Dear Dr. Klaus, We are writing this letter regarding Dr. Ahmad Sarhan.

As students in his Data Structures (CSCI 260) Spring 2007 course, we have encountered significant problems, and we feel it is imperative that they are expressed to you. The first of these major issues is the course syllabus, which does not clearly explain what is expected in the course. The following excerpt is the only portion of the provided syllabus, as taken from the course website (www.geocities.com/sarhanam), which mentions the topics specific to data structures: �The classic data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, etc. are studies. Sorting and Searching are stressed. Computational analysis is also studied.� This is brief and vague, with the topics only superficially mentioned, and provides an unclear description of the course. The second major problem is that only a small portion of the mentioned topics has been covered. Throughout a full quarter, only chapters 1, 2, 5 and part of 3 from the book have been completed, none of which directly address the topics mentioned in the syllabus. This lack of class guidance, coupled with the weak syllabus, has made even independent effort difficult, as students lack the necessary direction to extend their knowledge of the subject. As a result, students feel extremely unprepared and incompetent in the subject of Data Structures, whose principles form an essential basis of any studies in computing. In addition to these problems, there is a major weakness in the presented material. Lectures are presented in a disorganized manner, with slides often repeated, and often left incomplete. Another major problem is that class time is often spent with extensive discussion over what should be established facts, and is often confusing, as usually no clear answer is reached. While this may be desirable in some of the more ambiguous areas of knowledge, it is an extreme drawback in understanding computer systems. In one of these cases, over thirty minutes of class time was spent discussing what the range of integer numbers in Java contains, reaching many contradictory solutions, while it is a simple established convention. This is only one of many examples of such discussions, which only leave students puzzled. Overall, there is a high degree of confusion about the course material. The last of the major concerns relates to the assessments. There are apparent contradictions in some assigned marks, and no clear marking scheme. Also, the questions tend to encourage repetition of information rather than analysis, making the challenge more about memorizing details rather than understanding and developing ideas. We are confident that these complaints will be seriously addressed, as we believe that NYIT shares our high expectations in its courses and our concerns to create a solid educational basis for future studies. Thank you for your time, Students of Data Structures, CSCI 260

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