to work together to fund
research and then share this knowledge
with anyone and everyone who farms,
ships, handles or consumes produce.”
For Patricio this is not just lip
service, it’s something he is putting into
practice at home. Since the 1990s, the
California melon industry has utilized
industry assessment dollars to fund a
great deal of food safety research. Most
recently, the California Cantaloupe
Board completed a couple of impor-
tant research projects by renowned food
safety scientist Dr. Trevor Suslow of the
University of California, Davis. Suslow
conducted a series of tests both in com-
mercial melon neld settings as well as in
greenhouses to analyze how pathogens,
particularly Salmonella, could poten-
tially nnd their way into packed melons.
“What Dr. Suslow learned is very
good news,” said Patricio. “Te research
connrms there is no internalization of
pathogens into cantaloupes via root
uptake and, in fact, it appears that can-
taloupes may have some natural capac-
ity to ward on salmonella systemically.”
Patricio explained that Dr. Suslow
is now further examining this phenome-
non as part of a CPS-funded project that
will look at other commodities besides
melons. Further, Patricio noted that
other California melon industry-funded
research by Suslow has provided addi-
tional nndings about certain growing
practices in California that minimize
contamination of product in the neld.
“Our intention now is to share this
research with producers in other melon
growing regions who have recently expe-
rienced issues with contaminated prod-
uct,” said Patricio. “We have learned the
hard way that the best case scenario is for
all melons to be safe. Tis is what melon
producers want and what is best for con-
sumers of melons around the world.”
Patricio explains that Dr. Suslow’s
research nndings, as well as all of the
other funded research projects of the
California melon industry, are avail-
able and posted on the website of the
California Melon Research Board at
www.cmrb.org . He urges all melon pro-
ducers to contact the California Melon
Research Board to gain access to the
research database and to see other food
safety information concerning melons so
it can be put to use on their own farms.
He also noted that the most recent
U.S. Food and Drug Agency Guide
to Minimize Microbial Food Safety
Hazards for Melons is also available on
the CMRB website.
Patricio believes the current U.S.
food safety policy environment, new leg-
islation and pending food safety regula-
tions are even more reason for producers
to band together.
“It is of the utmost importance that
we have commodity-specinc food safety
guidelines that are applicable for all
growing areas and that they really work
to protect public health,” he said. “Tat
means more and greater collaboration.
I am very happy to be a part of the
industry-wide CPS organization at this
unique time.”
Patricio concluded by saying, “Tose
who know me understand I am an out-
spoken advocate on issues that are impor-
tant to producers. I hope people recognize
they can come to me with their concerns
and know I’ll listen and try to help. “
In the meantime, Patricio urges
all members of the produce industry to
support the Center for Produce Safety.
For more information, visit
myfreshfruit.com. ■
photo by Scott Bauer, courtesy of the Agricultural Research Service
C A L I F O R N I A F R E S H F R U I T F O O D S A F E T Y 1 1
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California farmers discuss farm bill priorities for 2012
by Christine Souza
W
ith less funding likely to be
available for agricultural pro-
grams in the next federal farm bill,
California farmers and farm orga-
nizations emphasized the need to
maintain research, pest exclusion and
market development programs dur-
ing California Department of Food
and Agriculture listening sessions.
State Food and Agriculture
Secretary Karen Ross said the ses-
sions would help her better advo-
cate California farm bill priorities at
the national level. Te current farm
bill will expire in 2012, necessitating
action by Congress.
“Te most important thing that
we can do if we want to make a dif-
ference in Washington is to have
a strong, unined, California voice
around our themes that really illus-
trate for Congress that what’s good
in California is very helpful to the
future of America,” Ross said.
During a listening session in
Sacramento, California Farm Bureau
Federation President Paul Wenger said
he realizes those drafting the 2012
Farm Bill have a tough job ahead.
“We know we are facing chal-
lenging times, but just like on our
farms and ranches when we are chal-
lenged nnancially, as we sit back and
prioritize, we really can make the
decisions that will help us build for a
great future,” Wenger said.
He emphasized the importance of
continued support for research through
the U.S. Department of Agriculture
Agricultural Research Service and the
University of California.
“Cooperative Extension through
our land grant universities is so criti-
cal to where we have come as a
country agriculturally that sometimes
we overlook that it is also extreme-
ly important to our urban areas,”
Wenger said. “As we think about food
safety, food handling and nutrition
issues, we need to be really look-
ing at how we can be supportive of
Cooperative Extension.”
Dean Neal Van Alfen of the
University of California, Davis, College
of Agricultural and Environmental
Sciences said the nation “has not been
supporting agricultural research the
way it has many other areas of research
... and this is not going to help us solve
our needs for the future.”
Many speakers emphasized the
need to retain adequate funding for
plant, pest and disease programs.
At a listening session in Fresno,
Tulare County Farm Bureau
Executive Director Tricia Stever
Blattler referred to the pest and dis-
ease control and exclusion programs
as “an important and critical tool in
protecting our agricultural produc-
tion industry.”
She noted that the region’s citrus
farms face the threat of disease car-
ried by the Asian citrus psyllid.
“It is not a question of if this bug
will threaten the Central Valley, but
when. We must maintain vigilance
about keeping pest eradication and
early detection programs funded and
in place,” Stever Blattler said.
Several speakers supported
maintaining an appropriate safety
net for program crops such as corn,
cotton, rice, wheat and dairy.
Eric Erba of milk processor
California Dairies Inc. cited the coop-
erative’s recommendations for reducing
the volatility of the dairy business.
“Te basic theme for dairy pro-
ducers since 2009 has been one of
survivability,” he said.
Erba said he would like to see pro-
grams for dairy farmers that help with
risk management and enhancing inter-
national markets for dairy products.
Other speakers sought contin-
ued support for market development
programs such as the Market Access
Program.
In the 2008 Farm Bill, specialty
crops such as fruits, vegetables and nuts
earned their own section for the nrst
time. Chris Valadez of the California
Grape and Tree Fruit League noted
that his organization was one of 120
groups that formed a national coalition
known as the Specialty Crop Farm Bill
Alliance. Valadez praised the Technical
Assistance for Specialty Crops program
and advocated for a stronger emphasis
on the Specialty Crop Block Grant
program.
Claudia Reid, policy direc-
tor for California Certined Organic
Farmers, asked that the new farm
bill retain programs and funding for
organic agriculture that were added
to the 2008 Farm Bill.
Speakers highlighted the ben-
ents of farm bill conservation pro-
grams such as the Environmental
Quality Incentives Program. Nita
Vail of the California Rangeland
Trust described conservation pro-
grams as critical for California.
“We know that conservation
programs are regularly oversub-
scribed, that there are more farm-
ers and ranchers who would like to
get into the programs than funding
allows,” she said.
Wenger noted that nutrition
programs in the farm bill can benent
both farmers and consumers.
“We encourage focusing on
programs that build demand for
California’s diversity of fruits, nuts
and vegetables and get these prod-
ucts into the hands of all consum-
ers,” he said.
Still to be seen is the impact that
federal dencit-reduction enorts will have
on the farm bill debate. In October, the
House and Senate agriculture commit-
tees will submit recommendations to
the 12-member congressional dencit
reduction committee.
As the dencit-reduction debate
continues, Wenger said Farm Bureau
and other farm organizations “will be
looking at the programs important to
California farmers and seeing which
ones we can’t anord to lose and seeing
where changes could be made.”
To submit comments to CDFA
on the 2012 Farm Bill, email to
farmbill@cdfa.ca.gov or write to
California Department of Food and
Agriculture, 1220 N St., Suite 400,
Sacramento, CA 95814.
Tanks to the California Farm
Bureau Federation for granting per-
mission to reprint this item.
Editor’s note: What are your prior-
ities? Visit our Facebook page and share
your comments about what belongs in
the next farm bill. ■
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Farm Leader Calls for Balanced Energy Policy
S
mart energy policy must bal-
ance renewable and conventional
sources of energy, stress self-sum-
ciency and avoid diluting science
with politics, according to California
Farm Bureau Federation President
Paul Wenger.
Wenger discussed energy
policy during a speech hosted by
the Consumer Energy Alliance,
in conjunction with the National
Association of Regulatory Utility
Commissioners summer meeting in
Los Angeles.
“We are making progress in
renewable energy but there is still
a gap in the science and the anord-
ability of some renewable sources,”
Wenger said. “Policy makers need
to make an honest assessment of
the potential for renewable energy
sources before imposing standards
that may be impractical or impos-
sible to meet. At the same time, we
must pursue safe development of
available domestic sources, includ-
ing onshore oil supplies and the
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.”
Wenger noted that nearly
2,000 California farmers have
installed solar panels, wind tur-
bines or other forms of renew-
able energy production, making
California the No. 1 state for
on-farm energy generation. But
he warned that renewable-energy
policies have also placed some
farmland under threat.
“Tere’s a new land rush that’s
been touched on by pressure to max-
imize solar energy development,”
he said. “Solar developers look for
nat land with good solar exposure,
and that often means farmland.
Government policy should conserve
productive farmland and limit solar
development to marginally produc-
tive lands.”
Wenger said smart energy policy
should also place more emphasis on
hydroelectricity.
“Hydroelectric energy is an
important, renewable resource,
with multipurpose benefits that
include f lood control, water sup-
ply and recreation. But only hydro
facilities smaller than 30 mega-
watts count toward the state’s
renewable mandate,” he said.
“This is a case where politics
gets in the way of sound energy
decisions, because reservoir con-
struction has fallen out of favor.
We must broaden our thinking in
order to assure a safe and reliable
domestic energy supply.”
Te California Farm Bureau
Federation works to protect fam-
ily farms and ranches on behalf of
approximately 76,500 members state-
wide and as part of a nationwide
network of nearly 6.3 million Farm
Bureau members. ■
C A L I F O R N I A F R E S H F R U I T R E N E WA B L E E N E R G Y 1 3
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
Peach farmers see a ‘marginally better’ year
By Christine Souza
C
alifornia’s scaled-down freestone
peach business shows a hint of
promise this season, farmers say, fol-
lowing the closure of more than a
dozen longtime grower-packer-ship-
pers in recent years and a decision
by growers this year not to fund the
federal marketing order for the crop.
“A lot of people in the industry
are somewhat nying blind and trying
to gauge where we are overall, but to
generalize, peaches are having a mar-
ginally better year than the last few at
this point,” said Barry Bedwell, presi-
dent of the California Grape & Tree
Fruit League. “We still have a long way
to go, but I think the mild summer has
produced apparently good yields and
the quality and taste of the fruit is very
good. So that is clearly a positive.”
Tat’s hopeful news for peach
farmers, especially after 2009,
when about a dozen medium and
large growers-packers-shippers of
California stone fruit were forced
to close their doors. Rising produc-
tion costs, lower returns, a slumping
national economy and competition
from other commodities were cited
as reasons for the shutdown of the
longtime businesses.
Merced County farmer Jimmy
Johnston grows 300 acres of freestone
peaches that he sells to Dole Packaged
Foods in Atwater for the fresh-frozen
market. Although he also grows a
few cling peaches that are canned by
Seneca Foods Corp. in Modesto, he
said he has found a good market for
his fresh peaches.
“I’ve packed a few boxes for
the fresh market now and then, but
my peaches mostly go to Dole, who
freezes them,” Johnston said. “Once
harvested, we put the peaches in bins,
and Dole comes out and picks them
up from the neld and takes them back
to their facility in Atwater. Tere,
they will wash, pit and process the
fruit, which could then be packaged
as halves, sliced or diced.”
Te labor cost involved in pro-
ducing a peach crop, Johnston said,
is one reason why many of his fellow
farmers have decided to get out of the
peach business.
“Growers are just plain getting
out of peaches and planting almonds,
which require a lot less labor,”
Johnston said. “Almonds are almost
completely mechanized now, whereas
with peaches, we’re still doing prun-
ing by hand, thinning by hand and
harvesting by hand.”
Johnston was raised in a peach-
farming family that operated a pro-
cessing facility in Atwater. Te family
sold the facility to Dole about nve
years ago.
His sister Dena Cipponeri also
grows freestone peaches for the fresh-
frozen market. She and her husband
operate Cipponeri Family Farms, a
produce stand outside of Turlock, and
sell produce at 20 farmers markets in
the Bay Area and the Central Valley.
“People still love peaches. You
can them, make pies, ice cream—
they are so versatile—so peaches do
well with our customers at our pro-
duce stand and at the farmers mar-
kets,” Cipponeri said.
One plus for fresh peaches this
year is a later season caused by cooler-
than-normal spring temperatures and
rains. Tis change in timing, Bedwell
said, has resulted in fewer competing
commodities on store shelves.
“Tere’s been less competition to
this point from things like grapes and
cherries. So when you look at some
of these other competing products’
movement, the sales of peaches have
been very good,” Bedwell said.
Te balance of supply and
demand for freestone peaches may be
improving after the consolidation of
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grower-packers, Bedwell said, but the
nnal word on that won’t be known
until the end of the season. Te U.S.
Department of Agriculture National
Agricultural Statistics Service fore-
cast for July onered a crop produc-
tion forecast for the state’s 2011 free-
stone peach crop at 385,000 tons,
unchanged from 2010.
“People are hoping that by the
end of the year they’ll be able to say,
‘We were maybe prontable on most
of our varieties for the nrst time,’”
Bedwell said. “We’ll try to gather as
much information as we can at the
end and also listen to the industry
about what potential tools they need
to help them in future years.”
Fresh peach grower Jim Montross,
a neld manager at Wawona Frozen
Foods in Clovis that processes freestone
peaches for the fresh-frozen market, said
he sees only a gradual recovery.
“I believe the market is still low
in the pront zone. All of the factors
have to collect to get these guys some
returns, and it is just not quite there
yet,” Montross said. “For an acre of tree
fruit, you throw $5,000 to $6,000 at it
to get a crop and walk away with not
much. It just doesn’t make any sense.
Te margin has to be there or else the
bank will laugh you out of the omce.”
Te fresh peach business is also
adjusting to the end of the federal
marketing order for California fresh
peaches and nectarines, the California
Tree Fruit Agreement. Farmers voted
in April to dissolve the marketing
order that onered production and
marketing research, quality control
and market development.
“Te small grower, he’s probably
thinking more about keeping the 20
cents a box that was being assessed on
him and for the big guy, they think
that they can promote it themselves;
they don’t need the industry enort,”
Montross said. “What we will miss
about CTFA are the research proj-
ects they did with the University of
California as well as its weekly tabula-
tion of all of the boxes packed. We
always had an idea of how much fruit
was getting shipped and obviously
what not to pack.”
Montross said the quality of this
year’s peaches should spur demand.
“I pulled some Elegant Ladies on
of the trees and let me tell you, it is a
navorful year and that’s what sells tree
fruit. It is better than candy,” he said.
Thanks to the California Farm
Bureau Federation for granting per-
mission to print this item. ■
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Support Grows for “Eat Local, Buy California Grown Day”
T
he move to get Californians to eat more
California-grown foods has come to the
Central Valley. A resolution that calls for
Californians to choose meals made exclusively
from California-grown ingredients at least one
day a week was passed by the Fresno county
board of supervisors and other valley counties
are being encouraged to pass similar measures.
“We are pleased to see the support grow
for this effort,” said Kathleen Nave, president
of the California Table Grape Commission.
“Fresno County is the third largest producer
of table grapes in the state, so support from
its board of supervisors shows the importance
the county places on agriculture. We look for-
ward to seeing other counties pass resolutions
in support of the Eat Local, Buy California
Grown Day.”
According to Fresno County’s 2010 Annual
Crop and Livestock Report, farmers and ranch-
ers in Fresno County produced a record $5.9
billion in crops and commodities in 2010, more
than any county in the nation. Grapes (wine,
table, raisin), for the ninth year in a row, were
the top valued crop in the county. Nearly all
(99 percent) of the table grapes commercially
grown in the U.S. are from California.
“Consumers all over the world recognize
California for the quality of its agriculture,” said
Nave. “Valley shoppers have the opportunity to
support their local economy and enjoy some of
the best food in the world at the same time.”
California consumers can show support by
signing a pledge to dedicate a day to eating local
on the Eat Local, Buy California Grown Day
Facebook page: www.facebook.com/eatlocalbuy-
californiagrown.
The California Table Grape Commission was
created by the California legislature in 1967 to
increase worldwide demand for fresh California
grapes through a variety of research and promo-
tional programs. ■
We are excited to announce that California
Fresh Fruit has gone live with the mobile
version of our website! You can access the
site by typing www.myfreshfruit.com into
your browser. If you have any complications
or feedback, please let us know by emailing
us at editor@myfreshfruit.com or sharing
your comments on our Facebook page. We
hope you can benefit from this convenient
new feature and look forward to getting
more information into your hands.
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White House announces first ever oil savings
standards for heavy duty trucks, buses
Saving $50 billion in fuel costs and over 500 million barrels of oil
P
resident Obama met with indus-
try omcials on Aug. 9 to discuss
the nrst of their kind fuel emciency
and greenhouse gas pollution stan-
dards for work trucks, buses, and
other heavy duty vehicles and to thank
them for their leadership in nnaliz-
ing a successful national program for
these vehicles. Tis meeting marks the
Administration’s announcement of the
standards, which will save American
businesses who operate and own these
commercial vehicles approximately $50
billion in fuel costs over the life of
the program. Te U.S. Department
of Transportation (DOT) and the
Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) developed the standards in close
coordination with the companies that
met with the President as well as other
stakeholders, following requests from
companies to develop this program.
Te cost savings for American busi-
nesses are on top of the $1.7 trillion
that American families will save at the
pump from the historic fuel-emciency
standards announced by the Obama
Administrations for cars and light duty
trucks, including the model year 2017-
2025 agreement announced by the
President last month.
“While we were working to
improve the emciency of cars and
light-duty trucks, something inter-
esting happened,” said President
Obama. “We started getting letters
asking that we do the same for medi-
um and heavy-duty trucks. Tey were
from the people who build, buy, and
drive these trucks. And today, I’m
proud to have the support of these
companies as we announce the nrst-
ever national policy to increase fuel
emciency and decrease greenhouse
gas pollution from medium-and
heavy-duty trucks.”
“Thanks to the Obama
Administration, for the nrst time in
our history we have a common goal
for increasing the fuel emciency of
the trucks that deliver our products,
the vehicles we use at work, and the
buses our children ride to school,” said
Secretary LaHood. “Tese new stan-
dards will reduce fuel costs for busi-
nesses, encourage innovation in the
manufacturing sector, and promote
energy independence for America.”
“Tis Administration is commit-
ted to protecting the air we breathe
and cutting carbon pollution – and
programs like these ensure that we
can serve those priorities while also
reducing our dependence on import-
ed oil and saving money for driv-
ers,” said EPA Administrator Lisa P.
Jackson. “More emcient trucks on
our highways and less pollution from
the buses in our neighborhoods will
allow us to breathe cleaner air and
use less oil, providing a wide range of
benents to our health, our environ-
ment and our economy.”
Under the comprehensive
new national program, trucks and
buses built in 2014 through 2018
will reduce oil consumption by a
projected 530 million barrels and
greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution
by approximately 270 million met-
ric tons. Like the Administration’s
historic car standards, this program
– which relies heavily on on-the-
shelf technologies – was developed in
coordination with truck and engine
manufacturers, neet owners, the State
of California, environmental groups
and other stakeholders.
Te joint DOT/EPA program will
include a range of targets which are
specinc to the diverse vehicle types
and purposes. Vehicles are divided
into three major categories: combina-
tion tractors (semi-trucks), heavy-duty
pickup trucks and vans, and vocational
vehicles (like transit buses and refuse
trucks). Within each of those catego-
ries, even more specinc targets are laid
out based on the design and purpose
1 8 E N V I R O N ME N T S E P T E MB E R 2 0 1 1
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
of the vehicle. Tis nexible structure
allows serious but achievable fuel em-
ciency improvement goals charted for
each year and for each vehicle category
and type.
Te standards are expected to
yield an estimated $50 billion in net
benents over the life of model year 2014
to 2018 vehicles, and to result in sig-
nincant long-terms savings for vehicle
owners and operators. A semi-truck
operator could pay for the technology
upgrades in under a year and realize net
savings of $73,000 through reduced
fuel costs over the truck’s useful life.
Tese cost saving standards will also
reduce emissions of harmful air pol-
lutants like particulate matter, which
can lead to asthma, heart attacks and
premature death.
By the 2018 model year, the
program is expected to achieve sig-
nincant savings relative to current
levels, across vehicle types. Certain
combination tractors – commonly
known as big-rigs or semi-trucks –
will be required to achieve up to
approximately 20 percent reduction
in fuel consumption and greenhouse
gas emissions by model year 2018,
saving up to 4 gallons of fuel for every
100 miles traveled.
For heavy-duty pickup trucks
and vans, separate standards are
required for gasoline-powered and
diesel trucks. Tese vehicles will be
required to achieve up to approx-
imately 15 percent reduction in
fuel consumption and greenhouse
gas emissions by model year 2018.
Under the nnalized standards a
typical gasoline or diesel powered
heavy-duty pickup truck or van
could save one gallon of fuel for
every 100 miles traveled.
Vocational vehicles – including
delivery trucks, buses, and garbage
trucks – will be required to reduce
fuel consumption and greenhouse
gas emissions by approximately 10
percent by model year 2018. Tese
trucks could save an average of one
gallon of fuel for every 100 miles
traveled.
Beyond the direct benents to
businesses that own and operate these
vehicles, the program will also benent
consumers and businesses by reduc-
ing costs for transporting goods, and
spur growth in the clean energy sector
by fostering innovative technologies
and providing regulatory certainty
for manufacturers. ■
C A L I F O R N I A F R E S H F R U I T E N V I R O N ME N T 1 9
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California’s rural traffic fatality
rate is fifth highest in nation
State’s rural roads and bridges are deteriorated and may not support economic
growth and mobility demands.
A
merica’s rural heartland is
home to approximately 50 mil-
lion people and its natural resourc-
es provide the primary source of
the energy, food and fiber that
supports the nation’s economy and
way of life. But, according to a new
report, the roads and bridges that
serve and connect the nation’s rural
areas face a number of significant
challenges, including inadequate
capacity to handle the growing
levels of traffic and commerce,
limited connectivity, the inability
to accommodate growing freight
travel, deteriorated road and bridge
conditions, a lack of desirable safe-
ty features, and a traffic fatal-
ity rate far higher than all other
roads and highways. The report,
“Rural Connections: Challenges
and Opportunities in America’s
Heartland,” was released by TRIP,
a national non-prof it transpor-
tation research group based in
Washington, D.C. It defines Rural
America as all places outside of
urban areas of 5,000 or more.
Despite a recent decrease in the
overall fatality rate on America’s
roads, traffic crashes and fatalities
on California’s rural roads remain
disproportionately high, occurring
at a rate more than four times
higher than on all other roads.
California ranks second in the
nation in the number of fatalities
on the state’s rural, non-Interstate
roads and fifth in the nation in
the traffic fatality rate on its rural,
non-Interstate roads. In 2009,
California’s non-Interstate rural
roads had a traffic fatality rate of
2.86 deaths for every 100 million
vehicle miles of travel, compared to
a fatality rate on all other roads of
0.68 deaths per 100 million vehi-
cle miles of travel. Of the 3,081
traffic fatalities that occurred in
California in 2009, 1,164 were
on rural, non-Interstate roads.
Inadequate roadway safety design,
longer emergency vehicle response
times and the higher speeds trav-
eled on rural roads are factors in
the higher traffic fatality rate.
According to the TRIP report,
California has the fifteenth highest
percentage of major rural pave-
ments in poor condition. In 2008,
18 percent of the state’s major rural
roads were rated in poor condi-
tion and another 52 percent were
rated in mediocre or fair condition.
California also ranks nineteenth
in the nation in the percentage
of rural bridges that are structur-
ally deficient. In 2010, 14 percent
of California’s rural bridges were
rated as structurally deficient and
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13 percent were functionally obso-
lete.
“Californians deserve to get
where we’re going safely, whether
driving to shopping areas, trying
to connect to an Interstate, visiting
a state park or national forest, or
going to the wine country or ski-
ing,” said Bert Sandman, chairman
of Transportation California. The
TRIP report shows that inade-
quate roadway safety design, longer
emergency vehicle response times
and the higher speeds traveled on
rural roads are factors in the high-
er traffic fatality rate, particularly
on two-lane roads. “Many vital
connector routes between towns
and cities and between the major
north-south freeways are hazardous
two-lane roads,” Sandman said.
“If the funding is provided, these
roads can be modernized and made
safer,” he said.
“The safety and quality of life
in America’s small communities
and rural areas and the health
of the nation’s economy ride on
our rural transportation system.
This backbone of the heartland
allows mobility and connectivity
for millions of rural Americans
and provides crucial links from
farm to market, moves manufac-
tured and energy products, and
provides access to countless tour-
ist and recreational destinations,”
said Will Wilkins, executive direc-
tor of TRIP. “But, with long-
term federal transportation legisla-
tion stuck in political gridlock in
Washington, America’s rural com-
munities and economies could face
even higher unemployment and
decline. Funding the moderniza-
tion of our rural transportation
system will create jobs and help
ensure long-term economic devel-
opment and quality of life in rural
America.”
According to the TRIP report,
America must adopt transportation
policies that will improve rural
transportation connectivity, safe-
ty and conditions to provide the
nation’s small communities and
rural areas with the level of safe
and efficient access that will sup-
port quality of life and enhance
economic productivity. This can
be done, in part, by modernizing
and extending key routes to accom-
modate personal and commercial
travel, improving public transit
access to rural areas, implementing
needed roadway safety improve-
ments, improving emergency
response times, and adequately
funding state and local transporta-
tion programs to insure sufficient
preservation and maintenance of
rural transportation assets. ■
C A L I F O R N I A F R E S H F R U I T R U R A L N E WS 2 1
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
CONTACT: CARLOS PEREZ 8319025525 OR FRANK KENDRICK 5592170048 CONTACT: CARLOS PEREZ 8319025525 OR FRANK KENDRICK 5592170048
SureHarvest Awarded
“Game Changer”
of the Year
Honored as One of California’s
Most Innovative Businesses
SureHarvest has been selected
as “California’s 2011 Leaders In
Agriculture Innovation” by Grow-
California for its cutting-edge
approach to business, which has a
positive impact on California’s agri-
cultural industry and economy.
Te award was presented by
California Secretary of Agriculture,
Karen Ross, and USDA Rural
Development State Director, Dr.
Glenda Humiston, at a special cer-
emony during the inaugural California
Agriculture innovation conference on
the campus of U.C. Davis on July 21st.
“Te SureHarvest team has been
working hard to mainstream sus-
tainability as a core business strat-
egy in California’s agrifood sector
by adapting continuous improve-
ment approaches common in manu-
facturing to the demanding condi-
tions found on the farm and inside
food processing and winery facili-
ties. California agriculture is a global
leader in operational emciency, qual-
ity, and most recently sustainabil-
ity. I’m thrilled SureHarvest’s con-
tributions to California agriculture is
being recognized through the“Game
Changer” award”, announced Jen
Dlott, SureHarvest CEO.
“SureHarvest is a true game
changer in its innovative approach,”
said Jon Gregory, president and
CEO of Grow California. He added,
“It is a business that has caught
the interest of numerous investors,
bankers and economic development
organizations who consulted with
us to identify California agricultur-
al companies who were impressed
by their focus on innovation.”
Koch Agronomic Services
reaches agreement
to acquire assets of
Agrotain International
AGROTAIN International
announced today that it has signed a
dennitive agreement to sell its assets
to Koch Agronomic Services, LLC,
a subsidiary of Koch Fertilizer, LLC.
Te transaction is subject to regula-
tory approval and certain other clos-
ing conditions. Te deal is expected
to close in the third quarter.
“Te AGROTAIN business has
experienced great success and such
rapid growth that additional resourc-
es are needed to meet demand,”
said Mike Stegmann, president of
AGROTAIN International. “As
Koch has a strong presence in the
fertilizer business, they approached
us about possibly working together.
We saw how their resources could
help bolster our position as a market
leader in the enhanced emciency
fertilizer business and it evolved
into an oner to purchase.”
“AGROTAIN International is
an outstanding company with a
long history of providing value-
added products and a dedicated,
customer-focused workforce,” said
Steve Packebush, president of Koch
Fertilizer. “Te organization truly
has an entrepreneurial spirit that
lends itself well to take advantage
of signincant growth opportunities
within the enhanced emciency fer-
tilizer market.
Farm Aid President
Willie Nelson to be
inducted into the
Agricultural Hall of Fame
Farm Aid and the National
Agricultural Center and Hall of Fame
announced that Farm Aid founder
and president Willie Nelson will be
inducted into the Agricultural Hall
of Fame.
Nelson was honored in a cer-
emony that took place the morn-
ing before Farm Aid’s 2011 concert
at LIVESTRONG Sporting Park in
Kansas City, Kan last month.
“We want to recognize Mr.
Nelson for his long commitment
to America’s family farmers,” said
Cathi Hahner, executive director of
the National Agricultural Center and
Hall of Fame. “To this day, he con-
tinues the work that he started back
2 2 P E O P L E & P L A C E S S E P T E MB E R 2 0 1 1
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
in 1985 when he, along with John
Mellencamp and Neil Young, orga-
nized the nrst Farm Aid concert, rais-
ing millions of dollars and drawing
enormous attention to the devastat-
ing economic problems faced by this
country’s family farmers and their
communities.”
As Farm Aid’s founder and presi-
dent, Nelson has been a champion
in the work to raise awareness about
the loss of family farms and to raise
funds to keep farm families on their
land. Over the past 26 years, Farm
Aid has raised more than $39 mil-
lion to promote a strong and resilient
family farm system of agriculture that
ensures farmers a fair living, strength-
ens our communities, protects our
natural resources and delivers good
food for all.
“I am extremely honored and
humbled to join the company of the
38 prominent inductees already in
the Agricultural Hall of Fame,” said
Nelson. “I have long said that family
farmers are the backbone of our coun-
try. I never thought Farm Aid would
need to be around as long as it has been,
but we know our country needs family
farmers, and Farm Aid will be here as
long as family farmers need us. It’s up
to all of us to work together to keep
family farmers growing.”
Te Agricultural Hall of Fame’s
inductees include George Washington
Carver, John Deere, Louise Stanley
and Tomas Jenerson. Te National
Agricultural Center and Hall of Fame
was issued a rare federal charter by
the act of the 86th Congress to serve
as the national museum of agriculture
and to honor the American farmer.
Today, it sits on a 164 acre complex
in the Kansas City, Kan., metro area
that includes the Agricultural Hall
of Fame, Museum of Farming, Farm
Town USA, Poultry Museum and the
National Farmers Memorial, which
stands as the nation’s only national
monument honoring the American
farmer — past, present and future.
Musco Family Olive
Co. Awarded “Game
Changer of the Year”
Family-Owned, Leading Olive
Supplier Recognized at California
Agriculture Innovation Conference
in Energy Emciency and Renewable
Energy Category
Family-owned, Musco Family
Olive Co., the nation’s leading
supplier of table olives, was hon-
ored as a “California 2011 Leader
in Innovation in Energy and
Agriculture” by Grow-California for
its cutting-edge approach to busi-
ness which has a positive impact on
California’s agricultural industry and
economy. Musco received the “Game
Changer of the Year” Award in the
category of Innovation in Energy and
Agriculture and earned the recogni-
tion specincally for its most recent
initiative – the Renewable Energy
and Wastewater System (RENEWS).
According to Felix Musco, CEO
of Musco Family Olive Co., more
than 15 tons of olive pits, previously
considered waste, are converted to
carbon-neutral heat energy each day
through RENEWS. Energy from the
pits is used to evaporate wastewater
and to drive the largest industrial
steam engine in the United States,
at Musco’s Tracy, California head-
quarters. RENEWS was invented
and patented by leading specialist,
Frank Schubert, CEO and founder
of Combined Solar Technologies, on-
site at Musco’s facilities. More than
half of the facility’s electrical needs
will be supplied by the system.
“Receiving the ‘Game Changer
of the Year’ Award underscores
Musco’s commitment to environ-
mental stewardship and to providing
for future generations,” said Musco,
representing the third generation of
the Musco family legacy. “Our goal
is a 100 percent renewable practice,
where every olive processed within
the facility is also helping our planet.”
Musco’s environmental steward-
ship extends to multiple innovations,
including recycling more than 90 per-
cent of all its water through a closed-
loop system and extensive diversion
from landnlls, either through ben-
encial reuse on-site or via on-site
institutional recycling. Musco is the
nrst food processor in the United
States to utilize NyPa crop forage to
address soil salinity. Te company is
also dedicated to innovative transport
and packaging processes.
“Musco Family Olive Co. is a
true game changer in its innovative
approach,” said Jon Gregory, presi-
dent and CEO of Grow California.
“RENEWS caught the interest of
numerous investors, bankers and
economic development organiza-
tions who consulted with us to
identify California agricultural
companies with an impressive focus
on innovation.”
“We are proud of our hard-
earned legacy as being the leading
olive producer in the nation, but we
are even more proud of our dedica-
tion and investment to doing busi-
ness in a way that is healthy for our
environment and community,” said
Musco. “It doesn’t matter the size
of your business. We are proof that
innovative environmental solutions
are attainable.”
Te award was presented by
California Secretary of Agriculture,
Karen Ross, and USDA Rural
Development State Director, Dr.
Glenda Humiston, at a special cer-
emony today during the inaugural
California Agriculture Innovation con-
ference on the campus of U.C. Davis.
Winners were selected because of their
focus on innovation and contributions
to California’s economic growth. ■
C A L I F O R N I A F R E S H F R U I T P E O P L E & P L A C E S 2 3
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
WANTED
VINEYARDS & ORCHARDS FOR 2011-2012 SEASON
Call: 559-470-7599 And let’s talk!
Road is bumpy one for farm equipment
By Don Curlee
W
hile farming in California is
among the state’s few econom-
ic bright spots, those who supply
heavy equipment to farmers are busy
steering away from ruts in the road.
It takes an optimistic outlook for
a farmer to invest $300,000 in a large
combine, super sized tractor, other
harvesting or specialized equipment.
And when equipment dealers explain
that it might be 10 months or more
before his order can be delivered the
farmer’s optimism must be long term.
Delayed delivery is not the only
obstacle that farm equipment dealers
are encountering in behalf of their
customers. Te price of
new equipment is a bar-
rier in itself. Worse, fab-
rication of some units
is delayed or diverted
for lack of parts. Some
hiccups in the Japanese
economy have inter-
fered with traditionally
prompt delivery of parts
and replacement items.
Te cost of delivery
has increased as shippers are faced
with higher prices for gasoline and
delays and increased costs for parts to
maintain their trucks.
Te cost and inconvenience of
regulations, most
of them imposed by
the state, cause farm
equipment dealers to
invest extra time and
money to meet and
maintain them, record
their compliance and
report it when asked
to. Regulations, espe-
cially those with ques-
tionable goals, are
more than inconvenient. Complying
takes a dealer’s time away from other
pront centered activities.
Bill Garton, one of the state’s
largest farm equipment dealers
with outlets in Modesto, Newman,
Stockton, Tulare, Turlock, Santa
Rosa and Ukiah underscores the
bumps in the road enumerated
above, but says the farm equipment
business is good. “If agriculture does
well we do well.’ he said. “I am glad
to be in agriculture.”
Steven Koste, Executive Vice
President of the Far West Equipment
Dealers Ass’n,, agreed with Garton’s
view of the global innuences on avail-
ability and cost of farm equipment.
Koste also drew the contrast
between California agriculture and
typical Midwest farm production of
only a few crops. He noted that most
segments of Western agriculture are
doing well, but emphasized the strug-
gles of the dairy industry as it faces
increasing costs of feed and other
essential inputs.
Te association he manages
includes dealers in seven western
states, providing him with a regional
overview. He, like Garton, pinpointed
costly regulatory restrictions that cause
dealers and farmers to invest heavily to
comply. Most of the regulations are
state imposed, but some originate at
the national level.
Koste said dealers are trying
to “partner” with their custom-
ers in planning ahead, anticipat-
ing equipment deliveries three to
12 months down the road. “Lead
time for deliveries definitely has
increased,” he said.
He noted that the availability of
water for irrigation is a major factor
wherever he goes. “Water is the com-
mon denominator,” he said.
For a banker’s point of view we
contacted Vernon Crowder, a nnancial
analyst specializing in agriculture for
Rabobank, and located in the bank’s
Fresno headquarters.. His full analysis
of the farm equipment sector is pend-
ing, but he sees strong buying power
among many farmers. He said data
collected by the U. S. Department of
Agriculture show the farm equipment
industry to be doing well.
At another level, one manufac-
turer of wind machines for frost pro-
tection said citrus growers are install-
ing his product at a brisk pace. His
sales through June were equal to his
total performance for the preceding
year, and that was a banner year for
him and his company.
Some wonder how California’s
two major farm equipment shows
continue to expand each year, and
attract larger numbers of farmers and
growers. Te farm equipment industry
seems to have the answers: farmers are
doing well; they have money to spend,
and farm equipment is always one of
their favorite places to invest it. ■
Don Curlee
2 4 A G AT L A R G E S E P T E MB E R 2 0 1 1
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
BioFlora
®
biological solutions
take crop yields to the next
level—naturally.
Synthetic fertilizers alone can’t
create the microbially diverse soils
needed to maximize yields and
achieve the highest profits.
Maximum crop yields always
come from fertile, bio-active,
carbon-rich soils.
The world’s best soil fertility
programs start with BioFlora
®

biological solutions, which are
scientifically formulated to create
microbially diverse soils, increase
soil humus, and add carbon-rich
organic acids. BioFlora
®
products
create bio-active soils that
stimulate microbe proliferation —
converting soil organic matter into
plant-available forms and storing
nutrients and moisture for plant
use. Highest yields come from this
symbiotic relationship between
soils and plants.
The reciprocal arrangement
between crops and soil results
in increased crop production,
improved synthetic fertilizer
conversion, and long-range
soil fertility.
Contact BioFlora
®
and create
the perfect partnership today.
E-mail: sales@bioflora.com
Toll-Free: 1-888-bioflora
Web: www.bioflora.com
16121 W. Eddi e Al ber t Way
Goodyear, Ari zona 85338
BioFlora
®
nurtures
the partnership
between crops
and soil.
BioFlora
®
nurtures
the partnership
between crops
and soil.
The delicious secret to a healthy freezer
O
ne of the best ways to get more
of nature’s healthiest superfoods
into your daily diet is to “think fro-
zen.” Frozen fruits and vegetables
retain their nutritional value just as
well as fresh. And when it comes to
taste, one superfood is a freezer super-
star: Wild Blueberries.
Tese delicious little blue pow-
erhouses have superior antioxidant
capacity compared with other fruits
and veggies — and they’re available
year-round in your grocer’s freezer.
Stock up and turn your own freezer
into a daily source of health-pro-
moting superfood. Studies show that
Wild Blueberries may help combat
cancer, heart disease and the enects of
aging. Brain benents include:
t Improving motor skills
t Reversing short-term memory loss
Tere’s no real secret to eating
healthy. Just have a ready supply of
Wild Blueberries in your freezer so
you can enjoy these delicious recipes
any time, in any season. Get more
wildly healthy recipes at www.wild-
blueberries.com.
Wild Blueberries grow naturally
in the nelds and barrens of Maine
and Canada, and are fresh frozen at
the peak of their antioxidant power.
You’ll nnd them in your grocer’s fro-
zen food section — they’re easy and
anordable all year-round.
Wild Blueberries pack a bigger
antioxidant punch than their larg-
er, cultivated cousins. And because
they’re smaller, they also freeze per-
fectly, maintaining superior color,
texture and sweet and tangy navor.
Tandoori Chicken
Sticks with Wild
Blueberry Fig Sauce
Serves 4 as entrée or 12 as an appetizer
Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless
chicken breast
1 package Tandoori Tikka or
Tandoori Chicken marinade
1/2 cup low-fat, plain yogurt
2/3 cup frozen Wild Blueberries
1/2 cup Wild Blueberry jam
1/2 cup chopped fresh ngs (or substi-
tute pears)
1/2 teaspoon orange zest
2/3 cup cooked red lentils
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon powdered coriander
1 tablespoon oil or cooking spray
Skewers
Directions
Chop chicken into bite-sized
chunks.
Stir together Tandoori Tikka
and yogurt in medium bowl and add
chicken. Cover and let marinate for
at least 1 hour.
Sauce: Stir together Wild
Blueberries and jam in a small sauce-
pan. Rinse and chop ngs. Add ngs
and orange zest. Cook sauce stir-
ring until it just comes to a simmer.
Remove from heat, cool slightly. Add
lentils and season with salt, pepper
and coriander.
Pre-heat oven to 425°F. Remove
chicken from marinade and drain in
a colander. Place chicken pieces in an
oiled 11 x 13-inch glass baking dish,
without allowing them to touch.
Roast 8 to 10 minutes until
done. Place chicken on skewers.
Serve with the Wild Blueberry dip-
ping sauce. Traditionally accompa-
nied by rice as an entrée.
Nutritional Information per
Serving: 123 calories, 1g fat, 130mg
sodium, 14g carbohydrates, 1g nber,
14g protein, 30mg cholesterol. ■
Wild Blueberries
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
C A L I F O R N I A F R E S H F R U I T H E A R T H A N D H O ME 2 5
Index to advertisers
A&E Pressure Washers
www.aefresno.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Agro-K
www.agro-k.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
ALW Enterprises, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
A&P Ag Structures
www.aandpag.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Brandt Monterey
www.montereyagresources.com . . . . . . . . . . 20
Brandt Monterey
www.montereyagresources.com . . . . . . . . . . 28
CCIS Insurance
www.ccisinsurance.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Diamond West Farming, Co., Inc. . . . . . . 23
Duarte Nursery
www.duartenursery.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Fowler Nurseries
www.fowlernurseries.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Fresno Equipment
www.fresnoequipment.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Global Organics
www.bioora.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Golden State Irrigation Systems
www.goldenstateirr.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Great Western Sales
www.greatwesternsales.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Hansen Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Hard Hitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
hardhitter.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Hedrick’s Chevrolet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
H.F. Haun
www.hfhau.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Jorgensen Company
www.jorgensenco.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Kern County Tractor Parts
www.kerncountytractor.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Kingsburg Cultivator, Inc.
www.kci-mfg.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Kingsburg Cultivator, Inc.
www.kci-mfg.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Kings Canyon Wood Products
www.kingscanyonwood.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Lamanuzzi & Pantaleo Dehydrators . . . . . 22
Lockwood Seed and Grain . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Lockwood Seed and Grain . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Mana Financial
www.mananancial.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Mid-Valley Distributors, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 26
Mitchell Insurance Services
www.mitchellagins.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Oregon Blueberry Farms
www.oreblueberry.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Pacinc Distributing
www.orchard-right.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Pacinc Western Container
www.pacicwestern.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Pistacchio Pump Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Sierra Gold Nurseries
www.sierragoldtrees.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Strathmore Ladder
www.strathmoreladder.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Sunnyside
www.clubsunnyside.net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Superior Soil
www.superiorsoil.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Surveillance integration
www.survint.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Sustainable Ag Expo
www.sustainableagexpo.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Tri-Cal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
United Site Services
www.unitedsiteservices.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Valley Agricultural Software . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Vamco
www.vamco.biz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Water Changers, Inc.
www.waterchangers.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Weed Badger
www.weedbadger.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
West Hills Gypsum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
YNT Harvesting
tonyynt@earthlink.net. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2 6 I N D E X T O A D V E R T I S E R S S E P T E MB E R 2 0 1 1
W W W . M Y F R E S H F R U I T . C O M
Knowledge, Service, Honesty & Price, This is not just our motto, It’s the Nuts & Bolts of our Company
SINCE 1946
THE VALLEY'S LARGEST FASTENER DISTRIBUTOR
MID-VALLEY
DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
Ph. (559) 485-2660
3886 E. Jensen • Fresno, CA 93725
Ask about our Volume Discount Pricing
SINCE 1946
THE VALLEY'S LARGEST FASTENER DISTRIBUTOR
MID-VALLEY
DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
Ph. (559) 485-2660
3886 E. Jensen • Fresno, CA 93725
Phone (559) 485-2660
Fax (559) 485-1611
Free Delivery • Competitive Pricing • Large IN-STOCK Inventory
Custom Special Orders NO Problem!
OVER ONE HUNDRED MILLION PIECES IN STOCK
SINCE 1946 THE VALLEY'S LARGEST FASTENER DISTRIBUTOR
MID-VALLEY
DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
3886 East Jensen
Fresno, CA 93725
BOLTS
RIVETS
THREADED ROD
CHAIN & FITTINGS
NUTS
CUTTING TOOLS
SCREWS
ANCHORS
POWER TOOLS
WASHERS
MISCELLANEOUS
STOCKING DISTRIBUTOR FOR:
• Large variety of fasteners are available in Metric, Stainless, Brass, Nylon, Etc.
• Custom Fabricated and Special Order items are welcome.
•Custom designed “BIN STOCKING” programs to meet your specific “VENDOR MANAGED INVENTORY” needs.
Anchor (foundation)
Carriage
Elevator
Eye Bolts
Flange
Grade 2,5,8,9,B-7
Hanger
Lag
Metric
Plow
Square
A235 Structural
A325 T/C Bolts
Aluminum
Bulb
Drive Rivets
Huck Bolts
Mono-Bolts
Nutsert
Pins & Collars
Pop Rivets
Olympic Bulb Rivets
Rivets Nuts
Rivet Tools (hand/air)
Solid Steel
Acme
Brass
Cold Roll Stock
Left Hand
Stainless
B-7
B-7 Studs
GR-2 Zinc
Alloy
High Test
Hooks and Fittings
Proof Coil
Quick Links
Snaps
Stainless
Transportation
Weldless
Acme
Barrel
Bin (die)
Caged
Cap
Channel (Spring Nuts)
Clinch / Captive
Conduit Locknut
Coupling
Hex Castle
Heavy
Hex
High
Hot-Dip Galv.
Jam
Keps
Left Hand
Slotted
Square
Tee
Tinnerman
Well
Wing A325/24
2-H
Drop In
Epoxy(s)
Expansion
E-Z Anchors
Foundation
Hollow Wall
Lead Anchors
Nylon & Steel Nail-In
Plastic
Powder Actuated
Rawl Spikes
Sleeve
Tapcon
Toggle Bolts
Wedge
Cordless Drills
TEK Drivers
Drill Motors
Grinders
Jig Saw
Magnetic Drill Press
Recip Saws
Drywall Drivers
Rotary Hammers
Coach
Composite Deck Screws
Decking
Drywall
Floor Torx
K-Lath
Machine
Roof Deck
Security
Sems
Sharp Point
Sheet Metal
Socket Head
Square Drive
Square Head Set
Star Drive Wood Screw
TEK (self drilling)
Thread Cutting
Thumb
Trim Head
Wood
A.N.
Anti-Turn
Bevel
Countersunk
Disc. L/W
Fender
Finish
Heavy
Hi-Collar L/W
Load Indicator
Machinery
Malleable
Lock
S.A.E.
Specials
Spring Lock Washer
Square
Steel / Neo
U.S.S.
F436/Structural
GR-8 & GR-9
A / C Cable
Abrasives
Anaerobic Thread Lockers
Anti-Seize
Bolt Bins
Brass Fittings
C-Clamps
Clevis
Cotter Pins
Cutting & Tapping Oil
Fall Protection
Flashings
Firestop
Grease Fittings
HeliCoil Inserts & Kits
Hold Downs
Hose Clamps
JK Staples & Tools
Key Stock
Nylon Ties
Pipe Fittings
Paint
Screwdriver Insert Bits
Spacers & Standoffs
Spiral Wrap
Tape
Terminals/Connectors
Trays
Turnbuckles
Two-Way Radios
Lumber Connectors
WD-40 / Lubricants
Woodruff Keys
LOCKING NUTS
Annular Cutters
Diamond Core Bits
Carbide Tip Hole Saws
Flat Boring Bits
Hack Saw Blades
Haugen Cutters
High Speed Drill Bits
High Speed Taps
Hole Saws
Jigsaw Blades
Recip Blades
Rotor Hammer Bits
Wood Augers
Flange (whiz)
Flex-Lock
Grade C
Nylon Insert
Reversing
STRUT & FITTINGS
Beam Clamps
Channel (strut)
Clevis Hangers
Deck Inserts
Fittings
J Hangers
Pipe Clamps
Pipe Piers
Post Bases
U Bolts
www.midvalleydist.com
AEARO SAFETY
ALEMITE
AVDEL
BOSCH
BUILDEX
CM CHAIN
CAMCAR
CAPTIVE
CHICAGO HARDWARE
CONSTRUCTION ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS
DIAMOND PRODUCTS
ERICO
FIRESTOP
HINDLEY
HELICOIL
JACKSON SAFETY
KENWOOD PROTALK RADIOS
LEGRIS
LENOX
MILWAUKEE
OLYMPIC FASTENERS
PANASONIC
PARKER
PERMATEX
POP-RIVET
POWERS
RAMSET / REDHEAD
RUST-OLEUM
SOUTHCO
SPS TECHNOLOGIES
TOLCO
UNISTRUT
USP
WESANCO
Custom Special Orders NO Problem!
Phone (559) 485-2660
Fax (559) 485-1611
Free Delivery • Competitive Pricing • Large IN-STOCK Inventory
Custom Special Orders NO Problem!
OVER ONE HUNDRED MILLION PIECES IN STOCK
SINCE 1946 THE VALLEY'S LARGEST FASTENER DISTRIBUTOR
MID-VALLEY
DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
3886 East Jensen
Fresno, CA 93725
BOLTS
RIVETS
THREADED ROD
CHAIN & FITTINGS
NUTS
CUTTING TOOLS
SCREWS
ANCHORS
POWER TOOLS
WASHERS
MISCELLANEOUS
STOCKING DISTRIBUTOR FOR:
• Large variety of fasteners are available in Metric, Stainless, Brass, Nylon, Etc.
• Custom Fabricated and Special Order items are welcome.
•Custom designed “BIN STOCKING” programs to meet your specific “VENDOR MANAGED INVENTORY” needs.
Anchor (foundation)
Carriage
Elevator
Eye Bolts
Flange
Grade 2,5,8,9,B-7
Hanger
Lag
Metric
Plow
Square
A235 Structural
A325 T/C Bolts
Aluminum
Bulb
Drive Rivets
Huck Bolts
Mono-Bolts
Nutsert
Pins & Collars
Pop Rivets
Olympic Bulb Rivets
Rivets Nuts
Rivet Tools (hand/air)
Solid Steel
Acme
Brass
Cold Roll Stock
Left Hand
Stainless
B-7
B-7 Studs
GR-2 Zinc
Alloy
High Test
Hooks and Fittings
Proof Coil
Quick Links
Snaps
Stainless
Transportation
Weldless
Acme
Barrel
Bin (die)
Caged
Cap
Channel (Spring Nuts)
Clinch / Captive
Conduit Locknut
Coupling
Hex Castle
Heavy
Hex
High
Hot-Dip Galv.
Jam
Keps
Left Hand
Slotted
Square
Tee
Tinnerman
Well
Wing A325/24
2-H
Drop In
Epoxy(s)
Expansion
E-Z Anchors
Foundation
Hollow Wall
Lead Anchors
Nylon & Steel Nail-In
Plastic
Powder Actuated
Rawl Spikes
Sleeve
Tapcon
Toggle Bolts
Wedge
Cordless Drills
TEK Drivers
Drill Motors
Grinders
Jig Saw
Magnetic Drill Press
Recip Saws
Drywall Drivers
Rotary Hammers
Coach
Composite Deck Screws
Decking
Drywall
Floor Torx
K-Lath
Machine
Roof Deck
Security
Sems
Sharp Point
Sheet Metal
Socket Head
Square Drive
Square Head Set
Star Drive Wood Screw
TEK (self drilling)
Thread Cutting
Thumb
Trim Head
Wood
A.N.
Anti-Turn
Bevel
Countersunk
Disc. L/W
Fender
Finish
Heavy
Hi-Collar L/W
Load Indicator
Machinery
Malleable
Lock
S.A.E.
Specials
Spring Lock Washer
Square
Steel / Neo
U.S.S.
F436/Structural
GR-8 & GR-9
A / C Cable
Abrasives
Anaerobic Thread Lockers
Anti-Seize
Bolt Bins
Brass Fittings
C-Clamps
Clevis
Cotter Pins
Cutting & Tapping Oil
Fall Protection
Flashings
Firestop
Grease Fittings
HeliCoil Inserts & Kits
Hold Downs
Hose Clamps
JK Staples & Tools
Key Stock
Nylon Ties
Pipe Fittings
Paint
Screwdriver Insert Bits
Spacers & Standoffs
Spiral Wrap
Tape
Terminals/Connectors
Trays
Turnbuckles
Two-Way Radios
Lumber Connectors
WD-40 / Lubricants
Woodruff Keys
LOCKING NUTS
Annular Cutters
Diamond Core Bits
Carbide Tip Hole Saws
Flat Boring Bits
Hack Saw Blades
Haugen Cutters
High Speed Drill Bits
High Speed Taps
Hole Saws
Jigsaw Blades
Recip Blades
Rotor Hammer Bits
Wood Augers
Flange (whiz)
Flex-Lock
Grade C
Nylon Insert
Reversing
STRUT & FITTINGS
Beam Clamps
Channel (strut)
Clevis Hangers
Deck Inserts
Fittings
J Hangers
Pipe Clamps
Pipe Piers
Post Bases
U Bolts
www.midvalleydist.com
AEARO SAFETY
ALEMITE
AVDEL
BOSCH
BUILDEX
CM CHAIN
CAMCAR
CAPTIVE
CHICAGO HARDWARE
CONSTRUCTION ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS
DIAMOND PRODUCTS
ERICO
FIRESTOP
HINDLEY
HELICOIL
JACKSON SAFETY
KENWOOD PROTALK RADIOS
LEGRIS
LENOX
MILWAUKEE
OLYMPIC FASTENERS
PANASONIC
PARKER
PERMATEX
POP-RIVET
POWERS
RAMSET / REDHEAD
RUST-OLEUM
SOUTHCO
SPS TECHNOLOGIES
TOLCO
UNISTRUT
USP
WESANCO
3886 E. Jensen
Fresno, CA 93725
Phone (559) 485-2660
Fax (559) 485-1611
www.midvalleydist.com
You’ll be Glad You Did!
Put Our People to Work For You
Mention this ad
for a Free Knife!
*
* Restrictions Apply
Mid Valley Distributing is a Certied California Small Business Entity (SBE) # 30518
Phone (559) 485-2660
Fax (559) 485-1611
Free Delivery • Competitive Pricing • Large IN-STOCK Inventory
Custom Special Orders NO Problem!
OVER ONE HUNDRED MILLION PIECES IN STOCK
SINCE 1946 THE VALLEY'S LARGEST FASTENER DISTRIBUTOR
MID-VALLEY
DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
3886 East Jensen
Fresno, CA 93725
BOLTS
RIVETS
THREADED ROD
CHAIN & FITTINGS
NUTS
CUTTING TOOLS
SCREWS
ANCHORS
POWER TOOLS
WASHERS
MISCELLANEOUS
STOCKING DISTRIBUTOR FOR:
• Large variety of fasteners are available in Metric, Stainless, Brass, Nylon, Etc.
• Custom Fabricated and Special Order items are welcome.
•Custom designed “BIN STOCKING” programs to meet your specific “VENDOR MANAGED INVENTORY” needs.
Anchor (foundation)
Carriage
Elevator
Eye Bolts
Flange
Grade 2,5,8,9,B-7
Hanger
Lag
Metric
Plow
Square
A235 Structural
A325 T/C Bolts
Aluminum
Bulb
Drive Rivets
Huck Bolts
Mono-Bolts
Nutsert
Pins & Collars
Pop Rivets
Olympic Bulb Rivets
Rivets Nuts
Rivet Tools (hand/air)
Solid Steel
Acme
Brass
Cold Roll Stock
Left Hand
Stainless
B-7
B-7 Studs
GR-2 Zinc
Alloy
High Test
Hooks and Fittings
Proof Coil
Quick Links
Snaps
Stainless
Transportation
Weldless
Acme
Barrel
Bin (die)
Caged
Cap
Channel (Spring Nuts)
Clinch / Captive
Conduit Locknut
Coupling
Hex Castle
Heavy
Hex
High
Hot-Dip Galv.
Jam
Keps
Left Hand
Slotted
Square
Tee
Tinnerman
Well
Wing A325/24
2-H
Drop In
Epoxy(s)
Expansion
E-Z Anchors
Foundation
Hollow Wall
Lead Anchors
Nylon & Steel Nail-In
Plastic
Powder Actuated
Rawl Spikes
Sleeve
Tapcon
Toggle Bolts
Wedge
Cordless Drills
TEK Drivers
Drill Motors
Grinders
Jig Saw
Magnetic Drill Press
Recip Saws
Drywall Drivers
Rotary Hammers
Coach
Composite Deck Screws
Decking
Drywall
Floor Torx
K-Lath
Machine
Roof Deck
Security
Sems
Sharp Point
Sheet Metal
Socket Head
Square Drive
Square Head Set
Star Drive Wood Screw
TEK (self drilling)
Thread Cutting
Thumb
Trim Head
Wood
A.N.
Anti-Turn
Bevel
Countersunk
Disc. L/W
Fender
Finish
Heavy
Hi-Collar L/W
Load Indicator
Machinery
Malleable
Lock
S.A.E.
Specials
Spring Lock Washer
Square
Steel / Neo
U.S.S.
F436/Structural
GR-8 & GR-9
A / C Cable
Abrasives
Anaerobic Thread Lockers
Anti-Seize
Bolt Bins
Brass Fittings
C-Clamps
Clevis
Cotter Pins
Cutting & Tapping Oil
Fall Protection
Flashings
Firestop
Grease Fittings
HeliCoil Inserts & Kits
Hold Downs
Hose Clamps
JK Staples & Tools
Key Stock
Nylon Ties
Pipe Fittings
Paint
Screwdriver Insert Bits
Spacers & Standoffs
Spiral Wrap
Tape
Terminals/Connectors
Trays
Turnbuckles
Two-Way Radios
Lumber Connectors
WD-40 / Lubricants
Woodruff Keys
LOCKING NUTS
Annular Cutters
Diamond Core Bits
Carbide Tip Hole Saws
Flat Boring Bits
Hack Saw Blades
Haugen Cutters
High Speed Drill Bits
High Speed Taps
Hole Saws
Jigsaw Blades
Recip Blades
Rotor Hammer Bits
Wood Augers
Flange (whiz)
Flex-Lock
Grade C
Nylon Insert
Reversing
STRUT & FITTINGS
Beam Clamps
Channel (strut)
Clevis Hangers
Deck Inserts
Fittings
J Hangers
Pipe Clamps
Pipe Piers
Post Bases
U Bolts
www.midvalleydist.com
AEARO SAFETY
ALEMITE
AVDEL
BOSCH
BUILDEX
CM CHAIN
CAMCAR
CAPTIVE
CHICAGO HARDWARE
CONSTRUCTION ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS
DIAMOND PRODUCTS
ERICO
FIRESTOP
HINDLEY
HELICOIL
JACKSON SAFETY
KENWOOD PROTALK RADIOS
LEGRIS
LENOX
MILWAUKEE
OLYMPIC FASTENERS
PANASONIC
PARKER
PERMATEX
POP-RIVET
POWERS
RAMSET / REDHEAD
RUST-OLEUM
SOUTHCO
SPS TECHNOLOGIES
TOLCO
UNISTRUT
USP
WESANCO
Carriers
and
Shipping
Containers
with Inserts
Manufacturer of corrugated containers,
displays and specialty agricultural
products since 1973.
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1460 S. Mirage, Lindsay, CA 93247 - O ce: 559-562-5185 - Cell: 559-805-3505 - Fax: 559-562-5260
Contact Mark A. Veteto, Sr.
on the web at www.vamco.biz and email mark@vamco.biz
1460 S. Mirage, Lindsay, CA 93247 - O ce: 559-562-5185 - Cell: 559-805-3505 - Fax: 559-562-5260
Contact Mark A. Veteto, Sr.
on the web at www.vamco.biz and email mark@vamco.biz
1460 S. Mirage, Lindsay, CA 93247 - O ce: 559-562-5185 - Cell: 559-805-3505 - Fax: 559-562-5260
Contact Mark A. Veteto, Sr.
on the web at www.vamco.biz and email mark@vamco.biz
1460 S. Mirage, Lindsay, CA 93247 - O ce: 559-562-5185 - Cell: 559-805-3505 - Fax: 559-562-5260
Contact Mark A. Veteto, Sr.
on the web at www.vamco.biz and email mark@vamco.biz
Time To Service
Your Wind Machine
Ah, WIND MACHINES YES, it is that time of year again to consider your preven-
tative maintenance program. Those machines that are just standing out in the
eld most of the year are calling for help! You will soon be demanding that your
machines perform like new, but you remember that they have not been serviced
or run for nearly a year. IT’S TIME TO CALL VAMCO LTD., INC. again. The team
at VAMCO have been patiently awaiting your call. You can reach service manager
Larry Shaw at (559) 804-7352 right now and schedule your fall service. You’ve
heard it before, but again, THANK YOU FOR YOUR BUSINESS from your service
team and all of the employees at VAMCO.
We have used Vamco for a good many years, we have
bought new, and used. Their prompt reply sets them
apart from the rest.
Their 24hr eld service and parts supply has kept us
very satised. They have always had a very adequate
supply of new and used equipment. I plan on doing
business with them for years to come. I have used
others, but Vamco is always our rst choice. With
Mark and the staff I have no complaints.
Lee & Harvey Bailey with Experience Care
One thing I like is they have been in business in the val-
ley for a long time, they know my machines and how
to get to them. When I need someone late on a cold
winter night, they do what it takes to keep my equip-
ment running. I enjoy them being full service, that is a
big plus; service, repair, 24 hour availability and knowl-
edgeable personnel. Vamco has all I need.
Shawn Stevenson with Harlan Ranch
Monterey AgResources

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