DOUGLASTON HISTORIC DISTRICT PROPOSED DISTRICT EXTENSIONS DOUGLASTON, NEW YORK

PREPARED FOR: THE DOUGLASTON-LITTLE NECK HISTORICAL SOCIETY SEPTEMBER 2007

REVISED JANUARY 2008
Associated Cultural Resource Consultants

ACRC

FIGURE 1 DOUGLASTON HISTORIC DISTRICT, DOUGLASTON HILL HISTORIC DISTRICT AND PROPOSED DOUGLASTON HISTORIC DISTRICT EXTENSIONS

DOUGLASTON HISTORIC DISTRICT
SUB-AREA E

SUB-AREA C SUB-AREA A SUB-AREA B

SUB-AREA D

DOUGLASTON HILL HISTORIC DISTRICT

Douglaston Extensions Description The Proposed Douglaston Historic District Extensions, located in Douglaston, Queens, are a collection of the earliest buildings of the 1853 Village of Marathon subdivision and a number of Eclectic period residences constructed primarily between 1900 and 1915, with some additional 1920s infill. These parcels represent the continuum of Douglaston’s earliest nineteenth century planned development through the period of the twentieth century planned community, Douglas Manor. Two of these resources are immediately threatened with demolition or alterations that would significantly change the context of this important enclave and how it relates to both the Douglaston Historic District to the north and the Douglaston Hill Historic District to the south. The Proposed Douglaston Historic District Extensions consist of five subareas adjacent to the existing Douglaston Historic District (Figure 1). Only the Sub-areas A through C will be addressed at length in this document. Sub-area A is located immediately south of the existing district and is centered on Douglaston Parkway and the western terminus of both Cherry and Willow streets. Sub-area B consists of a dozen buildings and several vacant lots located along 240th Street (also known as Prospect Avenue) and the eastern end of Cherry Street. Sub-area C consists of five properties south and west of the Douglaston Historic District on 233rd Street, Bay Street and Regatta Place. Sub-area D is centered upon the Douglaston train station and includes commercial buildings, a public school and a church. Sub-area E is a small enclave of mid-19th and early 20th century houses, some with ties to the former oysterman community, adjacent to the southeastern portion of the Douglaston Historic District. The history of the proposed Douglaston Historic District Extensions closely mirrors that of the Douglaston Hill Historic District. The Village of Marathon, a mid-19th century “suburban” community, was laid out in May of 1853 on the former Jeremiah Lambertson farm, which encompassed approximately 125 acres (Figure 2). The Village was bordered by the salt marshes of Alley Creek and Little Neck Bay on the west; Northern Boulevard on the south; the “Ravine” to the east; and the estates of George Douglas and Benjamin Allen to the north. Eleven acres of the former farm located along a stretch of land on the west side of present-day Douglaston Parkway between Northern Boulevard and the current Douglaston station of the Long Island Railroad was reserved by the Lambertson family for their own use. Otherwise, the land was divided into 107 lots more or less one acre each in size.

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At the time of subdivision, the only structure extant in the immediate area was the Zion Episcopal Church, constructed in 1831, on Northern Boulevard. The parcels varied in configuration: narrow and elongated (from 300 to 600 feet long) on the outer edges, the central lots in the Village of Marathon were 40,000 square feet, 200 by 200 feet square near-acre sites. According to the Douglaston Hill Historic District Designation Report, Lam-

FIGURE 2 - MAP OF MARATHON, 1853
bertson “sold the lots at auction” soon after subdivision, while the timing of his creation of the Village of Marathon
suggests that he was anticipating the arrival of passenger train service on the Flushing and Northside Railroad, which was being extended eastward at the time, reaching Flushing in 1854, with plans to reach Great Neck, Long Island, via Douglaston by the late 1860s.

Douglaston Parkway, then known as Main Avenue, was laid out on what was originally a trail created by the Native American Matinicoc tribe, right at the point where the salt marshes to the west met a steep hillside to the east. The earliest houses were constructed at the foot of the hill on the

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east. The earliest houses were constructed at the foot of the hill on the west side of the street. These early residences had the benefit of being in a relatively sheltered spot at the bottom of the hill, and yet had immediate access from the back end of their lots to the tidal creek that led directly to Little Neck Bay. The first documented house constructed in the Village of Marathon was the John Quade (later McQuade) house, built in 1854 and located at 3918 Douglaston Parkway. For over one hundred and twenty years, the west side of Douglaston Parkway north of the railroad tracks up to Bay Street (originally Myrtle Place), was lived in by members of the Quade FIGURE 3 - MAP OF DOUGLASTON family, an extended tenBEERS ATLAS OF LONG ISLAND, 1873 ant farm family originally from Ireland. The earliest remaining buildings are the John Quade House, later shown as the P. Dimmeny house on the Beers Atlas of Long Island (1873) (Figure 3); the D. Starkings house (c. 1865), located at 38-80 Douglaston Parkway; and the Mrs. Mott house (c. 1865), which was moved from just south of the John Quade house in 1956 to its current location at 38-60 Douglaston Parkway (Figure 4). Right at end of the Civil War, the Northside Railroad purchased the property through Douglaston, and created the right-of-way to what was then the end of the line—Great Neck–in 1866. Initially, the Douglaston station, known as the Main Avenue—Little Neck station, was a freight station for the use of business owners, farmers and fishermen in the Alley. Passenger service

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began in 1867. Soon after, the Long Island Railroad, under the auspices of then-President Oliver Charlick, purchased the Northside Railroad, which later became the Port Washington Branch. The Northside Railroad excavated the hillside between Douglaston and Little Neck in an operation known as the “Marathon Cut.” This manmade ravine, over 100 feet deep in places, created a permanent physical division between the north and south parts of Marathon. From that point on, each section then developed somewhat separately from the other; the railroad cut still acts as a dividing line between these two sections of Douglaston.

38-60 DOUGLASTON PARKWAY

MOVED IN 1956

38-80 DOUGLASTON PARKWAY 39-18 DOUGLASTON PARKWAY

By 1873, modest, though uneven, growth had occurred in Village of Marathon. The area north of the railroad had modest farmhouses along the spine of Douglaston Parkway, mostly on the west side (the extended Quade family’s’ compound), which backed up to the headFIGURE 4 - PARTIAL MAP OF DOUGLASTON waters of Little Neck Bay. BEERS ATLAS OF LONG ISLAND, 1873 Other concentrated development was located along Bay Street and Regatta Place, where more opulent country houses were constructed on relatively high ground near or at Little Neck Bay. Additionally, these houses bordered the then-contiguous Douglas Estate (William, George Douglas’ son, had purchased the Allen estate in 1872) to the north. William Douglas had, at the inception of rail service, donated a farm building from his estate to become the station depot on the condition that the

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village be renamed Douglaston. While incorporating the Allen residence into his land holdings, the “back-country” portion of the former Allen estate, as well as a portion of the Village of Marathon along Cherry Street that he had purchased, was subdivided into 375 twenty-five foot wide lots. Ultimately, these lots were never developed under Douglas’ auspices. In contrast, the area south of the tracks (in the current Douglaston Hill) developed to the north and east of Northern Boulevard on the perimeter of the Ravine. The Ravine was a natural highway to Udall’s Cove, located to the north and east, for the oystermen who worked the bays and coves of the north shore of Long Island. The land bordering the Ravine, approximately one hundred feet above sea level, was relatively flat and optimal for house construction. This was in contrast to the steeply sloping hillside facing Little Neck Bay. Also, the Lambertsons continued to maintain their holdings on the west side of Douglaston Parkway just north of Northern Boulevard. To wit, both sections of the Village of Marathon had one thing in common; as of 1873, there was virtually no development of the two hundred foot square parcels in the center of the subdivision. While the Village of Marathon was initially settled primarily by tradesmen, farmers and oystermen, Douglaston became more fashionable for the middle and upper classes in the latter part of the 19th century. Comfortable country houses began to fill in the sloping hillsides, particularly south of the railroad tracks, to take advantage of the fresh sea breeze and pastoral views of Little Neck Bay and Long Island Sound. Additionally, the Lambertson family began to break up their eleven acre estate, selling the northern portion to small landowners while retaining the southern portion for themselves. By the beginning of the twentieth century, Douglaston had become an increasingly fashionable and desirable address, with fast – and direct - rail service to Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan. However, during this period, some longtime landowners including the extended Quade family held on to their land holdings. The Quades even constructed new residences for their expanding extended family as needed. In 1906, the Rickert-Finlay Real Estate Company purchased the Douglas Estate. Founded in 1904 by Edward J. Rickert (1862-1935) and Charles E. Finlay (1862-1940), Rickert-Finlay developed four major neighborhoods in northeastern Queens: Bellcourt in Bayside (1904), Douglas Manor (1906), Broadway-Flushing (1906) and Westmoreland (1907) in Little Neck.

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As described in the Broadway-Flushing Historic District National Register of Historic Places nomination, the company focused on
hilly, picturesque parcels that were adjacent to the Great Neck (later Port Washington) branch of the Long Island Railroad on the north shore of Long Island. The rail line was within easy commuting distance of Manhattan, especially with the completion of the East River rail tunnels. Additionally, with the recent advent of the automobile and completion of the Queensborough Bridge and connection to Jackson Avenue (later Northern Boulevard), a speculative boom had begun throughout the borough of Queens…By 1908, the company was advertising itself as “The Largest Developers of Real Estate in Queens Borough – over 10,000 lots within the limits of New York City.”

In addition to upgrading their improvements at each development – in Douglas Manor, cement sidewalks were laid down, roads were macadamed and trees and landscaping were planted in context with the mature nursery specimens already extant – Rickert-Finlay also created deed restrictions and covenants to further enhance and ensure the desirability of their holdings. Municipal zoning was not adopted in New York City until 1916, so RickertFinlay created language that ensured minimum lot sizes, peaked roofs, deep minimum setbacks, and, in the case of Douglas Manor, a commonlyowned waterfront. By 1910, the southern half of the original Village of Marathon was substantially developed with residences, ranging from the modest to substantial homes (Figure 5). However, the blocks to the north of the railroad, particularly on the hillside from Douglaston Parkway to the east, were still substantially undeveloped.

FIGURE 5 - MAP OF DOUGLASTON BROMLEY ATLAS OF QUEENS, 1909

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There were, however, several houses constructed between 1900 and 1910 in Free Classic and vernacular Colonial Revival styles. They were constructed on the west side of Douglaston Parkway, on the Quade property, and on the east side of Prospect Avenue between Cherry and Willow streets. Several other similarly-styled houses would be constructed on Douglaston Parkway, Cherry Street and Prospect Avenue in the second decade of the twentieth century. However, it was the hillside blocks of Cherry and Willow streets where more interesting development occurred. The picturesque, romantic roadways to the north of Cherry Street, developed by Rickert-Finlay for Douglas Manor, were in stark contrast to the rectangular blocks to the south developed for the Village of Marathon a halfcentury earlier. However, where these two subdivisions met – north of Bay Street to the west, and at Cherry Street to the east – a certain synergy occurred. While there were no architectural restrictions on the properties in Douglas Manor besides peaked roofs, lot size and setback requirements, the lots were usually no deeper or wider than 100 feet, leading to a very specific context on how the buildings related to their property and each other. On the other hand, the lots on the south side of Cherry Street and the north side of Willow Street were from the original Village of Marathon subdivision, with lot depths two hundred feet deep or more and lot widths ranging from fifty to two hundred feet in width, particularly between Douglaston Parkway and Prospect Avenue (240th Street). The resulting houses, combined with expansive lots climbing the steep hillside, created arresting eclectic buildings oriented towards Little Neck Bay and Manhattan rather than the street. 6 and 18 Cherry Street and 7, 9 and 27 Willow Street (Figure 6), as well as several other houses on Cherry Street already in the Douglaston Historic District, are examples of this unusual – and brief – transitional period of architectural design. At the Bay Street end of the Village of Marathon subdivision, several buildings were constructed at the same time. The street, which had been substantially developed by 1910, included what became known as Parsons Beach – the old Parsons estate – at the northwest corner, where Bay Street meets Regatta Place. At the eastern end of that property, two former access roads – one still in use (the present 233rd Street) and one a disused right-of-way at the border of Douglas Manor – led to the beach at the north coast facing Little Neck Bay. On the west side of 233rd Street is the former barn and carriage house complex for the Parsons estate (ca. 1900), designed in a Colonial Revival style and facing the former right of way terminus at the beach.

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The remainder of the first three decades of the twentieth century saw substantial infilling with primarily Colonial Revival-style development along Willow and Cherry streets, Prospect Avenue and Regatta Place. Specifically, the south side of Cherry Street east of 240th Street had a series of Dutch Colonial and Colonial Revival style residences that complement the Colonial Revival houses on the north – Douglas Manor - side of the street already in the Douglaston Historic District. By a quirk of the original metes and bounds of that particular block, the first forty feet of frontage of the lots on the south side of the street are partially within the mapped area of Douglas Manor.

FIGURE 6 - PARTIAL MAP OF DOUGLASTON, SANBORN FIRE MAP, 1917
Another important property is the waterfront mansion located at 38-40 Regatta Place. On an oversized 150’ x 300’ parcel, this Colonial Revival style house is one of a few historic houses in Douglaston that have direct access

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to the Little Neck Bay waterfront. While there are several properties within Douglas Manor south of Shore Road that have waterfront access, both this property and the Parsons Barn complex, located at the end of 233rd Place, are the only historic resources on the waterfront in Douglaston that are not located in the Douglaston Historic District. The one parcel that stands out as unique in this entire portion of Douglaston is the Manor Apartments at 38-50 Douglaston Parkway, where Douglaston Parkway curves to the north and enters Douglas Manor. This apartment complex punctuates the entranceway to Douglas Manor and, although taller than any other building in this part of Douglaston, does not dominate nor block the views of neighboring houses the way that post-World War II buildings did along the southern section of Douglaston Parkway in Douglaston Hill. After World War II there was only one lot subdivision, at 39-05 Douglaston Parkway, within the boundaries of the proposed historic district extension. A Ranch-style residence built in 1960 on the former lawn of 6 Cherry Street, the building was purposefully constructed as to not obstruct views from that house, which is slightly uphill to the east. One of the Quade farmhouses, located at 38-70 Douglaston Parkway, was enveloped by a Ranch-style residence in the mid-1980s. In recent years, a few houses have had minor alterations, including window replacement. In the last two years, 6 Cherry Street constructed a large addition to the rear. Currently, 39-12 Douglaston Parkway, a Free Classic-style farmhouse constructed by the Quade family, ca.1910, is threatened with demolition. Across the street at 39-21 Douglaston Parkway, a wood shingle-sided Colonial Revival house has recently been covered with a vapor-barrier wrap, a transparent plastic sheeting material, in preparation of purportedly being covered with shiny white brick facing. Should these two houses be significantly altered or demolished, the context of Douglaston Parkway and the remnants of the earliest era of planned development in Douglaston will be compromised.

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Architectural Overview The building stock in the proposed historic district extension spans roughly one hundred and fifty years, from the early farmhouses on Douglaston Parkway to a few mid- to late twentieth century additions and infill construction. If an argument is to be made for cohesiveness of the proposed extensions, it should be realized in terms of a historical continuum in both American architectural history and the development of immediate area. The oldest houses in the proposed extensions are the Quade farmhouses on the west side of Douglaston Parkway, which date from the middle of the nineteenth century (Figure 7). It is likely that the three oldest (38-60, 3880 and, 39-18 Douglaston Parkway) all started out as vernacular, one-anda-half story farmhouses that were altered through additions and stylistic updates. They were also all originally only one room deep, as evidenced by the remaining forms. The stylistic changes and newer houses date from the mid-Victorian period and early twentieth century and reflect recognized regional and national stylistic fashions.

FIGURE 7 - QUADE FAMILY FARMHOUSES ON DOUGLASTON PKWY
The Free Classic expression of the Queen Anne style has a strong presence in the proposed extensions, the late nineteenth and early twentieth century transitional expression utilizing the emerging Colonial Revival trends of the period. This stylistic trend is evident in a number of houses through the use of details such as Tuscan-style columns and classical-inspired forms and molding profiles. Two examples of the Early Colonial Revival that have evolved beyond the Queen Anne period but retain a vernacular feel are the mirrored houses at 84 and 88 Prospect Street. The two houses have a distinct vernacular farmhouse expression but incorporate strong classical-inspired details in the trim work. They are more akin to the American foursquare, but have gableended facades and oversized wall dormers. More research will be required to evaluate local architectural significance.

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The largest and most high-style houses in the proposed extensions are outstanding examples of the early years of the eclectic era, recognized as from between 1890 and 1915. This transitional period is celebrated as a time when architects, and even builders, were experimenting with a combination of styles. Even though many had distinct historical associations, such as the Colonial Revival, Arts and Crafts, and Classical Revival, the fusion of these sometime disparate elements created some very unusual and unique designs. The best examples are the Arts and Crafts style house at 18 Cherry Street and the highly eclectic neighboring house at 7 Willow Street. As is evident from the more academically correct, mirrored Colonial Revival-style houses at 39-15 and 39-27 Douglaston Parkway, both constructed about 1915, this experimental phase in American architectural design had all but disappeared. The next, and last for the purposes of the proposed extension, is the era of what is referred to as Period Houses where stylistic combinations were replaced with more stylistically unified historical revival expressions. These houses are well represented in a number of Colonial Revival and Tudor Revival style residences from the mid teens through the early 1930s. The Manor Apartments at 38-50 Douglaston Parkway is an excellent high-style Tudor Revival example of this second phase of the eclectic movement. Conclusion The cohesiveness of the Douglaston Historic District, which already contains several blocks of the original Village of Marathon (portions of Cherry and Bay streets) would be enhanced immeasurably by the inclusion of Subareas A, B and C as described in this document. By protecting these resources, dating back to the inception of Marathon and including some exceptional architecturally significant buildings dating to the Eclectic era, the totality of the history of Douglaston will be ensured for future generations.

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Sub-Area A
WE S
38-30 West Drive

DOUGLASTON
PARKWAY

38-60 38-70 38-80 39-04

CHERR Y
39-05 39-15 39-21 39-25 1 7 6 10 14

STREE T
18

39-12 39-18

9

WILLO W

STREE

T

West Drive
38-30 Douglaston Parkway 8059 Lot 1 Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block

38-30 Douglaston Parkway (also known as West Drive), constructed in 1931, is a three-and-one-half-story, wood frame, irregular plan, Tudor Revival-style apartment building. Located at the corner of Douglaston Parkway and West Drive the roughly U-shaped building utilizes the irregular site to maximize its footprint and uses full-height angular bays on the north end. A deep walkway leads to a symmetrical façade with a crenellated roofline and copper-roofed, glazed entryway. The brick veneer walls are interspersed with random projecting clinker bricks. The slate roofs are punctuated by gables finished in faux half-timbering elements and large, slate-covered dormers on the north end. Steel casement windows are utilized throughout. The romantic eclecticism of the design and extensive, mature specimen plantings soften the impact on the otherwise single-family residential character of the neighborhood.

Douglaston Parkway
38-60 Douglaston Parkway Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (C) Block 8081 Lot 246

38-60 Douglaston Parkway, constructed in ca. 1865, is a two-story, 4 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, single-family residence. The one-and-a-halfstory sub-type has a strong Greek Revival presence with elements that include a heavy cornice and deep fascia boards; 6/6 double-hung wood sash windows; a hip-roofed portico with plain entablature supported by substantial wood piers, and a rectilinear transom and sidelight configuration at the front door. The cornice at the north end of the street elevation is embellished with Italianate paired brackets. Other features include a cross-gabled roofline, and louvered wood shutters. A one-story, flat-roofed wing is attached at the rear (west) elevation. An early twentieth century, two car garage is placed at the southwest end of the property.

Douglaston Parkway
38-70 Douglaston Parkway Non-Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8081 Lot 250

38-70 Douglaston Parkway, originally constructed ca. 1880, was completely enveloped by the ca. 1985 raised Ranch-style single-family residence. The two-story, 3-bay, wood-frame, rectangular plan house is clad in a brick veneer interspersed with rectangular rusticated granite blocks. A neotraditional portico is placed at the center entry, supported by aluminumclad columns and surmounted by a wrought-iron roof balustrade. A second story arcaded loggia is placed in antis at the south end of the façade. The shallow hip roof is bounded by a plain cornice at the eave line. Fenestration consists of contemporary multi-light casement windows. The site rises gradually from the street and drops off at the rear of the house to the west.

Douglaston Parkway
38-80 Douglaston Parkway Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8082 Lots 255 and 256

38-80 Douglaston Parkway, constructed ca. 1865 is a two-story, 3-bay, wood-frame, rectangular plan, vernacular farmhouse. The one-and-a-halfstory side-gabled sub-type has some Greek Revival, Italianate and Folk Victorian aspects. Architectural elements include wood clapboard siding; a prominent cornice with deep fascia boards and paired brackets; double hung wood sash windows flanked by louvered shutters; gently flared eaves at the shingled gable ends; a hip-roofed, full-width portico with plain entablature supported by substantial wood piers, and; a rectilinear transom and sidelight configuration at the front door. A one-story, flat-roofed wing is attached at the south elevation which incorporates high-style Victorian details that include a second level angular bay with ‘teardrop’ shingles. A twostory, clapboard-sided shed-roofed addition is attached at the north elevation. The site drops off sharply from the street exposing a lower level at the west elevation.

Douglaston Parkway
39-04 Douglaston Parkway Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8082 Lot 261

39-04 Douglaston Parkway, constructed in 1906, is a two-story, woodframe, rectangular plan, late Queen Anne style residence. The ’Free classic’ aspects of the house are expressed through Colonial Revival elements such as the porch with Tuscan-inspired support columns and pedimented, gabled porch ends; half-round window with keystone element, and; overall unembellished surfaces and minimal decoration. The house is finished in wood clapboards at the first level, and wood shingles above. Other architectural elements include a two-story bay at the south elevation and small bay on the north elevation. The entry is comprised of a double, glazed doorway flanked by sidelights. Fenestration consists of 1/1 wood double-hung sash. The site drops sharply to the west to a seasonal pond.

Douglaston Parkway
39-05 Douglaston Parkway Non-Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8098 Lot 41

39-05 Douglaston Parkway, constructed in 1960, is a two-story, woodframe, rectangular plan, Split-level Ranch-style residence. The infill property, once the front yard for 6 Cherry Street, is partially built into a berm on the north side, exposing an integrated, 2-car garage at grade on the south end of the street elevation. The house, with shallow hip roof, is clad in a brick veneer with the exception of the north end of the street façade which is slightly recessed and finished in an ashlar cut, randomly patterned, rusticated stone veneer. The entry, with raised-panel wood door, is raised to the upper level. Fenestration consists of 1/1, horizontally-oriented double-hung sash and an engaged chimney stack is placed centrally on the north elevation. The site rises gradually to the east terminating a retaining wall.

Douglaston Parkway
39-12 Douglaston Parkway Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8082 Lot 263

39-12 Douglaston Parkway, constructed ca. 1910, is a two-story, 2-bay, wood-frame, L-plan, late Queen Anne style residence. The straightforward ‘Free-classic’ farmhouse has a wrap-around hip-roofed porch on the east and south elevations supported by stylized classical columns, interspersed by a simple wood porch railing. The building is finished with wood clapboard siding and the 1/1 double-hung sash are flanked by louvered wood shutters. The two-story projection on the south elevation is gabled, but does not rise to the full height of the main roof; it contains a one-story angular bay with a hipped roof. The site drops off sharply to the west close to the street and the long lot terminates at a seasonal pond.

Douglaston Parkway
39-15 Douglaston Parkway Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (N/C) Block 8098 Lot 44

39-15 Douglaston Parkway, constructed ca. 1915, is a two-story, wood frame, rectangular plan, gambrel-roofed, Dutch Colonial Revival-style residence (mirrored plan at 39-27 Douglaston Parkway). The gable end is oriented to the street, bisected by an integrated chimney stack. Continuous shed dormers dominate the north & west elevations with a large half-round stair hall window integrated at the north. A continuous entablature supported by Tuscan columns is integrated into the first level of the south elevation, terminating at the first bays of the east and west elevations. The house is clad in painted wood shingles and contains original double-hung wood sash. The hip-roofed portico on the south end consists of a simple entablature supported by substantial plain wood piers (constructed after 1938 Hurricane destroyed original). House is set up from street behind a low stone retaining wall. The interior is original and unaltered. A shared two-car garage is placed at the southeast corner of the property.

Douglaston Parkway
39-18 Douglaston Parkway Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (C) Block 8082 Lot 265

39-18 Douglaston Parkway, constructed in 1854, is a two-story, 3-bay, wood-frame, rectangular plan, vernacular farmhouse with Queen Anne embellishments. Originally a one-and-a-half story house, an 1883 addition pushed the house up a story and added a cross-gabled roof at the north end. A one-story, shed-roofed segment is attached at the south end of the original house and a stylistically-similar one-story addition was placed at the rear (west) in 1995 by architect Deborah Burke. The center-entry contains a prominent Classically-inspired, flat-roofed portico with roof balustrade, and a side porch with pergola is placed at the north elevation. The house is finished in wood clapboards and fish-scale shingles at the upper gable ends. Fenestration consists of 6/6 double-hung wood sash at first floor and 2/2 wood sash above (addition), all flanked by raised-panel wood shutters. The site drops off from the street to a low point adjacent to a seasonal pond at the west end of the property. An early twentieth century, two car garage is placed at the southwest end of the property.

Douglaston Parkway
39-21 Douglaston Parkway Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (N/C) Block 8098 Lot 47

39-21 Douglaston Parkway, constructed ca. 1915, is a two-and-a-halfstory, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival-style residence. The center plan, saltbox-type house is clad in wood shingles and has a highlyordered symmetrical façade. A prominent flat-roofed portico with simple entablature is supported by Tuscan style columns. The foundation is finished in red brick and an engaged chimney stack is placed on the north elevation. Fenestration consists of replacement windows in the original configuration. A one-story, hip-roofed bay is centrally placed on the north elevation and retains its original moldings and 6-light casements. A shared two-car garage is placed at the southeast corner of the property. The house was recently altered in the rear (east elevation) with a slightly raised roofline. The wall surfaces are currently covered in a sheet-type vapor barrier.

Current

March 2007

Douglaston Parkway
39-27 Douglaston Parkway Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (N/C) Block 8098 Lot 50

39-27 Douglaston Parkway, constructed ca. 1915, is a two-story, wood frame, rectangular plan, gambrel-roofed Dutch Colonial Revival-style residence (mirrored plan at 39-15 Douglaston Parkway). The gable end is oriented to the street, bisected by an integrated chimney stack. Continuous shed dormers dominate the north & west elevations with a tall half-round stair hall window integrated at the south. A continuous entablature supported by Tuscan columns is integrated into the first level of the north elevation, terminated at the first bays of the east and west elevations. It contains a replacement bay and casement windows. The house is clad in stained wood shakes and contains original double-hung wood sash. The gabled portico with open pediment is supported by full-entablature supports on Tuscan columns. The house is set up from street behind a large stone retaining wall. A two-car garage is placed close to the hillside at the rear of property.

Cherry Street
6 Cherry Street Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8098 Lot 37

6 Cherry Street, originally constructed ca. 1895, is a two-and-one-half story, 3 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival-style residence. The symmetrical façade is oriented to the west (Douglaston Parkway) and due to the sharp rise in grade features a raised, full-width porch supported by substantial plain wooden piers. The hip-roofed, full-width portico is supported by Tuscan style columns interspersed with Victorian inspired stairs and porch railing. The center entry features paired entry doors surmounted by a rectilinear transom. An oversized gable wall dormer is centrally placed on the roof, interrupted by the cornice. The east end of the house contain a large, stylistically integrated, cross-gabled addition. The entire house is clad in vinyl clapboard siding and the 1/1 replacement windows are flanked by raised-panel wood shutters.

Cherry Street
10 Cherry Street / 236-18 39th Avenue Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (C) Block 8098 Lot 35

10 Cherry Street, constructed ca. 1910, is a two-and-one-half story, 3 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival style residence. The transitional house exhibits Queen Anne elements such as the angular bay on the east end of the street elevation. Prominent features include widely overhanging and flared roof and dormer eaves. The roof is hipped as are the substantial dormers. The entry porch has been obscured by an incompatible brick veneer enclosure with a replacement door and windows. The remainder of the form is very much intact but has replacement windows and is clad in vinyl siding. An early twentieth century, single car garage is placed at the southeast end of the narrow lot. The site is level, but its placement on the relatively steep site leaves a tall concrete retaining wall on the east side of the property.

Cherry Street
14 Cherry Street / 236-14 39th Avenue Block 8098 Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached former carriage house (C) Lot 33

14 Cherry Street, constructed ca. 1910, is a two-and-one-half-story, 3 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, late Queen Anne-style residence. The ‘FreeClassic’ expression of the house is expressed through elements such as a continuous cornice, symmetrical façade, and classical detailing and columns on the full width, hip-roofed front porch. The house, with gable end oriented to the street is finished in wood shingles and contains an oversized gabled dormer on the east elevation. Fenestration consists of original 2/2 double hung wood sash and some of the windows as well as the front door are flanked by louvered wood shutters. A one-story, hip-roofed rear entryway is placed on the southeast corner. The site is level, but its placement on the relatively steep site leaves a retaining wall on the east side of the property. A vernacular carriage house is located at the southeast end of the narrow lot.

Cherry Street
18 Cherry Street Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (C) Block 8098 Lot 29

18 Cherry Street, constructed ca. 1905, is a two-story, irregular plan, Arts & Crafts-style residence. It is unknown whether the high-style residence is wood-framed with a cementitious coating, or of load-bearing, reinforced concrete construction. The highly eclectic design is finished at the foundation level in courses of random rubble boulders which transition into a partial chimneystack on the porch at the north elevation. The remainder of the walls are of colored concrete with an exposed, smooth pebble aggregate. The first floor is comprised of multiple, large half-round arched openings infilled with wood casement windows and the entry door offset the north on the west (façade) elevation. Other architectural details include exposed roof beams, exposed rafter tails, and buttress elements at the south elevation. The L-shaped site contains a two-car garage at the east end and the relatively gentle slope of the site allows for a large lawn area.

Willow Street
1 Willow Street Block 8098 Contributing Outbuildings: 1 2-bay garage built into hillside (N/C) Lot 52

1 Willow Street, constructed ca. 1915, is a two story, wood frame, rectangular plan, Arts and Crafts-style residence. The eclectic cottage is stuccocoated at the first floor, and wood shingled-sided elsewhere. Built into a steep hillside, the salt-box type gable-end is oriented to the south. A substantial, two-story, shed-roofed wing projects from the gable and contains a sleeping porch with multiple glazed sash. The entry is placed in a small , shed-roofed enclosure on the east elevation. The north elevation contains a two-part roofline and architectural details include exposed roof beams and rafter tails; flared wall eaves and pergola-type rafter tails below the sleeping porch. Fenestration consists of casement and double-hung sash. A saltbox-type shed is placed below the house above a street-side two-car garage constructed into the steep hillside and Douglaston Parkway.

Willow Street
7 Willow Street Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8098 Lot 56

7 Willow Street, constructed ca. 1912, is a two-story, wood frame, rectangular plan, Italian Renaissance and Arts & Crafts-inspired residence. The highly eclectic house is constructed in two segments—the south end in a loosely Italian Renaissance expression with a hipped roof, and in the north end, an Arts & Crafts-inspired, gable-roofed section. Elements common to the entire house are stucco-coated walls, exposed carved rafter tails, and Spanish tile roofing—the remaining elements are strongly incongruous. The street elevation reflects the Italian Renaissance influences with elements such as rectilinear window frames, a round-arched recessed panel above the entry, and pergola-type rafter tails integrated into the enclosed portico. By comparison, the north side has a European vernacular feel with segmental-arch window frames, exposed roof beams, buttress elements, and a shallow, continuous dormer on the east elevation. The hillside site drops off sharply to the south where substantial stone retaining walls are bisected by prominent staircases. A covered parking area in front of a garage integrated into the hillside is finished with a Spanish tile roof.

North Elevation

South Elevation

Willow Street
9 Willow Street Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (C) Block 8098 Lot 59

9 Willow Street, constructed ca. 1914, is a two-and-a-half story, 3 bay, wood frame, irregular plan, Colonial Revival-style residence. The high-style house contains a rectangular central block with offset, telescoping wings on the north and south elevations. The center entry of the symmetrical façade contains a hip-roofed portico supported by fluted Tuscan columns surmounted by a pergola-type entablature. The gabled roof is dominated by contemporary oversized dormers on both elevations. The north wing is a one-and-a-half story saltbox type with an arcaded passage at grade and continuous shed dormer above. The south wing contains integrated classical entablature surrounds with infill glazing flanked by fluted columns. Other features includes exposed roof beams and diminutive jerkin-head details at the rooflines. The relatively flat site is placed close to the top of the rise of Willow Street and a stylistically similar two-car garage is placed at the northeast end of the property.

Sub-Area B

240th ST / PROSP E CT

CHERRY

38 Cherry Street
27 Willow Street

STREET 39-03 312 31 320 328 6 39-09 324 39-15

88

84

AVE

WILLOW S

T

Cherry Street
38 Cherry Street / 239-02 39th Avenue Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8098 Lots 9 and 15

38 Cherry Street, constructed ca. 1916, is a two-story, 3 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival-style residence. The side-gabled house with symmetrical façade is clad in aluminum-sided clapboards. A prominent pedimented portico with shield-like, glazed decorative window is supported by paired slender classical-inspired columns. The entry door is behind a multi-light storm door. Fenestration consists of 6/6 double-hung wood sash windows flanked by louvered wood shutters. An oversized gabled dormer is centrally placed on the roof. An integrated two-car garage is placed at the southeast end of the house accessed through simple, vertical–plank swing out-type, wood doors facing 240th Street. The site is relatively flat but drops to the east and the deep lot is obscured by plant screening.

Cherry Street
312 Cherry Street / 240-16 39th Avenue Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (C) Block 8103 Lots 47 & 49

312 Cherry Street / 240-16 39th Avenue, constructed ca. 1918, is a twoand-a-half story, wood frame, L-plan, Dutch Colonial Revival-style residence. The gambrel-roofed residence with gable end oriented to the street contains a perpendicularly placed, two-story gambrel-roofed wing integrated at the façade. The first floor of the house is finished in a brick veneer, and stucco-coated above. Continuous shed dormers run the length of the east and west elevations. Fenestration consists of 6/1 double-hung wood sash. The site grades gently to the east. A two-car garage is placed at the southeast end of the property.

Cherry Street
316 Cherry Street / 240-24 39th Avenue Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8103 Lot 50

316 Cherry Street / 240-24 39th Avenue, constructed ca. 1925, is a two story, 3 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival-style residence. The diminutive, gabled New England farmhouse-type with symmetrical façade contains a one-story gabled wing placed at the west elevation. The center entry features a prominent enclosed, pedimented portico. The entry door is flanked by 4-light sidelights and the side elevations of the portico contain large fixed sash. The house is clad in composition shingles and contains 6/1 double-hung wood sash. The site grades gently to the east.

Cherry Street
320 Cherry Street / 240-30 39th Avenue Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8103 Lot 53

320 Cherry Street / 240-30 39th Avenue, constructed ca. 1925, is a two story, 3 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Dutch Colonial Revival-style residence. The diminutive house with symmetrical façade contains a onestory gabled wing placed at the west elevation. The center entry features an enclosed, pedimented portico. The side elevations of the portico contain six-light fixed sash. The house is clad in wood shingles and contains 6/1 double-hung wood sash. The site grades gently to the east.

Cherry Street
324 Cherry Street / 240-34 39th Avenue Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8103 Lot 56

324 Cherry Street / 240-34 39th Avenue, constructed ca. 1925, is a two story, 3 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival-style residence. The diminutive, gabled New England farmhouse-type with symmetrical façade contains a one-story gabled wing placed at the west elevation. The center entry features a pedimented portico supported by simple wood piers. The house is clad in composition shingles and contains 6/1 doublehung wood sash. The site grades gently to the east.

Cherry Street
328 Cherry Street / 240-42 39th Avenue Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached shed (N/C) Block 8103 Lot 58

328 Cherry Street / 240-42 39th Avenue, constructed ca. 1925, is a two story, 3 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Dutch Colonial Revival-style residence. The diminutive house with symmetrical façade contains a onestory hip-roofed wing placed at the east elevation. The center entry features an enclosed, gabled portico. The house is clad in vinyl clapboard siding and contains 1/1 double-hung replacement sash. A contemporary portcochere is attached on the west elevation. The site grades gently to the east. A detached shed is placed at the rear of the property.

240th Street
39-01 240th Street Non-Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (N/C) Block 8103 Lot 45

39-01 240th Street, originally constructed ca. 1915, is a two-and-a-half story, wood frame, rectangular plan, contemporary Shed-style residence. Altered significantly in the 1980s, the house retains none of its original form or details. The house is clad in vertical plank siding. Fenestration consists of casement windows. The site grades gently to the east. A two-car garage with doors facing Cherry Street is placed at the southeast end of the property.

240th Street
39-09 240th Street Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (N/C) Block 8103 Lot 43

39-09 240th Street, constructed ca. 1922, is a two story, two bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival-style residence. The diminutive, gabled farmhouse-type with asymmetrical façade contains a gabled wing at the south elevation. A full-width pent roof is placed on the façade with an integrated, gabled door hood, supported by carved wood brackets, placed on the north end and . The house is finished in a stucco-coating at the first floor and vinyl clapboard–side above. Fenestration consists of 1/1 doublehung replacement sash. The site is relatively flat. A small one-car garage is placed at the northeast end of the property.

240th Street
39-15 240th Street Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (N/C) Block 8103 Lot 43

39-15 240th Street, constructed ca. 1895, is a two story, wood frame, rectangular plan, vernacular Colonial Revival-style residence. The three bay, symmetrical façade with gable end oriented to the street has a full-width shed roofed porch with pedimented segment at the north end. The porch is supported by Tuscan style columns interspersed by a simple wood porch railing. In 2004, a one story addition was placed on the north end of the house. A small angular bay window is placed at the east end of the south elevation. Fenestration consists of replacement 1/1 double hung sash. The house sits on a slope that grades gently to the east.

240th Street / Prospect Avenue
39-23 240th Street / 88 Prospect Avenue Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8103 Lot 35

39-23 240th Street / 88 Prospect Avenue, constructed ca. 1900, is a twostory, 2 bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival-style residence. A mirror plan to 84 Prospect Avenue, the house contains an oversized gabled dormer on the south elevation. The asymmetrical façade has the gable end oriented to the street. The north elevation contains a 1970s two-story flat-roofed addition and an enclosed greenhouse-type porch enclosure on the street (west) elevation. The house is stucco-coated with replacement windows that are finished in Tudor-inspired window trim. The site grades gently to the east.

240th Street / Prospect Avenue
39-23 240th Street / 84 Prospect Avenue Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (C) Block 8103 Lot 38

39-23 240th Street / 84 Prospect Avenue, constructed ca 1900, is a twostory, 2-bay, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival-style residence. The building was moved to its current site ca. 1915. The clapboardsided house with gable end oriented to the street is fronted by an offset, full-width, shed-roofed enclosed entry porch with classical-inspired detailing. The foundation is finished in a brick veneer and fenestration consists of 6/1 double-hung sash. An oversized, gabled dormer is placed on the north elevation. The site grades gently to the east. A detached, stylisticallysimilar one-car garage is placed on the southeast end of the property.

Willow Street
27 Willow Street / 39-24 240th Street Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8098 Lot 8

27 Willow Street, constructed ca. 1915, is a two-and-a-half story, wood frame, irregular plan, Arts & Crafts inspired residence. The large house, set far back from the street at the top of a rise, has the gable end oriented to the street. A large, two-story, cross-gabled wing is placed at the south elevation, infilled with multi-light sash at the second floor. The stucco-coated exterior is trimmed in simple planks and the gable ends, with simple verge boards, feature exposed roof beams. The entry portico, changed at midcentury is executed in a Modernistic design with hollow-block sidewalls surmounted by a thin, flat roof. The raised entry is fronted by an ashlar-cut stone planter, pushing flanking stairways to the sides. The paneled entry door is flanked by full-height, multi-light glazing panels. Fenestration consists of double hung sash, stained-glass casements and replacement bay window on the first floor. The site has no driveway, but a long walkway from a stucco-coated, pillared gateway and low wall at the street.

Sub-Area C

37 - 0 4

T STREE BAY 233-10 et ay Stre B
38-33

rd P 233 LAC E

TTA P REGA

38-40

38-43

LACE

Regatta Place / Bay Street
38-31 Regatta Place / 233-10 Bay Street Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8059 Lot 47

38-31 Regatta Place / 233-10 Bay Street is an empty lot created by the demolition of a ca. 1865 house formerly known as the Anderson House (Beers Atlas, 1873). The site is adjacent to the existing Landmark District and proposed properties at Regatta Place.

Regatta Place
38-33 Regatta Place Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8059 Lot 43

38-33 Regatta Place, constructed in ca. 1922, is a two-story, wood frame, rectangular plan, Dutch Colonial Revival-style residence. The side-gabled house with asymmetrical façade contains a one-story hip-roofed wing placed at the south elevation. The offset entry is placed at the north end of the street (west) elevation. The house is clad in vinyl clapboard siding and sits on a brick veneer foundation. Fenestration consists of 6/6, 4/4 doublehung wood and a few replacement sash. A contemporary two-bay garage is attached on the north elevation, facing the street. The site is relatively flat.

Regatta Place /233 Street
38-40 Regatta Place / 38-40 233rd Street Contributing Outbuildings: 1 wood frame shed (C) Block 8072 Lot 6

38-40 233rd Street / 38-40 Regatta Place, constructed ca. 1870, is a twostory, wood frame, rectangular plan, Colonial Revival style residence. The large side-gabled house, altered ca. 1925, is placed on a large level site overlooking the bay and consists of a main block, a telescoping wing at the north end and, an attached, perpendicularly-placed garage addition to the east. The asymmetrical façade contains an offset entry with a high-style Federal-inspired gabled portico with segmental-arched ceiling, resting on full entablature projections supported by paired, slender columns. The house is clad in wood clapboards. Fenestration consists of 6/6 and 8/8 double-hung wood and replacement sash except the south end of the first floor which contains three oversized 9/9 double-hung sash, repeated on both floors of the south elevation. The gabled garage addition contains a contemporary two-car garage offset to the west. A vernacular Tudor-inspired shed is placed at the southwest end of the property.

Regatta Place
38-43 Regatta Place Contributing Outbuildings: 0 Block 8059 Lot 36

38-43 Regatta Place, constructed in ca. 1922, is a two-story, wood frame, irregular plan, Tudor Revival style residence. The multi-gabled house with asymmetrical façade contains a large, one-story, hip-roofed wing placed at the south end of the façade. A one-bay, hip-roofed, garage wing is attached at the north elevation. The façade is dominated by two, cross-gabled second story projections, one gabled and one with a clipped, or jerkin-head treatment. The stucco-coated house is finished with faux half-timbering and a simple, enclosed gabled portico is placed off center on the facade. Fenestration consists of 6/6 double-hung wood sash and casement windows. The level site is placed relatively close to the street.

233rd Place
37-04 233rd Place Contributing Outbuildings: 1 detached garage (N/C) Block 8071 Lot 2

37-04 233rd Place, constructed ca. 1900, is a complex of former farm group buildings converted to residential use. The linear group of three attached buildings is set parallel to the waterfront. The vernacular Colonial Revival style buildings consist of a flat-roofed central building flanked by stylistically integrated, gambrel-roofed buildings, the east one being one-and-a-half stories, the western, one story. The buildings are clad in weathered wood shakes and all three have substantial overhanging eaves. The eastern building has continuous shed dormers centrally placed at the north and south elevations and an engaged chimney stack on the east elevation. The site slopes steeply to Little Neck Bay. There is a large deck at the north elevation with sliding glass doors facing Little Neck Bay. A stylistically compatible two-bay, gable-roofed garage is placed adjacent to the westernmost building.

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