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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • March 7, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 173
WHERE ARE THEY?
STATE PAGE 5
BUSY NIGHT
IN PLAYOFFS
SPORTS PAGE 11
UNIQUE WAYS TO
LIGHT YOUR YARD
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17
MORE CALIFORNIA SEX OFFENDERS GO MISSING UNDER NEW
LAW
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E, San Carlos
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Questions about how sexual education
would be presented to seventh graders at
Ralston Middle School has resulted in the
program being pulled this spring to allow for
a community conversation on how to
approach the subject.
Teen Talk, a two-week program managed
by Redwood City-based nonprofit Teen Talk
Sexuality Education, was set to be offered to
seventh grade students later this month —
provided parents signed the permission slip.
Questions about the nature of the program, its
appropriateness and communication from the
school were raised by parents which caused
the district to, originally, place the topic on
tonight’s board meeting agenda. On
Wednesday, it was decided that the board item
would be pulled from the agenda. Instead, the
district will postpone sexual education for
current seventh grade students to have a com-
munity conversation about the right way to
tackle the subject.
“We’re extremely sensitive to our parents.
This is a sensitive subject,” said co-
Superintendent Nellie Hungerford, adding
this will allow the community to come togeth-
er to find a solution that most can support.
Teen Talk Executive Director Abigail
Karlin-Resnick said, after working with the
district, that both sides decided not to offer the
Teen Talk program during this school year.
The two-week program was scheduled to
start Monday, March 18. Instead, parents got
an email from the superintendents Wednesday
afternoon about the change. The board will
discuss sexual health and HIV/AIDS preven-
tion education during a May meeting, accord-
ing to the letter. In addition, students will be
taught the human anatomy and reproduction
District pulls sex ed program
Content leads to Belmont parent questions about appropriateness
Helping spot
slavery in San
Mateo County
Human trafficking more
prevalent than most think
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Human trafficking often sounds like a faraway, Third World
problem, or a problem that is only happening in more-popu-
lated areas like Oakland.
“The hard part is for people to believe that it’s here,” said
Betty Ann Boeving, who moved to San Mateo County two
years ago.
Boeving, director of the Bay Area Anti-Trafficking
Coalition, has been educating communities on the realities of
human trafficking in their own backyards.
She often defines human trafficking simply as, “people con-
trolling others through the exploitation of their labor.”
Hillsborough man in police
custody after hospital fire
Officials say man had knife and
intendedto stab hospital worker
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Police arrested a Hillsborough man early
yesterday morning after he locked himself
in a hospital room and started a small fire,
according to San Mateo police.
Zavtcho Stoyanov, 51, was a patient at
the San Mateo Medical Center on 39th
Avenue when he allegedly started the fire
Zavtcho
Stoyanov
See SLAVERY, Page 20
See FIRE, Page 18
See SEX ED, Page 18
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
The Transit Center in downtown San Mateo, built 10 years ago and owned by the city, has suffered some water infiltration in
recent months and city officials want to determine what improvements are needed for the building and the Main Street Parking
Garage across the street.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In an effort to be a good landlord, San
Mateo is seeking proposals to assess the
conditions at the Transit Center and
Main Street Parking Garage after heavy
rains caused some water intrusion to the
buildings’ commercial tenants in
December.
Capital Realty Group, on behalf of the
city, issued a request for proposals for a
comprehensive facility condition assess-
ments March 4.
“We suffered some water intrusion in
the commercial spaces,” said Matt
Bronson, the city’s interim streets and
Transit Center, parking garage need work
See WORK, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Comedian Wanda
Sykes is 49.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1965
A march by civil rights demonstrators
was violently broken up at the Edmund
Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., by state
troopers and a sheriff’s posse in what
came to be known as “Bloody Sunday.”
“The telephone book is full of facts,
but it doesn’t contain a single idea.”
— Mortimer J. Adler, American philosopher (1902-2001)
Entertainment
executive Michael
Eisner is 71.
Actress Jenna
Fischer is 39.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A 3-D model of a complex anaplastology case, created in collaboration with the anaplastologist Jan De Cubber, is seen at
the Belgian company Materialise,the biggest 3-D printer in Europe,in Leuven.Three-D printing has already changed the game
for manufacturing specialized products such as medical devices but the real revolution will come when designers start to
rethink the shapes of objects.
Thursday: Showers likely and a slight
chance of thunderstorms. Some thunder-
storms may produce small hail. Highs in the
mid 50s. East winds around 10
mph...Becoming northwest 10 to 20 mph in
the afternoon.
Thursday night: Showers likely and a
slight chance of thunderstorms in the
evening...Then a chance of showers after midnight. Some
thunderstorms may produce small hail in the evening. Lows in
the upper 30s. North winds 10 to 20 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
A slight chance of showers. Highs in the mid 50s. North winds
10 to 20 mph. Chance of showers 20 percent.
Friday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming part-
ly cloudy. Lows in the lower 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 07 Eureka
in first place;No. 08 Gorgeous George in second
place; and No. 06 Whirl Win in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:48.46.
(Answers tomorrow)
QUILT CLOUT PROVEN DONKEY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: If a penny came to life, it would become —
“CENT-IENT”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
FARWD
BOATO
DRETNY
SUDSIC
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
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Print answer here:
0 8 8
6 20 39 41 46 42
Mega number
March 5 Mega Millions
4 15 18 28 35
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 6 1 0
Daily Four
7 7 3
Daily three evening
In 1793, during the French Revolutionary Wars, France
declared war on Spain.
In 1850, in a three-hour speech to the U.S. Senate, Daniel
Webster of Massachusetts endorsed the Compromise of 1850
as a means of preserving the Union.
In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell received a patent for his tele-
phone.
In 1912, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen arrived in
Hobart, Australia, where he dispatched telegrams announcing
his success in leading the first expedition to the South Pole the
previous December.
In 1926, the first successful trans-Atlantic radio-telephone
conversations took place between New York and London.
In 1936, Adolf Hitler ordered his troops to march into the
Rhineland, thereby breaking the Treaty of Versailles and the
Locarno Pact.
In 1945, during World War II, U.S. forces crossed the Rhine
River at Remagen, Germany, using the damaged but still usable
Ludendorff Bridge.
In 1960, Jack Paar returned as host of NBC’s “Tonight Show”
nearly a month after walking off in a censorship dispute with
the network.
In 1963, the Pan Am Building (today the MetLife Building)
first opened in midtown Manhattan.
In 1975, the U.S. Senate revised its filibuster rule, allowing 60
senators to limit debate in most cases, instead of the previous-
ly required two-thirds of senators present.
In 1983, the original version of The Nashville Network (now
Spike) made its debut.
In 1994, the Supreme Court, in Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music
Inc., unanimously ruled that a parody that pokes fun at an orig-
inal work can be considered “fair use” that doesn’t require per-
mission from the copyright holder.
Photographer Lord Snowdon is 83. TV personality Willard Scott
is 79. Auto racer Janet Guthrie is 75. Actor Daniel J. Travanti is 73.
Rock musician Chris White (The Zombies) is 70. Actor John
Heard is 67. Rock singer Peter Wolf is 67. Rock musician Matthew
Fisher (Procol Harum) is 67. Pro Football Hall-of-Famer Franco
Harris is 63. Pro and College Football Hall-of-Famer Lynn Swann
is 61. Rhythm-and-blues singer-musician Ernie Isley (The Isley
Brothers) is 61. Actor Bryan Cranston is 57. Actress Donna
Murphy is 54. Actor Nick Searcy is 54. Golfer Tom Lehman is 54.
International Tennis Hall-of-Famer Ivan Lendl is 53.
106-year-old man
gets high school diploma
BEVERLY, Mass. — Fred Butler was
married for 65 years, raised five children,
served in the Army during World War II
and worked for years for the local water
department, but the fact he never earned a
high school diploma always bothered
him.
Not anymore.
The 106-year-old was awarded his hon-
orary diploma Monday during an emo-
tional ceremony attended by school offi-
cials, state lawmakers and Beverly Mayor
Bill Scanlon.
“I thank everybody who is responsible
for this,” he said, wearing a mortar board
hat and tassel and holding the prized doc-
ument in his hands. “I certainly appreci-
ate it.”
Butler dropped out of school before the
ninth-grade to accept a full-time job at a
print shop to support his mother and five
younger siblings.
Daughter-in-law Cathy Butler says he
regretted dropping out and always
emphasized the importance of education
to his children and grandchildren.
A grandson, Mike Calabro, said Butler
gave him $5 for every A on his report
card.
Cathy Butler launched the effort to get
her father-in-law his diploma as a way to
raise his spirits following the death of his
wife, Ruth, last year.
Fred Butler’s only concern was that he
hadn’t earned it.
Scanlon put that concern to rest. “It’s a
long time to wait for your diploma,”
Scanlon said, “but you’ve obviously
earned it very well.”
Lion kills worker at
California animal park
DUNLAP — A lion killed a worker on
Wednesday at a private wild animal park
in Central California, authorities said.
The person was attacked and fatally
injured after getting into an enclosure
with the lion at Cat Haven in Dunlap,
Calif., Cal Fire spokesman Ryan
Michaels told the Associated Press.
The facility, which is licensed by the
California Department of Fish and
Wildlife, is about 45 miles east of Fresno
in the Sierra Nevada foothills.
A call to Cat Haven went unanswered.
The lion, a 4-year-old male named
Couscous, had been raised at Cat Haven
since it was 8 weeks old, said Tanya
Osegueda, a spokeswoman for Project
Survival, the nonprofit that operates Cat
Haven.
Osegueda did not know how the park
acquired the cub.
Cat Haven is a 100-acre wild animal
park just west of Kings Canyon National
Park. Since the property opened in 1993,
it has housed numerous big cats, includ-
ing tigers, leopards and other exotic
species.
The person who was killed worked at
Cat Haven and the lion, a male from
Africa, was shot and killed by a Fresno
County sheriff’s deputy. Fish and
Wildlife spokesman Lt. Tony Spada told
The Fresno Bee.
Cat Haven has had a good safety
record, Spada said.
Another big cat sanctuary, Big Cat
Rescue in Tampa, Fla., told the AP last
year that at least 21 people, including five
children, have been killed and 246
mauled by exotic cats since 1990. Over
that period, 254 cats escaped and 143
were killed.
Cat Haven has housed Bengal tigers,
Siberian lynx, caracals, jaguars and leop-
ards of various types as well as bobcats
native to the area. Its founder Dale
Anderson, described the private zoo sev-
eral years ago as one of a handful of facil-
ities across the U.S. that has all of the big
cat species in one place.
The facility’s website says it promotes
conservation and preservation of wild
cats in their native habitats and offers vis-
itors tours and educational outreach.
Anderson told the AP after a fatal
Christmas Day 2007 tiger attack on a
teenage boy at the San Francisco Zoo that
it was a “good time to do a good story on
a small organization doing some great
work to save cats in the wild.”
Tatiana, the tiger responsible for the
San Francisco attack, was killed by police
after jumping out of its enclosure and
fatally mauling 17-year-old Carlos Sousa
Jr. and injuring two other people.
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STATE
GOVERNMENT
• The California
High-Speed Rail
Authority failed to
approve a memoran-
dum of understand-
ing with Caltrain
yesterday to share train tracks on the
Peninsula under the “blended system”
because it did not get the required five
votes needed for passage. The board techni-
cally has nine members but only five
attended yesterday’s board meeting in
Redwood City. Lynn Schenk, vice chair of
the rail authority board, voted against the
proposal yesterday as board member
Michael Rossi was absent. The board,
however, is expected to approve the MOU
next month when Rossi returns. Gov. Jerry
Brown has yet to appoint members for the
three vacant seats on the rail authority
board. The Peninsula Corridor Joint
Powers Board is expected to approve the
MOU in San Carlos today.
• State Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-
Menlo Park, will chair the newly formed
Select Committee on Sea Level Rise and
the California Economy. Gordon request-
ed the formation of the select committee to
review the challenges ahead in addressing
the expected impacts of climate change on
the California economy by examining the
effect of sea level rise on ports and infra-
structure, coastal agriculture, parks and
other state lands and the fishing industry.
COUNTY GOVERNMENT
• San Mateo County’s Chief Elections
Officer Mark Church announced yester-
day that Monday, March 11 is the first day
of the early voting period for the April 9
Coastside Fire Protection District
Special Recall Election. The early voting
period is from March 11 through April 8,
during which any eligible voter may cast a
ballot at the Elections Division located at
40 Tower Road in San Mateo or request a
vote by mail ballot.
• The county Parks Commission is seek-
ing public feedback on its new Parks
Strategic Draft Plan, a document that
identifies goals and strategies over the next
five years to accommodate the future needs
of the parks and their visitors.
The commission is holding a special
meeting at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, March 7 in
Board of Supervisors’ chambers with sub-
committee members board President Don
Horsley and Supervisor Dave Pine. The
chambers are at 400 County Center,
Redwood City.
Comments may also be submitted to
ParksCommission@smcgov.org or in writ-
ing to James C. Porter, director of public
works and parks, 555 County Center, fifth
floor, Redwood City, CA 94063.
HALF MOON BAY
Theft. A purse was stolen from a restaurant on
the 300 block of Capistrano Road in Princeton
before 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 5.
Burglary. A car was broken into and items
worth $1,000 were stolen on the 600 block of
Third Avenue before 6:29 a.m. on Tuesday,
March 5.
Suspicious circumstances. A woman reported
receiving a package full of marijuana on the first
block of Highway 1 before 4:30 p.m. on
Monday, March 4.
Vandalism. A vehicle was vandalized for the
third time on the first block of Chandler Way
before 10:28 a.m. on Monday, March 4.
Burglary. A commercial property was burglar-
ized on the 2600 block of Highway 1 before
8:42 a.m. on Monday, March 4.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Disturbance. A woman stole items from a
Salvation Army donation bin on Mission Road
before 10:28 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 28.
Fraud. A person attempted to cash a fraudulent
check at a bank on El Camino Real before 6:05
p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 27.
Arrest. A person was arrested for being
involved with narcotics at a hotel on Cypress
Avenue before 5:33 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb.
27.
Arrest. A person was arrested for being
involved with narcotics on South Airport
Boulevard before 6:35 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 25.
Police reports
Sticker shock
A woman was yelled at by another driver
who she believed was upset by her
Obama sticker on Burlingame Avenue
and El Camino Real in Burlingame before
12:47 p.m. on Friday, March 1.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A man previously found mentally fit to
stand trial for allegedly trying to rape a
woman studying inside a Redwood City motel
is still competent to aid in his own defense,
according to one court-appointed doctor.
But another needs more time to complete an
evaluation of Maurice Banks and his report
will either propel the transient to trial on sev-
eral felonies or — if contradictory to the other
conclusion — force a tie-breaking doctor to
be appointed.
Prosecutors Ivan Nightengale believes the
latest question of Banks’ competency, raised
the morning of jury trial in January, is a ploy
to stave off prosecution and said he’s willing
to seek a trial on the issue if the doctor evalu-
ations lean toward him being hospitalized
rather than tried for the Dec. 4, 2010 attack.
“I’ve been trying to get this case out to trial
for years now and it’s horrific what he did,”
said prosecutor Ivan Nightengale.
Nightengale said the doctor who found
Banks competent also concluded he is malin-
gering, or exaggerating, his post traumatic
stress disorder.
Defense attorney Jeff Hayden filed a motion
to strike that report out of concern the doctor
did not take a fresh look at his client but
instead used information from a previous
competency proceeding last April. If a third
doctor is necessary,
Hayden may withdraw his
motion as moot.
“I declared a doubt
based on a change in his
condition so, assuming
last year’s report was used,
he is significantly differ-
ent,” Hayden.
Hayden said Banks’
conditions include his
PTSD, hearing voices and a history of drug
abuse. He also now has phantom pain during
which he becomes unfocused and inattentive.
Banks’ case has stretched over two years,
with jury trial dates set six times and multiple
mental evaluations requested. The second
doctor’s report is due back March 22.
Banks was previously found fit last spring
but, on Jan. 14, a judge suspended proceed-
ings at Hayden’s request because he was act-
ing out in court through hand wringing, winc-
ing and gyrating.
If Banks is ever restored to competency and
tried, he faces life in prison on charges includ-
ing assault with the intent to sexually assault,
causing great bodily injury, assault, attempted
oral copulation, first-degree burglary, indecent
exposure and maliciously dissuading a wit-
ness.
Officers arrested Banks after responding to
reports of a woman screaming for help at the
Garden Motel at 1690 Broadway in Redwood
City. The woman told police she was using the
motel as a quiet studying venue and had seen
the defendant the day before the attack enter-
ing an adjoining room and making unwanted
propositions.
At approximately 4 a.m., she told police she
heard prying noises at the window opposite
the front door and got up to run from the
room. While fumbling with the lock and
chain, a man she later identified as Banks
entered the window, grabbed her and threw
her on the bed.
The suspect punched her several times in
the face and strangled her into unconscious-
ness. When she awoke, her pants were pulled
down to her knees and the suspect was stand-
ing over her demanding oral sex. The woman
said she consented but ran from the room after
he turned his head. Police found Banks three
to four hours later at the motel and DNA
linked him to the crime, Nightengale said.
The woman was hospitalized for her
injuries, which included fractured eye orbital
bones and sinus fractures requiring surgery.
She still has severe vision trouble which
makes attending class difficult because it lim-
its her studying, Nightengale said.
Banks remains in custody in lieu of
$250,000 bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Sexual assault suspect’s
competency in question
Maurice Banks
4
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
City suffers string of residential burglaries
Two residential burglaries took place in San Bruno Tuesday
afternoon under similar circumstances that police think may be
related to another residential burglary that
took place Feb. 28.
Tuesday, police responded to the 2400
block of Whitman Way and the other on the
2200 block of Trenton Drive. In both
instances, residents returned home after a
brief absence and discovered their rear doors
had been forced open and their homes bur-
glarized, according to police.
On Feb. 28, police responded to a home
on the 2600 block of Plymouth Way after a man tried to kick in
the door of the residence before being spotted by the occupants,
according to police.
The suspect is described as a Hispanic male, in his 30s, 5 feet
7 inches tall, with short curly hair and a “scruffy” unshaven face,
according to police.
Anyone with information on this incident should call San
Bruno police at (650) 616-7100.
Three residential burglars arrested
Menlo Park police pulled over a car Tuesday night for a vehi-
cle code violation and ended up arresting the three occupants,
after smelling marijuana, for being suspects in an East Palo Alto
home burglary that occurred earlier in the day, according to
police.
Officers found numerous electronic items, jewelry and a large
sum of cash that was taken from a residence in East Palo Alto,
according to police.
Police spoke with the victims and were able to determine the
items found in the traffic stop belonged to them, according to
police.
The stolen items were later returned to the victims.
Arrested were Menlo Park residents Francisco Ramirez, 20,
Victor Bell, 18, and an East Palo Alto juvenile, according to
police.
Charges range from residential burglary, conspiracy, posses-
sion of stolen items, contributing to the delinquency of a minor
and a criminal street gang enhancement.
JobTrain’s longtime executive
director Sharon Williams steps down
Sharon Williams, JobTrain’s longtime executive director, will
step away from her position in late spring or early summer.
A reception and dinner will be held at the Four Seasons Silicon
Valley in East Palo Alto March 9 to celebrate Williams’ leader-
ship and to raise funds for her “Life Skills” legacy to JobTrain.
Williams joined JobTrain as a general educational develop-
ment test teacher in 1973 and became director of development in
1978. She took the helm as executive director in 1979. During
her 30 plus years in JobTrain’s top spot, Williams and her team
transformed a beleaguered nonprofit into a premier job training
and placement institution. Major accomplishments include the
purchase and renovation of a 31,000-square-foot training facili-
ty; accreditation through Western Association of Schools and
Colleges; creation of cutting edge training; and a diverse funding
base that includes support from prestigious Silicon Valley lead-
ers and corporations.
JobTrain currently helps 8,000 people each year, 500-600 of
them through full-time vocational training. At least 85 percent of
those who enroll complete their training; 75 percent are placed
in jobs; and 12 months after placement, 84 percent are still work-
ing.
Local briefs
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Families living in 70 homes on a nine-
acre parcel once used for a San Bruno
elementary school should soon be able
to vote whether to change the school dis-
trict assignment.
On Tuesday, the San Mateo County
Committee on School District
Organization approved a petition from
homeowners to change the school dis-
trict assignment from South San
Francisco Unified to San Bruno Park
Elementary and San Mateo Union High
school districts. Since one of the districts
opposed the change — South San
Francisco — the matter will go to a vote
of the property owners through a special
election if no appeals are filed within 30
days of the committee decision,
explained Nancy Magee, county Office
of Education spokeswoman.
In August, home owners from 58 of
the 70 homes in the disputed area in San
Bruno — known as the Merimont subdi-
vision — submitted a petition to County
Superintendent Anne Campbell request-
ing the boundaries be changed from the
South San Francisco Unified School
District. Along with the fact that the land
previously housed a school in the San
Bruno Park Elementary School District,
the petitioners argued most of the neigh-
borhood children attend school in San
Bruno. As such, they would like to con-
tinue with friends through high school
into the San Mateo Union High School
District, according to the petition.
South San Francisco school officials
oppose the switch while elected repre-
sentatives of both San Mateo Union and
San Bruno Park support it. San Bruno
students attended Carl Sandburg
Elementary on Evergreen Drive in San
Bruno until it was closed in 1978. In
2005, the land was sold and, shortly
after, houses were built which brought
families to the area. While the land is
located within San Bruno city limits, it is
also located within the South San
Francisco Unified School District
boundary. School boundaries were
drawn prior to city limits. When Carl
Sandburg Elementary was built, the land
was in unincorporated San Mateo
County. In 1977, the Local Agency
Formation Commission annexed the
land to the city of San Bruno.
Prior to the petition from home own-
ers, the topic came up in 2010 when both
districts learned of the discrepancy. Both
San Bruno Park Elementary and South
San Francisco Unified school districts
saw the land as being within its bound-
aries. Since the two sides disagreed, the
boundary remained unchanged.
It’s not only about boundaries. The
boundaries dictate where property rev-
enue is funneled. If the school district
boundaries are changed, future tax rev-
enue would instead go to San Bruno
Park Elementary and San Mateo Union
High school districts.
More recently, the money debate has
also included developer fees collected
by San Bruno Park during construction
of the housing on the Sandburg land.
South San Francisco contends it should
have received the funds — a request to
be paid that money was made to San
Bruno Park earlier this year.
School district boundary
change to go to voters
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Wyoming man accused, along with
an Aptos couple, of stealing a 82-foot
yacht in Sausalito and running aground
on a Pacifica beach appeared in court yes-
terday while the others were released
from custody.
Leslie Gardner, 63, of Gillette, Wyo.,
was formally charged with felony grand
theft, possessing stolen property and van-
dalism. He is also facing the allegation of
excessive taking based on the value of the
boat. Prosecutors declined to pursue
charges against the Aptos couple, Dario
Mira, 54, and Lisa Modawell, 56, because
they couldn’t prove they had any idea the
boat was stolen.
“We don’t have proof beyond a rea-
sonable doubt and by all appearances it
seems they met this man three to four
days ago and he told them he had
inherited a boat and invited them to go
on a trip,” said Assistant District
Attorney Al Serrato.
A fourth person
drove with them to
Sausalito then drove
Gardner’s truck
toward Pillar Point
where he was to meet
the boat, Serrato said.
A judge upheld
Gardner’s $1.01 mil-
lion bail and ordered
him back to court March 18 for a prelim-
inary hearing after he pleaded not guilty
and asked for a court-appointed attorney.
The odd story began Monday when a
beachgoer called authorities to report a
boat, the Darling, in need of help because
it was stuck on a sandbar in shallow water
at low tide off Linda Mar Beach. The call
came about three hours after the vessel,
which his insured at $4.2 million, was
taken from the Sausalito Yacht Harbor in
the early hours of Monday morning.
As surfers paddled out to help and tele-
vision news broadcast footage of the
damaged boat, its owner recognized his
vessel and called Sausalito police to
report it stolen. Authorities surrounded
the boat at gunpoint but the three passen-
gers refused to leave for a few hours.
Once removed, they were arrested and
authorities reported finding pizza and
beer bottles onboard.
Gardner was not assessed for boating
under the influence, Serrato said.
On Tuesday, the boat was towed to
Richmond by a salvage crew hired by the
owner so that its damage could be
assessed.
The amount of damage and the cost of
the response by the Coast Guard will be a
factor in the case, including potential
restitution, Serrato said.
The Marin County District Attorney’s
Office considered taking the case back
into its jurisdiction because the boat was
taken from Sausalito but ultimately
allowed San Mateo County prosecutors to
handle it, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
Man charged with stealing yacht for joyride
Leslie Gardner
5
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A San Mateo martial arts instructor accused
of inappropriately touching two young female
students will stand trial on four felony counts
of molestation that could leave him facing life
in prison if convicted of abusing multiple vic-
tims.
Meng Ricky Wong, 36, of Redwood City,
has pleaded not guilty to the charges but was
held to answer on all counts yesterday after
waiving a preliminary hearing on four counts
of molestation. Wong faces life in prison if
convicted of those plus the special allegation
of abusing multiple victims.
Wong worked at the Tat Wong Kung Fu
Academy on 43rd Avenue studio between
1999 and 2011. Prosecutors say he fondled
two girls, ages 9 and 11, at different times
between August 2010 and
October 2011. The girls do
not know each other but
are very similar in age and
appearance, according to
San Mateo police.
In the first instance,
Wong allegedly took the
girl upstairs at the studio
and touched her breasts
and buttocks. The girl
reported the incident but the lack of corrobo-
ration led to no prosecution. In October 2011,
the second girl reported an identical touching
incident upstairs at the studio.
In August, one of the girls sued him, studio
owner Tat Mau Wong and parent company
Action Martial Arts for “carelessly and negli-
gently” failing to establish appropriate guide-
lines for interacting and teaching minors.
Which girl’s guardian filed the San Mateo
County Superior Court case is unclear but she
joined the academy in October 2006 in hopes
of earning a black belt, according to the docu-
ment. In late summer through November
2010, Wong touched the girl in a way uncon-
nected to his instruction, the suit alleges.
As a result, the girl claims she suffered
severe pain and suffering, anxiety, shock,
humiliation and shame. She also incurred
expenses for medical care, medicine and
counseling, the suit states.
He returns to Superior Court April 4 to enter
a plea and possibly set a trial date.
He is free from custody on a $100,000 bail
bond.
Martial arts instructor to trial for molestation
Meng Wong
Police standoff ends
with arrest in San Francisco
Police arrested a robbery suspect
Wednesday after a nearly seven-hour standoff
that began when he barricaded himself inside
a marijuana growing site in San Francisco.
Four people who worked inside the building
had been taken hostage but were freed hours
before the standoff ended. Police would not
say if they had been released by the suspect or
rescued by a SWAT team.
The suspect was taken into custody after a
tactical team with a police dog rushed the
building in an industrial area of the city’s
Bayview district.
Police credited the dog, named Tomak, with
capturing the suspect.
“The tactical team announced their pres-
ence and the dog barked, and as they made
their way through the building, the suspect
surrendered, stating that he did not want to be
bitten by the police dog,” said Sgt. Michael
Andraychak, a police spokesman.
The incident began before 4 a.m. as an
attempted robbery by four men who stormed
the building that police initially thought was a
medical marijuana dispensary, authorities
said.
Arriving officers arrested three suspects
wearing ski masks who ran from the scene
while another person stayed inside and
refused to leave the building.
Police quickly set up a three-block perime-
ter and treated the incident as a potential
hostage situation. The SWAT team and nego-
tiators were called.
They waited several hours before rushing
the building, where they also discovered about
1,000 marijuana plants.
Community mourns
slain Santa Cruz officers
Community members cried, prayed and left
remembrances at a closed-casket visitation for
two slain Santa Cruz Police Department
detectives.
Wednesday’s public casket viewing at Santa
Cruz Memorial cemetery is the first of several
events honoring detectives Sgt. Loran
“Butch” Baker and Officer Elizabeth Butler.
Jeremy Goulet shot and killed both officers
when they came to his house on Feb. 26 while
investigating a misdemeanor sexual assault
case. Goulet was killed in a subsequent chase
and shootout.
The main memorial ceremony is scheduled
for Thursday at San Jose’s HP Pavilion, 525
West Santa Clara St., from noon to 3 p.m. A
procession of 200 local law enforcement offi-
cers leaves the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk
amusement park at 8:30 a.m. to attend the
memorial.
Around the Bay
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The number of
paroled sex offenders who are fugitives in
California is 15 percent higher today than
before Gov. Jerry Brown’s sweeping law
enforcement realignment law took effect 17
months ago, according to figures released
Wednesday by the state corrections depart-
ment.
The increase amounts to 360 more sex
offenders whose whereabouts were unknown
and who were not reporting to their parole
officers last year.
An Associated Press analysis of the
Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
data shows that 2,706 paroled sex offenders
dropped out of sight in the 15 months since
the new law took effect in October 2011,
compared to 2,346 in the 15 months before
realignment. The numbers were obtained by
the AP before their public release.
That’s an average of 180 sex offender fugi-
tives each month, up from 156 before realign-
ment.
Attention has focused on parolees who cut
off or disable their GPS-linked ankle
bracelets, meaning that parole agents are
unable to track their movements by satellite.
Sex offender parolees are required to wear the
tracking devices under Jessica’s Law,
approved by state voters in 2006.
The governor’s realignment law sends
lower-level offenders to county jails instead
of state prisons and was enacted in part to
conform to a federal court order to reduce the
inmate population.
Before the law took effect in 2011, those
who violated their parole by tampering with
the devices could have been returned to state
prison for up to a year. Now they can be sen-
tenced to up to six months in county jails, but
many are released within days because local
jails are overcrowded.
Some county jails refuse to accept the
parole violators at all.
The problem varies greatly by county.
Many saw no significant change, while some
saw decreases in the number of sex offenders
who could no longer be located.
But the number nearly doubled in Fresno
County, from 62 before realignment to 116
through the end of last year. The number
jumped from 685 to 847 in Los Angeles
County, which produces about a third of the
state’s criminals.
Among other large counties in Southern
California, Orange County saw an increase
from 91 to 119; Riverside County from 131 to
151; and San Bernardino County from 154 to
195. The number dropped slightly in San
Diego County, from 141 to 140.
In the Central Valley, Kern County saw an
increase in the number of fugitive sex offend-
ers from 51 to 67, Sacramento County from
170 to 191 and San Joaquin County from 74
to 94. San Francisco increased from 72 to 84.
The majority of fugitives are quickly recap-
tured, the figures show.
In Alameda County, for instance, just eight
of 106 parolees eluded capture last year.
There were four parolees still missing in
Fresno County, 71 in Los Angeles County, 11
in Orange County, seven in Riverside County,
nine in Sacramento County, 18 in San
Bernardino County, and four in San Diego
County.
“Criminals have been removing their GPS
devices for as long as they’ve been using
them. It’s a crime we take very seriously. We
aggressively track and arrest convicts who
commit it,” said state corrections spokes-
woman Deborah Hoffman.
Parolees are recaptured in an average of 12
days, she said.
It’s the punishment after they are back in
custody that has changed, with overcrowding
in many county jails creating a revolving door
that often allows criminals to go free within
days.
More sex offenders are going
missing under new state law
“Criminals have been removing their GPS devices for
as long as they’ve been using them. It’s a crime we take very
seriously.We aggressively track and arrest convicts who commit it.”
— Deborah Hoffman, state corrections spokeswoman
6
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Advertisement
Adrian John Daansen
Adrian John Daansen, resident
of San Bruno, died in Hayward
March 6, 2013.
He was the loving husband of 54
years to Patricia Daansen and is
also survived by his daughters
Cheryl Shonk and Karen Daansen
and son Steven Daansen (his wife,
Angela); six grandchildren and
four great-grandchildren; his niece
Erin Stapp and great-nephew Ryan
Stapp. Brother-in-law of Maureen
Bell. He was preceded in death by
his daughter Judith Daansen and
son-in-law John Shonk.
He was a native of Rochester,
N.Y., age 81 and lived in the Bay
Area for more than 60 years.
Adrian served in the U.S. Navy
during the Korean Conflict. He
retired from the U.S.P.S. after 33
years service.
Family and friends are invited to
attend the liturgy service 11 a.m.
Thursday, March 14 at Holy Cross
Cemetery in Colma. The family
suggests memorial contributions
be made to a charity of your
choice.
As a public service, the Daily
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Obituary
By Richard Lardner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A tea party
senator from Kentucky used an old-
style filibuster lasting nearly 13
hours to block Senate confirmation
of John Brennan’s nomination to be
CIA director.
Sen. Rand Paul ended his fili-
buster shortly after midnight, but
Senate Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell, also a Kentucky
Republican, said he would continue
to oppose Brennan’s confirmation
and try to keep the debate going.
After Paul yielded the floor, Sen.
Dick Durbin, D-Ill., filed a motion
to cut off debate on Brennan’s nom-
ination and bring it up for a vote.
Paul ended his lengthy speech
with a joke. He said that he was
tempted to go another 12 hours and
try to break former South Carolina
Sen. Strom Thurmond’s filibuster
record of 24 hours, but he needed to
use the bathroom.
“I discovered that there are some
limits to filibustering and I’m going
to have to go and take care of one of
those in a few minutes,” Paul said.
But Paul’s performance clearly
energized his colleagues and even
he seemed invigorated as the night
progressed. Paul, a tea party favorite
and a Republican critic of President
Barack Obama’s unmanned drone
policy, started just before noon
Wednesday by demanding the pres-
ident or Attorney General Eric
Holder issue a statement assuring
that the aircraft would not be used
in the United States to kill terrorism
suspects who are U.S. citizens. He
wasn’t picky about the format, say-
ing at one point he’d be happy with
a telegram or a Tweet.
But by the time he left the floor,
he said he’d received no response.
In a show of support, more than a
dozen of Paul’s colleagues who
share his conservative views came
to the floor to take turns speaking
for him and trading questions.
McConnell congratulated Paul for
his “tenacity and for his convic-
tion.” McConnell also called
Obama’s choice, John Brennan, a
“controversial nominee.”
Paul said he recognized that he
can’t stop Brennan from being con-
firmed. But the nomination was the
right vehicle for a debate over what
the Obama White House believes
are the limits of the federal govern-
ment’s ability to conduct lethal
operations against suspected terror-
ists, he said.
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, read
Twitter messages from people eager
to “Stand With Rand.” The
Twitterverse, said Cruz, is “blowing
up.” And as the night went on, Cruz
spoke for longer periods as Paul
leaned against a desk across the
floor.
Cruz, an insurgent Republican
with strong tea party backing, read
passages from Shakespeare’s
“Henry V” and lines from the 1970
movie “Patton,” starring George C.
Scott.
Senate GOP block vote on Obama’s CIA pick
REUTERS
John Brennan testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing
on his nomination to be the director of the CIA.
By Seth Borenstein
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Physicists in
Italy said Wednesday they are
achingly close to concluding that
what they found last year was the
Higgs boson, the elusive “God par-
ticle.” They need to eliminate one
last remote possibility that it’s
something else.
The long theorized subatomic
particle would explain why matter
has mass and has been called a
missing cornerstone of physics.
With new analyses, scientists are
closer to being certain they found
the crucial Higgs boson. But they
want to be 99.9 percent positive,
said Pauline Gagnon, a physicist
with the European Center for
Nuclear Research.
Last July scientists with the
world’s largest atom smasher, the
$10 billion Large Hadron Collider
on the Swiss-French border,
announced finding a particle they
described as Higgs-like, but would-
n’t say it was conclusively the parti-
cle. Now thousands of checks show
them even closer.
“It looks more and more like a
Higgs boson,” said Gagnon after an
update presented Wednesday at a
conference in the Italian Alps.
Gagnon compared finding the
Higgs to identifying a specific per-
son. This looks, talks, and sings like
a Higgs, but scientists want to make
sure it dances like the Higgs before
they shout “Eureka.”
She said there is only one last
thing the particle they found could
also be: a graviton. That’s another
subatomic particle associated with
gravitational fields, not mass.
By checking the spin of the parti-
cle, scientists will be able to tell if it
is a Higgs boson, which is far more
likely, or a graviton. If it has no
internal spin, it’s the Higgs boson; if
it has a lot of spin it’s a graviton.
‘God particle’: Confirmation is ‘achingly close’
NATION 7
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
House votes to prevent March 27 federal shutdown
By David Espo and Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Republicans pushed
legislation through the House on Wednesday
to prevent a government shutdown this month
while easing the short-term impact of $85 bil-
lion in spending cuts — at the same time pre-
viewing a longer-term plan to erase federal
deficits without raising taxes.
President Barack Obama pursued a differ-
ent path as the GOP asserted its budget prior-
ities. He arranged to have dinner with several
Republican senators at a hotel near the White
House in search of bipartisan support for a
deficit-cutting approach that includes the
higher taxes he seeks as well as savings from
Medicare and other benefit programs that
they stress.
Any such compromise talks are unlikely to
yield fruit for months, if then, although
Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, the author of the
House Republican budget plan, expressed
hope that some progress across party lines
might be possible later in the year.
“I think this whole thing will come to a
crescendo this summer, and we’re going to
have to talk to each other to get an agreement
about how to delay a debt crisis, how to save
this country from a fiscal train wreck that’s
coming,” said Ryan, who was the
Republicans’ vice presidential candidate last
year. He added that he had spoken with
Obama in recent days, but he declined to pro-
vide details.
For now, the divided government’s immedi-
ate objectives are to prevent a shutdown of
federal agencies on March 27, at the same
time lawmakers and the White House look for
ways to ease the impact of across-the-board
spending cuts that kicked in less than a week
ago.
The legislation that cleared the House on a
bipartisan vote of 267-151 would do both,
ensuring funding through the Sept. 30 end of
the budget year while granting the Pentagon
and the Department of Veterans Affairs
greater flexibility in implementing their share
of short-term spending cuts.
“This is all about whether or not we shut
down the government. This is a bill to keep
the government operating,” said Rep. Hal
Rogers, the Kentucky Republican who chairs
the House Appropriations Committee.
Minority Democrats appeared torn between
a desire to support legislation to keep the gov-
ernment open and their goal of replacing at
least half of the spending cuts with provisions
to increase revenue.
“Instead of closing tax loopholes for corpo-
rate jets, they want to cut 4 million meals on
wheels,” the party’s House leader, Rep.
Nancy Pelosi of California, said of
Republicans.
The bill passed with the support of 53
Democrats, more than a quarter of those vot-
ing.
It now goes to the Senate, where Democrats
and the White House are deep in negotiations
with Republicans on changes that would give
the Department of Homeland Security and
other domestic agencies the same type of flex-
ibility in administering the spending cuts that
the Pentagon would receive.
Obama’s dinner with Senate Republicans
stemmed from a suggestion he made during a
conversation recently with GOP Sen. Lindsey
Graham of South Carolina, according to a
presidential aide.
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Shifting course in the
face of political gridlock, President Barack
Obama is making rare overtures to rank-and-
file Republicans, inviting GOP senators to
dinner Wednesday, planning visits to Capitol
Hill and working the phones with lawmakers.
Obama’s efforts are aimed at jumpstarting
budget talks and rallying support for his pro-
posals on immigration and gun control.
The president’s new charm offensive
underscores the limitations of his earlier
attempts to use public pressure, rather than
direct engagement, to win Republican coop-
eration. That strategy proved futile in recent
weeks, as the White House and Congress
failed to prevent $85 billion in automatic
budget cuts that both sides said they wanted
to avoid.
As that “sequester” has started taking
effect, Obama has begun quietly calling con-
gressional Republicans to discuss the
prospects for an elusive longer-term deficit
reduction deal as well as his other second-
term priorities. Aides say Obama is concen-
trating his outreach on lawmakers with a his-
tory of bipartisan deal-making and those who
have indicated some willingness to support
increased tax revenue as part of a big deficit-
cutting package.
In both his calls and dinner invitations, the
president pointedly has skipped over Sen.
Mitch McConnell and House Speaker John
Boehner, the GOP leaders who insist that
Obama will get no further tax hikes from
Capitol Hill.
Republicans have had mixed reactions to
the outreach from the president, who previ-
ously has shown little appetite for personal
engagement with lawmakers, often prefer-
ring to assign those efforts to his staff and
Vice President Joe Biden.
“He’s never spent anytime reaching out,”
said Oklahoma Sen. Tom Coburn, who spoke
with the president this week about gun legis-
lation. “The question is, is it starting to
change because there is bad poll numbers or
is it because he really decided he’s going to
lead and solve some of the problems of the
country?”
Sen. Lindsey Graham, a frequent critic of
the White House on national security issues,
said he was encouraged by Obama’s efforts.
“This is how you solve hard problems,” the
South Carolina Republican said.
President tries to charm
Republican lawmakers
REUTERS
Barack Obama walks on the South Lawn of the White House.
By Ken Thomas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Jeb Bush has long resis-
ted pressure from supporters to run for presi-
dent. Now the former Florida governor is sig-
naling that he’s at least open to the idea, a shift
that comes as he promotes a new book and
Republicans struggle to rebound after
President Barack Obama’s re-election.
“I’m not saying yes. I’m just not saying no,”
Bush told NBC News earlier this week, one of
a series of such comments he’s made as he
talks about the book “Immigration Wars” in
television interviews and forums.
Comments like those
from Bush, 60, are in
sharp contrast to past
refusals to even entertain
the idea of following in
the footsteps of his older
brother, former President
George W. Bush, and
their father, former
President George H.W.
Bush.
Less than three years before the first
Republican presidential primaries, Bush’s
words offer a window into his evolving think-
ing on a future run.
Jeb Bush more open to
future White House bid
Jeb Bush
WORLD 8
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Peter Orsi and Raphael Satter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Some cried, some cheered.
Many Latin Americans mourned the death of
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, leaders
in Europe and Asia sent condolences, and
Iran’s president predicted great works in the
afterlife.
President Barack Obama, meanwhile,
focused on “a new chapter” for Venezuela,
following 14 years in which Chavez cast him-
self as a bulwark against U.S. domination.
Chavez, who died Tuesday at age 58, was
seen as a hero by some for his socialist pro-
grams, his anti-U.S. rhetoric and gifts of cut-
rate oil. Others considered him a bully who
repressed his opponents.
A teary-eyed Bolivian President Evo
Morales, one of Chavez’s closest allies and
most loyal disciples, declared that “Chavez is
more alive than ever.”
“Chavez will continue to be an inspira-
tion for all peoples who fight for their lib-
eration,” Morales said Tuesday in a tele-
vised speech. “Chavez will always be pres-
ent in all the regions of the world and all
social sectors. Hugo Chavez will always be
with us, accompanying us.”
Former London Mayor Ken Livingstone,
another left-wing fan of the Latin American
strongman, told the Associated Press that
Chavez’s ability to shrug off American pres-
sure and weather what he described as a U.S.-
backed coup attempt had inspired the entire
continent to defy Washington.
“The fact that he survived encouraged other
Latin American nations to break free and put
their own people ahead of corporate inter-
ests,” Livingstone said in a telephone inter-
view. “Before him, the governments there
were just creatures of the White House. Now
they are generally pursuing policies that help
their own people.”
The U.N. Security Council observed a
minute of silence to honor the memory of
Chavez at the start of a meeting on
Wednesday morning.
Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin,
the current council president, expressed the
“deepest sympathy” of the U.N.’s most pow-
erful body at Chavez’s death. He then asked
for a minute of silence and the 15 council
members and other diplomats and U.N. staff
in the room stood up to honor the late
Venezuelan leader.
Chavez mourned, but some hope change coming
By Edith M. Lederer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
UNITED NATIONS — Armed fighters
linked to the Syrian opposition detained 21
U.N. peacekeepers Wednesday in the increas-
ingly volatile zone separating Israeli and
Syrian troops on the Golan Heights, a new
escalation in the spillover of Syria’s civil war.
The U.N. Security Council demanded their
immediate and unconditional release.
The capture comes a week after the
announcement that a member of the peace-
keeping force is missing. The force, known as
UNDOF, was established in 1974 following
the 1973 Yom Kippur war to monitor the dis-
engagement of Israeli and Syrian forces and
maintain a cease-fire.
Israeli officials have grown increasingly jit-
tery as the Syrian war moves closer to Israel.
There have been several instances in which
stray fire has landed in the Israeli-controlled
Golan Heights, and Israel is concerned that
Syrian weapons could fall into the hands of
hostile groups and be used against Israel.
Israel captured the Golan Heights from Syria
in 1967 and Syria wants the land returned in
exchange for peace.
Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin,
the current Security Council president, said
talks are under way between U.N. officials
from the peacekeeping force and the captors.
U.N. peacekeeping chief Herve Ladsous,
who briefed the council behind closed doors,
identified the captors as being from a group
associated with the Syrian armed opposition,
Churkin said.
“There was no fighting, according to his
briefing to us,” Churkin said. “My understand-
ing is that they took over the trucks in which
the UNDOF personnel was moving around.”
Churkin said the capture of the peacekeep-
ers “is particularly unacceptable and bizarre”
because the UNDOF peacekeepers are
unarmed and their mission has nothing to do
with Syria’s internal conflict.
U.N. says 21 peacekeepers detained on Golan Heights
REUTERS
The coffin of Venezuela’s late president Hugo Chavez is driven through the streets of Caracas
after leaving the military hospital where he died of cancer.
OPINION 9
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula High School
Editor,
Thank you for your informative and
well-balanced editorial March 6
“Finding a Spot for Peninsula High
School.” I am pleased to hear
Superintendent Laurence is still in the
process of seeking an appropriate site
for Peninsula High School. Although I
cannot attend the meeting at Aragon
High School tonight, I would like to
comment on the much-touted site
adjoining San Mateo High School.
As an educator, a volunteer bilingual
tutor in a San Mateo elementary school
and the mother of a son who found the
success in an alternative high school
that he could not achieve in the tradi-
tional high school, I fully appreciate the
value of a school that “educates those
who may otherwise fall through the
cracks.” I agree that Crestmoor students
“deserve a facility on the same level as
other district students.”
However, I strongly object to the idea
of placing this school in the area of
Poplar Avenue between Delaware and
Humboldt streets — and definitely not
due to any concerns about non-tradi-
tional students. There is no southbound
entry to Highway 101 from Peninsula
Avenue and the Poplar Avenue freeway
entrance has become extremely danger-
ous — with cars coming from four
directions and waiting, guessing whose
turn it is to proceed. Poplar Avenue traf-
fic is constantly backed up past Idaho
and Humboldt streets. Since these stu-
dents will be coming from all over the
district, more cars will add to an already
difficult and dangerous situation.
Secondly, as you note in your editori-
al, a significant number of Crestmoor
students were relocated from San Mateo
High School. A full understanding by
educators and administrators of the
kinds of teenage rivalries that build up
in such situations would eliminate con-
sideration of placing this school close to
San Mateo High School.
I hope Mr. Laurence and his team
will find a more appropriate location for
this worthwhile endeavor.
Norma Tarrow, Ph.D.
San Mateo
The letter writer
is a professor emeritus at
California State University, Long Beach
No CPR in health facility
Editor,
The article (“Woman dies after nurse
refuses to do CPR” in the March 5 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal) may not have
all the relevant facts. It is possible that
this elderly woman may have had an
advance directive which stated that in
such circumstances she did not want
CPR.
I am a volunteer of long standing for
the organization “Compassion and
Choice,” which helps patients make
end-of-life decisions and acts as their
advocate to see that their wishes are
carried out. It is our experience that all
too often health care facilities in their
“wisdom” override a prior decision to
let nature take its course and subject
their patients to unneeded, unwanted
and very intrusive interventions.
The event in the article certainly war-
rants further investigation. However, it
would be most unfortunate if it fright-
ened the administrators of these facili-
ties into not honoring their patients’
wishes.
Jonathan Feinberg
San Mateo
Matt Grocott
Editor,
Thank you, Mayor Grocott of San
Carlos, for standing your ground in the
face of adverse attempts to silence and
intimidate you voicing real concerns
regarding the proposed ban on plastic
bags at the last City Council meeting
(in response to Mayor Grocott’s letter
“Bag ban ordinance” in the March 5
edition of the Daily Journal).
I have spoken to a number of restau-
rant and take-out food business in San
Carlos about this proposed ban. The
general feeling on banning plastic bags
is that it could strongly effect and ham-
per their businesses. Potential leakage
from takeout items could hinder safe
handling of hot and cold food products,
endangering the ability to protect items
from spillage on body parts, clothes, in
vehicles and home areas, etc.
What will be next, a ban on all all
plastic goods, containers and packaging
at delis and markets (or a ban on frozen
foods, selling fresh foods only), phar-
macies, dry cleaners, paint shops, hard-
ware stores, clothing stores, florists and
other sundry stores and businesses?
Let’s not forget plastics in hospitals,
medical offices and clinics and the tons
of plastics in autos, electronics, ships
and planes. More wood and paper only
means fewer trees in our forests.
Jerry Emanuel
San Carlos
A better approach
to leaf blowers
Editor,
When a small, vocal and well-organ-
ized group imposes their opinion on the
public, fairness is diminished and the
needs and rights of most are impinged
upon. Such is the case with the San
Mateo City Council’s apparent drive to
ban the leaf blower.
Admittedly, the blower can be noisy
and, when used nearby, can interrupt
one’s enjoyment of one’s garden or a
restorative walk on a tree-lined street.
However, there is unanimous agreement
among park departments, school dis-
tricts, professional gardeners and tree
service providers on the efficiency of
leaf blowers. The city of San Mateo
reported on Nov. 5, 2012 that without
leaf blowers it will take six wage earn-
ers 32 hours instead of 19 hours to
clean Central Park and it will take two
staff members 8.5 hours instead of 3
hours to maintain the Japanese Garden.
That gross inefficiency will be repeated
52 times per year — with still greater
waste of time following storms, with
increased debris.
Of course, a home owner may well
choose to rake his own small yard or
leave leaf debris in his garden. But
when he demands that those of us
charged with cleaning large gardens,
circular driveways and tennis courts
may not use efficient tools, he displays
a gross unfairness to 96,000 fellow San
Mateo residents and all gardeners.
Numerous cities have gone beyond
this knee-jerk response and instead have
pursued the new quieter blowers and
actual agreements between neighbors
and their gardeners so noise and annoy-
ance can be reduced. With pressure
from consumers, manufacturers devised
quieter blowers and they would assured-
ly provide yet quieter blowers if we gar-
deners could only use machines at 55
db or less.
San Mateo would benefit from such a
cooperative and enlightened approach
instead of a heavy-handed ban with all
its disadvantages.
Gary Parma
San Mateo
Article priority
Editor,
In the March 4 edition of the Daily
Journal, I read letter writer Mr. Gus
Sinks taking issue with Mr. Gil
Henderson’s letter regarding “article
priority” in the recent murders of two
fine police officers from the city of
Santa Cruz.
Well, Mr. Sinks, probably to your sur-
prise, Mr. Henderson is not the only
person that saw a problem with this. I
agree with him 100 percent. Our “local”
paper should have put this on the front
page. Santa Cruz is one of the many
local hot spots we enjoy in this area. All
of our public safety personnel deserve
our respect and gratitude, and this paper
should have done more to recognize
that. I’m hoping they will in the future.
Darryl M. Lindsay
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
What a steal!
W
ith apologies to the National Rifle Association,
plastic bags don’t cause litter. People do. That
is the message San Carlos Mayor Matt Grocott
pretty much promoted last week when he bristled at a pro-
posal to ban single-use bags in the city and require mer-
chants to charge patrons between a dime and a quarter if
they dare insist on such a throw-
away carryall.
Grocott, who is nothing if not
prepared, brought to the council
meeting photos of garbage
strewn about downtown San
Carlos including coffee cups and
so many cigarette butts it must
seem that the Belmont ban on
puffing is pushing smokers to its
neighbor. Bags, Grocott said, are
not the enemy.
And he’s right to some extent.
Remove the bags and the county
doesn’t suddenly become the pristine streets of Singapore,
unless of course we begin caning those who dare chew gum
or have no concept of a trash receptacle. For all the preva-
lent recycling and green thinking, we are still dirty, sloven-
ly people and, even when we aren’t, the wind has a tenden-
cy to push cup sleeves and wadded-up napkins off tables
and the top of garbage cans down the street. Let’s also out-
law the wind.
But the natural elements are not in question; instead, the
question is how to control the man-made components
which is what is bringing the bag ban to dozens of cities
lately and which led to Grocott’s minority opinion that
there are alternatives like compostable products.
The rest of the council disagreed. County Public Health
Director Dean Peterson disagreed. Pretty much anybody
who wants to wrap their arms around the world and are so
environmentally conscious they compost and collect rain
water and think those who use plastic bags for wet waste
are the devil — they all disagreed, too.
Now Woodside is jumping into the fray, not balking at
the idea of prohibiting single-use bans but disliking the
idea of ordering merchants to charge and keep tabs on how
many they sell. Nobody needs to call Al Gore and company
quite yet; the skepticism of two cities isn’t enough to
declare an environmental backlash and lament that the anti-
climate change folks are grabbing a foothold.
But sorry naysayers; in the scrum over Earth versus envi-
ronmental dictatorship, they are missing a key argument of
why some merchants say the push for reusable carriers just
aren’t their bag. Store owners in the Seattle area are report-
ing links between reusable bags and shoplifting. In other
words, sticky-fingered shoppers who aren’t keen on
shelling out 10 or 25 cents for a bag are also unwilling to
pony up on the actual price of goods. On a side note,
Washington state also did just legalize gay marriage and
marijuana so the curious may wonder if the swiped items
tend toward dish towels and zigzag papers. Maybe potato
chips.
In any case, the point is not what they’re stealing but that
merchants and retail industry experts say they’ve lost thou-
sands of dollars in merchandise because thieves can more
readily hide items in reusable items before moseying back
out. Employees can’t easily tell what comes in versus what
comes out when customers are bringing in their own bags
instead of relying on sacks emblazoned with store logos.
Not sure if business owners really can’t get a handle on
the shoplifting problem but it certainly puts a fresh spin on
the tired debate. Maybe authorities should also outlaw
recyclable bags. This will eliminate the argument the bags
are public safety hazards when owners bypass the occa-
sional wash and dry or shove fruit in a container also used
for leaky meat or sweaty gym clothes. That ban might also
force consumers to buy only what they can fit in two
hands, or a begging bowl. That’s fine, America has an obe-
sity problem anyway.
In the meantime, I am hoarding plastic bags like there’s
no tomorrow. And after Earth Day in many Peninsula cities
— or July likely in San Carlos — there actually will be no
tomorrow for the condemned bags, at least without a price.
They will join that graveyard of sketchy items past, along-
side polystyrene, soda six-pack rings and DDT. That means
no bags to clog up recycling machinery and contaminate
beaches but also no easily available bags to collect dog
waste, line the bathroom waste basket or bundle donation
items for Goodwill. The Earth will benefit; the pocketbook
will slightly suffer as like-minded bag users are forced to
purchase them.
Of course, we could always take a cue from Washington
state consumers and opt for a five-finger discount. At least
the reusable bags will finally come in handy.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200
ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter to
the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,296.24 +0.30% 10-Yr Bond 1.94 +2.32%
Nasdaq3,222.37 -0.05% Oil (per barrel) 90.44
S&P 500 1,541.46 +0.11% Gold 1,582.30
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
American Eagle Outfitters Inc., down $2.28 at $20.27
The teen retailer said that its fiscal fourth-quarter net income jumped
85 percent as it reduced inventory and sales improved.But its first-quarter
outlook disappointed.
Maidenform Brands Inc., down $1.67 at $16.96
The intimate-apparel maker posted a disappointing 2013 outlook and
said it will make changes to the business as competition increases.
Big Lots Inc., up $2.08 at $35.97
The discount retailer said its fourth-quarter net income rose 5 percent on
strong sales in U.S. and Canadian stores.
Best Buy Co. Inc., up 35 cents at $18.75
A Jefferies analyst upgraded the electronics retailer’s stock, predicting
that it will cut costs and fix its business model.
BankUnited Inc., down $1.57 at $27
A regulatory filing revealed that the bank’s CEO and other investors plan
to sell 19.6 million shares in an underwritten offering.
Nasdaq
The Fresh Market Inc., down $4.13 at $38.42
The grocery chain’s fiscal fourth-quarter results and fiscal 2013 earnings
forecast were below Wall Street expectations.
Staples Inc., down 95 cents at $12.34
Due to charges related to store closings, the office supplies company
said its fourth-quarter net income fell 72 percent.
AeroVironment Inc., down $2.12 at $19.57
The defense company posted lower-than-expected third-quarter results
and a weak outlook for the year due to government order delays.
Big movers
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — After barreling
through a record the day before, the Dow
Jones industrial average meandered
higher on Wednesday.
The Dow edged up 42.47 points, or
0.3 percent, to close at 14,296.24. An
encouraging job-market report helped
nudge the stock market up and pushed
bond prices lower.
On Tuesday, the Dow blew past the
previous all-time high it hit more than
five years ago. The index of 30 big cor-
porations has more than doubled since
hitting a low during the financial crisis in
March 2009.
The question now is, how much longer
can it keep climbing?
In the past, stock indexes have often
drifted lower in the months after break-
ing through previous record highs.
David Brown, director of Sabrient
Systems, an investment research firm,
sees plenty of reasons for the market to
keep climbing, however. People are put-
ting their cash into the stock market
again. And the alternatives, like bonds,
are hardly appealing.
“There is literally nowhere else to go,”
Brown said. “Do you really want to
make 1.9 percent on a 10-year Treasury?
You won’t make any money doing that.”
In other trading, the Standard & Poor’s
500 index rose 1.67 points, or 0.1 per-
cent, to 1,541.46. The Nasdaq slipped
1.77, less than 0.1 percent, to 3,222.36.
Microsoft led a decline in tech stocks,
losing 26 cents to $28.09. European reg-
ulators fined the company for breaking
an antitrust agreement requiring the soft-
ware giant to offer computer users a
choice of Internet browsers, instead of
just Internet Explorer.
Companies added 198,000 U.S. work-
ers to their payrolls in February, accord-
ing to payment processor ADP. The firm
also said employers added 23,000 more
jobs in January than first reported.
The ADP survey suggests that govern-
ment spending cuts have yet to deter
employers from hiring. Investors look to
the ADP survey as a preview to the
closely watched Labor Department
report, which comes out Friday.
Economists expect the government to
say employers added 152,000 jobs in
February, lowering the unemployment
rate to 7.8 percent from 7.9 percent.
As traders anticipated better news
about the job market, bond prices fell
and the yield on the 10-year Treasury
rose to 1.93 percent from 1.90 percent
late Tuesday.
Stocks edge up following Dow’s record day
REUTERS
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange.
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Strong auto sales,
better hiring and a continued housing
recovery helped the U.S. economy grow
in January and February throughout the
country, according to a survey released
Wednesday by the Federal Reserve.
The survey noted that 10 of the Fed’s
12 banking districts reported moderate or
modest growth, while the Boston and
Chicago districts reported slow growth.
Consumer spending increased in most
regions, although spending growth
slowed in many districts and much of the
gains were driven by auto sales. Many
districts said consumers pulled back
slightly elsewhere after seeing taxes rise
and gas prices increase. Some also
expressed concerns about federal spend-
ing cuts that started on March 1.
Housing markets showed more
strength in nearly all parts of the country.
Manufacturing grew modestly in most
regions after struggling in through most
of 2012. And many districts reported
improvement in individual jobs markets.
The report, called the Beige Book,
provides anecdotal information on eco-
nomic conditions through February 22.
The information will be discussed along
with other economic data during the
Fed’s next policy meeting on March 19-
20.
Analysts said the report was slightly
more upbeat than the previous Fed sur-
vey, noting the modest rebound in manu-
facturing in the past two months. Jennifer
Lee, senior economist at BMO Capital
Markets, called the latest survey “more
encouraging news on the U.S. economy.”
Fed survey: Economy growing throughout country
New TSA rules on knives
draw fire from Sept. 11 families
NEW YORK — Some family members of victims killed
in the Sept. 11 terror attacks said Wednesday that they are
outraged by the Transportation Security Administration’s
decision to let passengers carry pocketknives on planes.
TSA Administrator John Pistole announced Tuesday
that airline passengers will be able to carry pocketknives
with blades less than 2.36 inches long and less than half an
inch wide. Souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other
sports equipment also will be permitted starting next
month.
The agency said the policy aligns the U.S. with interna-
tional standards and allows the TSA to concentrate on
more serious safety threats.
Unions representing flight attendants and other airline
workers decried the change, and several relatives of people
killed when terrorists hijacked four U.S. airliners on Sept.
11, 2001, criticized the move as well.
“I’m flabbergasted,” said Sally Regenhard, whose fire-
fighter son was killed at the World Trade Center. “I’m real-
ly disgusted by this latest news.”
Regenhard said she recently had a container of yogurt
confiscated by the TSA because it was a gel. “I’m just
wondering why a yogurt is more dangerous than a
penknife or a golf club,” she said.
Debra Burlingame, whose brother Charles was the pilot
of the plane that crashed into the Pentagon, said a pock-
etknife can be just as deadly as a box cutter, like the ones
the hijackers used. Box cutters will still be banned under
the new rules.
“When you’re drawing a blade against someone’s neck,
they’re quite lethal,” Burlingame said. “This is bad news.”
Facebook adds University
of California chief to board
Facebook says the chancellor of the University of
California at San Francisco, Susan Desmond-Hellmann,
will join its board of directors.
She will be the second woman elect-
ed to the Menlo Park company’s board,
joining Facebook’s No. 2 executive,
Sheryl Sandberg. The company named
Sandberg to the body last June after
criticism that its directors were all men.
Before serving as chancellor,
Desmond-Hellmann was an executive
at biotechnology drugmaker
Genentech, which markets some of the
best-selling cancer drugs in the world.
She is a doctor with a specialty in treat-
ing cancer.
Facebook Inc.’s board also includes Netflix Inc. chief
Reed Hastings, entrepreneurs Marc Andreessen and Peter
Thiel, and Washington Post Co. CEO Donald Graham.
Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg is chairman
of the board, which now has nine members.
Business briefs
Susan
Desmond-
Hellmann
<< Niners release 6-time Pro Bowler, page 13
• Pac-12 tourney heating up in Seattle, page 13
Thursday, March 7, 2013
PADRES PREVAIL: IT TOOK SERRA TENNIS 15 YEARS TO ONCE AGAIN BEAT BELLARMINE >>> PAGE 12
State tourney in full swing
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Burlingame’s Will Dobson goes up for a shot Wednesday during the Panthers’ 58-50 loss to Campolindo High School in the CIF Northern California state tournament’s first round.
Burlingame swept at home, Menlo sweeps its games, El Camino’s stars have huge night
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It was the great Connor Haupt, Burlingame
Panther basketball legend and Central Coast
Section champion, who said, “every run has to
come to an end eventually.”
And thus, in front of a standing-room only
crowd at Burlingame High School and only a
couple days removed from experiencing the
ultimate of highs by capturing two CCS
Division III titles, the Panthers basketball pro-
gram was dealt a double dose of disappoint-
ment by losing in the opening round of the
CIF Northern California playoffs.
The girls could not buy a basket against No.
11 Modesto Christian and fell 48-34 while the
boys fell apart in the final minutes of their
game against No. 10 Campolindo and lost 58-
50.
“We had a lot of mental breakdowns,” said
boys’ center Nick Loew. “We just didn’t exe-
cute. I thought we gave it a heck of a run at the
end but it was too little too late I guess.”
“I think we fought but it just wasn’t
enough,” said boys’ point guard Mikel Floro-
Cruz. “We had the momentum but every time
we gained one step, it was two steps back with
a turnover or a missed shot. We were in it, but
at the end of the day, the scoreboard shows it.”
The Panthers appeared to be in the driver’s
seat late in the game, clawing back from a 10-
point deficit with 5:04 left in the game to 48-
47 with 3:34 on the clock and all the momen-
tum in their corner.
The performance up until that point was
typical of Burlingame’s run through this post-
season. Campolindo was in control on the
scoreboard throughout, but the Panthers knew
they were good for one big surge and they got
it when Floro-Cruz hit an emotional 3-pointer
to pull within one.
See CIF, Page 14
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Things didn’t go Steven Hughes’ way on the
mound, but the Aragon junior ended up being
the hero with the bat as the Dons (5-0)
downed El Camino 5-2 Wednesday at Aragon
High School.
With Aragon trailing 2-1 in the fifth inning,
one loud swing from Hughes propelled the
Dons to victory, as the big left-handed hitter
stepped to the plate with two on and two out
and slammed a three-run home run to the
right-center power alley.
Hughes took a no-decision through four
innings, but junior left-hander Brennan Carey
hurled two perfect innings of relief to earn the
win. El Camino right-hander Josh Eclavea
surrendered four runs (one earned) over five
innings to take the loss.
His record falls to 2-1.
“We hit the ball around
the yard,” Aragon manager
Lenny Souza said. “We
didn’t string them together
today. But any time you
can get out with a win
against a team like El Camino you’re happy.”
El Camino (2-4) jumped on the board in the
first when Steve Pastora swiped home on a
wheel steal. Then with two outs and the bases
loaded, Emiliano Rios singled to right to drive
home Eclavea, giving El Camino a 2-0 lead.
Aragon seemed to respond in the bottom of
the inning when, with one on, Aldo Sevrerson
See DONS, Page 14
Late-inning blasts give Aragon win over E.C.
Serra picks
up huge win
in tennis
See page 12
INSIDE
SPORTS 12
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
For the first time in his coaching career,
Serra High School tennis coach Marcus
Charles was speechless.
His team hugged, tears were shed and
Charles said he didn’t know what to say.
The Serra varsity tennis team defeated
eight-time defending champion Bellarmine
Bells 5-2 in front of a hostile San Jose crowd
on Tuesday — the team’s first win against the
West Catholic Athletic League powerhouse in
more than 15 years.
“It was very intense,” Charles said. “They
knew when they went in they had a great
chance to win given how we did against them
(Bellarmine) last year. Physically, they knew
they could go shot-for-shot with those guys.
But mentally, we weren’t ready last year. We
weren’t there yet.”
That all changed on Tuesday, Charles said.
In fact, it was the mental side of tennis that
propelled the Padres over the Bells.
“When we jumped up 3-2, we felt we had
them. Bellarmine had their entire cheering
section out. But, those guys were really bat-
tling out there. They were all focused, I’ve
never seen them so focused. At the end of the
match, I was speechless. For the first time I
could not find words.”
The Padres received key wins at No. 1 and
No. 2 doubles.
Seniors Alex Frank and Joey Simpson,
along with juniors Brenden Barrows and
Gordon Barrows won in straight sets.
The other crucial wins came at No. 1, 3 and
4 singles.
Sean Talmadge, Peter Campana and Eric
Dennis all went three grueling sets to secure
the victory.
The win is crucial as Serra tries to capture
its first West Catholic Athletic League title
since 1990. The Padres finished second in the
WCAL last year.
The win also keeps Serra unbeaten for the
season.
The Bells had not lost a WCAL team match
in at least the last four seasons and finished
second in the Central Coast Section and
Northern California tournaments last year.
On another Serra quick hit, it was a record
breaking Mt. Pleasant Relay for shotputter
Jonathan Beering. With only one week of
track practice under his belt, Beering broke
Tom Banducci’s 41-year school record of 57-
10 with his put of 58-6.5 on a second round
throw.
The toss was not a complete surprise after
Beering’s junior year campaign that saw him
finish second in the Central Coast Section and
14th at the CIF state meet. Beering’s previous
best of 56-9.5 was set at CCS finals last year.
His throw on Saturday was the farthest by a
CCS shotputter since 2008.
In other early week news, the Sacred Heart
Prep girls’ lacrosse team moves to 2-0 after a
13-0 win against Notre Dame-San Jose. ...
Goals for the Gators went to Liz Eder (2),
Emma Johnson, Libby Muir (2), Kiana
Cacchione, Allison Harman, Brigid White (3)
and Megan lamb (2). ... In a four-set loss to
Sobrato, the SHP boys’ volleyball team got 15
kills, 10 digs and five blocks from Ian
Bennett. ... The Gators’ Matt Hao tallied 20
assists and three aces. ... In a 4-3 battle
between Menlo-Atherton and Carlmont boys’
tennis, Reed Fratt and Richie Sarwal picked
up dominant wins. ... The Menlo tennis team
is up to its winning ways. ... The Knights are
5-0 after defeating SHP 7-0. ... Their four sin-
gles dropped a total of seven points overall in
that win. ... SHP did bounce back nicely
though. ... The Gators beat The King’s
Academy 6-1 a day later. ... Carter Kremer
and Scott Magsuson were silky smooth in 6-0,
6-1 two-set wins.
Huge win for Serra tennis
Big days for Beering, Sarwal,White and Menlo
Calgary Flames burn
past San Jose Sharks
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Klay Thompson made the
go-ahead 3-pointer with 7.5 seconds remain-
ing and finished with 20 points to lead the
Golden State Warriors
past the Sacramento
Kings, 87-83 on
Wednesday night.
Thompson then forced
Tyreke Evans into an
errant layup on the final
possession to seal a slop-
py win for the Warriors
over the Western
Conference’s worst team.
After dropping the first
two in Sacramento this season, Golden State
overcame 18 turnovers and 36 percent shoot-
ing against its Northern California rival.
David Lee had 17 points and 10 rebounds,
and rookie Harrison Barnes added 14 points
for the Warriors, who are 2-0 since a four-
game losing streak. They held the Kings to 40
percent shooting and forced 15 turnovers.
Jason Thompson had 17 points and eight
rebounds, and Patrick Patterson added 15
points for Sacramento, which has lost 11 of its
last 13 games. DeMarcus Cousins had five
points and four rebounds and sat out the entire
fourth quarter.
The long-range shot bailed out the Warriors
again.
Stephen Curry came off a pick-and-roll and
made a 3-pointer to give Golden State an 82-
78 lead with a little more than 2 minutes
remaining. The Warriors stopped Sacramento,
but then had a shot-clock violation just before
Jarrett Jack’s layup.
Jason Thompson hit a jumper and Patterson
followed with a 3-pointer in front of the
Warriors bench to put the Kings ahead 83-82.
Patterson mouthed a few words and flicked
three fingers back at Golden State’s bench as
he skipped down court.
The Warriors then blew two chances to tie
or take the lead. Jack missed a 3-pointer on the
first one, and Klay Thompson missed an open
jumper after another stop and timeout.
The third time proved to be the charm.
Toney Douglas missed a difficult shot in the
face of a defender, Andrew Bogut corralled
the rebound and the Warriors called timeout.
Lee found Thompson standing in the corner,
and the second-year guard’s swish gave
Golden State an 85-83 lead, holding his hand
in the air as the sold-out crowd announced at
19,956 roared to its feet.
Evans missed a difficult layup in
Thompson’s face, Draymond Green grabbed
the rebound and made both free throws to seal
the victory. While it was sloppy at best, the
Warriors will take every win they can get as
they look to remain a playoff contender.
The matchup of bruising big men turned
into an afterthought.
Bogut, starting for the second straight game
after sitting out the previous six with back
spasms, only played in spurts and deferred to
his teammates on offense. He finished with
two points and eight rebounds in 28 minutes.
Cousins picked up two fouls in the first 10
minutes, sat the rest of the half and often
looked disinterested. During one timeout in
the second quarter, he watched the in-house
band instead of joining the Kings huddle.
Cousins, who had eight points on 1-for-12
shooting in a home loss against Denver a night
earlier, finished 2 for 10 from the floor.
With more room to move on the floor, Jack
and Klay Thompson each made two 3-point-
ers and Curry added another to highlight a 20-
6 run in the first quarter that gave Golden State
a 26-16 lead. The Warriors started 5 of 9 from
beyond the arc.
Sacramento answered with a 15-5 spurt
capped by Douglas’ layup and 3-pointer mid-
way through the second quarter. The Kings led
44-41 at the break.
Home stretch starts
with a Warriors win
THE ASSOCIATE DPRESS
CALGARY, Alberta — Miikka Kiprusoff
made 32 saves in his return from a knee injury
to lead the Calgary Flames to a 4-1 victory
over the San Jose Sharks on Wednesday night.
Blake Comeau scored the tiebreaking goal
early in the third period. Jarome Iginla,
Roman Cervenka and Curtis Glencross (into
an empty net) also scored for Calgary, which
improved to 4-1-1 in its last six games.
Joe Thornton had the only goal for the
Sharks, who are 2-6-1 in their last nine.
Kiprusoff returned to the lineup after miss-
ing 13 games with a sprained knee. The 36-
year-old goalie was injured in the second peri-
od of Calgary’s 4-1 win over the Red Wings
on Feb. 5. Calgary went 6-5-2 during his
absence.
Kiprusoff was busiest in the third as the
Sharks had the period’s only two power plays
and outshot Calgary 17-6. But they couldn’t
beat Kiprusoff, who began his NHL career
with the Sharks 12 years ago.
Calgary took a 2-1 lead at 2:57 of the third
when Comeau burst down the right wing and
snapped a shot inside the far post, past San
Jose goalie Thomas Greiss.
It was Comeau’s first goal this season and
just his second in the last 41 games, dating to
last season.
Less than 2 minutes later, Iginla scored his
sixth goal in the last five games by ripping a
shot past Greiss from the slot after being set
up by Jiri Hudler.
The Flames took a 1-0 lead at 4:27 of the
first period, before the Sharks had put their
first shot on Kiprusoff. A shot by defenseman
Jay Bouwmeester was stopped by Greiss, but
the rebound kicked out to Cervenka, who
scored his first goal in nine games.
Greiss was making his first start for the
Sharks in 10 games. Anntti Niemi was given
the night off after beating the Vancouver
Canucks on Tuesday night.
Klay Thompson
SPORTS 13
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By Tim Booth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE — For a change, talk-
ing about Pac-12 women’s basket-
ball from a national perspective
doesn’t stop after mentioning No. 4
Stanford.
R i g h t
behind the
Cardinal, and
sharing the
c onf e r e nc e
title this year,
is rapidly
i mp r o v i n g
and fifth-
r a n k e d
Ca l i f or ni a .
Not too far
back are No.
14 UCLA and the surprise of the
season, No. 18 Colorado. Even
recently downtrodden Washington
is showing signs of resurgence and
is on the verge of a 20-win season.
While the top to bottom depth of
the Pac-12 could still use improve-
ment, the coaches see the league
becoming stronger and receiving
more worthy recognition.
The depth of the conference will
get a chance to showcase itself this
week when the Pac-12 tournament
moves out of Los Angeles and gets a
four-day billing at KeyArena in
Seattle.
Stanford, California, UCLA and
Colorado all received first-round
byes. The tournament begins on
Thursday with fifth-seeded
Washington facing No. 12 Oregon;
No. 6 Utah vs. No. 11 Arizona; No.
7 USC vs. No. 10 Oregon State and
No. 8 Washington State vs. No. 9
Arizona State.
“My hope this weekend and mov-
ing forward is because of the televi-
sion coverage and the timing of it,
it’s going to help the NCAA selec-
tion committee. It will give us a
good look,” Arizona State coach
Charli Turner Thorne said. “A few
years ago when we talked endlessly
to have it or not, the biggest reason
was to allow teams to get a few
more wins that were on the bubble
and showcase ourselves for seed in
the NCAA tournament. We’re really
positioned well for that now with
how things are structured.”
As conference tournaments begin
around the country, the Pac-12 is
one of two — along with the SEC
— with four teams ranked in the top
18 nationally. The last time the con-
ference ended the season with four
teams ranked in the final AP poll:
1981. Five times since 2001, the
conference ended the season with
just one ranked team, including
Stanford last season.
Colorado is clearly the surprise of
the four ranked teams. Colorado
was picked to finished ninth in the
preseason conference poll.
“It’s always our goal to be better
than anyone thinks we would be. I
knew at the beginning of the season
there was no way we would finish
ninth,” Colorado coach Linda Lappe
said. “But I knew we had to stay
healthy and get our young players
better and acclimated to the college
game and that’s a huge reason we
were able to finished fourth.
Increasing exposure and recogni-
tion nationally for Pac-12 women’s
hoops was one of Larry Scott’s ini-
tiatives when he took over as con-
ference commissioner. A big help in
increasing that exposure was the
development and launch this year of
the Pac-12 Network, which regular-
ly made games available on a
national platform. Combining that
bump in how many games are being
seen with the teams doing their part,
and the end result is more national
attention on the Pac-12 than has
been seen for quite some time.
“We certainly had a view and a
belief that Pac-12 women’s basket-
ball was under leveraged and was
not getting the respect nationally
that it deserved,” Scott said.
Along with separating itself from
the men’s tournament and getting
out of Los Angeles where there was
minimal interest, the tournament
was bumped up by a week, giving it
premier billing on the West Coast
and more time for the NCAA selec-
tion committee to look over team
resumes.
There won’t be any debate about
NCAA bids coming to Stanford,
California, UCLA or Colorado. A
Stanford-California matchup in the
conference title game could deter-
mine a No. 1 seed in the NCAA
tournament and which team gets to
stay on the West Coast with the
regional in Spokane, Wash.
“We know we put ourselves in a
pretty good position to get a really
good seed in the NCAA tourna-
ment,” California coach Lindsay
Gottlieb said. “We’re focused on
winning the Pac-12 tournament,
that’s important to us, and if that
leads to a No. 1 seed it’s pretty
incredible that we’re in that spot.
But that only comes if we play pret-
ty good basketball this weekend.”
Washington could put itself back
in the NCAA bubble discussion
with a deep run, but a four-game
losing streak to end the regular sea-
son likely ended the Huskies hopes
of an at-large bid.
Then there is the rest of the field,
none of which enter the tournament
with more than eight conference
victories and only Utah has a win-
ning record.
“It’s not like you have a No. 1
team and a No. 12 and there is a lot
of space in between,” Stanford
coach Tara VanDerveer said. “It’s
compressed. There are a lot of good
teams in there.”
Moving to Seattle puts the tourna-
ment in a women’s basketball
hotbed, although just how strong the
public response will be remains to
be seen. The conference has part-
nered with Force 10 Hoops, the
owners of the Seattle Storm, to
operate the event. Coaches are
thrilled to be playing where the
games will be appreciated and not
just an afterthought as they seemed
to be in Los Angeles.
“I’m confident that it’s going to
be a lot better than it was in Los
Angeles,” Scott said. “How big and
how strong remains to be seen.”
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — On top of
the NFL one season, out the door
the next.
The San Francisco 49ers released
six-time Pro Bowl kicker David
Akers on Wednesday, ending a two-
year run of record-breaking highs
and frustrating lows. General
Manager Trent Baalke thanked
Akers in a statement, calling the
kicker a “true professional who rep-
resented himself and this organiza-
tion with class.”
“We wish him, and his family, all
the best,” Baalke said.
Akers appeared in all 32 regular-
season games and five playoff con-
tests the past two seasons, including
San Francisco’s 34-31 loss to the
Baltimore Ravens in the Super
Bowl on Feb. 3. He connected on 73
of 94 field goal attempts and all 78
extra points.
In 2011, Akers set NFL records
with 44 field goals made and 52
attempted. He also tied the league
mark for the longest made when he
kicked from 63 yards in the season-
opening win at Green Bay last year,
bouncing the ball off the crossbar
and through the upright.
But Akers made just 29 of 44
attempts last season, his lowest per-
centage since 1999. That included
two potential game-winning kicks
in separate overtime games against
the St. Louis Rams, leading to a tie
and a 49ers loss.
Akers, now 38 years old, particu-
larly struggled from long range. He
finished the season 9 of 19 on
attempts from 40 yards or more.
The 49ers even brought in Billy
Cundiff to compete against Akers
before the divisional-round playoff
and NFC championship game.
Niners coach Jim Harbaugh
decided to stick with Akers anyway.
Akers hit the left upright on his only
attempt in the NFC title game and
made three field goals in the Super
Bowl. However, he missed a 39-
yard try that was called back
because the Ravens were flagged for
running into the kicker.
The left-footed Akers later
revealed he underwent double her-
nia surgery in February 2012 then
re-aggravated the area during the
season when he slipped on the field
during practice. After a Nov. 25
game at New Orleans, Akers
returned to the doctor in
Philadelphia who performed the
surgery to receive an injection.
Deep Pac-12 set for conference tourney in Seattle
49ers release struggling kicker David Akers
ASSOCIATED PRESS
David Akers, right, was a six-time Pro Bowl kicker who struggled in 2012.
“I knew we always had one last burst in us,”
Loew said. “It doesn’t matter what the deficit
was. We could have been down 20, we can
still come back with this team. I was really
happy with the effort out there.”
“We had a few good buckets there, but
they’re a good team and they battled right
back,” Haupt said. “They battled for every 50-
50 ball and they got every one. That makes a
big difference.”
A winning difference actually. The Cougars
turned up the intensity from there, outscoring
the Panthers 10-3 and more importantly, out-
hustling and out-working Burlingame to key
rebounds and loose balls. And during the
game, Campolindo did an exceptional job of
slowing Haupt down. He finished with only
11 points.
“The closed out very well on shooters,
especially Connor, and that really bothered
us,” Floro-Cruz said. “They’re a great team.”
“They switched very well and they pushed
me out of my range,” Haupt said. “I was two
to three feet behind the 3-point line on most of
my shots. It’s a lower percentage shot when
you’re that far out. They played great
defense.”
Campolindo held a 23-18 lead at the half
and 39-38 advantage after three quarters.
The Panthers finish the season 21-10.
“I loved being a Panther,” Haupt said in this
final game in the red and white. “I couldn’t be
happier with the way my senior season went.
We have a lot to be happy about.”
On the girls’ side, the Modesto defense was
as good as advertised.
The Crusaders got the Lady Panthers com-
pletely out of their groove, holding them to 13
of 59 shooting from the field (22 percent)
including 1 of 14 from beyond the arc.
“We shot the ball terrible,” said Burlingame
girls’ head coach Bill Lepaltak. “They outre-
bounded us. We didn’t play very well. We
were down five in the third quarter and they
hit a couple of 3’s. We didn’t shoot the ball
good enough tonight. Defensively ... we did-
n’t rebound well and our guards broke down.
We talked about the way we wanted to play
defense and our guards went up too high.”
The first quarter was a preview of things to
come with the teams combining for just 12
points (Modesto 7, Burlingame 5).
But the Crusaders found a little rhythm in
the second and the Panthers simply did not.
Burlingame shot 5 of 28 from the floor and
trailed 22-13 at the half.
The nine-point deficit was cut to four
behind Lauren Rally, Nora Gustafson and
Nina Newman in the third quarter, 26-22, but
the Crusaders put together an 18-5 stretch that
put the game away.
“We’re 28-3,” Lepaltak said. “One loss
doesn’t take away from all that. The kids hurt
because they wanted to go out playing their
best game and they didn’t. And the coach
wanted to do out coaching his best game and
he didn’t either.”
In other CIF Northern California action, El
Camino got 25 points from Elijah White and
19 from Michael Smith to defeat No. 9
Rocklin 72-60. ... The Menlo boys defended
home court against St. Mary’s and won 60-54.
... The Menlo girls once again jumped out to
big lead in the first half and then coasted to a
55 -40 victory against Moreau Catholic. ...
Menlo was led by Drew Edelman and Lauren
Lete who scored 28 and 15 points respective-
ly. ... Edelman also chipped in 13 rebounds. ...
Half Moon Bay boys saw their season come to
a 55-52 end against Liberty Ranch. ... Sacred
Heart Prep girls made easy work of Anderson.
crushed a deep drive to left. The ball cleared
the wall for an apparent home run. However, it
bounced off a metal shack beyond the fence
and back into the field of play, and was ruled a
live ball as if it had not left the yard. The Dons
ultimately left the bases loaded, scoring no
runs in the inning.
In the third, Aragon once again seemed to tie
it up. However, this time it was El Camino’s
defense — not the umpire — that intervened.
The Dons got on the board when cleanup
hitter Chris Davis doubled home Severson,
with Davis advancing to third on a throw to the
plate. Hughes followed with a towering fly ball
down the line in medium-deep left field, but
the left fielder Rios fired a cannon-shot home
to cut down Davis at the dish, denying Aragon
the would-be tying run on what appeared to be
a gimme sacrifice fly.
“Any time I’m in that in situation, I’m not
looking to [throw to the cutoff man], I’m look-
ing to throw the guy out,” Rios said. “Me and
[catcher Evan Giacomino] usually have a good
connection going. He made a great catch and I
just tried to get the ball there as soon as I could
and let him do everything else.”
El Camino had several early chances to
extend its lead. But the Colts stranded eight
runners over the first four innings, including
leaving the bases loaded in the first and the
second. In the second, the Colts loaded the
bases with no outs and the heart of their order
due up, but failed to get the ball out of the
infield through the rest of the inning.
In the fifth, Eclevea seemed to be cruising
on the mound for the Colts. The right-hander
got two quick outs. After Severson blooped a
single to right, Davis hit a chopper down the
third-base line that turned into a tricky hop
over the bag for Colts third sacker Nick
Moisant.
The senior picked the ball cleanly and had
the third out of the inning in his sights, but an
errant throw to first allowed Davis to reach,
setting the table for Hughes.
With Hughes coming to the plate and the go-
ahead run on base, El Camino manager Victor
Messer opted to stick with Eclavea on the
mound. Eclavea has been the Colts’ workhorse
this season, pacing the staff in innings
pitchedthus far.
“Eclavea is our workhorse,” Messer said.
“He’s our guy. So we’re going to stick with
him, and win or lose, we’re going to ride him.”
But on his 79th pitch of the afternoon,
Eclavea grooved a fastball across the letters in
a fastball count that Hughes launched over the
wall in right-center for what proved to be the
game-winner.
“(It was a) 2-0 count, and I was looking for
a fastball the entire way,” Hughes said. “I saw
my pitch right there, a nice inside (fastball)
right at the chest. That’s my pitch right there.”
Aragon’s bullpen did the rest, facing just one
over the minimum through the final three
innings, including a six-up and six-down per-
formance by the big southpaw Carey, before
Severson closed it out in the seventh.
“[Carey] shut the door,” Souza said. “He did
a great job. We really needed that. We jumped
on the lead, and you need someone to go out
there and take care of it like that.”
Next up for both squads — El Camino trav-
els to Archbishop Riordan, Friday at 3:15 p.m.
while Aragon travels to Fremont to take on
Washington, Saturday at 1 p.m.
SPORTS 14
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Continued from page 11
DONS
Continued from page 11
CIF
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FARO, Portugal — When the U.S. women
get rolling, watch out.
Abby Wambach got her 154th goal, leaving
her four shy of Mia Hamm’s all-time record,
and Rachel Buehler scored in her 100th
appearance as the Americans rebounded from
a sluggish first half to beat Iceland 3-0
Wednesday in the opener of the Algarve Cup.
Shannon Boxx also scored for the Olympic
champions, who got all three goals and 12 of
their 18 shots in the second half.
The U.S. will play Friday against China,
which drew 1-1 with Sweden on Wednesday in
the other Group B game. In Group A, Norway
beat Japan 2-0 and Denmark and Germany
tied 0-0. In Group C, host Portugal beat Wales
2-0 and Mexico beat Hungary 1-0.
The Americans struggled to find their
rhythm in the first half, and needed a diving
save by Jill Loyden on a header inside the
penalty area to avoid falling behind in the 19th
minute.
USWNT beats Iceland
3-0 in the Algarve Cup
Goodell: NFL ’can and
must’ make football safer
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — NFL
Commissioner Roger Goodell says the league
will continue to do “everything we can” to
make football safer.
Player safety in the NFL has been a fre-
quent topic of conversation recently and
Goodell discussed it again Wednesday during
a lecture and question-and-answer session at
the department of exercise and sport science
at the University of North Carolina.
“We know that in order to secure the future,
we can and must do more to make the game
safer, and in the process, we will make other
sports safer as well,” Goodell said.
Goodell called for “a culture of safety for
every sport” and welcomes the national con-
versation about player safety and the growing
issue of concussions.
The NFL is facing concussion-related law-
suits from thousands of former players. In a
series of interviews about head injuries with
The Associated Press in December 2011, 31
of 44 players said they wanted the league to
have independent neurologists at games.
SPORTS 15
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
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Sports brief
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 36 21 .632 —
Brooklyn 34 26 .567 3 1/2
Boston 32 27 .542 5
Philadelphia 23 36 .390 14
Toronto 23 38 .377 15
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 44 14 .759 —
Atlanta 33 26 .559 11 1/2
Washington 19 39 .328 25
Orlando 17 44 .279 28 1/2
Charlotte 13 47 .217 32
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 38 22 .633 —
Chicago 34 26 .567 4
Milwaukee 30 28 .517 7
Detroit 23 39 .371 16
Cleveland 20 40 .333 18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 47 14 .770 —
Memphis 39 19 .672 6 1/2
Houston 33 28 .541 14
Dallas 26 33 .441 20
New Orleans 21 40 .344 26
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 44 16 .733 —
Denver 40 22 .645 5
Utah 32 28 .533 12
Portland 28 31 .475 15 1/2
Minnesota 20 37 .351 22 1/2
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 43 19 .694 —
Golden State 34 27 .557 8 1/2
L.A. Lakers 30 31 .492 12 1/2
Phoenix 21 39 .350 21
Sacramento 21 41 .339 22
Wednesday’sGames
Cleveland 104, Utah 101
Brooklyn 99, Charlotte 78
Boston 83, Indiana 81
Atlanta 107, Philadelphia 96
New York 87, Detroit 77
Miami 97, Orlando 96
Memphis 91, Portland 85
Minnesota 87,Washington 82
L.A. Lakers 108, New Orleans 102
Dallas 112, Houston 108
Toronto 98, Phoenix 71
San Antonio 101, Chicago 83
Golden State 87, Sacramento 83
L.A. Clippers 117, Milwaukee 10
Thursday’sGames
Oklahoma City at New York, 5 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Denver, 7:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 23 15 8 0 30 81 67
New Jersey 23 10 8 5 25 56 65
N.Y. Rangers 21 11 8 2 24 55 53
Philadelphia 24 11 12 1 23 68 72
N.Y. Islanders 23 10 11 2 22 70 78
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 23 14 5 4 32 71 59
Boston 20 14 3 3 31 60 46
Toronto 24 15 9 0 30 73 61
Ottawa 24 12 8 4 28 56 49
Buffalo 24 9 13 2 20 63 77
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 22 13 8 1 27 67 62
Tampa Bay 23 10 12 1 21 81 73
Winnipeg 22 10 11 1 21 56 68
Florida 23 7 11 5 19 59 83
Washington 21 9 11 1 19 59 62
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 24 21 0 3 45 78 46
Detroit 23 11 8 4 26 63 60
St. Louis 22 11 9 2 24 64 67
Nashville 23 9 9 5 23 47 59
Columbus 23 7 12 4 18 53 69
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 22 11 6 5 27 63 61
Minnesota 22 11 9 2 24 52 56
Calgary 21 9 8 4 22 61 69
Edmonton 22 8 9 5 21 54 62
Colorado 22 8 10 4 20 53 65
PacificDivision
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 22 16 3 3 35 77 60
Los Angeles 21 12 7 2 26 60 52
San Jose 22 11 7 4 26 51 50
Phoenix 23 11 9 3 25 67 65
Dallas 22 11 9 2 24 61 63
NOTE:Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Wednesday’sGames
Toronto 5, Ottawa 4
Chicago 3, Colorado 2
Calgary 4, San Jose 1
Anaheim 2, Phoenix 0
Thursday’sGames
Toronto at Boston, 4 p.m.
Buffalo at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 4 p.m.
Montreal at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Columbus 1 0 0 3 3 0
Sporting KC 1 0 0 3 3 1
Houston 1 0 0 3 2 0
Montreal 1 0 0 3 1 0
New York 0 0 1 1 3 3
New England 0 0 0 0 0 0
Toronto FC 0 1 0 0 0 1
Philadelphia 0 1 0 0 1 3
D.C. 0 1 0 0 0 2
Chicago 0 1 0 0 0 4
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Los Angeles 1 0 0 3 4 0
Real Salt Lake 1 0 0 3 2 0
Vancouver 1 0 0 3 1 0
FC Dallas 1 0 0 3 1 0
Portland 0 0 1 1 3 3
Colorado 0 1 0 0 0 1
Seattle 0 1 0 0 0 1
San Jose 0 1 0 0 0 2
Chivas USA 0 1 0 0 0 3
NOTE:Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturday’sGames
Sporting Kansas City 3, Philadelphia 1
Vancouver 1,Toronto FC 0
Houston 2, D.C. United 0
FC Dallas 1, Colorado 0
Columbus 3, Chivas USA 0
Montreal 1, Seattle FC 0
Sunday’sGames
Los Angeles 4, Chicago 0
Portland 3, New York 3, tie
Real Salt Lake 2, San Jose 0
Saturday, March9
Sporting Kansas City at Toronto FC, 10:30 a.m.
Philadelphia at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at D.C. United, 4 p.m.
New England at Chicago, 4:30 p.m.
Columbus at Vancouver, 4:30 p.m.
Montreal at Portland, 7 p.m.
Sunday, March10
FC Dallas at Chivas USA, 2 p.m.
New York at San Jose, 7 p.m.
GROUP A
W L Pct GB
x-Cuba 3 0 1.000 —
x-Japan 2 1 .667 1
China 1 2 .333 2
Brazil 0 3 .000 3
x-advanced to second round
At Fukuoka, Japan
Tuesday, March 5
China 5, Brazil 2
Wednesday, March 6
Cuba 6, Japan 3
GROUP B
W L Pct GB
x-Taiwan 2 1 .667 —
x-Netherlands 2 1 .667 —
South Korea 2 1 .667 —
Australia 0 3 .000 2 1/2
x-advanced to second round
Monday, March 4
South Korea 6, Australia 0
Netherlands 4, Australia 1
Tuesday, March 5
South Korea 3,Taiwan 2
GROUP C
W L Pct GB
Dominican Republic 0 0 .000 —
Puerto Rico 0 0 .000 —
Spain 0 0 .000 —
Venezuela 0 0 .000 —
At San Juan, Puerto Rico
Thursday, March 7
Venezuela vs. Dominican Republic, 6:30 p.m.
Friday, March 8
Spain vs. Puerto Rico, 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 9
Dominican Republic vs. Spain, 11 a.m.
Puerto Rico vs.Venezuela, 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 10
Spain vs.Venezuela, 12:30 p.m.
Dominican Republic vs. Puerto Rico, 7:30 p.m.
GROUP D
W L Pct GB
Canada 0 0 .000 —
Italy 0 0 .000 —
Mexico 0 0 .000 —
United States 0 0 .000 —
Thursday, March 7
At Scottsdale, Ariz.
Italy vs. Mexico, 3 p.m.
Friday, March 8
At Scottsdale, Ariz.
Canada vs. Italy, 2:30 p.m.
At Phoenix
Mexico vs. United States, 9 p.m.
Saturday, March 9
At Phoenix
Canada vs. Mexico, 2:30 p.m.
United States vs. Italy, 9 p.m.
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
TEXAS RANGERS—Agreed to terms with RHP
Derek Lowe on a minor league contract.
National League
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Named Willie McGee
special assistant to the general manager.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Agreed to terms
with OF Corey Brown, RHP Erik Davis, INF Danny
Espinosa, RHP Christian Garcia, RHP Nathan Karns,
RHP Cole Kimball, C Sandy Leon, INF Steve Lom-
bardozzi, 1B Chris Marrero, RHP Ryan Mattheus,
1B/OF Tyler Moore, OF Eury Perez, RHP Ryan Perry,
C Wilson Ramos, INF Carlos Rivero, RHP Henry Ro-
driguez, C Jhonatan Solano and RHP Stephen
Strasburg on one-year contracts.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALOBILLS—Tendered an offer to TE Dorin
Dickerson.
GREEN BAYPACKERS—Named Alonzo Dotson
college scout.
SANFRANCISCO49ERS—ReleasedKDavidAkers.
SEATTLESEAHAWKS—Signed TE Darren Fells.
WASHINGTONREDSKINS—Hired A.J. Smith as a
senior executive.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
CHICAGOBLACKHAWKS—Assigned F Brandon
Bollig to Rockford (AHL).
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Assigned C Nick
Drazenovic to Springfield (AHL).
DALLASSTARS—Recalled F Francis Wathier from
Texas (AHL).
NASHVILLEPREDATORS—RecalledDVictor Bart-
ley from Milwaukee (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Claimed RW Tom
Kostopoulos off waivers from Pittsburgh.Assigned
RW Cam Janssen and G Keith Kinkaid to Albany
(AHL). Recalled G Jeff Frazee from Albany (AHL).
NEWYORKRANGERS—Claimed D Roman Ham-
rlik off waivers from Washington.
PHOENIXCOYOTES—SignedDMathieuBrisebois
to a three-year entry-level contract.
ST.LOUISBLUES—RecalledGJakeAllenfromPeo-
ria (AHL).Signed D Joel Edmundson and F Yannick
Veilleux to three-year entry level contracts.
SOCCER
National Women’sSoccer League
SKYBLUEFC—Signed D Caitlin Foord.
CanadianFootball League
CFL—Fined the Edmonton Eskimos $10,000 for
violating its tampering rules when signing free
agent DL Odell Willis.
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS—Signed P Brett
Cameron.
MLS GLANCE WORLD BASEBALL
CLASSIC
TRANSACTIONS
16
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Melissa Rayworth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Many Americans have embraced outdoor
decorating, filling their yards with fluffy
sofas, gleaming end tables and even outdoor
rugs.
But what happens when the sun goes down?
Chris Lambton, landscape designer and
host of HGTV’s “Going Yard,” advises his
clients to give as much thought to the lighting
of their outdoor space as they do to the fur-
nishings.
Forget yesterday’s glaring porch light, he
says. You can now choose from a wide range
of much subtler lighting options. Many are
inexpensive and stylish enough to quickly
turn a basic patio into a chic entertaining
space.
Here Lambton and two other outdoor deco-
rating experts — Los Angeles-based design-
ers Jeff Andrews and Brian Patrick Flynn —
offer advice on the newest, most attractive and
safest options for outdoor lighting.
INDULGE YOUR INDOOR STYLE
Many indoor furniture designs and fabrics
are now available as outdoor items, Lambton
says, and the same goes for lighting.
Companies are creating outdoor versions of
their most popular indoor lamps and fixtures.
Flynn is a fan of outdoor chandeliers on
patios or decks that are covered: “They’re an
excellent way to make any humdrum outdoor
space feel like an actual room.”
But, he says, choose wisely: “To get them
right, you’ve got to take scale and proportion
into consideration. Install one that’s too small,
and it will look like an afterthought. Install
one that’s too big or hangs too low, and it will
completely overwhelm the space.”
Flynn also recommends using floor lamps
and table lamps designed for outdoor use.
Prices vary widely (from more than $1,000 to
less than $100), so he suggests hunting online
for deals and the perfect style.
Another option: Create your own outdoor
fixture. Many electricians can rewire your
favorite indoor lighting to be safely used out-
side, Lambton says. “Search for whatever fix-
ture you like,” he says, “then put an outdoor
conduit in and attach it to a switch.”
GO VINTAGE
“Vintage is always a key to good lighting,”
Andrews says, “indoors and outdoors.”
“Recently I got these really cool, inexpen-
sive Moroccan lanterns” with a vintage look.
Rather than simply displaying them on a
table, he hung them from outdoor branches. “I
had them wired for outside and hid the wires
in the trees,” he explains.
When the vintage lanterns glow from the
tree branches at night, it gives the yard a
“romantic and kind of European feel.”
FORGET THE FLOOD LIGHT
Rather than one or two bright porch lights,
all three designers suggest using a variety of
softer lights.
Lambton has used faux stone blocks with
LED lights hidden inside, alongside tradition-
al lighting. Flynn has done the same with illu-
minated planters.
“Sneaking in ambient light in unexpected
ways is something I love to do,” Flynn says.
“In Los Angeles, I turned the middle of a fam-
ily’s Los Feliz backyard into a full-fledged
family room, comfy sectional sofa and all. To
bring light to the space, I used modern, plas-
tic planters that light up. They have cords on
the back of them, and connect to exterior out-
lets. Once turned on, a light bulb inside the
transparent plastic illuminates and the entire
area glows softly. This is so genius because it
requires no electrician whatsoever.”
Even simpler options: thin strips of lights
that can be attached along the underside of
deck railings, or strands of lights in the shape
of everything from simple bulbs to stars,
hearts or jalapeno peppers strung overhead.
No matter which style of light you choose,
Andrews says, add dimmers to your outdoor
light switches. “Everything in the world,” he
says, “needs to be on a dimmer.”
GO BEYOND
YOUR DECK OR PATIO
Don’t forget to light the far reaches of your
Outdoor lighting options abound
Forget yesterday’s glaring porch light for your yard.You can now choose from a wide range
of much subtler options.
See LIGHTING, Page 18
18
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
yard, Lambton says. It will make your property feel bigger and
banish the feeling of being enveloped by darkness when you
entertain outside.
It costs little to place a few small, solar-powered lights at the
bases of trees and shrubs. He also suggests attaching a few to
tree branches. “And I love to uplight ornamental grasses,”
Lambton says. “It adds nice depth to the yard.”
DON’T FORGET THE FIRE
Fire pits of all sizes — from huge outdoor fireplaces to small
tabletop containers — provide golden, flickering light for your
outdoor space.
Display a collection of pillar candles in varying sizes (bat-
tery-powered or real), either clustered on their own or tucked
inside large, glass lanterns to “add a bit of sparkle” to your
yard, Andrews says.
Or create an outdoor chandelier with candles: “I tend to try
my hand at rustic do-it-yourself ideas,” Flynn says. “In my
own outdoor dining room, I suspended a candelabra made
from reclaimed pine planks, rope, mason jars and tea lights
above the dining table. When my family comes over for pizza
night, it creates the perfect ambience.”
COMBINE
SAFETY AND BEAUTY
Home improvement stores and websites offer a huge array
of options for lighting outdoor pathways and deck stairs,
adding beauty while making your space safer.
And what about the safety of leaving lighting out in all
weather? If it’s outdoor-rated, Andrews says, it should be fine.
But keep your climate in mind.
Continued from page 17
LIGHTING
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Draperies
Blinds & Shades
Upholstery & Re-upholstery
Home Textiles
Accessories
Call today for your
in-home appointment.
lessons traditionally taught by seventh grade
science teachers, according to the letter.
“Education code requirements for compre-
hensive sexual health and HIV/AIDS preven-
tion education that are not met this year will
be addressed in eighth grade,” Hungerford
and fellow co-Superintendent Suzanne Roy
wrote.
This year was supposed to be the second
year that the Belmont school was to use
Teen Talk’s curriculum. Last year, the pro-
gram caused a stir with many of the par-
ents. Parents of current seventh graders are
also concerned by the lack of communica-
tion and about the possible graphic nature
of how the topics are presented. School
administrators sent out additional informa-
tion via email earlier this week but parents
have some unanswered questions.
Communication was the main issue for par-
ents. Originally, a permission slip that was
sent out had little information about what
would actually be covered in the sexual edu-
cation program. A second permission slip has
since been sent out along with answers to
questions and concerns being posed by par-
ents such as: being uncomfortable with stu-
dents asking parents about the topics dis-
cussed, whether or not students will individu-
ally take part in a demonstration of how to use
a condom and the inappropriate questions
which can be submitted in the anonymous
question box.
By pulling the curriculum, the district is
hoping for a community conversation about
how to approach sexual health education,
according to the letter.
The board meets 7 p.m. Thursday, March 7
at Fox School, 3100 St. James Road, Belmont.
Continued from page 1
SEX ED
on the first floor that prompted hospital
staff to evacuate 29 rooms Tuesday
night before 11 p.m., according to
police.
After hospital staff extinguished the
small fire, Stoyanov isolated himself in a
hospital room and was reported to be in
possession of a knife, according to
police.
Police attempted to negotiate with
Stoyanov and set up a tactical team
around the room. It took nearly two
hours, however, before he gave himself
up to police.
Stoyanov was arrested at about 1 a.m.
and no injuries were reported from the
incident.
The investigation revealed that in
addition to setting the small fire,
Stoyanov had also attempted to stab a
hospital employee during the incident,
according to police.
Stoyanov was evaluated and cleared
by the hospital staff and subsequently
booked into San Mateo County Jail for
assault with a deadly weapon and arson.
The arson investigation will be jointly
pursued by the San Mateo police and fire
departments.
“Due to the quick action of those
responding, this incident was resolved
without serious injury to patients, hospi-
tal staff or the suspect,” Dr. Susan
Ehrlich, the medical center’s chief exec-
utive officer, said in a prepared state-
ment. The hospital is a county-run facil-
ity.
Hospital staff could not indicate why
Stoyanov was in the hospital and police
could not indicate why the man was so
agitated as to start the fire to protect
Stoyanov’s medical privacy.
Continued from page 1
FIRE
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In many parts of the country, you don’t
have to look far to see cherry trees in bloom
in coming weeks. Still, more than half a mil-
lion visitors annually embark on a spring
pilgrimage to Washington, D.C., to see the
ones there.
Besides sheer profusion, those cherries
have history. They were a gift from Japan as
thanks for our help during the Russo-
Japanese War of 1905. Howard Taft was sec-
retary of war then; he was president when
the first cherry tree was lowered into the
ground in 1912 by his wife, Helen.
AGING TREES
Alas, no tree lives forever, and those orig-
inal cherries have been succumbing to age
despite efforts to coddle them along. It
wouldn’t seem right to stick just any old
cherry trees into the ground to replace those
that fail. After all, these particular trees
symbolize a bond with Japan and have stood
witness to history. Besides, there are a num-
ber of different cherry species and varieties
— not even all pink-flowered, or double-
flowered or weeping cherries are the same.
The 3,000 or so trees sent as a gift in 1912
were mostly Yoshino cherry trees. Yoshinos
are hybrids of unknown parentage, and
come in a number of varieties, among them
those with pink flowers and upright habit
(Afterglow), white flowers and weeping
habit (Pendula) and diminutive size and
weeping habit (Shidare Yoshino).
The earliest replacements for ailing trees
around the Tidal Basin were made in the
1930s and were of a Yoshino variety called
Akebono (“Daybreak”), which has double,
pink flowers.
THE CLONING SOLUTION
In recent years, efforts were made to
replace ailing trees with genetic replicas
of the originals. Such trees would be
exactly the same as the originals, only
younger. Genetic replicas are created by
cloning, which involves taking cuttings
from the original trees and rooting them
to make whole new ones.
Rooting cuttings from an 80-year-old tree
is not easy, because cuttings generally root
most readily from so-called juvenile wood.
Where do you find juvenile wood on an 80-
year-old plant? In sprouts near the base, the
original part of the plant.
Since not all of the original Yoshino cher-
ries were identical, efforts have also been
made to “fingerprint” them, using their
DNA to better identify and differentiate
them. The greater the genetic diversity that
is found the better, because a narrow gene
pool makes any planting more likely to be
wiped out by pest problems.
Some of those original cherries are not
even Yoshinos but so-called Japanese cher-
ries, another species with a similar range in
varietal characteristics. Kwanzan is perhaps
the most famous variety of Japanese cherry.
A BETTER CHERRY?
A few other ornamental cherry species
exist, and the one I’d plant would be Higan
cherry. Unfortunately, Higan is not counted
among those trees originally set in the
ground around Washington’s Tidal Basin.
While cherries generally are susceptible to a
number of insects and diseases, Higan is one
of the most pest-resistant. It is also longer
lived, faster growing, and more tolerant of
heat and cold than the others.
Higan cherry’s qualities do not sacrifice
beauty. Like other ornamental cherries,
Higan varieties show a range of ornamental
characteristics. For instance, the variety
Whitcomb has horizontal, spreading limbs
that each spring are dotted with pink buds
that unfold into almost white blossoms.
Pendula is a variety offering very early, sin-
gle pink blossoms on weeping stems.
Autumnalis is truly unique, not for its semi-
double pink blossoms that unfold in spring,
but because it often puts on a repeat per-
formance in autumn.
How to replace Washington’s famed cherry trees?
The cherry trees come in a number of varieties, among them those with pink flowers and
upright habit (Afterglow), white flowers and weeping habit (Pendula) and diminutive size
and weeping habit (Shidare Yoshino).
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, MARCH 7
Linking HR Functions to
Organizational Goals. 7:30 a.m. to
9:30 a.m. Sequoia, 1850 Gateway Drive,
Suite 600, San Mateo. $35 general
admission, free for NCHRA members.
Northern California Human resources
Association helps you discover the
secret to thinking, talking and acting
like a business leader. For more
information go to www.nchra.org.
Peninsula Youth Theater Presents
‘Fiddler on the Roof.’ 9:30 a.m. 500
Castro St., Mountain View. $20 adults,
$16 seniors and children 12 and under,
$10 weekday shows and $7 per ticket
for groups of 10 or more. For more
information and to order tickets call
903-6000.
Just Between Friends Baby, Kids
and Maternity Consignment Sale.
Noon to 9 p.m. San Mateo Event
Center, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San
Mateo. Shop for bargains on over
35,000 items including gently used
kids clothing, toys, furniture and more.
$3. For more information call (415)
710-3973.
‘Wonderful Town.’ 7:30 p.m. Crystal
Springs Upland School, 400 Uplands
Road, Hillsborough. Tells the
adventures and misadventures of two
sisters who move from their
comfortable hometown in Ohio to
New York City to fulfill their dreams.
For tickets visit https://www.csus.org
or call 342-4668.
Pear Theatre Presents: ‘The Apple
Never Falls.’ 8 p.m. Pear Avenue
Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain
View. Tickets are $10-$30. The world
premiere of this play written by Paul
Bracerman will run from Feb. 22 until
March 10, with performances every
Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 8
p.m. and every Sunday at 2 p.m. For
more information and to purchase
tickets call 254-1148.
FRIDAY, MARCH 8
Free Tax Preparation. Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from Jan. 14
to April 5. 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to
4 p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more information
call 523-0804.
Just Between Friends Baby, Kids
and Maternity Consignment Sale. 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. San Mateo Event Center,
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Shop
for bargains on more than 35,000
items including gently used kids
clothing, toys, furniture and more. Free
admission, paid parking. For more
information visit
www.sanmateo.jbfsale.com or call
(415) 710-3973.
Needlepoint Experts at Luv2Stitch.
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Luv2stich, 747
Bermuda Drive, San Mateo, in the
Fiesta Garden Shopping Center.
Inspired stitching instruction from
Susan Portra. For more information call
344-5200.
Peninsula Youth Theater Presents
‘Fiddler on the Roof.’ 9:30 a.m. and
7:30 p.m. 500 Castro St., Mountain
View. $20 adults, $16 seniors and
children 12 and under, $10 weekday
shows and $7 per ticket for groups of
10 or more. For more information and
to order tickets call 903-6000.
Step Into Spring. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Municipal Services Building, 33 Arroyo
Drive, South San Francisco. Soroptimist
International of North San Mateo
County will hold a fundraiser that will
include a silent auction, music,
exhibitors, food, drinks, games and
more. Tickets can be purchased
through club members or at the door.
$25 per adult. For more information
go to
www.soroptimistnorthsanmateocoun
ty.org.
San Carlos Children’s Theater
Presents ‘The U-u-ugly Duckling.’ 7
p.m. Mustang Hall, Central Middle
School, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
$12 in advance at
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com
or $15 at the door. For more
information call 594-2730.
Movie Night. 7 p.m. San Carlos Flight
Center, 655 Skyway Road, No. 215, San
Carlos. Free. A social gathering to enjoy
food, refreshments and an aviation-
related movie. For more information
go to www.sancarlosflightcenter.com.
‘Wonderful Town.’ 7:30 p.m. Crystal
Springs Upland School, 400 Uplands
Road, Hillsborough. Tells the
adventures and misadventures of two
sisters who move from their
comfortable hometown in Ohio to
New York City to fulfill their dreams.
For tickets visit https://www.csus.org
or call 342-4668.
Woodside High School presents
‘Legally Blonde, the Musical.’ 8 p.m.
Woodside High School, 199 Churchill
Ave., Woodside. For more information
or to purchase tickets go to
http://www.whsdramaboosters.com/r
nrnORrnrnCall or call 367-9750.
Pear Theatre Presents: ‘The Apple
Never Falls.’ 8 p.m. Pear Avenue
Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain
View. Tickets are $10-$30. The world
premiere of this play written by Paul
Bracerman will run from Feb. 22 until
March 10, with performances every
Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 8
p.m. and every Sunday at 2 p.m. For
more information and to purchase
tickets call 254-1148.
Comedy Club Night. 8 p.m. The
Dragon Theater, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Comedians Daniel
Dugar and Rodger Lizaola will
perform. Tickets are $30 and include
two drinks. For more information go
to www.premiercomedyclub.com.
TheRiP-TiDEs! 9 p.m. to midnight.The
Iron Gate, 1360 El Camino Real,
Belmont. Help the RiP-TiDEs! kick off
their 14th years as a band. For more
information visit iron-gate.com.
SATURDAY, MARCH 9
Peninsula and South Bay Autism
Resource Fair. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur University, 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. Free, mini
workshops $25 each. For more
information go to
www.wingslaerningcenter.org.
Just Between Friends Baby, Kids
and Maternity Consignment Sale. 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. San Mateo Event Center,
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Shop
for bargains on more than 35,000
items including gently used kids
clothing, toys, furniture and more. Fifty
percent off sale. $3. For more
information call (415) 710-3973.
OvereatersAnonymous Newcomers
Day. 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Kaiser
Permanente, 1150 Veterans Blvd.,
Cypress Room, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 328-2936 or go
to www.oamidpeninsula.org.
Ukulele Story time. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Join Kayla and her
ukulele for some fun books and songs
for all ages. For more information call
591-8286.
Open House. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. San
Carlos Flight Center, 655 Skyway Road,
No. 215, San Carlos. Free. Gather at the
airport, meet women pilots, participate
in fun activities and experience
something new. Lunch is included
when you RSVP. For more information
go to www.sancarlosflightcenter.com.
AffordableBooksat theBookNook.
Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane, Twin
Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks are
three for $1, hardbacks are $2 and up.
There will be a large supply of CDs at
low prices. All proceeds will benefit
the Belmont Library. For more
information call 593-5650.
Midpeninsula Regional OpenSpace
District Hosts Children’sEvent.12:30
p.m. to 2 p.m. Linden Tree Books, 265
State St., Los Altos. Celebrates the
District’s 40th Anniversary and the
publication of its new coffee table
book entitled ‘Room to Breathe: The
Wild Heart of San Francisco Peninsula.’
Free. For more information call 691-
1200.
Hands-on Wool Weaving Workshop.
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Presented by artist Kira
Dulaney. Participants will learn to use
a wooden loom, drop spindle and
spinning wheel. $10 materials fee for
members, $15 for non-members. For
more information call 299-0104.
Dad and Me at the Library Family
Puppet Show. 2 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Live puppet show sponsored
by the Fatherhood Collaborative of
San Mateo County. Puppet Art Theater
presents ‘The Boy Who Cried Wolf.’
Program recommended for ages three
and older. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Peninsula Youth Theater Presents
‘Fiddler on the Roof.’ 2 p.m. and 7:30
p.m. 500 Castro St., Mountain View. $20
adults, $16 seniors and children 12 and
under, $10 weekday shows and $7 per
ticket for groups of 10 or more. For
more information and to order tickets
call 903-6000.
Lecture: Girl with a Pearl Earring. 3
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. The de Young
Museum will be the first venue in the
American tour of paintings from the
Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis,The
Hague. On exhibit from Jan. 26 to June
2 is the world’s most prestigious
collection of Dutch Golden Age
paintings. The docent slide talk will
include Vermeers ‘Girl with a Pearl
Earring,’ as well as other examples of
the period. For more information call
591-8286.
‘Wonderful Town.’ 3 p.m. Crystal
Springs Upland School, 400 Uplands
Road, Hillsborough. Tells the
adventures and misadventures of two
sisters who move from their
comfortable hometown in Ohio to
New York City to fulfill their dreams.
For tickets visit https://www.csus.org
or call 342-4668.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Coercion, the main element of human
trafficking, can take many forms.
“Women stuck in brothels is the typical
idea,” said Boeving.
But human trafficking can be children
in restaurants, nannies and hotel maids.
Hotels will hire a man with a van full of
maids who come, clean the rooms and get
back into van without getting paid, said
Boeving.
“It is a crime that is right under our
nose and very well hidden,” she said.
“There are ways that people can be the
eyes and ears in the Bay Area.”
Boeving urges people to think twice
about what is happening at their local nail
salons and massage parlors, which are
often “fronts” for prostitution businesses.
In a Tedx Talk she gave in San Mateo a
few years ago, Boeving marveled at the
number of massage parlors in Belmont.
“There are 87 massage parlors, the last
time it was checked, for a population of
26,000 people,” she said in the talk, part
of a global set of conferences that focus
on technology, entertainment and design.
“Let’s realize that there are many mas-
sage parlors that are actually fronting as
businesses where young girls are brought
in to be giving much more than a mas-
sage.”
The problem of human trafficking is
not just one of foreign victims being
brought into the United States to be
exploited. Boeving gave an example of a
local girl who was growing up as a soccer
star in Los Altos who was pimped out by
her own parents in San Jose.
Purchasing power
Every person can affect human traffick-
ing with their wallet, said Boeving. Items
like chocolate and coffee are often pro-
duced using child labor, she said.
There are resources available for the
public to discover how their lives inter-
sect with slavery. Oakland-based slavery-
footprint.org allows people to answer the
question, “how many slaves work for
you?” Slavery Footprint takes a list of
someone’s purchases and shows them
which of their products were made using
modern-day slavery.
Human trafficking does not just appear
to be growing because it is more and
more exposed, but is actually expanding
rapidly, said Boeving.
“We’re facing the fastest growing crime
in the world,” she said.
San Diego, Los Angeles and San
Francisco are all in the top 10 cities in the
country estimated to have the highest
human trafficking, she said.
Trained eyes
In San Mateo County, which is home
to the San Francisco International
Airport, rising community awareness is
helping to combat local human traffick-
ers.
Last month, two people were arrested
at La Quinta Inn in South San Francisco
for holding three women and one girl for
prostitution.
A hotel clerk, who had recently under-
gone human trafficking training, alerted
police after noticing a man check two
women into a hotel room one night, and
two different women into the same room
the next night.
The training that the South San
Francisco Police Department has done
for hotels near the airport has been a key
development.
“[The hotel clerk] reported to the police
what he had been trained to recognize as
suspicious,” said Al Serrato, San Mateo
County assistant district attorney. “That
resulted in two defendants in custody.”
The two defendants would be the first
in the county to be tried under the new
human trafficking law Proposition 35,
which increased human trafficking penal-
ties.
Before the passage of Proposition 35
last year, traffickers were tried for other
crimes that were easier to prosecute,
including pimping, pandering, false
imprisonment and kidnapping, said
Serrato.
A human trafficking conviction
requires proof that the victims were
“coerced,” something Serrato said can be
hard to prove, as young or foreign victims
often grow to trust the perpetrators.
With the passage of Proposition 35 —
which has redefined human trafficking
and increased penalties — the county
could see more human trafficking prose-
cutions in the future, said Serrato.
Freedom House
Since it began in 2010, Freedom House
in San Mateo County has helped more
than 100 human trafficking victims.
“They’re in nail salons, they’re in
restaurants, they’re in private homes,”
said Frances Byrne, deputy director of
Freedom House. “That does happen right
here in San Mateo County.”
Children are often trafficked by their
own parents who need money or drugs,
said Byrne.
One victim told Byrnes she was traf-
ficked at age 9, when her parents sold her
to a gang.
“These children are very, very vulnera-
ble,” she said, adding that they are often
foster children.
Freedom House provides counseling
and an 18-month victim aftercare pro-
gram. The organization holds eight of the
just 529 beds in the country designated
for trafficking victims, said Byrne.
Betty Ann Boeving will be speaking at a
International Women’s Day Human
Trafficking Event hosted by the American
Association of University Women. The
event is Friday, March 8, from 1 p.m. to
2:30 p.m., at the Burlingame Parks and
Recreation Department’s Social Hall,
850 Burlingame Ave., Burlingame.
For more information on Freedom
House visit freedomhousesf.org.
Continued from page 1
SLAVERY
facilities manager within the Public
Works Department.
Over the years, there have also been
roofing, heating and cooling issues at the
two buildings that city staff have rou-
tinely had to address, he said.
But now, the city wants a complete
outside assessment of the two buildings
to determine what work needs to be done
to keep their commercial tenants in
place, which include the Melting Pot and
brand-new tenant AdsWizz at the Transit
Center.
Other tenants that suffered water intru-
sion in December include Fletch’s,
Beard Papa’s, So Thankful Clothing Co.
and Cold Stone Creamery at the Main
Street Parking Garage between First and
Second avenues downtown.
The city-owned buildings are only 10
years old.
“We’re looking to be a responsible
property owner,” Bronson said.
The assessment will include an analy-
sis of the architectural, structural,
mechanical, electrical, plumbing and
water intrusion and seek corrective rec-
ommendations along with budget esti-
mates for the suggested corrective work
and a proposed timeline for completion.
A site visit is scheduled for March 13
and proposals are due by March 27.
Fletch’s, the Chicago-style hot dogs
restaurant on Second Avenue, had some
windows leak and puddles form in the
restaurant in December. The damage
was not major, however, but is cause for
concern in the future, an employee told
the Daily Journal.
The Main Street Parking Garage is
unique, Bronson said, as it has parking
stacked on top of commercial stacked on
top of parking, Bronson said.
Water was still pooling in some areas
of the Main Street Parking Garage yes-
terday from rain earlier this week.
The garage has 82 parking spaces
underground and 251 parking spaces on
the upper floors. The Transit Center has
about 165 parking spaces underground.
The assessment will include a look at
all walls, doors, windows, the elevators
and the structural integrity of the foun-
dation.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
WORK
COMICS/GAMES
3-7-13
wednesday’s PUZZLe sOLVed
PreViOUs
sUdOkU
answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Gaggle members
6 Math subj.
10 Baby
12 Strong cords
14 Instinct
15 Jazz fan
16 Rubicon crosser
18 Dadaist Jean
19 Kind of school
21 Gloss target
23 Item in a poker pot
24 “-- Te Ching”
26 Joined the chorus
29 Robin beaks
31 Main rd.
33 Cold feet
35 Patella site
36 Goodall subject
37 Ms. Bombeck
38 Russian emperor
40 Startled cries
42 Victory sign
43 Alcove
45 Level
47 Quizzical sounds
50 Odd
52 Plant science
54 Flower parts
58 Cheaper make (2 wds.)
59 More nimble
60 -- and crafts
61 Goes it alone
dOwn
1 Martini base
2 Bambi’s aunt
3 Salamander
4 Hollandaise, e.g.
5 Mesmerized
6 Dweebs
7 Split
8 Early Peruvian
9 Toothed wheel
11 Casual wear
12 Bangkok native
13 Indy 500 sponsor
17 No speed demon
19 Gist
20 Yokels
22 Secure
23 Pen contents
25 Cry of discovery
27 Audacity
28 Pluckier
30 Penn or Connery
32 Longbow wood
34 Funny Charlotte --
39 Guards make them
41 Marinates
44 Black gem
46 Opening
47 Wane
48 Circle dance
49 Play the lead
51 FDR had three
53 Hill builder
55 Have a cold
56 August kid, maybe
57 Almost-grads
diLBerT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLe
fUTUre sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre swine®
GeT fUZZy®
THUrsday, MarCH 7, 2013
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Because you’re likely
to be a visionary with a purpose, your probabilities
for success are excellent. When you are motivated in
such a way, anything is possible.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Although you’ll derive
much satisfaction from achieving an impressive
accomplishment, striving for it will give you the most
pleasure. The fun is in the chase.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Those with whom you
hang out, including your family, will have a powerful
effect on your attitude. If they’re doers, you’re apt to
be a success too.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Even if most of your
efforts are spent doing things for others, when it
comes time to divvy up the results, you’ll share in
what they gained.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- If you have to make a
presentation, try to isolate the key players, because
you’ll do much better and be far more dynamic
working on a close, personal basis.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t be reluctant to be of
assistance to an associate if it’s needed. You could
be surprised by how much your actions help your
situation as well.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Consideration and
diplomacy won’t dilute your strengths -- they will
enhance them. Persons with whom you’re involved
will recognize and admire your clout.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Engaging in do-it-
yourself household projects could turn out to be
more fun than drudgework. Now’s the time to fx
everything that needs mending.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Occasionally, it can be
therapeutic to break away from everyday routines
and change the game plan. If possible, seek out
involvements that are fun and relaxing.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Substantial
achievements are possible when you devote your
energies to matters that could enhance your
material well-being. Go for the gold.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Adhere to any
strong notions that direct you to take action on a
specifc issue. Tackling a quantity of jobs is not
necessarily better than doing quality work on one.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- In order to get
what you’re entitled to, it might be necessary for
you to be assertive. Don’t hesitate to be bold when
circumstances require it.

COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday• Mar. 7, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Mar. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
For assisted living facility
in South San Francisco
On the Job Training Available.
Apply in person
Westborough Royale,
89 Westborough Blvd, South SF
CAREGIVERS
WANTED
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOUSE CLEANER WANTED 35 to 40
Hours a week. Monday thru Friday.
Experienced, transportation, bilingual
$10.00 to start. Gary (650)591-6037
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
Mid Peninsula
CNAs needed
Hiring now!
Hourly & Live-ins
Drivers encouraged
Call Mon-Fri 9am – 3pm
Reliable Caregivers
415-436-0100
(650)286-0111
110 Employment
HOUSEKEEPER
NEEDED
Full-time on the Peninsula.
Duties include cleaning
laundry, ironing
and errands. Must drive &
have 3+ yrs private home
experience.
$22-$25 per hour
415-567-0956
www.tandcr.com
MAINTENANCE
ASSISTANT
Full time. Requires basic
knowledge of plumbing,
electrical,. heating, masonry.
Good English skills. Ability
to lift 50 pounds without re-
striction. Apply in person
Carlmont Gardens Nursing
Center, : 2140 Carlmont
Drive, Belmont.
RESTAURANT -
CITY PUB is looking for an
experienced Food Server
capable of fitting in with our
fast paced team service.
Apply in Person,
10:30-5:00 M-F
2620 Broadway,
Redwood City
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING COOKS - FT & PT, Good
Pay, D.O.E., Short Order Cooks, Apply in
Person @ Neal’s Coffee Shop, 114
DeAnza Blvd., San Mateo,
(650)581-1754
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254401
The following person is doing business
as: Team Gymography, 145 N. El Cami-
no Real, #108, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Ron Scheldrup, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Ron Scheldrup /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254209
The following person is doing business
as: Climbing Kids OT, 554 Kelmore St.,
MOSS BEACH, CA 94038 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Joanie
Hooper, OTR/L, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/25/2013
/s/ Joanie Hooper /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254355
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Mobility Works, 2) Mobilityworks
890 Cowan Rd., Ste. B, BURLINGAME,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Moblity Works of Califor-
nia, Inc, CA. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Gerhard Schmidt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254335
The following person is doing business
as: Wally’s Repairs, 865 Douglas Ave.,
Redwood City, CA 94063 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Paul Wat-
son, 322 Cuardo Ave., Millbrae, CA
94030. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Paul Watson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/14/13, 02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254380
The following person is doing business
as: Bellissima, 4060 South El Camino
Real #15, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Camila Rose Rodondi, 7216 Shelter
Creek Lane, #7, San Bruno, CA 94066.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
02/16/2013.
/s/ Camila Rodondi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254519
The following person is doing business
as: Pix, 966 Peninsula Ave., #103, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Daniel Hoeck,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/18/2013.
/s/ Daniel Hoeck /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254103
The following person is doing business
as: QM Nails & Spa, 860 Maple St.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mi-
chelle Le, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Michelle Le /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13).
23 Thursday • Mar. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254595
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Awesome Nu You, 751 Celes-
tial Lane, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: David R. Fast and Ronda S. Fast,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2013
/s/ David Fast /
/s/ Ronda Fast /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254356
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Apolon West Catering, 1480
Crestwood Dr., Apt. 1, SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94128 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Roberto Jose Lo-
pez, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Roberto J. Lopez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254582
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Masson Veterinary Hospital,
805 Masson Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Masson Veterinary Hospital,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
03/01/1990.
/s/ Brenda L. Conkling /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #2545646
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Infinity Fitness, 965 Brewster
Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Ayelette Robinson, 447 Hillcrest Rd.,
San Carlos, CA 94070. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/10/2013.
/s/ Ayelette Robison /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254651
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sunset Machine Shop, 1160
San Mateo Ave., SOUTH SAN FRAN-
CISCO, CA, 94080 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Elisabeth Niel-
sen, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ Elisabeth Nielsen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/28/13, 03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254688
The following person is doing business
as: 4100 E. 3rd Ave., Ste. 201, FOSTER
CITY, CA, 94404 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Special Counsel,
Inc., FL. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Gregory D. Holland /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13, 03/28/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254714
The following person is doing business
as: Civil Court Technologies, 165 Shell
St., PACIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Jason
James Lisica, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Jason Lisica /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13, 03/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254321
The following person is doing business
as: A & R Premier Services, 335 San
Carlos Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Andrea Angulo, same ad-
dress and Rosie Pulido, 5 Greenwood
Dr., Redwood City, CA 94061 The busi-
ness is conducted by a Joint Venture.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Andrea Angulo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/07/13, 03/14/13, 03/21/13, 03/28/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-250710
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Ten
Little Fingers, 554 Kelmore St., MOSS
BEACH, CA 94038. The fictitious busi-
ness name referred to above was filed in
County on 01/25/2013. The business
was conducted by: Joanie Hooper, same
address.
/s/ Joanie Hooper /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 01/29/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 02/14/13,
02/21/13, 02/28/13, 03/07/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., (650)270-8113
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., (650)270-8113
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
L6 WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER - DeLonghi, 1500
watts, oil filled, almost new, $30.,
(650)315-5902
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
T.V. 19" Color3000, RCA, w/remote
SOLD!
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER - $75, SOLD!
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99
(650)365-3987
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80’s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
BRASS TROPHY Cup, Mounted on wal-
nut base. $35 (650)341-8342
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all SOLD!
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
DELL 17” Flat screen monitor, used 1
year $40, (650)290-1960
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
CHILDREN’S VHS Disney movies, (4),
all $30., (650)518-0813
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo (650)349-6059
VINTAGE HAND Carved mallard duck
beautiful in a decoy $55., (650)341-8342
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PANASONIC CAMCORDER- VHSC
Rarely used, SOLD!
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
TV - 27" Sony TV $15., (650)494-1687
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
lead crystal, with 24 carot guilding, model
# B8640, beautiful, $50., (650)315-5902
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
304 Furniture
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - Medium brown, 50” x 39”,
two swinging doors plus 6 deep drawers,
SOLD!
DRESSER 6 Drawers $20
(650)341-2397
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 6’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf.
SOLD!
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHOWER STOOL, round, 14" diameter,
revolves, and locks in place (never used)
$40 (650)344-2254
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
24
Thursday • Mar. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Theme
6 Woody’s “Annie
Hall” role
10 Slash mark?
14 NBC’s “Weekend
Today” co-anchor
Hill
15 Some parasites
16 Marching band
instrument
17 See 60-Across
20 “Viva el
matador!”
21 Has the stage
22 Winter airs
23 Plastic __ Band
24 Summoning
gesture
26 See 60-Across
34 Big name in big
banking
35 Nick-named actor
36 Miss Piggy, to
Miss Piggy
37 Neglects to
mention
39 Communication
no one hears:
Abbr.
40 Cabbage salads
42 At an angle: Abbr.
43 Leg bone
45 Applications
46 See 60-Across
50 “... to market, to
buy __ pig ...”
51 Smudge on
Santa’s suit
52 Snowman’s
accessory
55 Hearing subject
57 Summer shade
60 Trio suggested by
the answers to
17-, 26- and 46-
Across
64 Sword with a
guarded tip
65 Kept
66 Shah’s fate
67 “Buddenbrooks”
novelist
68 Wild about
69 Provide room for
growth, perhaps
DOWN
1 Jogging
instrument?
2 Unwritten test
3 Roofer’s
purchase
4 Hard water?
5 Going up against
6 Part for a singer
7 Oz visitor
8 TiVo ancestor
9 So far
10 It precedes
“Substituted Ball”
in the Definitions
section of the
“Rules of Golf”
11 Pickled veggie
12 First family
member
13 Tropicana Field
team
18 Date-setting
phrase
19 Rich relatives?
23 “Count __!”
24 Story-telling
song
25 Handyman’s
approx.
26 Shaggy’s pal, to
Shaggy
27 Unsettled state
28 Not straight up
29 With money at
stake
30 Violinist’s supply
31 Member of the
Five College
Consortium,
familiarly
32 Swimmer’s need
33 Temper tantrum
38 World No. 1
tennis player
between Martina
and Monica
41 Abundant,
plantwise
44 Tax shelter
letters
47 Become pitiless
48 Ascribed, as
blame
49 Old Testament
queen
52 Mushroom piece
53 Club where “music
and passion were
always the
fashion,” in song
54 “Right on!”
55 Fries seasoning
56 Menu choice after
an “oops”
57 Dancing blunder
58 Folksy Guthrie
59 Rostov rejection
61 Sox, in line scores
62 Boy toy?
63 Send packing
By Joel D. Lafargue
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
03/07/13
03/07/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
306 Housewares
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
308 Tools
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
DRAFTING TABLE - 60” x 40” tilt top,
with 3 full sets of professional ruling
arms, great deal, $50. all, (650)315-5902
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CEILING FAN - 42”, color of blades
chalk, in perfect condition, $40.,
(650)349-9261
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30
(650)290-1960
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
310 Misc. For Sale
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PET MATE Vari dog kennel large brand
new $99 firm 28" high 24" wide & 36"
length SOLD!
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
310 Misc. For Sale
SET OF MIRRORS (2) - 33” x 50”, no
border, plain mirrors, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WICKER DOG Bed excellent condition
34" long 26"wide and 10" deep $25
SOLD!
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WOOL YARN - 12 skeins, Stahlwolle,
Serenade, mauve, all $30., (650)518-
0813
X BOX with case - 4 games, all $60.,
(650)518-0813
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
316 Clothes
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COAT - Size 6/8, Ladies, Red, Jones
New York, cute, like new, warm, light-
weight, above knee length, $35.,
(650)345-3277
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
Reversible. Outside: weatherproof tan
color. Inside: Navy plush. Zipper clo-
sure, elastic cuffs. $15 (650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WINTER coat - knee length,
size 14, rust color, $25., (650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor label.
Excellent condition. $18.00
(650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2011 SCATTANTE CFR SPORT ROAD-
BIKE - Carbon, Shimano hardware,
$1400 new, now $700., SOLD!
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$50.(650)368-0748.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
25 Thursday • Mar. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
318 Sports Equipment
GOLF CART (bag boy express model) 3
wheeler, dual brakes $39., Redwood City
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
KR SKATES arm and knee pads, in box,
$15 (650)515-2605
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
319 Firewood
FIREWOOD ALL KINDS- from 4” by 4”
inches to 1” by 8”. All 12” to 24” in length.
Over 1 cord. $50, (650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
SAN MATEO
455 Wisnom Ave.
(cross street Poplar)
Saturday
March 9th
8am - Noon
Lots of baby clothes!
Toys, household
items, women's cloth-
ing, small dresser.
Lots of misc
items. Great bargains!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
322 Garage Sales
HUGE
BABY & KIDS
CONSIGNMENT
SALE
San Mateo Event
Center
(San Mateo Fairgrounds)
MARCH 7-9
Thursday, 3/7
12pm-9pm
Friday 3/8
9am-6pm
Saturday, 3/9
9am-3pm
Just Between Friends has
over 35,000 gently used
children's items including
baby and kids gear, clothing,
toys, books, games,
furniture & so much more!
Saturday is the 50% off sale
when many already great
deals go half price! Join us!
www.sanmateo.jbfsale.com
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
450 Homes for Rent
RENTERS
Stop Paying Your
Landlord’s
Mortgage.
Free Report reveals
How Easy it is to Buy
Your Own Home.
BuySanMateoHome.com
Free recorded message
1-800-231-0064
ID# 1001
JM Sun Team # 00981193 Re/Max
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1993 HONDA Civic, sun roof, electric
windows, immaculate in and out, low mi-
lage, $3,400 obo, SOLD!
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVY ‘03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$17,000. obo, (650)465-6056
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
‘95 HARLEY DAVIDSON very clean
bike, asking $3000, (650)291-5156
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
BAY AREA UPHOLSTERY
(650)583-5143
Specializing in: Trucks, Autos,
Boats & Furniture.
40+ years in trade
615 Airport Blvd., SSF
Bayareaupholstery.org
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
670 Auto Parts
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Cleaning
HOUSE CLEANING
Homes, apartments,
condos, offices.
Call
Clean Superstar
(650)576-7794
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)280-9240
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
26
Thursday • Mar. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST
HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
A+ BBB rating
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
FREE DUMPING
Bricks, Blocks
&Trees
(650)873-8025
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Hauling
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 208-9437
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
TRUSTS & DIVORCE
Attorney Fees Reduced
For New March Clients.
HarrisZelnigherLaw.com
Ira Harris:
(650)342-3777
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
27 Thursday • Mar. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
COMING SOON!
AMAZING MASSAGE
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
Opening in March!
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Health & Medical
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
PROVIDING
CAREGIVING
Care Giver services
Hillsborough, Burlingame areas.
Several years experience,
friendly, compassionate care.
Ask for Paula.
Call: 650-834-0771 or
email: johnspanek@gmail.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Angency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday • March 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY‡BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 3/31/13
WEBUY
$â0 $â0
OFF
Established 1979

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