ICT-Enabled Collaborative Policy Development

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The Case for Crowdsourcing
Engr. Pierre Tito Galla, PECE Democracy.Net.PH
February 11, 2013

Collaborative Policy Development: The Current Model
• Face-to-face meetings
– Significant logistical requirements – Venue and attendee transport – Availability and common scheduling of key attendees, resource persons, decision-makers – Preparation and distribution of meeting materials

Remember: significant time and effort is already being spent even before the meeting has been convened.
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Crowdsourcing for Collaborative Policy Development
• What is crowdsourcing?
– Formal definition by Estellés Arolas, E. and González Ladrón-deGuevara, F. (2012), “Towards an integrated crowdsourcing definition,” Journal of Information Science:
"Crowdsourcing is a type of participative online activity in which an individual, an institution, a non-profit organization, or company proposes to a group of individuals of varying knowledge, heterogeneity, and number, via a flexible open call, the voluntary undertaking of a task. The undertaking of the task, of variable complexity and modularity, and in which the crowd should participate bringing their work, money, knowledge and/or experience, always entails mutual benefit. The user will receive the satisfaction of a given type of need, be it economic, social recognition, self-esteem, or the development of individual skills, while the crowdsourcer will obtain and utilize to their advantage that what the user has brought to the venture, whose form will depend on the type of activity undertaken.“

– In simple terms: crowdsourcing is the outsourcing of tasks to a distributed group of committed and engaged people, typically through the use of the Internet and ICT.
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Crowdsourcing for Collaborative Policy Development
• Tools for crowdsourcing
– Computer and internet connection – Email and chat applications – Productivity applications (word processing, spreadsheet, desktop publishing, design) – Cloud storage and cloud applications (e.g., Google Docs and Google Drive, Dropbox) – Phone, SMS, and other traditional communications methods (e.g., messengerial services)

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Crowdsourcing for Collaborative Policy Development
• Skills for a successful crowdsourcing project
– Project management
• • • • Patience Persuasiveness Periodicity Persistence

– – – – –

Flexibility and decisiveness Computer and internet literacy Good written and verbal communication skills Enthusiasm and positive attitude Sense of urgency
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Crowdsourcing for Collaborative Policy Development
• Democracy.Net.PH crowdsourced policy development projects
– Position paper and proposed NTC Memorandum Order on Minimum Broadband Speeds
• Contributed to the content of NTC Memorandum Order No. 07-07-2011 (Minimum Speed of Broadband Connections)

– The Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom
• Was filed at the Senate by Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago as SBN 3327, without modification • “An Act Establishing a Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom, Cybercrime Prevention and Law Enforcement, and Cyberdefense and National Cybersecurity”
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The Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom experience.

CROWDSOURCING LEGISLATION

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Crowdsourcing Legislation: The MCPIF Experience
• Preparatory Steps – Formation of the core team – Set-up of crowdsourcing tool (Google Docs) and access rights – Set-up and use of communication channels (Facebook, Twitter, email, Google Hangout, online chat, SMS, offline meetings) • Key implementation success factors – Timeliness of communication AND short response times – Appropriate access rights and proper use of version control – Parallel information processing, not sequential

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Crowdsourcing Legislation: The MCPIF Experience
• Step 1: Objective setting. – Objective of the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom (MCPIF) crowdsourcing initiative:
• To prepare a draft bill ready for the consideration of Congress, that promotes rights, governance, development, and security in the use of ICT in the Philippines, that may be used by Congress to repeal immediately RA 10175.

• Step 2: Recruit crowdsourcers. – The crowdsourcers with appropriate knowledge, as well as sufficient computer and internet skills are best recruited through social media.

• Step 3: Give the crowdsourcers appropriate access to the tool used and establish open and timely communications channels.

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Crowdsourcing Legislation: The MCPIF Experience
• Step 4: Assign tasks to the crowdsourcers with appropriate skills. – Crowdsourcers worked on the individual parts and sections of the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom upholding the anchor concepts of rights, governance, development, and security of which they had expert knowledge. – Parallel processing ensures the speed of the completion of a crowdsourcing initiative. • Step 5: Enforce milestones and versioning. – The Democracy.Net.PH core team ensured that milestones were clearly stated, managed, and met, to prevent any incidence of crowdsourcing fatigue. Major danger from crowdsourcing fatigue: crowdsourcers lose interest, quit, and can no longer be convinced to return and contribute.
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Crowdsourcing Legislation: The MCPIF Experience
• Parallel Step: Continual recruitment of crowdsourcers. – As progress ramped up on the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom, more crowdsourcers and experts contributed to richer, more valuable content. • Step 6: Ensure completion. – Completion of a crowdsourced project answers this key question:
“Has the objective set in the beginning been met by the crowdsourcing initiative?”

– The Democracy.Net.PH core team ensured that the content of the Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom was the results of the best efforts to make it ready for the consideration of Congress. – As such, Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago deemed the MCPIF as worthy of filing in the Senate, and did so file without edits last year.
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Q&A

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