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DJA080740 SJ**690 (04.00)
DJA080740 SJ**690 (04.00)
DJA080740 SJ**690 (04.00)

DJA080740

SJ**690 (04.00)

DJA080740 SJ**690 (04.00)
DJA080740 SJ**690 (04.00)

Warranties and Liabilities

All warranties given by Intergraph Corporation about equipment or software are set forth in your purchase contract, and nothing stated in or implied by this document or its contents shall be considered or deemed a modification or amendment of such warranties. The information and the software discussed in this document are subject to change without notice and should not be considered commitments by Intergraph Corporation. Intergraph Corporation assumes no responsibility for any error that may appear in this document. The software discussed in this document is furnished under a license and may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of this license. No responsibility is assumed by Intergraph for the use or reliability of software on equipment that is not supplied by Intergraph or its affiliated companies.

Trademarks

Intergraph, GeoMedia, and, RIS are registered trademarks of Intergraph Corporation. SmartSketch is a trademark of Intergraph Corporation. Windows and Windows NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. NT is a registered trademark of Northern Telecom Limited. MapInfo is a registered trademark of MapInfo Corporation. All other brands and product names are trademarks of their respective owners.

Copyright

2000 Intergraph Corporation All Rights Reserved Including software, file formats, and audiovisual displays, may be used pursuant to applicable software license agreement. Contains confidential and proprietary information of Intergraph and/or third parties, which is protected by copyright and trade secret law and may not be provided or otherwise made available without proper authorization.

Restricted Rights Legend

Use, duplication, or disclosure by the government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) of The Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013 or subparagraphs (c) (1) and (2) of Commercial Computer Software—Restricted Rights at 48 CFR 52.227-19, as applicable. Unpublished rights reserved under the copyright laws of the United States.

Intergraph Corporation Huntsville, Alabama 35894-0001

Copyright for the Canadian National Transformation Software:

Produced under license from Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Natural Resources. Software based on the National Transformation Version 2 developed by Geodetic Survey Division, Geomatics Canada. ©1995. Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Natural Resources.

What do you think about Working with GeoMedia Professional?

DJA080740

We would like your opinion of this document. Please help us improve our documentation by completing this questionnaire. Write your comments or circle your responses to the questions. Circle all responses that apply, and include additional pages of comments if you wish. When you have completed the questionnaire, fold and mail it to Intergraph. Postage is prepaid. Thank you for taking the time to let us know what you think.

1.

How much of this document have you worked through?

1.

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5

(1=entire document, 2=most of it, 3=about half, 4=about one-third, 5=one-fourth or less)

 

2.

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2.

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(1=difficult

5=easy)

 

3.

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3.

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4.

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(1=orientation

5=thorough understanding)

 

5.

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5.

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5=very well)

 

6. Have you used Intergraph software before? (1=yes, 2=no)

6.

1 - 2

7. What percentage of your work time is spent using Intergraph software?

7.

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5

(1=10% or less, 2=25%, 3=50%, 4=75%, 5=90% or more)

 

8.

How would you rate your level of software use?

8.

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(1=demanding

5=casual)

 

9.

Did this document help you learn to use the software in a satisfactory way?

9.

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(1=yes, 2=no)

 

10. How would you rate this document overall? (1=poor

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12. Please describe and note page numbers of any errors or inconsistencies in this document.

13. How would you improve this document?

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Thanks again for your time and effort.

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BUSINESS REPLY MAIL

FIRST CLASS MAIL

PERMIT NO. 9079

HUNTSVILLE, AL

POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

NO. 9079 HUNTSVILLE, AL POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE INTERGRAPH CORPORATION Manager, Mapping and GIS
NO. 9079 HUNTSVILLE, AL POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE INTERGRAPH CORPORATION Manager, Mapping and GIS

INTERGRAPH CORPORATION

Manager, Mapping and GIS Technical Documentation Mail Stop IW17A4 One Madison Industrial Park Huntsville, AL 35894-0001

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Table of Contents

Start Here

1-1

Looking at GeoMedia Professional: An Overview

1-2

What You Need to Know to Work

1-3

Documents Shipped

1-3

Getting Started

1-7

Getting Around in the Software

1-8

The Product Workflows

1-10

Working with GeoWorkspaces

2-1

Creating a GeoWorkspace

2-2

Opening a GeoWorkspace

2-2

Delaying Data Loading

2-3

Saving, Closing, and Copying a GeoWorkspace

2-5

E-Mailing a GeoWorkspace

2-6

Creating a GeoWorkspace Template

2-7

Working with Coordinate Systems

3-1

Defining a Coordinate System for a GeoWorkspace

3-4

Defining a Coordinate System for an Access Warehouse

3-6

Matching GeoWorkspace and Warehouse Coordinate Systems

3-8

Getting Coordinate Readouts

3-10

Setting Units and Formats

3-11

Configuring for Datum Transformations

3-13

Displaying Data That Has No Coordinate System Specified

3-14

Creating Coordinate-System Files from Design Files

3-18

Working with Warehouses

4-1

Creating a Read/Write Access Warehouse

4-2

Defining a Coordinate System for a Warehouse

4-3

Preparing to Connect

4-4

Working with Connections

4-45

Working with Spatial Filters

4-51

Working with Vicinity Connections

4-59

Importing Data into a Read/Write Warehouse

4-60

Inserting Images into Warehouses

4-66

Managing Warehouse Images

4-69

Viewing Changes in a Multi-User Environment

4-70

Creating an Access Warehouse Template

4-70

Changing the Coordinate System of a New Access Warehouse Template

4-71

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Working with Map Windows

5-1

Understanding the Legend

5-2

Displaying or Hiding the Legend

5-4

Adding Entries to the Legend

5-4

Controlling the Map Window

5-8

Customizing the Legend

5-29

Customizing the Legend Toolbar

5-33

Using the Legend Pop-up Menu

5-34

Creating Additional Map Windows

5-35

Displaying Design Files

5-36

Working with Data Windows

6-1

Opening a Data Window

6-1

Controlling the Data Window

6-2

Editing Cells in the Data Window

6-7

Taking a Snapshot of the Data Window

6-8

Working with Features

7-1

Understanding Geometry Types

7-2

Working with Feature Classes

7-3

Selecting Features in the Map Window

7-8

Collecting Data

7-13

Inserting Features

7-29

Digitizing Discontiguous Features and Features with Holes

7-43

Tools for Collection of Attribute Information

7-48

Inserting Area Features Automatically

7-50

Inserting Text Features into a Feature Class

7-53

Adding Hypertext to a Feature Class

7-55

Placing Buffer Zones Around Features

7-58

Editing Features and Geometries

8-1

Changing Feature Attributes

8-1

Updating Feature Attributes

8-3

Updating Feature Attributes Using Text

8-8

Manipulating Features

8-10

Manipulating Geometry

8-20

Continuing Geometry

8-27

Changing Feature Class

8-33

Table of Contents

Registering Data

9-1

Performing Digitizer Setup

9-1

Setting Digitizer Mode

9-10

Registering Images

9-12

Outputting to GeoTIFF

9-16

Registering Vector Data

9-17

Inserting Traverses

10-1

Defining a Traverse

10-2

Additional Command Features

10-6

Insert Traverse Workflows

10-8

Validating and Fixing Data

11-1

Displaying Geometry Information

11-2

Validating Geometry

11-5

Fixing Geometry

11-9

Validating Connectivity

11-11

Fixing Connectivity

11-20

Analyzing Geometry

11-24

Extending Geometry to Intersections

11-29

Trimming Geometry to Intersections

11-31

Inserting Intersections

11-33

Working with Queries

12-1

Working with Filter Queries

12-1

Working with Native Queries

12-14

Working with Joins

12-21

Working with Labels

12-24

Working with Spatial Analysis Queries

12-30

Geocoding Coordinates

12-36

Manipulating Queries

12-38

Querying Graphics-Only Features in MGE and MGSM

12-42

Working With Addresses

13-1

Finding Addresses

13-3

Geocoding Addresses

13-5

Linking and Printing in GeoMedia Professional

14-1

Linking and Embedding a GeoWorkspace

14-1

Printing Map, Data, and Layout Windows

14-2

Designing Map Layouts and Printing Maps

14-8

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Exporting Data to Other Systems

15-1

Exporting to Shapefile

15-1

Exporting to MapInfo Interchange Format

15-3

Exporting to Design File

15-5

Exporting to Oracle Object Model

15-10

Exporting to MS SQL Server

15-13

How to Reach Intergraph

A-1

Using the Oracle Relational Spatial Model

B-1

GDOO Connections and Metadata

B-1

Importing Data into SC

B-4

Default Registry Values

B-5

Spatial Data Tables - Spatial Layers

B-7

Spatial Data Indexing

B-10

Using Views with GDOO

B-11

Using Synonyms with GDOO

B-12

Date and Time Data in GDOO

B-13

Filtered Queries with SC

B-13

Spatial Queries with SC

B-14

Using an Existing Oracle SC Database

B-14

GDOO Package

B-17

Using the Oracle Object Model Data Server

C-1

Delivery and Connection

C-1

Native Data Model

C-4

GeoMedia Professional Metadata – The Default GDOSYS Schema

C-13

Using an Existing Oracle Spatial Object Schema

C-19

Creating a New Oracle Spatial Object Database

C-20

Database Utilities

C-21

Coordinate System Information

D-1

Projection Algorithms

D-1

Datum Transformation Models

D-1

Geodetic Datums

D-5

Ellipsoids

D-8

Units of Measure (UOM)

D-10

State Plane Zone Codes—NAD27 Datum

D-12

State Plane Zone Codes—NAD83 Datum

D-14

UTM Zones

D-16

GeoTIFF Capabilities

D-17

Table of Contents

Raster Information

E-1

Raster Formats Supported in GeoMedia Professional

E-1

Compression Techniques

E-3

Tiling

E-4

Data Types

E-4

Troubleshooting Connection Problems

F-1

Troubleshooting MGE Connections

F-1

Troubleshooting MGSM Connections

F-13

Troubleshooting

Oracle

Connections

F-14

Line Weight Conversions and Line Styles

G-1

Line Weight Conversions

G-1

Line Styles

G-3

Creating Data Server .INI Files

H-1

The ARC/INFO Data Server .INI File

H-2

The ArcView Data Server .INI File

H-3

The CAD Data Server .INI File

H-4

The FRAMME Data Server .INI File

H-8

The MapInfo Data Server .INI File

H-14

The MGDM Data Server .INI File

H-18

The MGE Data Server .INI File

H-27

The MGSM Data Server .INI Files

H-41

Layout Window Graphics Commands

I-1

Conversion Tables

J-1

International System of Units to United States Customary System

J-1

United States Customary System to International System of Units

J-2

Index

IN-1

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Start Here

Start Here Welcome to GeoMedia ® Professional—the next generation in geographic-information systems (GIS). Based on

Welcome to GeoMedia ® Professional—the next generation in geographic-information systems (GIS). Based on Jupiter technology from Intergraph Corporation, this product is an enterprise GIS for the Windows ® 2000 and Windows NT ® operating systems. This product is the perfect tool for collecting GIS data, populating an enterprise database, and turning information into precise finished maps for distribution and presentation.

As a viewing and analysis tool, this product allows you to combine geographic data from different sources, in different formats, and with different map projections, all into a single environment. Using this software, you can perform complex queries on spatial and attribute data from various sources, and produce numerous views of highly sophisticated maps in a single workspace. Furthermore, this product gives you the capability of printing those map views on a single sheet and adding borders, marginalia, and other finishing touches.

As a data capture and maintenance tool, this product allows you to capture and to edit data more easily, faster, and with more intelligence than other products. Its integrated vector and raster snaps allow you to capture vector data from raster images, automatically identifying snap points to ensure accurate heads-up digitizing. The software also provides table-top digitizing and vector transformation for data requiring geometry transformation. Using the software, you can capture clean, accurate data the first time, thus minimizing editing. Automatic vector breaking and coincident geometry digitizing allow you to avoid traditional data-capture problems. However, you can locate data-capture problems with automatic error detection and then correct them with intelligent feature placement and editing tools. Furthermore, you can quickly annotate the data with powerful labeling and text-placement tools.

This product is also a software-development environment, and you can customize it with standard Windows-development tools such as Microsoft ® Visual Basic ® and Visual C++ ® .

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Looking at GeoMedia Professional: An Overview

The first thing you do in GeoMedia Professional is create a GeoWorkspace or open an existing one. After you open a GeoWorkspace, you configure it to suit your needs. You can, for example, change the coordinate-system properties or insert a map or raster image to use as a backdrop for geographic data. Your configuration is saved when you save the GeoWorkspace and restored when you reopen it.

The data you view is stored in warehouses, and you access data by creating connections from the GeoWorkspace to one or more warehouses. The Warehouse Connection Wizard presents a series of dialog boxes that prompt you for the information necessary to create the connection. Because data is not stored in the GeoWorkspace, all workflows require at least one warehouse connection.

A warehouse stores both geometric (graphic) and attribute (nongraphic) information. For example, a parcel might be represented by an area geometry and defined by attribute information such as the owner’s name and the date it was purchased.

Once you connect to at least one warehouse, you can display and analyze data from it. The software allows you to view multiple data sets from different warehouses in various formats in a single GeoWorkspace. This means you can perform spatial analyses on data from different sources in different formats using buffer zones, spatial queries, and thematic displays.

In this product, features are contained in feature classes, and the word feature refers to each instance of a feature within a feature class. Feature classes, images, query results, and thematic displays in the map window are collectively referred to as either features or map objects.

Features are represented in the map window by geometry and in the data window by attributes. You can display any number of map and data windows simultaneously or separately. They are linked so that changes made in one window are automatically reflected in the other.

You display features in a map window by adding entries to the legend. The legend is the control center for the map window. Through the legend, you populate the contents of the map window and control the display characteristics of the features, including their style and display priority.

Start Here

You can also perform tasks, such as capturing new data, performing maintenance on existing data, and inserting images or buffer zones. Furthermore, you can view data written to a read/write warehouse along with other data sets in a single GeoWorkspace.

Results of your analyses can be customized in the map window, printed, and saved for future use, all without altering the original data.

for future use, all without altering the original data. What You Need to Know to Work

What You Need to Know to Work

The documentation and learning tools assume that you have the following:

A basic understanding of your operating system.

The ability to move around in the Windows environment.

An understanding of the data you want to use.

Documents Shipped

The following documents are shipped with GeoMedia Professional.

Document

Number

Description

Installing

DJA0809

Instructions for installing the product. Available in paper as a jewel-case insert, and online in .pdf format through the PDF Viewer from the product CD \Geomedia Professional folder.

GeoMedia

Professional

Learning GeoMedia Professional

Online

Hands-on tutorial that guides you through the basics using an example workflow and real data. Runs through Web browser.

only

Working with

DJA0807

Overview of and workflows for performing most software tasks. Available in paper, and online in .pdf format through the PDF Viewer from the product CD \Geomedia Professional folder.

GeoMedia

Professional

GeoMedia

Online

Step-by-step instructions for all tasks and information about tools and dialog boxes.

Professional Help

only

Topics

 

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Document

Number

Description

Building on the GeoMedia Professional Engine

Online

Information about customizing the software and building your own applications with the GeoMedia Professional engine. Access through

Help > Programming Utilities.

only

GeoMedia Professional Object Reference

Online

Programmer's guide to the objects, methods, and properties in the software’s automation layer.

only

Access through Help > Programming Utilities.

GeoMedia Professional Object Model Quick Reference

Online

Quick reference to objects and a summary of each. Access from the product CD. You can view the document by double clicking on

<product

only

 

folder>\Product\resdlls\009\GMP_AutoModel40.hlp

See the "How to Reach Intergraph" appendix.

Note: Within the U.S., you can request copies of the paper documents from the Intergraph Customer Care Center. Outside the U.S., call your Intergraph representative.

Typeface Conventions Used in the Documents

ALL CAPS

Bold

unserifed

type

Courier

type

Italic type

Keyboard keys. If keys are separated by a comma, press them in sequence. For example: ALT, F5. If they are joined by a plus sign, press them at the same time. For example: CTRL+z.

An item in the graphical interface, such as the title of a dialog box or a tool. Paths through menus use right angle brackets between items you select. For example: Select File > Open to load a new file.

Information you type. For example: Type original.dat to load the ASCII file.

A document title, the first occurrence of a new or special term, folder and file names, or information about what the software is doing.

Start Here

Interactive Documents

This product provides an interactive tutorial to help you learn how to perform the basic tasks. If you are new to the software, you should work through Learning GeoMedia Professional first.

Help is available online if you need step-by-step instructions, and other documents are available for programmers who want to customize the software.

Learning GeoMedia Professional

to customize the software. Learning GeoMedia Professional Learning GeoMedia Professional steps you through an example

Learning GeoMedia Professional steps you through an example workflow that uses real data and covers the basic tasks. You start this

tutorial by selecting Help > Learning GeoMedia Professional from the

GeoMedia Professional menu. This opens the tutorial in your default Web browser. This tutorial works best with Internet Explorer 5.0, but it will run on another browser.

After you have worked through the tutorial, use Working with GeoMedia Professional to gain a broader understanding of what you can accomplish using this product.

Help Topics

of what you can accomplish using this product. Help Topics You can find information for advanced

You can find information for advanced topics and procedures from the online Help. Included with the Help topics is a dictionary.

If Help was not installed on your hard drive during setup, you must have the GeoMedia Professional CD in your CD-ROM drive or be connected to the network node containing the Help files.

To display Help when GeoMedia Professional is active, select Help To display Help when GeoMedia Professional is active, select H e l p

Help when GeoMedia Professional is not active, select Programs >

> GeoMedia Professional Help Topics from the menu. To display

GeoMedia Professional > GeoMedia Professional Help Topics

from the Start menu.

Help is context sensitive, which means that you can press F1 to display Help for the active window or dialog box. You can also click the Help button or press SHIFT+F1. When the cursor changes to a question mark, select a Help button or press SHIFT+F1. When the cursor changes to a question mark, select a menu item, toolbar, or area of a window or dialog box.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Programming Guides

Working with GeoMedia Professional Programming Guides This product includes two online guides for developers who have

This product includes two online guides for developers who have experience with programming languages that use automated objects and who want to customize or build applications on this software.

Building on the GeoMedia Professional Engine is an interactive user’s guide developed in HTML.

GeoMedia Professional Object Reference covers the objects, methods, and properties available through automation.

You access both of these documents by selecting the appropriate document on the Programming Utilities interface. To access this interface, select Help > Programming Utilities from the GeoMedia Professional menu.

Delivered Utilities Documentation

This product also includes online documentation for the following delivered utilities:

Building on the GeoMedia Professional Engine

Database Utilities

Define CAD Server Schema File

Define Coordinate System File

Define Symbol File

Edit MGSM Server Parameter File

Programming Utilities

RIS Schema Locator

Update CAD Server Schema File MBRs

You can access this online documentation by:

Selecting Start > GeoMedia Professional > <utility >.

Selecting the utility document name in the main product Help Topics.

Pressing F1 while the utility is active.

Note: You can also access the Define CAD Server Schema File Help and the RIS Schema Locator Help from the respective utility’s Help menu, and the Programming Utilities Help from that utility’s Command Wizard Help button.

Start Here

Getting Started

To start this product, select Start > Programs > GeoMedia

Professional > GeoMedia Professional.

If it has not been turned off, the Welcome! dialog box appears.

has not been turned off, the Welcome! dialog box appears. Once you have run Learning GeoMedia
has not been turned off, the Welcome! dialog box appears. Once you have run Learning GeoMedia

Once you have run Learning GeoMedia Professional, you can either open an existing GeoWorkspace or create a new one. Clicking Close takes you directly into an empty window.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

If the Don't display this startup screen again option on the Welcome!

dialog box has been turned on, you see the following dialog box instead:

been turned on, you see the following dialog box instead: This dialog box lists recently opened

This dialog box lists recently opened GeoWorkspaces. You can select one, and click OK. If the existing GeoWorkspace you want is not listed, select More Files, and click OK to find the GeoWorkspace yourself.

Note: To exit the software at any time, select File > Exit from the GeoMedia Professional menu.

Getting Around in the Software

Familiarity with Microsoft Windows conventions and Microsoft-Office applications should make it easy for you to get around in this product. As in Windows, for example, you move a window by placing the cursor over the title bar and dragging the window to a new location. Buttons and menu items are dimmed when the tools they invoke are not available, and you can see what tool a button invokes by placing your cursor over the button.

Start Here

See the "Working with Map Windows", "Working with Data Windows", and “Linking and Printing in GeoMedia Professional” chapters for information on the three types of windows

Common tools, such as File > Print, work essentially the same application as they do in any Windows application. Similarly, you can customize your software working environment to display the menu items and buttons you want and to accept the keyboard shortcuts you specify.

Still, the GeoMedia Professional working environment does have some special characteristics:

GeoMedia Professional offers several specialized toolbars that are available only under the appropriate circumstances. The Data toolbar, for example, is available only when the data window is active. Select View > Toolbars to specify which toolbars you want to display.

Some pop-up menus are available in this product. You display pop- up menus by pressing the right mouse button. The tools on the menu vary with the location of your cursor.

The product’s toolbars can be moved from their default locations and docked at other locations within the interface. Moving a toolbar over a map window converts the toolbar to a dockable control, and some tools provide a control rather than a dialog box interface. Further, clicking the right mouse button on the title bar of a control displays a menu that allows you to restore, move, minimize, maximize, or hide the control, while clicking the X icon dismisses the control. Clicking the right mouse button on a toolbar (or on the icons in a control) displays a menu that allows you to turn toolbars on and off, display the Status and Precision Coordinates toolbars, and customize toolbars.

Within the software, you work in three types of windows, map windows, data windows, and the layout window. These windows are contained in a GeoWorkspace, which is roughly analogous to a workbook in Microsoft Excel ® . If you have a Microsoft IntelliMouse , you can use it to manipulate map, data, and layout windows faster and more efficiently.

IntelliMouse ™ , you can use it to manipulate map, data, and layout windows faster and

Working with GeoMedia Professional

The Product Workflows

These are simplified example workflows for the most common GeoMedia Professional tasks. Your workflow, of course, will vary with the needs of your project.

General Viewing and Analysis Workflow

1.

Create a GeoWorkspace. See the "Working with GeoWorkspaces" chapter.

2.

Define a coordinate system for the GeoWorkspace. See the "Working with Coordinate Systems" chapter.

3.

Create warehouse connections. See the "Working with Warehouses" chapter.

4.

Display data in your map window. See the "Working with Map Windows" chapter.

5.

Change the appearance of the map-window contents. See the "Working with Map Windows" chapter.

6.

Display a data window. See the "Working with Data Windows" chapter.

7.

Build and run a query. See the "Working with Queries" chapter.

8.

Create a thematic display. See the "Working with Map Windows" chapter.

9.

Add labels to the map. See the "Working with Queries" chapter.

10.

Print the map. See the "Linking and Printing in GeoMedia Professional" chapter.

General Data-Capture and Maintenance Workflow

1. Create or open a GeoWorkspace. See the "Working with GeoWorkspaces" chapter.

2. Define a coordinate system for a new GeoWorkspace. See the "Working with Coordinate Systems" chapter.

3. Create warehouse connections. See the "Working with Warehouses" chapter.

4. Display data in your map window. See the "Working with Map Windows" chapter.

Start Here

5.

Change the appearance of the map-window contents. See the "Working with Map Windows" chapter.

6.

Work with existing features. See the "Working with Features" chapter.

7.

Create new features. See the "Working with Features" chapter.

8.

Edit features. See the "Editing Features and Geometries" chapter.

9.

Register data. See the "Registering Data" chapter.

10.

Validate data. See the "Validating Data" chapter.

11.

Export data. See the "Exporting Data to Other Systems" chapter.

Data-Capture Workflows

For information on data-capture and clean- up tools, see the “Registering Data”, “Validating Data”, “Working with Features”, and “Editing Features and Geometries” chapters.

This section presents workflows for building an enterprise GIS with GeoMedia Professional. Whether you digitize from a paper map or an on- screen image, or incorporate data from other digital sources, this product has the right tools for your particular needs. Furthermore, the data-capture and clean-up tools have been optimized for GIS workflows to increase your productivity. The workflows are as follows:

Manual input

Scanned maps

Satellite or photogrammetric images

CAD data

Attribute data in databases

Legacy GIS data

maps • Satellite or photogrammetric images • CAD data • Attribute data in databases • Legacy
maps • Satellite or photogrammetric images • CAD data • Attribute data in databases • Legacy
maps • Satellite or photogrammetric images • CAD data • Attribute data in databases • Legacy
maps • Satellite or photogrammetric images • CAD data • Attribute data in databases • Legacy

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Manual Input

1. Select the digitizer input.

2. Set up the map on the digitizing table.

3. Register the map coordinates to a GeoWorkspace with the registration tools.

4. Select the vector feature class from a warehouse, or create new feature classes with their own unique database properties.

5. Digitize selected features from the paper map.

6. Clean up the data with the validating and editing tools.

Scanned Maps

1. Select the scanned paper maps.

2. Place the raster image on the screen, and use the registration tools to display the raster in the correct geographic position.

3. Select the vector feature class from a warehouse, or create new feature classes with their own unique database properties.

4. Digitize the features on-screen with the raster image of the scanned map as the background, using the raster snap tools to speed data capture.

Note: Raster snap can be used on binary raster data only.

5. Clean up the data with the validating and editing tools.

Satellite or Photogrammetric Images

1. Select the satellite or photogrammetric images.

2. Place the raster image on the screen, and use the registration tools to display the raster in the correct geographic position.

3. Select the vector feature class from a warehouse, or create new feature classes with their own unique database properties.

4. Digitize the features on-screen with the raster images as the background, using the raster snap tools to speed data capture.

Start Here

Note: Raster snap can be used on binary raster data only.

5. Clean up the data with the validating and editing tools.

CAD Data

Into GeoMedia Professional:

and editing tools. CAD Data Into GeoMedia Professional: 1. Create a CAD data-server schema to define

1. Create a CAD data-server schema to define the folder, maps, coordinate system, and features.

2. Connect to one or more CAD files.

3. Import the CAD features into a read/write warehouse (Access, Oracle, or Oracle Spatial Cartridge).

4. Edit and add the GIS features in GeoMedia Professional.

OR

Build area features from the CAD linework in GeoMedia Professional.

Into CAD Applications:

1. Return the new and edited features to the CAD applications.

2. Export the features as design (.dgn) files.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Attribute Data in Databases

1. Prepare the attribute data in databases for features with a unique identifier, for example, a Parcel Identification Number (PIN).

for example, a Parcel Identification Number (PIN). 2. Connect to the external data source (database, ASCII

2. Connect to the external data source (database, ASCII file, Excel spreadsheet), using database tools from Access, Oracle, and so forth.

2. In the external source:

Display the attribute data using a database or Excel.

Sort the rows by a common identifier, for example, a PIN.

Copy the attribute values into a paste buffer.

3. Execute a Query/Update in the database to load the columns based on a common identifier, for example, a PIN.

3. In GeoMedia Professional:

Display the feature table in a data window.

Sort the data window rows by a common identifier.

Paste the attribute values from the paste buffer into the data window to populate the features.

Legacy GIS Data

Data in legacy systems, like Intergraph’s MGE and ESRI’s ARC/INFO and ArcView, already represent the graphic location (the map) and information (the database attributes supporting the location) for each item on a map. So, for a red line on a map that represents a U.S. Highway, the Department of Transportation may have database attributes that tell the resurfacing, accident, or bridge-maintenance records. One problem with systems like these is that they do not talk well to each other. GeoMedia Professional provides a platform where you can easily display and manipulate data from all three legacy systems.

For an enterprise that wants to migrate part or all of their current GIS to GeoMedia Professional, the workflow uses Intergraph’s powerful data- server technology combined with industry-standard databases. Operators can then add or edit data in the new environment.

Start Here

Migrating Legacy GIS Data into GeoMedia Professional:

1. Connect to the legacy data source (MGE, ArcView, or ARC/INFO).

to the legacy data source (MGE, ArcView, or ARC/INFO). 2. Select the features to migrate. 3.

2. Select the features to migrate.

3. Import the selected features into a read/write warehouse (Access, Oracle, or Oracle Spatial Cartridge).

4. Edit and add the GIS features in GeoMedia Professional.

Note: You can import GIS data into any GeoMedia Professional- supported format into an Access or an Oracle warehouse. You can import an entire feature class or only those features meeting the conditions that you define with an attribute filter. When you import features, the software copies the data from the source warehouse to a target read/write warehouse.

Using GeoMedia Professional to Maintain a Legacy GIS:

With its powerful data-capture abilities, enterprises appreciate GeoMedia Professional’s open architecture. This means that they can maintain their investment in a legacy GIS system while capitalizing on the unique productivity tools in the software.

1. Connect to the legacy data source (MGE, ArcView, or ARC/INFO).

2. Select the features to migrate.

3. Import the selected features into a read/write warehouse (Access, Oracle, or Oracle Spatial Cartridge).

4. Edit and add the GIS features in GeoMedia Professional.

4. Edit and add the GIS features in GeoMedia Professional. 5. Export the GIS features as

5. Export the GIS features as shapefiles.

6. Use ArcView or ARC/INFO tools to merge the new and edited features into the legacy GIS.

5. Use MGE to import warehouse data into an MGE project.

6. Use MGE tools to merge the new and edited features into the legacy GIS.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Capturing Data for a Legacy GIS:

GeoMedia Professional’s open architecture means that you can use its powerful data-capture abilities to populate a legacy system with new data. The use of industry-standard databases supports data-capture, wherever the data is ultimately going to be stored. This means that an enterprise can continue to use their legacy GIS system while capitalizing on the unique productivity tools in GeoMedia Professional.

1. Capture GIS features using GeoMedia Professional, and store them in Access or Oracle.

GeoMedia Professional, and store them in Access or Oracle. 2. Export the GIS features as shapefiles.

2. Export the GIS features as shapefiles.

3. Use ArcView or ARC/INFO tools to merge the new and edited features into the legacy GIS.

2. Use MGE to import warehouse data into an MGE project.

3. Use MGE tools to merge the new and edited features into the legacy GIS.

Working with GeoWorkspaces

A GeoWorkspace is the container for all your work in this product. Within its confines are the warehouse connections to your data, map and data windows, toolbars, coordinate-system information, and queries you have built. The first thing you do is open an existing GeoWorkspace or create a new one.

Once you are in a GeoWorkspace, you can change its coordinate system, establish warehouse connections, run queries, display data, and perform spatial analyses. The settings and connections you define in a GeoWorkspace are saved in a .gws file, although the actual data remains stored in warehouses. The software is delivered with an example GeoWorkspace, USSampleData.gws.

delivered with an example GeoWorkspace, USSampleData.gws . Note: The U.S. Sample Data Set contains a shaded

Note: The U.S. Sample Data Set contains a shaded relief image of the United States, complete with hypsometric tints. The data is a 1000-meter pixel resolution RGB GeoTIFF file.

Every GeoWorkspace is built on a template, and you can create your own templates or use an existing one. The software is delivered with a default GeoWorkspace template, normal.gwt, which contains an empty map window, an empty legend, and a predefined coordinate system. If you accidentally delete the normal.gwt file, you must reinstall the software to restore the template; so it is a good idea to back up this file.

This is a representative workflow for creating and configuring a GeoWorkspace:

1. Select File > New GeoWorkspace.

2. Select a template.

3. If the coordinate system you want differs from the one in the template, define a different coordinate system for the GeoWorkspace.

4. Make warehouse connections; configure map and data windows (topics covered in other chapters).

5. Save the GeoWorkspace.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Creating a GeoWorkspace

You create a GeoWorkspace using normal.gwt or another template in the \GeoMedia Professional\Templates\GeoWorkspace folder. The available templates are displayed when you select File > New GeoWorkspace from the GeoMedia Professional menu or Create new GeoWorkspace from the Welcome! dialog box.

The software assigns a default title of GeoWorkspace1 to each new GeoWorkspace. When you save a GeoWorkspace, you assign it a filename, and the software automatically adds a .gws extension.

Opening a GeoWorkspace

You can have only one GeoWorkspace open at a time. When you open a second GeoWorkspace in the same software session, the software closes the open GeoWorkspace.

If

the GeoWorkspace you want to open is read-only, you are advised that

it

is read-only and asked if you still want to open it. If you open it, the

software makes a copy of the read-only GeoWorkspace and opens it as read-only. If you then make changes to this internally copied GeoWorkspace and try to save it, you are advised that you have made changes and asked if you want to save the GeoWorkspace to a different file name because the original GeoWorkspace is read-only. The changes you make to a read-only GeoWorkspace are discarded when you close it unless you save it with a different file name.

A list of the most recently used GeoWorkspaces appears at the bottom of

the File menu. You can open a GeoWorkspace from this list by clicking the filename.

Working with GeoWorkspaces

To open a GeoWorkspace:

1. Select File > Open GeoWorkspace.

a GeoWorkspace: 1. Select File > Open GeoWorkspace . 2. Select the GeoWorkspace you want. 3.

2. Select the GeoWorkspace you want.

3. Click Open.

Note: If a connection fails while attempting to open a GeoWorkspace, an error dialog box appears prompting you to verify that your warehouse connection parameters are correct.

Delaying Data Loading

Depending on your data, opening an existing GeoWorkspace may take a long time. The amount of time varies with the number of feature classes being loaded into displays, the amount of data per feature class, and the processing time of any queries. To improve performance, you can delay the loading of data by selecting the Do not load data when opening GeoWorkspace check box on the General tab of the Options dialog box (Tools > Options). If this check box is not selected, which is the default, the software loads all data when opening a GeoWorkspace.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Working with GeoMedia Professional Upon setting this option, the map windows and data windows are empty

Upon setting this option, the map windows and data windows are empty when you open a GeoWorkspace. The legend entries in the map view are created but not in a loaded state; the data view shows a title but displays no records. Any existing queries are not re-executed. Also, any subsequent opening of an existing GeoWorkspace, in the same session or future sessions, does not load the data.

After opening a GeoWorkspace, you can selectively load its data as follows:

Legend Entries

 

Select View > Update All to update all legend entries in all map windows and all data windows.

Select one or more legend entries, display the right mouse menu (on the legend, not the map window), and select Load Data. This is enabled only when one or more of the selected legend entries is in an unloaded state.

Data Windows

Select View > Update All to update all legend entries in all map windows and all data windows.

Display the right mouse menu, and select Load Data. This is enabled only when the data window is in an unloaded state.

Working with GeoWorkspaces

Saving, Closing, and Copying a GeoWorkspace

GeoWorkspaces are not saved automatically, but there are several ways to save or close one. When you save or copy a GeoWorkspace, you are saving all its settings—the window configuration, the coordinate system, queries, legends, thematic displays, and warehouse connections—even if you are connected to a read-only warehouse.

The default location for GeoWorkspaces is specified during installation, usually the \GeoWorkspaces folder of your root folder. You can change the default folder through the File Locations tab of the Options dialog box. The default file extension for GeoWorkspaces is .gws.

box. The default file extension for GeoWorkspaces is .gws. To save changes to a GeoWorkspace any

To save changes to a GeoWorkspace any time during a session, select File > Save GeoWorkspace . This saves but does not close the GeoWorkspace. File > Save GeoWorkspace. This saves but does not close the GeoWorkspace.

 

To save a new GeoWorkspace, select File > Save GeoWorkspace As , and type a name for the GeoWorkspace in the File > Save GeoWorkspace As, and type a name for the GeoWorkspace in the File name field.

 

Note: To make a GeoWorkspace read-only, you use standard Windows procedures for changing file attributes.

To copy the open GeoWorkspace to a new file, select File > Save GeoWorkspace As, and give the GeoWorkspace a different name. This closes the open GeoWorkspace without saving changes to it since the session was opened or since the last save. The newly named GeoWorkspace becomes the open one.

To close a GeoWorkspace without saving changes made since the last save or since the current session was opened, select F i l e > File >

 

Close GeoWorkspace.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

To change the location of your GeoWorkspace files:

The default storage location of your GeoWorkspace files is established when the software is installed, but you can change it from the File Locations tab of the Options dialog box.

F i l e Locations tab of the Options dialog box. E-Mailing a GeoWorkspace When you

E-Mailing a GeoWorkspace

When you select File > Send from the GeoMedia Professional menu, the electronic-mail application on your system starts and attaches a copy of the open GeoWorkspace.

Because all warehouse connections are stored as folder paths, the person receiving the GeoWorkspace will be able to open the GeoWorkspace, re- establish all original warehouse connections, and view the data as it appeared when you e-mailed the GeoWorkspace.

1. Select File > Send.

2. Fill in the To and Subject fields as you would for any e-mail message.

3. Send the message.

Working with GeoWorkspaces

Creating a GeoWorkspace Template

The default location for GeoWorkspace templates is \Program Files\GeoMedia Professional\Templates\GeoWorkspaces. You can specify a different folder through Tools > Options > File Locations.

To create a GeoWorkspace template:

1.

Select File > New GeoWorkspace.

2.

On the New dialog box, select the Template option.

3.

Select the normal.gwt template, and click New.

4.

Define the GeoWorkspace coordinate system (View > GeoWorkspace

Coordinate System).

5.

Make the warehouse connections you want for this template

(Warehouse > New Connection).

6.

Turn on and position—or turn off—the legend, north arrow, and scale bar (View menu).

7.

Adjust the size and locations of the map and data windows.

8.

In the map window, display the features and background images you want.

9.

Build the queries you want saved with the template.

10.

Select File > Save GeoWorkspace As.

 

Note: If you have named an alternate file location for GeoWorkspace templates, that location appears in the Save in field of the Save GeoWorkspace As dialog box. Then if you want to store the new template in the main templates folder, click the drop- down arrow and browse to the \Program Files \GeoMedia Professional\Templates\GeoWorkspaces folder.

11.

Verify that GeoWorkspace Template appears in the Save as type

 

field.

12.

Type a name for the template in the File name text box. The file extension must be .gwt.

13.

Click Save.

the template in the F i l e n a m e text box. The file

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Working with Coordinate Systems

This product displays all data—even data from different sources—using the coordinate system defined for the GeoWorkspace. Features that are

stored in warehouses with different coordinate systems are transformed on the fly into the GeoWorkspace coordinate system when you display them

in the map window.

See "Displaying Data That Has No Coordinate System Specified" in this chapter.

IMPORTANT: To ensure the accurate display of all ARC/INFO, Arc/View, and MapInfo ® data and of raster images, CAD, or FRAMME data that does not otherwise specify a coordinate system, you must define a coordinate-system file that describes the coordinate system of this data.

file that describes the coordinate system of this data. A coordinate system provides the mathematical basis

A coordinate system provides the mathematical basis for relating the

features in your study area to their real-world positions. The software supports two types of coordinate systems:

A geographic coordinate system (the default) expresses coordinates as longitude, latitude, where longitude is the angular distance from a prime meridian, and latitude is the angular distance from the equator.

A projected coordinate system expresses coordinates as X,Y, where X normally points east on the plane of the map, and Y points north at the point chosen for the origin of the map. The X coordinate is called easting, and the Y coordinate is called northing.

Because the shape of the earth's surface varies from one geographic area

to

another, the software interprets coordinates with reference to a network

of

geodetic control points called the geodetic datum. The geodetic datum

in

turn defines the reference ellipsoid, which is the model used to

represent the shape of the earth’s surface.

If you change the coordinate system after displaying data, the data is

transformed to the new coordinate system, and the display is updated. Changing the coordinate system in the GeoWorkspace does not affect the data in the warehouse, only data in the map window.

When you add a feature class to a GeoWorkspace, the software checks the datums in the warehouse and in the GeoWorkspace for compatibility. If the datums are different, the software automatically builds the appropriate datum transformation for these datums.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Note: To customize the datum transformation, edit the datum- transformation-building algorithm in the file \Program Files\GeoMedia Professional\Program\cssruntm\cfg\autodt.ini.

The default coordinate system in the software contains the following settings:

Base storage type—Geographic

Horizontal resolution—1 degree

Projection algorithm—Cylindrical Equirectangular

Projection parameters—Centered at the equator and the prime meridian

Geodetic datum and ellipsoid—WGS84

Paper space—1:50,000

You can change coordinate-system settings in an individual GeoWorkspace or in an empty read/write warehouse. Or you can create a new template with different settings so that all GeoWorkspaces or warehouses you create with the new template will have the different settings.

For projected coordinate systems, you can define a projection algorithm and its specific projection parameters or accept the default of Cylindrical Equirectangular centered at the equator and the prime meridian. For both projected and geographic coordinate systems, you can define the horizontal resolution and storage-center parameters; or you can accept the defaults.

You can review but cannot change ellipsoid parameters unless you select user-defined (non-standard) datum and ellipsoid types. Then you can type an equatorial radius value and any other parameter and let the software calculate the remaining values.

Finally, coordinate systems are heavily data dependant; therefore, you should not define them arbitrarily. The projection you use in the definition should be the one that best suits the data being displayed.

Working with Coordinate Systems

Horizontal Resolution

For the coordinate system of a data source, the horizontal resolution (set on the Advanced Storage Parameters dialog box opened from the Define Coordinate System File dialog box) defines what the distance between sequential integer coordinate values is. For example, if the resolution is 0.001 ft., and then the x coordinate of a point changes from 1 to 2, the distance in the x direction of the change is 0.001 ft. This is very important for data sources that store coordinates as integers (MGE, MGDM, MGSM, and CAD with .dgn files) because for these data types, you cannot go between 1 and 2. Thus, the smallest distance that will resolve two values as being separate is 0.001 ft., which leads to the term resolution.

separate is 0.001 ft., which leads to the term resolution . In the context of IGDS/MGE,

In the context of IGDS/MGE, this concept was presented with the term UOR (Unit of Resolution), whereas GeoMedia Professional uses storage coordinates. Thus, when MGE tells you that you have 1000 UORs per ft., it is telling you exactly the same thing that GeoMedia Professional is telling you when it says you have a horizontal resolution of 0.001 ft. (1 ft./1000 UORs). GeoMedia Professional is just looking at the distance between two adjoining UORs, whereas MGE/MCSO presents the same concept as "how many UORs fill a common distance (such as 1 ft.)". The GeoMedia Professional way of presentation mimics common language, such as, "My data is at cm. resolution" (meaning the distance between UORs is 1 cm., whereas MGE would state this as "100 UORs per m." or "1 UOR per cm.").

For CAD and MGE users, the horizontal resolution is expressing the very real limitations of the data. For example, you cannot draw a line and measure between two UORs.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

For other data sources that use floating point, these limitations do not exist (within reason). Much ArcInfo and MapInfo data is found at a resolution of 1 meter (or for geographic data, 1 degree). That just means that the data source chose to store the coordinates in those units. It is not necessary for floating point data to be stored as hundredths of a foot, for example, which would be wasted calculation; they just store it as feet (or meters, or whatever—whole units, usually).

Likewise, data in GeoMedia Professional's own geometry cache is kept as floating point. Thus, it is normally not necessary to adjust the resolution definition for the GeoWorkspace coordinate system. This is especially true due to the ability to match GeoWorkspace and warehouse coordinate systems through the General tab of the Options dialog box (Tools >

Options).

You can also set the storage center on the Advanced Storage Parameters dialog box. This is another legacy from integer storage. Integer storage mechanisms such as MGE and CAD .dgn files can only store so many UORs. In some cases, users need to offset the range of UORs that is used (some users wanted all coordinates to be positive, for example). The MicroStation ® global origin offset would accomplish that. This appears in GeoMedia Professional as the storage center. A normal data set has a center of (0,0), which means no shifting is defined.

Defining a Coordinate System for a GeoWorkspace

See the "Coordinate System Information" appendix for the settings available in the software.

You can define the following coordinate-system properties in a GeoWorkspace:

Base storage type (geographic or projection)

Horizontal resolution

Storage center

Projection algorithm and parameters

Horizontal geodetic datum

Reference ellipsoid and parameters

To define a GeoWorkspace coordinate system:

1. Select View > GeoWorkspace Coordinate System.

2. On the Storage Space tab of the GeoWorkspace Coordinate

System dialog box, select the Geographic or Projection base storage type.

Working with Coordinate Systems

Working with Coordinate Systems 3. Optional: To change the horizontal resolution and storage center, click Advanced

3. Optional: To change the horizontal resolution and storage center,

click Advanced Parameters.

Note: Changing the base storage type from Projection to Geographic will reset the horizontal resolution to 1 degree. Changing the base storage type from Geographic to Projection will reset the horizontal resolution to 1 meter. Either change will reset the storage center to (0,0).

4. For projected coordinate systems only: On the Projection Space tab, select a projection algorithm from the Projection algorithm drop- down list.

To change parameters, click Projection Parameters. Depending on the projection algorithm selected, some text boxes may be read-only.

5. Optional: On the Geographic Space tab, select the geodetic datum from the Geodetic datum drop-down list.

6. Optional: If you select a user-defined (non-standard) geodetic datum, you can change the ellipsoid on the Geographic Space tab; and if you select a user-defined (non-standard) ellipsoid, you can change ellipsoid parameters as well.

7. On the GeoWorkspace Coordinate System dialog box, click OK.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Defining a Coordinate System for an Access Warehouse

For information about warehouses and about changing the coordinate system of a new Access warehouse template, see the “Working with Warehouses” chapter.

You can define the following coordinate-system properties in an empty read/write Access warehouse:

Base storage type (geographic or projection)

Horizontal resolution

Storage center

Projection algorithm and parameters

Horizontal geodetic datum

Reference ellipsoid and parameters

Note: You can view but cannot change the coordinate system for a warehouse in which feature classes already exist. To change the coordinate system for a warehouse in which feature classes do exist, you must create a new read/write Access warehouse, change the coordinate system, import the data into the new warehouse, and then delete the old warehouse. The import operation transforms the geometry to match the new coordinate-system definition.

To define a coordinate system for an Access warehouse:

1. Create or connect to an empty read/write Access warehouse.

2. Select Warehouse > Warehouse Coordinate System.

3. On the Select Connection dialog box, select the Access connection for which you want to define a warehouse coordinate system.

Working with Coordinate Systems

Working with Coordinate Systems 4. On the Storage Space tab of the Warehouse Coordinate System dialog

4. On the Storage Space tab of the Warehouse Coordinate System

dialog box, select the Geographic or Projection base storage type.

5. Optional: To change the horizontal resolution and storage center,

click Advanced Parameters.

Note: Changing the base storage type from Projection to Geographic will reset the horizontal resolution to 1 degree. Changing the base storage type from Projection to Geographic will reset the horizontal resolution to 1 meter. Either change will reset the storage center to (0,0).

6. For projected coordinate systems only: On the Projection Space tab, select a projection algorithm from the Projection algorithm drop- down list.

To change parameters, click Projection Parameters. Depending on the projection algorithm selected, some text boxes may be read-only.

7. Optional: On the Geographic Space tab, select the geodetic datum from the Geodetic datum drop-down list.

8. Optional: If you select a user-defined (non-standard) geodetic datum, you can change the ellipsoid on the Geographic Space tab; and if you select a user-defined (non-standard) ellipsoid, you can change ellipsoid parameters as well.

9. On the Warehouse Coordinate System dialog box, click OK.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Matching GeoWorkspace and Warehouse Coordinate Systems

The General tab of the Options dialog box (Tools > Options) provides two options to match the GeoWorkspace and warehouse coordinate systems. These options improve performance when loading and displaying data by not imposing unnecessary coordinate-system transformations. Both options are selected by default.

transformations. Both options are selected by default. The When making first connection option allows you to

The When making first connection option allows you to match the two coordinate systems by copying the coordinate-system definition of the first warehouse connection made for the GeoWorkspace with the New Connection command to the current GeoWorkspace coordinate system. If you do not select this option, New Connection has no effect on the definition of the GeoWorkspace coordinate system. You can verify the new coordinate-system definition through View > GeoWorkspace

Coordinate System.

The When creating a new warehouse option allows you to match the two coordinate systems by copying the coordinate-system definition of the current GeoWorkspace to a new Access warehouse when it is created. If you do not select this option, active template defines the coordinate system of the new warehouse.

Working with Coordinate Systems

The optimum workflow in many situations is to first use New Connection to connect to your data, thus setting the GeoWorkspace coordinate system, and then to use New Warehouse to create any appropriate new Access warehouse(s). This sequence ensures that the new Access warehouse shares the same coordinate-system definition with the data source and the GeoWorkspace.

Note: The When creating a new warehouse option does not apply to the Oracle Object Model. When using the Oracle Object Model, you need to verify that the coordinate system is set to what you want it to be; it is not automatically set by the software.

Vicinity Connections

New Connection overlooks any vicinity connection when attempting to determine if it should match the coordinate system of the GeoWorkspace to that of the newly connected warehouse. If the new connection is the only non-vicinity connection available, this command copies the coordinate system to the GeoWorkspace coordinate system.

Related Effects

to the GeoWorkspace coordinate system. Related Effects The software automatically updates the various aspects of

The software automatically updates the various aspects of the system that are affected by copying the coordinate-system definition of the first non- vicinity connection to the GeoWorkspace coordinate system. Any transformation pathways to coordinate systems of connections that were previously created and then deleted will be updated. Any spatial filters that exist (either from the GeoWorkspace template or from running Define

Spatial Filter By Fence or Define Spatial Filter By Area) will be

transformed into the new GeoWorkspace coordinate system. Coordinate- system information will be updated on all map views, resulting in recalculation of display scale. If the north arrow and scale bar are displayed, they will be refreshed to account for the new coordinate system and display scale.

Copying the GeoWorkspace Coordinate-System Definition onto the Coordinate System of a New (Access) Warehouse

If you select the matching options, the software copies the definition of the coordinate system of the GeoWorkspace new warehouse. This definition overwrites the first row in the GCoordSystem table of the database. If no rows exist in the table, the software creates a new row. This behavior is consistent with the behavior of the Warehouse Coordinate System command, which edits the first row of the GCoordSystem table and creates the row if it does not already exist.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

You can actually use the New Warehouse command in two slightly different ways to create 1) a new Access warehouse (.mdb – the default), or 2) a new Access warehouse template (.mdt). Only when creating a new warehouse (.mdb) does the command establish a connection to the new warehouse.

Because an open connection is required to update or to add a row to the GCoordSystem table of the warehouse, it is only when a new warehouse (not warehouse template) is created (and the preference is set) that the New Warehouse command copies the GeoWorkspace coordinate system to the warehouse.

The impacts of copying the GeoWorkspace coordinate-system definition onto the coordinate system of a new (Access) warehouse affect the optimum workflow. The optimum workflow in many situations is to first use New Connection to connect to your data source, thus setting the GeoWorkspace coordinate system, and then to use New Warehouse to create any new warehouse(s). This ordering ensures that the new warehouse shares the same coordinate-system definition with the data source and GeoWorkspace.

Getting Coordinate Readouts

To see the coordinates of any location in the map window, turn on the

Precision Coordinates display (View > Precision Coordinates).

Coordinates display ( View > Precision Coordinates ). This control displays the precision coordinates for the

This control displays the precision coordinates for the current cursor position in the map window. The current coordinate format drop-down list determines if the displayed coordinates are geographic or projected. The read-only coordinate display field displays the coordinate readout for the current cursor position.

The precision of the coordinate readout is defined using the Units and Formats tab of the Options dialog box. You have the option to update coordinates with a mouse move (the default) or with a click.

Working with Coordinate Systems

Setting Units and Formats

The Units and Formats tab of the Options dialog box (Tools > Options)

allows you to set measurement options for all commands that involve

measuring, for example, Measure Distance and Analyze Geometry. This

tab also allows you to control the way coordinate readout information appears on the Precision Coordinates dockable control.

appears on the Precision Coordinates dockable control. See the “Conversion Tables” appendix for multiplication

See the “Conversion Tables” appendix for multiplication factors for converting from/to the International System of Units (metric) to/from the United States Customary System.

These are the options you can set on the Units and Formats tab:

Type specifies the type of coordinates for which to set the default unit and precision. Each unit type used by the software is listed. When the software outputs values of the specified unit type, those values by default are displayed using the units and precision specified here. Some commands allow you to override these defaults.

Unit sets the linear, areal, or angular unit of measure. The choices vary with the unit type.

Precision defines the number of decimal places of precision in the coordinate readout applicable commands. A separate precision may be specified for each unit type.

Geographic coordinate order sets the order in which geographic latitude and longitude coordinate readouts are displayed.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Geographic quadrant specifies for geographic coordinates which hemispheres are defined as positive and which as negative and whether a character designator should be included.

Projection quadrant determines how the ordering of values in projection coordinates are interpreted.

For example, +East, +North indicates that the first coordinate of the pair is positive along the east axis, and the second coordinate is positive along the north axis (like easting,northing in a Cartesian system). Similarly, +East,+South indicates that the first coordinate is positive along the east axis, while the second is positive along the south axis. So, instead of being “up,” a positive second value would be “down.”

You must have the Precision Coordinates dockable control displayed to see a change in this setting.

Measurement interpretation specifies how Earth curvature is accounted for in measurements and coordinate calculations, either planar or spheroidal.

True (spheroidal) specifies that measurements are taken on the surface of the ellipsoid by taking the curvature of the Earth into account. These measurements do not contain any projection distortions.

Projected (planar) specifies that measurements are taken on the projection plane without taking the curvature of the Earth into account. These measurements do contain projection distortions. This is the default setting.

Azimuth settings specify the direction and starting point when setting and displaying azimuths. An azimuth is a way of specifying an angle by measuring either clockwise or counterclockwise from 0 to 360 degrees. These options apply to the distance and azimuth readouts and keyins, and to some coordinate system projection parameters.

Working with Coordinate Systems

Configuring for Datum Transformations

See the “Coordinate System Information” appendix for a list of datum-transformation models the software supports.

To convert data between two coordinate systems that are based on different horizontal geodetic datums, you need a datum transformation. The software uses the autodt.ini file to generate datum transformations during the building of coordinate-system transformation paths, such as the path between the GeoWorkspace coordinate system and a warehouse coordinate system. The autodt.ini file is in the \Program Files\GeoMedia Professional\Program\cssruntm\cfg folder.

When a datum transformation is needed, the software searches this file from top to bottom. The first entry whose Forward Input and Forward Output datums match the datum pair is used to build the datum transformation. Where more than one such entry exists, only the first will be used.

You can cause a different model or definition to be used by changing the order of the entries in the autodt.ini file. You can also define new entries for the Standard Molodensky, Bursa-Wolf, Second Degree Conformal Polynomial, and Second Degree (General) Polynomial models, if you have access to the parameters for these models that suit your needs. The Second Degree Conformal Polynomial model may be used to achieve a Helmert transformation. All datum transformation models can transform in both the forward and inverse directions.

For example, an entry that begins "csgdNAD27,csgdNAD83, match a transformation from NAD83 to NAD27 as well as a transformation from NAD27 to NAD83.

Details of the syntax for model-specific parameters are included as comments in the autodt.ini file. The general syntax for all entries in this file is as follows:

ForwardInputDatum,ForwardOutputDatum,DatumTransMod

elType[,model-specific-parameters

Fields are separated by a comma (,).

A semicolon (;) in the first column denotes a comment line.

Datums are defined using the ASCII mnemonics from the CSGeodeticDatumConstants enumeration.

Datum-transformation-model types are defined using the ASCII mnemonics from the CSDatumTransformationModelConstants enumeration.

." will

]

types are defined using the ASCII mnemonics from the CSDatumTransformationModelConstants enumeration. ." will ] 3-13

Working with GeoMedia Professional

This file is never localized for different languages, rather, it is always interpreted in English (it uses the comma for the field separator and the dot for the decimal character). No thousands grouping character is used.

Floating point values are never written in scientific notation.

When you make changes to the autodt.ini file, they do not affect any GeoMedia or GeoMedia object-based process that is currently running. This is because the coordinate transformation software only reads the file once at start-up time; so if the file is altered afterwards, the process does not know about the alteration until the next time the process is run.

In addition, when you make changes to the autodt.ini file, they do not affect transformations that have already been persisted in a GeoMedia GeoWorkspace. This is because the coordinate transformation software only uses the autodt.ini file to build new datum transformations. If, for example, you make a connection and the software at that time uses the autodt.ini file to include a datum transformation and you then save the GeoWorkspace, any subsequent change you make to the autodt.ini file does not affect that saved GeoWorkspace. This is because the datum transformation has already been created and saved within the GeoWorkspace.

Displaying Data That Has No Coordinate System Specified

To be displayed accurately in a GeoWorkspace, all data must specify a coordinate system. MGE, MGDM, and MGSM data already specify coordinate systems (type-56 element), but all ARC/INFO, Arc/View, and MapInfo data and some FRAMME, CAD, and raster data do not. To accommodate data with no specified coordinate system, you first define a coordinate-system file (.csf) outside of the software.

To define a coordinate-system file:

1. From the Windows Start menu, select Programs > GeoMedia

Professional > Define Coordinate System File.

2. On the Storage Space tab of the Define Coordinate System File

dialog box, select the base storage type—Geographic or Projection—of the coordinate-system file.

3. Optional: To change the horizontal resolution and storage center,

click Advanced Parameters.

Working with Coordinate Systems

Note: Changing the base storage type from Projection to Geographic will rest the horizontal resolution to 1 degree. Changing the base storage type from Geographic to Projection will reset the horizontal resolution to 1 meter. Either change will reset the storage center to (0,0).

4.

For projected coordinate systems only: On the Projection Space tab, select a projection algorithm from the Projection algorithm drop- down list.

5.

Optional: To change parameters, click Projection Parameters. Depending on the projection algorithm selected, some text boxes may be read-only.

6.

Optional: On the Geographic Space tab, select the geodetic datum from the Geodetic datum drop-down list.

7.

Optional: If you select a user-defined (non-standard) geodetic datum, you can change the ellipsoid on the Geographic Space tab; and if you select a user-defined (non-standard) ellipsoid, you can change ellipsoid parameters as well.

8.

On the Define Coordinate System File dialog box, click OK.

9.

On the Save Coordinate System File As dialog box, select the drive and folder where you want to save the coordinate-system file. If you do not select a path, the coordinate-system file will be saved in the root folder of your active drive.

Select one of the following locations:

The folder containing the specific warehouse for which the coordinate-system file defines coordinate data. This is the preferred location.

The folder where the warehouses are stored. The default is <drive:>\Warehouses. It may be necessary to use this location, for example, when the actual warehouse data is located on read- only media.

For FRAMME data, you can specify the folder containing the gateway file fsa.gtw or the folder named in the gralocs.txt file, which is located on the FRAMME graphics server. The default is

\win32app\ingr\frs\cfg.

10.

In the File name text box, type the name that you want to give to the coordinate-system file.

. 10. In the File name text box, type the name that you want to give

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11. Verify that the Save as type is set to Coordinate System File (*.csf).

12. Click Save.

To display ARC/INFO data:

See the “Creating Data Server .INI Files” appendix.

You identify the coordinate-system file for the ARC/INFO data by creating a <workspace>.ini file, where <workspace> is the name of the ARC/INFO workspace data folder. Within this file, you specify the coordinate-system file (.csf) to be used. Place the <workspace>.ini file in the ARC/INFO workspace folder, or if that is not possible, in the software’s \Warehouses folder specified during installation.

To display ArcView data:

See the “Creating Data Server .INI Files” appendix.

You identify the coordinate-system file for the ArcView data by creating a <workspace>.ini file, where <workspace> is the name of the ArcView workspace data folder. Within this file, you specify the coordinate-system file (.csf) to be used. Place the <workspace>.ini file in the ArcView workspace folder, or if that is not possible, in the software’s \Warehouses folder specified during installation ($/GeoMedia Professional/bin is the one specified for the .ini file).

To display CAD-server data:

For CAD-server data, perform the following:

Specify the coordinate-system file(s) in the CAD schema definition (.csd) file.

While creating the .csd file on the Files tab of the CAD Server Definition dialog box, select all the coordinate-system files to be used, and specify the coordinate-system file on the Coordinate Systems tab.

For the IGDS Scanner, you can use either a .dgn file (with a type-56 element) or a .csf file (created by Define Coordinate System File) to specify the coordinate-system information.

For the AutoCAD Scanner, you can use only a .csf file (created by Define Coordinate System File) to specify the coordinate-system information.

Working with Coordinate Systems

To display FRAMME data:

See the “Creating Data Server .INI Files” appendix.

See MGE Basic Nucleus or MGE Projection Manager documentation for information about type- 56 elements.

For FRAMME data, there are two ways to get spatially accurate displays:

Method 1

Under the [CoordinateSystem] keyword of the FRAMME .ini file, specify a design file (.dgn) that contains a type-56 element. The syntax is FILE=<filename>. For example, FILE=myfile.dgn.

If the design file you specify does not contain a type-56 element, the working units and global origin defined in the type-9 element will be used to create a coordinate system.

If you do not specify a design file, the wrk_seed.dgn file on theFRAMME server will be used to create a coordinate system.

Method 2

Define a coordinate-system file (.csf) that contains the coordinate-system parameters of the FRAMME data. Then identify the coordinate-system file under the [CoordinateSystem] keyword in the FRAMME .ini file as follows: FILE=<filename>. For example, FILE=myfile.csf.

To display MapInfo data:

See the “Creating Data Server .INI Files” appendix.

You identify the coordinate-system file for the MapInfo data by creating a <workspace>.ini file, where <workspace> is the name of the MapInfo workspace folder. Within this file, you specify the coordinate-system file (.csf) to be used. Place the <workspace>.ini file in the MapInfo workspace folder, or if that is not possible, in the software’s \Warehouses folder specified during installation.

If there is no .ini file, the data server will look for a .csf file in the MapInfo workspace folder that bears the same name as the MapInfo table and use that .csf file for the corresponding GeoMedia Professional feature class. This way, you need one .csf file for one feature class in the workspace folder. You cannot use a single .csf file for the whole folder unless you specify it in the .ini file.

To display raster images:

See “Inserting Images into Warehouses” in the ‘Working with Warehouses” chapter and the “Raster Information” appendix.

For Intergraph-format raster images that are inserted using the by-header placement mode or other raster formats that have an associated ESRI word file, you define a coordinate-system file and then insert the image into a read/write warehouse.

associated ESRI word file, you define a coordinate-system file and then insert the image into a

Working with GeoMedia Professional

To edit a coordinate-system file:

To edit an existing .csf file, double click the file name. This opens the Define Coordinate System File dialog box. Make changes to the file, and click OK.

Creating Coordinate-System Files from Design Files

You can easily create a coordinate-system file (.csf) from an IGDS design file (.dgn) with Define Coordinate System File. This utility can read a .dgn file if you: 1) drag the .dgn file from Explorer onto the Define Coordinate System File icon, or 2) rename the file from a .dgn extension

to a .csf extension and then double click to open the file in Define

Coordinate System File.

Note that Define Coordinate System File can only read .dgn files, not write to them. The only format this utility can write to is the .csf (OLE compound files structured-storage) format. If you want to write coordinate-system information into a type-56 element of a design file, you need to use MGE.

Define Coordinate System File reads .dgn files with or without a type-56 element. Without a type-56 element, it reads only the information on working units (resolution) and global origin (storage center) from the type-9 element. It then sets the projection to Rectangular Grid, which means no algorithm is defined to get from Projection to Geographic coordinates. With a valid type-56 element, in addition to reading the type- 9 element, this utility reads projection and datum information from the type-56 element.

A potential workflow to use this capability would be with CAD server

when you have .dgn data, and 1) the .dgn data does not contain a type-56 element with projection information, and 2) the information of the .dgn about working units (resolution) and global origin (storage center) is valid.

In this case, if you know the projection information, but for example were

digitizing with vanilla MicroStation, you may want to use Define Coordinate System File to read the working units and global origin information of the .dgn. You would then use it to define the projection and datum, and save the information out to a .csf file.

Working with Warehouses

See the “Creating Data Sever .INI Files” appendix for information on data server .ini files.

You display feature geometries and attribute data in a GeoWorkspace through connections to warehouses where the data are stored. Each warehouse connection uses a data server to convert the data into a format that the software can display. This version of the software lets you connect to data created in the following formats:

Access

ARC/INFO ®

ArcView shapefile

CAD

AutoCAD

MicroStation ® /IGDS

FRAMME

MapInfo ®

Modular GIS Environment (MGE)

MGE Data Manager (MGDM)

MGE Segment Manager (MGSM)

ODBC Tabular

Oracle ® Relational Model

Oracle Object Model

• Oracle ® Relational Model • Oracle Object Model Note: A set of Database Utilities is

Note: A set of Database Utilities is delivered with GeoMedia Professional for managing and updating Access, Oracle 8i Object, and MS SQL Server databases. You can access these utilities from Start >

Programs > GeoMedia Professional > Database Utilities. The

Database Utilities Online Help provides complete information on using these utilities.

See the “Working with Map Windows” and “Working with Data Windows” chapters for more information.

All warehouse types are read-only, except for Access and Oracle. This protects the integrity of your source data. So, if you want only to display data in the software from one or more warehouses, you simply create one or more warehouse connections and then use map windows and data windows to display the data.

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This is a representative workflow for accessing the warehouse data you want to display:

1.

Open a new GeoWorkspace.

2.

Connect to the warehouse containing the vicinity data for your area of interest.

3.

Use Tools > Options to designate the vicinity connection.

4.

Display the vicinity data.

5.

Define the spatial filter for your area of interest using the vicinity map.

6.

Connect to other warehouse(s), selecting the default spatial filter.

7.

Display the feature data.

If

you want write access to the data in the software—to add new features

or

change attributes of existing ones, for example—you create a new

Access warehouse and import data into it.

Whether you are displaying data or writing it, your GeoWorkspace can contain data from many different sources, even those whose native data types are incompatible.

This is a representative workflow for importing data into a read/write warehouse:

1. Follow the steps in the preceding workflow to identify the area for which data is to be imported.

2. Optional: Define a coordinate system for the empty warehouse. (The GeoWorkspace defaults to the coordinate system from the first feature added to the legend.)

3. Import feature classes from the connected warehouses into your read/write Access warehouse.

Creating a Read/Write Access Warehouse

See the “Working with Features” chapter.

A read/write Access warehouse can contain feature class definitions,

features, raster images, and a coordinate system.

Like a GeoWorkspace, a read/write Access warehouse is built on a template, and you can create your own template(s) or use an existing one. The software is delivered with a default Access warehouse template, normal.mdt.

Working with Warehouses

If you accidentally delete the normal.mdt file, you may have to reinstall the software to restore the template. If you have Microsoft Access, you can create a blank .mdb file to use as your template. Be sure and follow the instructions for defining a warehouse coordinate system, since this default database will not have one. Better still, make a backup copy of the template.

To create a read/write warehouse:

1. Select Warehouse > New Warehouse.

2. On the New dialog box, select a template. The default is normal.mdt.

3. Verify that Document is selected.

4. Click New.

5. On the New Warehouse dialog box in the Save in field, select a storage location. The default is <drive:>\warehouses.

Note: The default storage location is established when the software is installed, but you can change it in the product from the File

Locations tab of the Options dialog box (Tools > Options).

tab of the Options dialog box ( Tools > Options ). 6. In the File name

6. In the File name field, type a unique file name.

7. Leave Access as the file type.

8. Click Save.

Defining a Coordinate System for a Warehouse

Click Save . Defining a Coordinate System for a Warehouse See “Defining a Coordinate System for

See “Defining a Coordinate System for an Access Warehouse” in the “Working with Coordinate Systems” chapter.

Normally, you define a warehouse coordinate system only for an empty read/write Access warehouse that you just created. You can view but cannot change the coordinate system in a warehouse in which feature classes already exist, but you can accomplish a change to the coordinate system with the following procedure:

1. Create a new read/write Access warehouse.

2. Change the coordinate system.

3. Import the data into the new warehouse.

4. Delete the old warehouse.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Preparing to Connect

See the “Troubleshooting Connection Problems” appendix.

As the universal geographic client, the software lets you combine data from many sources and in different formats into one spatially accurate environment. To ensure accuracy, you must set up your data servers and provide the software with certain information about the data you want to view. Each data type requires different information; the following sections cover special procedures or information required for each.

Connecting to an Access Warehouse

To connect to an Access database, you must identify or select an Access GeoMedia Professional Database file (.mdb).

Connecting to an ARC/INFO Warehouse

See “Displaying Data That Has No Coordinate System Specified” in the “Working with Coordinate Systems” chapter, and see the “Creating Data Server .INI Files” appendix.

To connect to an ARC/INFO warehouse, you must identify or select an ARC/INFO workspace folder. Before trying to connect, check the following:

ARC/INFO data must be in native format (not exported). Native format requires a workspace defined as a folder that contains subfolders corresponding to coverages and an \INFO folder that contains an ARCDR9 or ARC.DIR file.

A coordinate-system file (.csf) for the ARC/INFO data must be

created with Define Coordinate System File.

The coordinate-system file for the ARC/INFO data must be identified in a <Arc/Infoworkspace folder name>.ini file, which should be stored in the ARC/INFO workspace folder, or if that is not possible, in the software’s \Warehouses folder.

For ease of maintenance, you should store the .csf and .ini files along with the data in the ARC/INFO workspace folder as the primary location. When this is not possible (due to read-only media, for example), you should store these files in the default warehouse location, and the software will find them there.

The software does not support the PC version of ARC/INFO.

Working with Warehouses

Connecting to an ArcView Warehouse

See “Displaying Data That Has No Coordinate System Specified” in the “Working with Coordinate Systems” chapter, and see the “Creating Data Server .INI Files” appendix.

To connect to an ArcView warehouse, you must identify or select an ArcView Shape Files folder. Before trying to connect, check the following:

For maintenance ease, you should sore the .csf and .ini files along with the data in the ArcView Shape Files folder as the primary location. When this is not possible (due to read-only media, for example), you should store these files in the default warehouse location, and the software will find them there.

A coordinate-system file (.csf) for the ArcView data must be created

with Define Coordinate System File.

The coordinate-system file for the ArcView data should be identified in a <workspace name>.ini file, which should be stored in the Arc View Shape Files folder, or if that is not possible, in the \Warehouses folder of the software.

ArcView data must be in native format (not exported). Native format requires a workspace defined as a folder that contains themes with each theme having its individual .dbf, .shp, and .shx files.

If an <ArcView Shape Files folder>.ini file is not found, the server looks for a <theme name>.csf file in the workspace folder.

Connecting to a CAD Warehouse

file in the workspace folder. Connecting to a CAD Warehouse To connect to a CAD warehouse,

To connect to a CAD warehouse, you must identify or select a CAD Server Schema file. Before trying to connect, check the following:

See Installing GeoMedia Professional and “Displaying Data That Has No Coordinate System Specified” in the “Working with Coordinate Systems” chapter.

For AutoCAD data, a coordinate-system file (.csf) must have been

created with Define Coordinate System File.

For IGDS data only, an ODBC data source must have been created if there are any database attribute linkages that have to be served.

A CAD schema definition file (.csd) must have been defined with Define CAD Server Schema File. The CAD data server allows you to use MicroStation design files (with or without attribute linkages) or AutoCAD files (.dwg/.dxf without database attribute linkages) as a GeoMedia Professional data source.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

You can specify a .ini file in the .csd file that allows for persistent caching. Persistent caching is done in CAD data server to improve server performance. The .ini file format is as follows:

CACHE FILE: <cache file name with .csc extension, with/ without its path>

CACHE UPTODATE: < TRUE|FALSE |T| F > [optional]

LOCK TIMEOUT THRESHOLD: < a reasonable value, based on the size of the .dxf, .dgn files > [optional]

The keywords and their values are not case sensitive.

Though the Cache UPTODATE flag is optional, it is a good idea to have it as TRUE if there are not changes in the map files (.dxf/ .dwg/.dgn). Also, set it to FALSE if there are changes to the map files, which helps improve server performance.

Similarly, if the lock timeout threshold value is not specified, the default value is 60 seconds. If the map file involved is too big, a higher value than 60 is advised for the display.

This is a representative workflow for setting up a CAD data server:

1. Outside of GeoMedia Professional, open Define CAD Server Schema

File.

2. Create or select an existing CAD server schema.

3. Identify the map files and coordinate-system files you want the CAD server to use.

4. Link each map file to a coordinate-system file.

5. Link the CAD graphics to database attributes. This tells the CAD server how to recognize and process each feature. (IGDS only)

6. Specify which attribute the CAD server is to use to for the primary unique key for all graphics-only features and for all database-linked features.

7. Define feature classes.

8. Specify which scanners to use and how to connect to the data.

9. Exit Define CAD Server Schema File.

Working with Warehouses

To create a CAD server schema:

IMPORTANT: Using CAD with database attributes is for MicroStation only.

To set up a CAD server, you must know:

The structure of your project.

The conventions used for digitizing and assigning attributes to features in your project.

How features are defined in your project.

Whether graphics in the project have attributes.

1. From the Windows Start menu, select Programs > GeoMedia

Professional > Define CAD Server Schema File.

1. From the Windows Start menu, select Programs > GeoMedia Professional > Define CAD Server Schema

Working with GeoMedia Professional

2. To create a new CAD server schema, select MicroStation or AutoCad on the CAD Server Schema dialog box.

Note: The remainder of this workflow reflects a MicroStation example.

3. Click OK.

workflow reflects a MicroStation example. 3. Click OK . To identify the files you want the

To identify the files you want the CAD server to use:

1. In the Folders field on the Files tab of the CAD Server Definition

dialog box, create a list of folders that contain the maps and coordinate-system or design files you want.

To add a folder, click New, and select the folder containing the map and coordinate-system files you want to use.

Working with Warehouses

To change a folder, click Change, and select the folder you want to use instead of the original.

To remove a folder from the list, select the folder name and click

Remove.

2. Select the folder that contains the maps you want.

A list of files in the folder appears in the Available maps box.

3. From the Available maps list, select the maps you want.

To select all maps, click >>.

To select individual maps, select one or more map names (using the CTRL or SHIFT keys to select multiple maps), and click >.

To remove individual maps from the Selected maps list, select one or more map names (using the CTRL or SHIFT keys to select multiple maps), and click <.

To remove all maps from the Selected maps list, click <<.

A

list of coordinate-system files and design files in the folder appears

in

the Available coordinate system files box.

in the Available coordinate system files box. 4. If it differs from the folder containing your

4. If it differs from the folder containing your maps, select the folder that contains the coordinate-system files you want.

5. Select the coordinate-system file you want from the Available

coordinate system files list.

If all of your map files use the same coordinate system, select one coordinate-system file.

If your maps have different coordinate systems, select all the coordinate-system files necessary.

IMPORTANT: If you use a design file to specify the coordinate system, verify that it contains a valid type-56 element. You can do this by using Define Coordinate System File to open the design file. A file that does not contain a valid type-56 element is interpreted as having the Rectangular Grid projection algorithm and a user-defined datum and ellipsoid, with ellipsoid parameters equivalent to the WGS84 ellipsoid.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

To link each map file to a coordinate-system file:

1. Click the Coordinate Systems tab.

file: 1. Click the Coordinate Systems tab. 2. If all of your map files use the

2. If all of your map files use the same coordinate system, select All

maps are in the same coordinate system, and select the name of the

coordinate-system file from the drop-down list.

3. If some map files use a different coordinate system, select Maps are

in different coordinate systems, and select the name of the

coordinate-system file for each map by clicking each row and selecting a file from the drop-down list in the Coordinate system file field.

Working with Warehouses

To link the CAD graphics to database attributes:

1. Click the Feature Definition tab.

to database attributes: 1. Click the Feature Definition tab. 2 . C l i c k

2. Click Database Linkage Options.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Working with GeoMedia Professional 3. In the Graphic to database table linkages section, check the graphic

3. In the Graphic to database table linkages section, check the graphic

attribute(s) you want to define the graphic-to-database-table linkages. EntityNumber is the default.

4. In the Graphic to database row linkages section, check the graphic attribute(s) you want to define the graphic-to-database-row linkages.

OccurrenceNumber is the default.

5. For each checked attribute, change the database scanner attribute name if it differs from the column name in your database.

For example, the OccurrenceNumber row in your database is associated with MSLINK, thus you change the database scanner attribute name from OccurrenceNumber to MSLINK.

6. On the Database Linkage Options dialog box, click Close.

To identify primary unique keys:

1. On the Feature Definition tab of the CAD Server Definition dialog box, click Primary Unique Keys.

Working with Warehouses

Working with Warehouses 2. On the Primary Unique Keys dialog box, check the attribute in the

2. On the Primary Unique Keys dialog box, check the attribute in the

Primary unique keys for all graphic only features list that you want

to use as the primary unique key for all graphics-only features. the software supports only one primary unique key for graphic-only feature classes.

one primary unique key for graphic-only feature classes. 3. Check the attribute in the Primary unique

3. Check the attribute in the Primary unique keys for all database

linked features field that you want to use as the primary unique key for all database-linked features. The software supports only one primary unique key for database-linked feature classes.

4. Click Close.

To define feature classes:

1. In the Feature classes box of the Feature Definition tab, click New

to invoke the Feature Definition Wizard.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Working with GeoMedia Professional 2. Type a unique name for the feature class. 3. From the

2. Type a unique name for the feature class.

3. From the drop-down list, select the file that defines the coordinate system for the feature class. The listed coordinate-system files are those you selected on the Files tab.

For the best performance, use the same coordinate system as that used to store the input data. If the input data is stored in multiple coordinate systems, select the coordinate-system file that matches most of the input data.

4. If the feature has database linkages that you want to expose to the

software, check This feature has database linkages? If the feature

is linked to a database table, all the attributes from that table will be exposed.

5. Click Next.

Working with Warehouses

Working with Warehouses 6. Select the attributes you want in the new feature class. − Choose

6. Select the attributes you want in the new feature class.

Choose at least one spatial or graphic attribute. Spatial attributes are also called the GDO geometry. Graphic attributes are used for visual reference but not for spatial operations.

used for visual reference but not for spatial operations. Note: The graphic attribute choices do not

Note: The graphic attribute choices do not appear in the Available attributes list by default. You must swap in the file that contains the attribute list to display the graphic attribute choices.

Specify the geometry type for the feature class by selecting the corresponding geometry attribute:

For point features, select SpatialPoint or GraphicPoint.

For linear features, select SpatialLine if it is appropriate to use the feature for spatial operations, or select GraphicLine if the feature is just for visual reference.

For area features, select SpatialArea or GraphicArea.

For compound features, select SpatialAny or GraphicAny.

For text features, select GraphicText.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

The other available attributes are the standard IGDS element/AutoCAD entity properties and a unique ID that the CAD server automatically generates for each feature.

If you pick multiple geometry types, the feature class will have multiple geometry columns, and you must select one geometry type as the primary geometry. Graphic elements that do not conform to the feature-class geometry type will have NULL values in the geometry column.

For example, if you chose SpatialLine as the geometry type and also specified that the feature is defined as all graphics (that is, with the geometry type SpatialAny) on level 1, then the point, text, and area geometries that are found on level 1 will have NULL as the value in the geometry column.

7. Check the attribute you want as the primary geometry in the Primary geometry list. Attributes in the Primary geometry list are the spatial and graphic attributes you selected in the previous step.

SpatialPoint and GraphicPoint geometry contain the origin point for text and text node elements. If you want to use a text feature for spatial operations, select both SpatialPoint and GraphicText attributes, and then select SpatialPoint as the primary geometry.

8. Click Next.

r a p h i c T e x t attributes, and then select SpatialPoint as

Working with Warehouses

9. Select the attributes you want to determine whether a graphic element is a member
9.
Select the attributes you want to determine whether a graphic element
is a member of the feature class.
10.
Click Next.
11.
Type values for each of the attributes selected in the previous step.
These values define the criteria that determine if a graphic element is a
member of the feature class. You can type individual values or a range
of values. For attributes of type Text, enter the string in single quotes.
For attributes of type Boolean, enter either 1 or 0 for TRUE and
FALSE, respectively.
For example, if all road features reside on level 1, you would type 1 in
the Value field. If road features reside on levels 1 through 5, you could
type any one of the following:
1-5
1,2,3,4,5
1,2,3-5
12.
Click Next.

Working with GeoMedia Professional

Working with GeoMedia Professional 13. Select the maps you want the CAD server to process to

13. Select the maps you want the CAD server to process to find the feature class. The maps that appear in the Available maps list are those you selected on the Files tab.

14. Click Finish.

To select a scanner:

A scanner is software that reads and processes the graphic and database information. This version of the software supports both MicroStation and AutoCAD data. ODBC is used to connect to the database for MicroStation/IGDS only. Some of the fields on this tab are reserved for future use.

1. Click the Scanner Options tab.