From Blog to Book.

milton-louw.blogspot.com

2

Contents
1 2009 1.1 January . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting 2009 with a plan (2009-01-05 10:18) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 February . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Philosophy Farm 101 (2009-02-28 17:37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 March . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thoughts on Prosperity (2009-03-12 09:37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Central Register for Namibia (2009-03-12 11:47) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ICT Recommendations for Namibia (2009-03-15 10:43) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Independence 2007 (2009-03-15 10:52) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Never too old to learn (2009-03-15 10:53) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Family Tree (2009-03-15 11:39) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Independence 2009 - reasons for registers (2009-03-22 10:12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Culling of Wildebeest applies to beer (2009-03-22 12:27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Credit Reporting Agency for Namibia (2009-03-25 09:59) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The need for Credit Bureaux in Namibia (2009-03-26 14:24) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . News 26 March 2009 (2009-03-26 20:35) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4 April . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keep you cell number - change your network (2009-04-12 17:54) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monopolies in Namibia (2009-04-12 17:55) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Search only Namibian websites (2009-04-12 18:02) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . God’s messages (2009-04-12 19:06) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Love Freedom Profile (2009-04-13 20:37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . On being Coloured (2009-04-14 19:15) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chinese a good thing for Namibia (2009-04-16 10:08) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Me and bad debts (2009-04-23 13:53) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Finished my book! (2009-04-24 16:34) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 15 15 15 15 16 16 16 22 23 24 25 26 27 27 28 30 30 30 31 32 33 33 34 34 35 36 3

1.5

June . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Having children is not easy (2009-06-05 17:32) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Being thankful in the face of adversity (2009-06-12 15:46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

36 36 36 37 37 38 39 39 39 39 40 41 42 42 43 43 43 44 45 46 47 47 47 49 49 49 49 49 50 51 51 51 52 52 52

1.6

July . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unionise the ICT / Data workers of Namibia (2009-07-20 17:14) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Corruption (2009-07-25 12:41) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.7

August . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foundation of Education (2009-08-05 11:20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2009-08-06 11:16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Influence of teachers - in memory of Heidi (Persendt) Japhta (2009-08-07 13:30) . . . . . . Loss of respect for the elderly (2009-08-13 13:30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Effective combating of crime (2009-08-18 10:48) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bring back forced labour (2009-08-18 10:50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loving a prostitute (2009-08-21 12:18) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . White and Black Economic Empowerment (2009-08-25 17:37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.8

September . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SharePoint is the next thing you need (2009-09-01 11:45) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of SharePoint capabilities (2009-09-10 13:27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Create an Internet Action Group for Namibia (2009-09-10 13:28) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What is love? (2009-09-24 15:27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.9

October . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . History of the Namibian Coloureds (2009-10-06 11:13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding Microsoft Certifications (2009-10-07 15:29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inspiring children to read (2009-10-12 10:24) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . God’s making space in my hands (2009-10-17 14:56) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sun is shining, weather is hot (2009-10-17 15:03) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.10 November . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shortest job I ever had (2009-11-04 12:02) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consumer Protection in Namibia (2009-11-13 09:40) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Induction Training for Parliamentarians (2009-11-16 10:27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charter of Namibian Consumer Rights (2009-11-17 10:41) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cultural Differences in Namibia (2009-11-24 15:06) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibia Consumer Protection Group Complaint Form (2009-11-27 11:16) . . . . . . . . . . 1.11 December . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Is a serious third party needed in Namibian politics? (2009-12-08 15:32) . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Increasing employment - a government dilemma (2009-12-09 10:36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibia Consumer Hotline (2009-12-11 10:19) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal Insurance in Namibia (2009-12-15 11:40) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consumer Hotline for Namibia (2009-12-15 16:19) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2010 2.1 January . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibia needs a national register (2010-01-07 09:12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sssshhhh.... I know your home address (2010-01-07 10:52) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marginalization of Coloureds must end (2010-01-13 13:10) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coloured issue can’t be ignored (2010-01-13 13:12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What is success? (2010-01-13 13:42) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This Colour Thing in Namibia (2010-01-13 16:44) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I know, I know Not (2010-01-14 12:30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibia Consumer Hotline (2010-01-22 16:36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Desiderata - Be a person becoming by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 13:59) . . . . . . . . . . . ”A Prayer” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:00) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ”Whatever else you do” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:10) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ”Reforming Oneself” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:11) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ” Dark Days” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ”Wanderers” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:14) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cinderella - Roald Dahl (2010-01-29 14:26) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ”I go my way” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:49) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ”Happiness” by Max Erdmann (2010-01-29 14:50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 February . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abortion - what else do we have to offer? (2010-02-05 11:46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extended CreditWise Consumer Protection (2010-02-05 11:47) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I am a Success! (2010-02-05 11:50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The lady on the farm (2010-02-05 11:52) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Celebrating four decades (2010-02-05 11:54) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . On being a father (2010-02-05 11:55) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forgiving is a hard journey (2010-02-05 11:56) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To my ex-wife (2010-02-05 11:56) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brotherhood among us (1987) (2010-02-22 12:23) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 April . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fire Nampower MD! (2010-04-14 11:37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

53 53 53 54 57 57 57 58 58 60 62 62 63 63 64 64 64 65 65 66 66 68 69 69 69 69 70 71 71 71 72 72 72 73 73 5

World Consumer Rights Day 2010 - ’Our money, our rights’ (2010-04-14 11:37) . . . . . . . Nampower management should be fired (2010-04-14 11:38) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How to get FB without accessing the site (your company blocked it) (2010-04-14 11:38) . . Crucifixion vs. Resurrection (2010-04-14 11:39) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No to leaderless consumer protest actions in Namibia (2010-04-19 09:30) . . . . . . . . . . . Open letter to Lodewyk van Graan, Chairperson of the ICT Alliance of Namibia (2010-04-26 16:19) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 May . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lodewyk van Graan responds to Open Letter (2010-05-24 13:19) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Are our Educational Institutions simply ripping us off? (2010-05-24 13:52) . . . . . . . . . (2010-05-26 16:53) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The relevance of Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) to the implementation of competition policy and law in Namibia (2010-05-26 16:54) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Black Economic Empowerment is needed in Namibia (2010-05-28 13:03) . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 July . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal shielding products a rip off! (2010-07-06 18:19) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . On tribal integration in Namibia (2010-07-20 09:25) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6 August . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibia and Integration (2010-08-14 12:40) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local economic development in Otjimbingwe (2010-08-18 11:01) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Ministries Re-engineered (2010-08-19 12:27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lady of my Dreams (2010-08-21 13:13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Do you love me? (2010-08-21 13:16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . My True Feelings (2010-08-21 13:17) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Love thoughts (2010-08-21 13:28) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Why do you like a guy like me? (2010-08-21 13:29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Song on my Radio (2010-08-21 13:29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heart – thief (2010-08-21 13:38) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

73 74 74 75 76 76 77 77 78 79 90 101 102 102 103 104 104 105 105 108 108 109 109 110 110 111 111 112 113 113 114 115 115 116

Head over Heels (2010-08-21 13:57) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prisoner of Love (2010-08-21 14:00) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I want you!! (2010-08-21 14:03) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doing it for you, Collette (2010-08-21 14:04) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Proving our love (2010-08-21 14:11) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your Love has shown me (2010-08-21 14:40) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thank you! Collette (2010-08-21 15:01) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Leftist Capitalist (2010-08-23 12:52) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Our Big Brother – South Africa (2010-08-23 15:16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . An exploration into the Coloured market (2010-08-24 12:28) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . My Birthday girl - (Collette Campher 17 June 1987) (2010-08-25 10:54) . . . . . . . . . . . Birthday Poem (17 June 1987 – Collette turns 18) (2010-08-25 10:56) . . . . . . . . . . . . Love Triangle (2010-08-25 10:57) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unopened Love bud (2010-08-25 11:43) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . My Philosoply on Life (2010-08-25 12:35) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A girl called Bernadette (2010-08-25 16:06) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Can I be sure? (2010-08-25 16:07) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Incomprehensible Poem - By: A Broken Heart (2010-08-25 16:08) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . You’re the one for me! (Dedicated to Yolanda Esterhuisen) (2010-08-25 16:08) . . . . . . . Being with you (2010-08-25 16:09) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missing you! (2010-08-25 16:10) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wanting you Again (My love for you still lives) (2010-08-25 16:14) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Freedom Flight (2010-08-25 16:16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memories (2010-08-25 16:16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Captives of Freedom (2010-08-25 16:20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Secrets (2010-08-25 17:05) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wander Lust (2010-08-25 17:13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Blues (2010-08-25 17:35) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reality (2010-08-25 17:41) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No More (2010-08-25 17:58) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Friends (2010-08-25 17:59) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unexpected Love (2010-08-25 18:06) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Valentine 89 (2010-08-25 18:06) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Something Read – Something Said! (2010-08-25 18:07) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Fleeting moment of Happiness (2010-08-25 18:07) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brotherhood among us (2010-08-25 18:08) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Why?? (2010-08-25 18:08) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Child of Africa (2010-08-25 18:09) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legislation for informational privacy in Namibia (2010-08-30 14:41) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 September . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Panarotti’s Thursday eat all you can (2010-09-03 16:09) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Are Namibian coloureds a distinct cultural/indigenous group? (2010-09-20 14:42) . . . . . . A consumer law in Namibia should protect people who are renting (2010-09-23 17:01) . . .

117 118 119 120 120 121 121 122 123 123 123 124 124 124 126 126 127 127 128 128 129 129 129 130 130 131 131 131 132 132 132 134 134 134 134 7

More Namibians have access to banking – World Bank (2010-09-24 08:34) . . . . . . . . . . 2.8 October . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Motion Namibians with or without Professional Qualifications (2010-10-19 13:39) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . on Unemployed

136 137 137 138 140 141 142 143 143 144 145 147

Contribution to the Employment Service Bill By Chief Ankama (2010-10-19 14:46) . . . . . Proposal for Joint Education Programme for Israeli and Palestinian Administrators (2010-10-25 08:50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibia: WACS cable will arrive in 2011 but monopoly legacy holds back prices and growth (2010-10-25 09:01) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mobile Contacts Databases for sale: (2010-10-27 11:59) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9 December . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What your credit listing means (2010-12-06 16:20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Code of conduct for debt in South Africa (2010-12-08 11:28) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SMS Services that hurt (2010-12-09 10:42) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2011 3.1 February . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . My life is good - living the jet-setting life in Düsseldorf (2011-02-04 16:26) . . . . . . . . . . NTN -National Theatre of Namibia needs help - online Facebook management (2011-02-15 15:03) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Solving Namibia’s economic problems - excerpt from Future Namibia (2011-02-15 15:05) . . Complaint about Reliance Motors cc (2011-02-15 15:07) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . List of my Facebook Friends - 19 January 2011 (2011-02-15 15:09) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How Government should intervene in the financial sector (2011-02-15 15:23) . . . . . . . . . Predictions for the future of social networking (2011-02-15 15:26) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Who Am I? (2011-02-18 12:45) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Is there such a thing as coloured? (2011-02-21 17:27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Who is best on (Namibian) Twitter? (2011-02-21 18:01) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Free business textbook for studying International Business Diploma (2011-02-21 18:02) . . . What does Reconciliation mean (2011-02-25 12:31) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What does Reconciliation mean in Namibia (2011-02-25 12:37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kuli Riberts article Sunday World - Jou ma se kinders - Eish, I miss daai lippies vannie Kaap (2011-02-28 15:52) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2 March . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibia, Etosha NP (2011-03-02 15:27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Women in civil society in Africa continue to face major hurdles (2011-03-08 14:42) . . . . . Press release: 8 Outright discrimination against Coloured community nothing new
(2011-03-10 16:50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

147 147 147 148 148 149 168 168 169 170 170 171 171 172 173 174 174 174 175

Manuel slams ANC spokesman on coloureds’ remarks (2011-03-11 10:51) . . . . . . . . . . RACISM, COLOURED PEOPLE AND BLACK NATIONALISM (2011-03-11 10:52) . . . William Jordan (1849-1886), Coloured settler in Namibia (2011-03-11 19:14) . . . . . . . . Consumers International Blog: Financial service providers must go back to their roots (2011-03-15 11:30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . African People’s Organisation / first coloured pressure group in Namibia (2011-03-15 18:22) What happened to multicultural identity? (2011-03-21 13:46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Crown For Your Brow, And a Key For Your Hand (2011-03-21 18:25) . . . . . . . . . . . What is a social entrepreneur (2011-03-21 19:01) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replays - Social Entrepreneur Empowerment Series (2011-03-22 17:47) . . . . . . . . . . . . (2011-03-23 18:47) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The way things are ... in Africa (2011-03-24 16:16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aiming morality at the youth (2011-03-28 18:08) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oldest coloured owned business in Namibia (2011-03-29 16:28) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Teach history warts and all (2011-03-31 18:44) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 April . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Statistics for Namibian websites -1 April 2011 (2011-04-01 10:36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consumer Protection an absolute Necessity in Namibia! (2011-04-01 10:39) . . . . . . . . . NGO’S need to be regulated in Namibia (2011-04-01 17:44) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Google Science Fair: Calling All Jr. Scientists (2011-04-04 16:27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open Letter to Robin Sherbourne / Nedbank Namibia & Old Mutual Namibia (2011-04-06 13:31) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibia Home Affairs Application Forms (2011-04-07 15:26) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open Letter to Robin Sherbourne / Nedbank Namibia & Old Mutual Namibia - No. 2 (2011-04-08 09:29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Struggle for Namibia’s Independence - 1985-1989 (2011-04-13 18:02) . . . . . . . . List of Namibian bloggers / 2011 (2011-04-21 16:11) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4 May . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minister Clears Hostel Boss Aziz Kyababa (2011-05-15 12:21) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlotte’s Guest House - managed living (2011-05-15 22:48) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Future Namibia - Foreword by Andimba Toivo ya Toivo (2011-05-20 15:48) . . . . . . . . . Call Me Ambassador Louw (2011-05-22 14:41) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Two years of Status Updates (2011-05-23 20:51) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hermanus van Wyk: The Biblical Moses’ of the Rehoboth Baster Community - by Shampapi Shiremo (2011-05-27 14:59) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5 June . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

176 177 178 179 179 180 180 181 181 181 182 183 183 184 184 184 189 192 192 193 194 195 195 196 197 197 197 198 199 199 220 222 9

Creating a common memory for Namibians (2011-06-05 12:36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ”Everyone is Free” (to use sun screen) (2011-06-05 12:37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network for quality, not quantity (2011-06-05 12:38) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constitution of SWAPO PARTY (2011-06-05 12:39) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Racial Gap in the Namibian Healthcare System (2011-06-05 12:40) . . . . . . . . . . . When interacting on Facebook (2011-06-05 12:42) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Citizens’ Emergency Flood Relief Campaign (2011-06-05 12:45) . . . . . . . . . . Job Interview Question (2011-06-05 12:46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internet Friends - Author unknown (2011-06-05 12:47) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Facebook Fan Pages - 18H30 on May 30 2011 (2011-06-05 12:49) . . . . . . . . . In a tight spot of debt (2011-06-05 12:51) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2011-06-05 12:51) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Facebook Fan Pages - 16H30 on June 4 2011 (2011-06-05 13:23) . . . . . . . . . . We Remember: Before, Now, and Later (2011-06-05 13:23) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Some encouragement in the workplace (2011-06-05 13:24) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Swearing at the Namibia Music Awards 2011 (2011-06-05 16:36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Think out of the Box (2011-06-22 17:01) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Email friend (2011-06-22 17:06) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6 August . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Why did I write, ”Future Namibia”? (2011-08-23 15:57) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.7 December . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idealism (2011-12-28 15:44) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2012 4.1 January . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Future Namibia - On Sale Now (2012-01-03 16:08) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Dogg making racial jokes on Facebook (2012-01-05 22:47) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Milton Louw - Future Namibia : Autorenportrait BoD - Books on Demand (2012-01-06 16:03) Black Consciousness Revisited (2012-01-13 10:20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cry The Beloved Country (2012-01-13 10:41) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urbanomics: A Public Credit Registry for India? (2012-01-17 17:12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibië moet digitaal verspring (2012-01-17 17:20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

222 222 223 224 244 245 246 247 247 248 249 250 251 253 254 254 255 255 256 256 257 257 259 259 259 259 261 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 267

Nuwe bedeling vir ’dot com dot na’ (2012-01-17 17:28) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tyd loop uit vir inspraak in kommunikasiewet (2012-01-17 17:29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roux-che Locke: teachers who were part of my life’s journey: thank you (2012-01-18 11:41) Andreas Guibeb - Experimenting with education in Namibia (2012-01-19 11:36) . . . . . . . 10

Management coaching: There’s method in the madness | Africa Report (2012-01-28 10:58) . Children’s books available electronically -when can we give them e-readers? (2012-01-30 11:06) Dr Seuss - my best friend (2012-01-31 12:03) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A quote on attitude (2012-01-31 12:04) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oh, the Places You’ll Go! (2012-01-31 13:25) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Financial education counselling: counsellor’s handbook (2012-01-31 16:04) . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Blog list 2012 (2012-01-31 16:14) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2 February . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Why use words like black market? (2012-02-01 09:15) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To my old slave master (2012-02-01 22:52) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I am a socio-political entrepreneur (2012-02-03 14:08) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Culture, racism and tribalism (2012-02-06 10:01) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Written Interview with Andreas Thomas - Windhoek Observer - 7 Feb 2012 (2012-02-08 00:15) Politicsweb - How to write about race - Top stories (2012-02-08 12:12) . . . . . . . . . . . . The need for open debate - Villager 14/08/11 (2012-02-08 18:14) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Rights. What about Namibian responsibilities? (2012-02-12 17:45) . . . . . . . . THE WATERS OF ERONGO (2012-02-13 01:04) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3 March . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implementing ICT policy for the benefit of Africans (2012-03-17 11:53) 4.4 . . . . . . . . . . .

268 269 270 270 271 274 274 276 276 276 277 278 280 281 282 283 285 289 289 291 291 291 292 293 293 293 294 294 295 297 298 299 299 299 299 11

April . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WHEN I ASK YOU TO LISTEN (2012-04-22 17:47) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legalise Prostitution in Namibia (2012-04-23 18:56) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Toekoms Namibië (2012-04-24 11:52) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Some good news for Namibian consumers (2012-04-26 15:12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.5

May . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Bloggers - May 2012 (2012-05-01 11:20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What is faith to me? (2012-05-05 12:15) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What happened at Sam Khubis - the day of the covenant of the Rehoboth Baster people of Namibia? (2012-05-08 17:41) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consumer Protection Group advocates for laws to protect buyers (2012-05-12 15:19) . . . . Am I Afropolitan? - ”a rose by any other name” (2012-05-20 12:19) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Let’s put Namibia on the forefront of technology (2012-05-30 16:25) . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.6

June . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I am an pan African (2012-06-01 16:32) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.7

July . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I am a Citizen Informaticist (2012-07-20 14:29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The argument for rent control in Namibia (2012-07-20 17:26) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2012-07-20 18:39) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Future Namibia - First edition (2012-07-23 16:56) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stealing copyrighted pictures in Africa (2012-07-24 11:51) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Establishing a Namibian Savings and Credit Cooperative (2012-07-26 10:33) . . . . . . . .

301 302 302 302 303 305 306 306 307 307 308 309 309 310 310 312 312 312 313 315 315 316 317 318 318 320 320

Please list me as the Father of your Child (2012-07-31 14:35) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.8 August . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Showing my love for my neighbour (2012-08-16 14:40) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I will put you in your place (2012-08-20 13:25) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inheritance Tracing Agency (2012-08-20 13:36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Can entrepreneurship be taught? (2012-08-20 13:45) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.9 September . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating an Information Bank for Namibian consumers (2012-09-14 16:57) . . . . . . . . . . 4.10 October . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Why is the consumer protection law taking so long to implement in Namibia? (2012-10-04 14:55) My debt is more than double? (2012-10-18 14:46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.11 November . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Telephone Numbering Plan (2012-11-12 13:29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . We need Consumer Protection laws (2012-11-12 14:04) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.12 December . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibian Telephone Numbering Plan (2012-12-03 10:44) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Growing trend of mobile phone spam in Namibia (2012-12-03 10:48) . . . . . . . . . . . . . History of credit in Namibia (2012-12-03 10:51) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What is the information you need when taking a bank loan? (2012-12-03 10:55) . . . . . . . A Consumer Christmas Wish List (2012-12-14 14:36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Competitions of luck not so lucky (2012-12-14 14:46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consumer Rights are Human Rights (2012-12-14 15:05) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Future Dreams (Submission to the Commonwealth Writers Short Story Prize 2012) (2012-12-29 23:36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 5 2013 5.1 January . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blowing my own horn (and Namibia’s) in Jan 2013 (2013-01-08 12:40) . . . . . . . . . . . . Transport plans long overdue for Namibia (2013-01-13 20:05) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-Governance needs to be prioritised (2013-01-13 20:08) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Confusing pricing and its remedy (2013-01-13 20:10) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 327 327 327 327 329 330

A New Year’s Resolution for 2013 (2013-01-13 20:16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Innovation needed for home ownership (2013-01-18 12:38) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Micro lending or loan sharks? (2013-01-26 17:23) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How much does it cost? (2013-01-31 10:49) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2 February . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The myth of Namibia (2013-02-19 01:24) 5.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

331 332 334 335 336 336 336 336 338 339 340 341 342 343 345 346 347 348 350

March . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding B2B, B2C and G2B (2013-03-07 11:22) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implementing ICT policy for the benefit of Namibian consumer (2013-03-07 11:31) . . . . . New Year’s Resolutions to help Namibian Consumers (2013-03-07 12:04) . . . . . . . . . . . Housing in Namibia (2013-03-07 12:06) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The downside of Credit (2013-03-07 12:15)

Money to be made in helping consumers (2013-03-07 12:17) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal Insurance for Namibians (2013-03-07 12:19) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Show me the money (2013-03-07 12:20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Have some manners, please (2013-03-07 12:22) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding Banking (2013-03-07 12:23) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hage Geingob must keep his promises (2013-03-07 12:24) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Namibians are Miserable (2013-03-07 12:28) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

14

Chapter 1

2009
1.1 January

Starting 2009 with a plan (2009-01-05 10:18)
The year 2008 ended on a fairly low note as I realised I needed (through necessity) to find a new employment or direction for my life. A friend of mine with a guest farm in the remote farming district of Otjimbingwe invited me to visit him and his family for a few days starting on the 2nd of January. WOW! Getting away from it all has never been so exhilarating. We get up in the morning and go jogging up the Kudu Trail and have a magnificent view for miles around. Jog back down and then it is time for breakfast. The best part is we get to chat along the way and discuss various business ideas. In fact, some of them are so good we are still working at them ten years later ;-). This year he suggested I write a book. Not any book - mind you, but a book on my thoughts for the economic development of Namibia. Scary to say the least. Well, I have never been one to sit too long on an idea so started writing to see if I could. Within two days we have thrashed out the framework for the book and now I have to make a decision on whether I actually have the guts to do it?

1.2

February

Philosophy Farm 101 (2009-02-28 17:37)
Hi, Milton Louw here on Farm Okomitundu, 170 km from Windhoek ([1]www.okomitundu.com). It is a Guest Farm with all the amenities, 2 heated swimming pools (;-), nature drives, hiking trails and much, much more. In fact, the other morning while jogging I suddenly rounded the farm dam and saw a group of about 20 wildebeest. I stood still while they ran about 20 metres and looked back at me. They reminded me of sales assistants in a clothing store on a Saturday morning watching my daughters and I enter. They instinctively know my daughters and I are window shopping, not yet ready to buy. In the same way the wildebeest knew I was here to look not to catch and eat. I was still marvelling at this encounter when I looked up to see an Oryx directly ahead in my path. He spent a few seconds looking at me before disappearing behind a bush. When I came to the place the Oryx was, there was small clearing and he had only reversed some 20 metres into the bush. It looked very much as if we had come to a crossing at the same time and he was giving me the ”right of way”. 15

As I jogged further, a peace came over me knowing that while the animal andtheir families were being looked after, mine would be too. So, here I am taking a break from the rat race and philosophising? In fact, I hope to prepare some articles on various relevant issues (and will keep them posted on a regular basis) to be incorporated into a book I am writing. Though for the week: ”The cure, therefore, of political ills is knowledge of the good life, and the statesman is he who has such knowledge, for that alone can give men what they are always seeking.” - Introduction to Aristotle’s Treatise on Government translation by William Ellis (1912) Remember, my email address is [2]miltonlouw@gmail.com. Enjoy your weekend, I am off for a beer in the swimming pool... Milton
1. http://www.okomitundu.com/ 2. mailto:miltonlouw@gmail.com

1.3

March

Thoughts on Prosperity (2009-03-12 09:37)
Hi, Milton Louw here in Walvis Bay. Just came through for the day and had to have some seafood at the Raft (excellent platter ;-). Very fortunate to see some good friends too while in Swakopmund and WB. Thought for the week: Prosperity is a way of living and thinking, and not just money or things. Poverty is a way of living and thinking, and not just a lack of money or things. -Eric Butterworth It is good to have money and the things that money can buy, but it’s good too, to check up once in a while and make sure you haven’t lost the things money can’t buy. - George Lorimer Blessed indeed is the man who hears many gentle voices call him father! - Lydia Maria Child Regards Milton Cell: + 264 81 304 3282

Central Register for Namibia (2009-03-12 11:47)
The following report was prepared for a workshop in August 1999 held in Windhoek. Some interesting reading on what the original business idea was. Posted here for posterity. Milton Central Register for Namibia Prepared by: Creditreform International Dr. Dieter Südhofen, Secretary General Preamble: 16

The special political situation as well as the reorganisation and restructuring of the state machinery aimed at in Namibia have provided a special opportunity to set up a central register which is organised in accordance with the latest aspects of computing, takes all essential legislation concerning data protection into account and reaches an efficiency ratio which Germany can unfortunately only dream of at present. The knowledge gained from setting up a modern central register could then be made available to other countries. Objectives: The data which has to be processed by state institutions for a modern social market economy should be organised with the aid of the latest data technology. Germany should be taken as a basis with regard to the essential data. Sufficient experience regarding the individual data necessary has been gathered here as a result of successfully establishing a social market economy. The updating and use of the data has to be separately analysed for Namibia to bring about the optimum benefit for Namibia. Any implementation of the project should fundamentally begin with the core applications. A feasibility study would have to be ordered in the short term to examine the further development of the project. Contents and Set-up of a Central Register in Namibia The registers kept in Germany are described in more detail below. They have grown historically and are, for the most part, still administered by hand at present. Various neighbouring countries are already way ahead in that respect, by administering the data fully by computer technology. When setting up a new central register, it should therefore, from the very beginning, be set up and organised from the viewpoint of today’s computer technology. Starting out from the natural and legal persons, it is necessary to set up a total stock of data which forms the basis for all essential registers. From that, each individual register independently and responsibly administers the which concerns it. Every access is recorded taking the law on data protection into account. The access authorisations of individual employees are controlled by computer in accordance with work sequence requirements. After the total quantity of data has been put together, it must finally be determined what data is available at what offices on what medium in Namibia, so that it can be used as the basis such an entire central register. The total quantities can then be approximately determined and a rough computing concept can be drawn up. Realisation of a Public Register 1.Principle and goal for the realisation of a public register The creation of a register for recording and collecting stocks of data results from, amongst other things, the necessity to check, protect and historically prove data and its origin. The aim thereby, with regard to the final result of all data recorded, must be to completely show facts and information which can be checked and controlled as regards the legislation on data protection. The consistent realisation of a register offers the basis for information systems and applications in industry and administration. On the whole, this offers the chance to set up databases and application systems in a co-ordinated and homogenous manner whilst avoiding a proliferation of partial solutions and insular solutions – as is the case in Germany for example – which can hardly be combined and co-ordinated in future. 1.1 Prerequisite Setting-up of a central database adapted to the requirements, with the possibility of locally updating the respective stock of data to be processed. 1.2 The Central database All externally recorded and processed information of the public register should be gathered and stored in this database. 1.3 External database stations Data is recorded, processed and used here in different areas. The respective data stock of these database stations should be transmitted to the central database daily, to enable data security (storage) on the one hand and, on the other hand, the use of essential information by calling up other external database stations. Additionally, a speedy exchange of information between the different database stations would be possible in that way. 1.4 Central and local solutions and applications Based on the central register, applications which support administrative, economic and social interests 17

from the municipal and regional level to the national level have to be added for the different specialised requirements. 2. Contents of the public register 2.1 Register of residents This external database station generally registers private person’s data. Persons are registered here along with their personal data by the respective local government body (town, local authority). The citizens of a country are registered here in the entirety of all the data recorded. The stored information serves the duties to report and register and is stored as a basis for internal and external administrative purposes. 2.1.1 Contents - Surname, first name - Date of birth - Nationality - Occupation - Title - Employer - Home address (street/place) - Resident there since when: - Moved from which address - Marital status - Name of spouse, if married - Spouse’s date of birth - Spouse’s occupation - Number of children - Name of children - Children’s date of birth - Address if parents are separated - Earlier home addresses 2.2 Commercial register data All information relating to commercial register data should be administered in this external database station. It should be kept as an official and public register of all fully qualified merchants. The aim and object of the commercial register is to officially deposit commercial and legal basis contracts of all fully qualified merchants active in business, to enable them to be checked and historically proven. 2.2.1 Contents of the commercial register database Facts requiring registration: a) Name of company - complete company name - legal form b) Corporate domicile of the company - address (place and street / P.O. Box - addresses of any branch offices c) Purpose of the company - branch number (s) - tax number - turnover tax identification number (VAT) d) Owners and partners - name, personal place of residence (address) - date of birth - name of occupation, title e) Subscribed capital - sum of liable capital 18

- capital shares paid up and still outstanding f) List of partners (sum of capital shares) - name and address of the individual partners - plus date of birth in case of private persons - plus commercial register number in the case of company holdings g) Managing persons in relation to third parties - managing directors, supervisory board members, management board members, - advisory board members, authorised officers - name and address plus date of birth, name of occupation, title h) Financial statements deposited - business reports - balance-sheet-data - notes to the financial statements - annual report i) Notarial deeds (instruments) - the company’s official documents - memorandums of association - amending contracts - supplementary contracts j) Peculiarities - licences - patents - utility models / registered designs 2.3 Register of co-operative societies This external database serves to prove the legal relations of the co-operative societies to the general public. It exists as an independent register in addition to the commercial register. The functions and objectives are comparable. 2.3.1 Contents of the register of co-operative societies They are identical to the data of the commercial register, but should be supplemented by the following additional points: a) the articles of association, which have to be signed by the members b) a list of members (holders of shares in the co-operative society) c) the duration of the co-operative society, if it is limited to a certain period only 2.4 Insolvent debtors’ data / Register of insolvent debtors Facts requiring registration: a) Surname of the person b) All known first names of the person c) Date of birth d) Place of residence (street/place) e) Any second place of residence f) Name of occupation (title) g) Stage names, if existent h) Form of entry in the insolvent debtors’ register 2.4.2 Contents of insolvent debtors’ data for legal persons Facts requiring registration: a) Name of company b) Address (street/place) c) P.O. Box /town d) Representatives of the company in relation to third parties - e.g. the managing directors 19

- surname / first name - address (private) - date of birth e) The company’s commercial register f) Commercial register number g) Form of entry in the insolvent debtors’ register 2.5 Marriage property register In this external database station, spouses have the possibility of having the property regime of spouses’ property increments agreed upon by contracts (marriage contract) and registered. The main function of the marriage property register is to document marital communities of accrued gain or marital ties regulated by a marriage contract, so they can be used as a basis for any legal disputes. 2.5.1 Contents a) Surname/first name of the wife/husband b) Maiden name of wife/husband if applicable c) Dates of birth of the married couple d) Date of marriage e) Date of marriage contract f) Notarial recording of the marriage contract 2.6 Register of associations Groupings (associations) whose purpose is not directed towards a commercial establishment are registered here. The independent register of associations is otherwise to be treated equivalent to the commercial register and the register of co-operative societies and, in that respect, also has the same functions of registration, checking and control. 2.6.1 Contents a) Name of the association b) Address (street/place) c) Members of the association - Surname, first name - Address (private) - Date of birth d) Association’s registration number e) Association’s registry court f) Representative authority of the persons representing in relation to third parties 2.7 Trade Register Traders have to be recorded in this external database station, irrespective of their legal form. In that respect, the trade register stores all necessary information for offices which further process that information. It is deemed to be, amongst other things, the basis and starting point for the taxation of persons carrying on a trade. No trade may be carried on without being registered in this register. Following an examination, the trade register grants a trade licence and checks how the trade is allowed for example, such as a health certificate in the case of traders in the field of foodstuffs or gastronomy, are checked and monitored. 2.7.1 Contents - Surname, first name of the trader - The owner’s address (street/P.O. Box /place) - Owner’s date of birth - Owner’s occupation / name of occupation - Existing titles (e.g. title of Master craftsman) - Purpose of the business - Address of the business premises or any branch offices - Essential special certificates - Permits for special business enterprises 20

2.8 Land register All information concerning the residential property and real estate of private persons and legal persons (companies) should be recorded in the land register. The land register is the official basis for registering private residential property and real estate as well as any financial encumbrance (mortgages), which are entered as a land charge in the land register. It provides information on the actual current owner of a house/property) and on any previous owners. The property situation is clearly registered and laid down with the aid of that data. 2.8.1 Contents - Address of real estate property - Size of the real estate / the property in square metres - Current market value - Sum of the registered land charge - Financing mortgage bank - Surname / first name of the owner (part-owner) - Date of birth - Private address of the owner - Size of the registered property as a percentage - Date of the purchase of the property - Former owners - Notarial recordings 2.9 Register of bankruptcies and compositions Entries of or about private persons and legal persons with regard to bankruptcy and composition proceedings applied for, opened, to be carried out or ended are stored here. The register registers, co-ordinates and monitors the measures to be carried out in things, as an intermediary point between the bankruptcy and / or composition proceedings, the courts and the respective creditors. The official dates are recorded here and released for publication. 2.9.1 Contents for private persons - Reference number - Surname, first name - Address (street / place) - Date of birth - Occupation - Employer - Marital status - Name of spouse - Application data – composition - Opening data – composition/bankruptcy - Closing data - composition/bankruptcy - Measures taken - Auctions - Levies of execution 2.9.2 Contents for legal persons - Reference number - Company name - Address (street / place) - Commercial register data (district court/commercial register number) - Purpose of the company - Representatives of the company - Name of the capital holders (partners) - Address of the partners (plus date of birth) 21

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Name of the persons representing the company in relation to third parties Address of those persons (plus date of birth) Application data – composition/bankruptcy Bankruptcy/composition trustee Official receivership data (prohibitions of sale) Name of official receiver Stipulated dates (examination dates) Opening data – composition/bankruptcy Closing data - composition/bankruptcy Measures taken Auctions Levies of execution The company’s assets The company’s liabilities Composition dividends Bankruptcy realisation assets

ICT Recommendations for Namibia (2009-03-15 10:43)
”First posted 4 May 2007” Hi, Milton here in Windhoek. Sitting in the office on a public holiday getting some work done! Last week I was questioned on the achievements of the ICT Alliance, so I thought to give a short overview of the recommendations recently accepted by the Government of Namibia in the area of Information and Communication Technology. The conference report details the areas Namibia will have to concentrate on if we wish to make ICT a pillar of our Vision 2030 and was developed in partnership between the Ministry and the ICT Alliance. My thought for this week - specifically with our neighbouring Zimbabwe in mind: ”Him that I love, I wish to be free – even from me.” - Anne Lindbergh Kind regards Milton Louw + 264 81 3043282 milton@iit.com.na The previous Ministry of Information and Broadcasting (now Ministry of Information and Communication Technology - MICT) held a conference in August 2007 on the role of ICT in Namibia. The conference was organised together with the Namibia Communication Commission and the ICT Alliance. The main objectives of this Conference were as follows: o To assess the current reality of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Namibia o To identify the challenges and opportunities for ICT in the country o To propose ways in which ICT can contribute to poverty alleviation and sustainable development in Namibia o And ultimately, to identify how ICT can assist Namibia in achieving its Vision 2030. The key expectation of the Namibian Minister of Information and Broadcasting for the Conference was to generate practical recommendations assisting Government in preparing a roadmap to accelerate economic development and prosperity for all through the use of ICT. The conference had two parts, the first dealing with the present status of the industry, and the second dealing with recommendations for future action on the part of the country. 22

A report was submitted to the Cabinet of Namibia and they have accepted the recommendations and established a Taskforce, under the leadership of the Permanent Secretary of the MICT, with the chairpersons of the various conference sub-groups. The sub-groups are: o Government (Chair: Mr. Samuel Goagoseb) o Legal framework (Mr. Hartmut Ruppel) o Education (Mr. Alfred Ilukena represented by Mr. Johan van Wyk) o Telecommunications and Broadcasting (Chair: Mr. Jochen Traut) o Internet (Chair: Mr. Gideon Nhundu) o ICT Industry (Chair: Mr. Theo Schoeman) These are the broad outlines of the recommendations proposed during the Conference and accepted by the Government of Namibia as areas of activity. ” Consolidation of overall ICT governance ” Free / Libre Open Source Software policy must be adopted ” Copyright legislation must be amended to include Creative Commons licensing ” Development of Broadband access (infrastructure) be accelerated ” Separate infrastructure ownership and usage ” Universal Service Fund must be clearly defined and administered ” Local companies must get preference in tenders ” E-commerce (electronic transactions) law must be passed ” Privacy and data protection must be addressed ” Top-level domain administration must be administered better ” Broadcasting policy must be created ” Investigate Tax incentives for ICT skills development The taskforce is meeting regularly and will submit a report to Cabinet on the activities to be undertaken as well as budgetary outlines. If you wish to have a copy of the report, please send an email to milton@iit.com.na. If you wish to peruse any of the presentations given at the conference, they can be found at http://www.ictalliance.org.na/ictnam.

Independence 2007 (2009-03-15 10:52)
*First Posted: 20 March 2007* Hi, Milton Louw here from Windhoek. Just about to leave the office to go celebrate our Namibian Independence tomorrow. Thinking back reminds me how our was the lucky person to raise the flag over Windhoek that first morning from where the Polytechnic is today. As the Chairperson of the tertiary Student’s Representative Council (Academy) in 1989/1990 I have to also consider what the inheritance is of the students born those years and now ”enjoying the fruits of our freedom”. I can categorically state that me and most of my generation have benefited greatly BUT................ I must also admit that the young generation of today have been done in. During this past week I was fortunate to talk to one of my mentors and idols, Toivo ya Toivo, and was once again humbled when he was most pleased to hear that I am teaching some of the knowledge I have acquired to the young generation of today. (I used to sometimes look down on the ”teaching profession” of Namibianow no more!) So my challenge to you today dear friends is: What have you done lately to give back to your community? Viva Namibia, Viva Responsibility 23

Milton Louw + 264 81 3043282

Never too old to learn (2009-03-15 10:53)
*First Posted: 5 January 2007* Hi, Milton Louw here from Windhoek in this first month of 2007. I hope you have had a relaxing vacation (those of you who could afford to get away), and are ready for the challenges of 2007. May all you efforts be rewarded with the success you work for. Now how about a New Years resolution to include improving yourself.......... This week, I cover 1. Thought for the week 2. Life Long Learning The next week means for most of us the return (or start) of school for our children. If you can, take just five minutes each day and consider what they will become upon leaving school. Then, check to see if you are doing everything possible to make their dreams come true. Enjoy the week, Milton Cell: +264 81 304 3282

Thought for the week We must encourage [each other] once we have grasped the basic points to interconnecting everything else on our own, to use memory to guide our original thinking, and to accept what someone else says as a starting point, a seed to be nourished and grow. For the correct analogy for the mind is not a vessel that needs filling but wood that needs igniting no more and then it motivates one towards originality and instills the desire for truth. Suppose someone were to go and ask his neighbors for fire and find a substantial blaze there, and just stay there continually warming himself: that is no different from someone who goes to someone else to get to some of his rationality, and fails to realize that he ought to ignite his own flame, his own intellect, but is happy to sit entranced by the lecture, and the words trigger only associative thinking and bring, as it were, only a flush to his cheeks and a glow to his limbs; but he has not dispelled or dispersed, in the warm light of philosophy, the internal dank gloom of his mind. • [1]Plutarch, On Listening to Lectures

Life-Long Learning Are you satisfied with what you have achieved in life? Do you want to climb the ladder of life even higher? Are you going to sit in an old age home at 60 and watch the world go by? 24

Today we recognise that finishing school or university is not the end of our learning experience. Think just about computers, cellular phones, etc and how much you have had to learn over the past decade to stay up to date with just having a life. How more so if you are in an ever changing working environment. This demands from you an approach where you take charge of your career, rather than the old-fashioned view that a career is what happens to you. Remember also, once you turn ”60”, it no longer means you have nothing to contribute to your society. Take the challenge this year, and choose something new to learn. Here are a few examples: • Another language - how many of us will be able to talk with our Chinese counterparts as they ever increasingly extend beyond their boundaries? • A musical Instrument - even the drums can be learnt by those (like me) who say they cannot carry a tune • Computer program - Project management is all the rage and it will take you less than four days to master a software package such as MS Project This are but a few of the areas that I am exploring for 2007. Maybe you have other interests, maybe even a hobby such as origami or bonsai, just as long as you keep them brain cells working. For interest sake, I typed in ”life long learning” in the Google Search engine. I got back over 86,000,000 sites that cover this topic. So remember, even if you do not consider life long learning, there are many other (your probable competitors) who do. Have a look at this link for some great ideas, [2]http://www.newhorizons.org/. Remember, you are never too old to learn.
1. http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Plutarch 2. http://www.newhorizons.org/

Namibian Family Tree (2009-03-15 11:39)

[1] Hi, Milton here from the farm Okomitundu. I have visited the top of the Kudu Mountain, some 400 metres above the farmhouse (1,670m above sea-level). I was being interviewed for the television programme Green Horizons that should be broadcast on NBC TV on 26 March. (Some people have asked for a picture of what the farm looks like, so have a look at [2]www.okomitundu.com.) This week I have finished loading 250,000 Namibians information listed by surname on to the Internet. This includes their name and surname, as well as their date of birth. See my article below and check if your details are online. You might be surprised how many of your relatives are on as well ;-). Thought for the week: ”Call it a clan, call it a network, call it a tribe, call it a family. Whatever you call it, whoever you are, you 25

need one.” Jane Howard Kind regards Milton Email: miltonlouw@gmail.com website: www.nambiz.co.cc

What is private? How much of your data is on a computer? How much do companies, employers, the government, even enemies know about your life? Even more worrying, how much of this information is publicly available? Since 1999, I have been proposing a central register for Namibia (http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/2009/03/central-register-for-nami bia.html). This week I listed all people I have been able to collect information on, in a family tree type website. It is available at www.nambiz.co.cc. You enter the yellow pages section and will then have an alphabetical list. Choose the letter your surname starts with and a list of all surnames starting with that letter will appear. Choose your surname, and a listing of everyone with the same surname will appear. You will find their name as well as their date of birth (if it is in the system). In my case, I checked my cousin, Merle Oosthuizen and found her birthday easily...... My hope is that after looking at the site you will consider the amount of information of yours that is already being stored someplace. I hope this will get your support for a data protection and privacy act being made law as soon as possible. Remember, I am only one person and have been able to collect all this, what about those businesses who have a lot more data on you? Email me with your comments: miltonlouw@gmail.com

1. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_3z1n0AbIGHk/SbzO8bbjJyI/AAAAAAAAAAc/6zAHqu0lCgM/s1600-h/thefarm.jpg 2. http:/www.okomitundu.com/

Independence 2009 - reasons for registers (2009-03-22 10:12)
Hi, Milton here. Still at the farm, fortunate to have one of my daughters, Ziana, visit for the weekend. Thought for the week: “If you’re respectful by habit, constantly honoring the worthy, four things increase: long life, beauty, happiness, strength.”-Buddha Quote Enjoy Namibia’s Independence Day! Kind regards Milton Someone asked, why a website with directories of people and business? The idea of creating an economic country database started in 1994 while working with the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation in Paris, France. Since then I have collected over 11,000 businesses details and 250,000 people. Once the data is collected and cleaned, there are many areas for possible commercial use. However, it has till thus far only been used for research purposes when conducting surveys of the Small and Medium Enterprises for example. 26

The main aim is still to create a Central Register for Namibia that will include amongst others: Register of Residents; Register of Business; Register of Professions; Register of Property Ownership; Register of Licences for Natural Resources and Utilisation; Register of Trademarks, Patents and Copyright; Register of External Trade; and Register of other legal entities. During the past ten years, I have managed to create registers for persons, business and external trade. This has assisted greatly in providing income opportunities for me in various areas in Research. I would however like to make this information available to more people to see what opportunities might arise. Lastly, I am preparing a database with much deeper individual information (not yet sure about privacy issues) to allow me to look at a credit assistance scheme that looks at ”reputational collateral” rather than history of financial mistakes.

Culling of Wildebeest applies to beer (2009-03-22 12:27)
This is not only philosophical but is obviously pure science. A herd of wildebeest can move only as fast as the slowest wildebeest, and when the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group keeps improving by the regular culling of the weakest members. In much the same way the human brain can only operate as fast as the slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, we all know, kills brain cells, but naturally it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells first. In this way regular consumption of beer eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and more efficient machine. So that’s why you always feel smarter after a few beers.

Credit Reporting Agency for Namibia (2009-03-25 09:59)
*First posted on 23 June 2006* SUBMISSION ON BANKING REGULATIONS VIS-À-VIS CREDIT PROVISION The following is the submission made to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Economics, Natural Resources and Public Administration. They held public hearings on bank charges and regulations on 14 July 2006 in Windhoek. The banking system in Namibia is presently facing difficulties in their abilities to provide financing for individuals and business, especially small and medium enterprises (SME’s). This problem is further influenced by the present level of non-performing debt being experienced in all sectors that provide credit. This poor performance on loans has led to many institutions having to recoup their losses, and provide themselves with profit, through high interests and ”innovative” banking charges. It is my opinion that this can be addressed through the increased usage of Information and Communication Technologies. As an example, I attach a paper on the need for credit bureau, and the establishment of an economic database to address this need. (if you wish a copy of the paper, please email me at [1]miltonlouw@gmail.com) Through the sharing of information between public and private sectors (with the appropriate legislation to prevent abuse), a reliable source of information can be provided which will necessitate the banking institutions 27

to become more competitive to attract clientele. This clientele in turn will be able to negotiate for better rates, and lower charges, if they are aware of their own credit worthiness. I remain at the convenience of the Committee to provide any further information they might require to encourage the necessary changes in legislation, as well as provide authority to the necessary public institutions, to implement a system to encourage the responsible growth of the credit sector. Lastly, I must add that I believe such a credit agency, whether public or private, will only facilitate the provision of credit, and not provide moral influence on us as a society to ensure we keep our side of the bargain and keep up our financial obligations. Thought for the week: ”I sincerely believe that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies, and that the principles of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale” - Thomas Jefferson (American 3rd President)
1. http://www.blogger.com/miltonlouw@gmail.com

The need for Credit Bureaux in Namibia (2009-03-26 14:24)
Submitted to Namibian Parliament on 13 July 2006 Providing affordable financing in Namibia The need for Credit Bureaux Introduction In many developing countries the providers of finance have access to information in databases that help them to asses the creditworthiness of an applicant for credit. With the appropriate credit risk management tools, a lender can reduce the default levels, and provide finance at a cheaper rate to creditworthy clients. The organisations that gather data and operate these services are known as Credit Bureaux, Credit Information Services, Credit Registries, Credit Reporting Agencies or Consumer Credit Reference Agencies. In Namibia, there is only one company, Transunion ITC, which provides a credit bureaux service for consumer information and they collect primarily negative information (negative – that is information on credit defaults, judgements, etc.). A joint-venture between NamBizDotCom and Creditreform Germany, has been developing a commercial database of over 11,000 companies and has completed a basic consumer database of 250,000 people in January 2007. This credit information service (CRIB) is yet to be made commercially available. Credit Information Service The creation of a credit report depends on the availability of information gathered from public records, statutory information, credit applications and credit accounts on the individual consumers and businesses. The bank (or other lender) accesses the service in the form of written reports and uses it to judge the application risk before supplying the credit. The bank can also use the credit report, and its credit risk rating, to determine the amount of the loan as well as the interest and other bank charges. The usage of a credit report with more than just negative information assists growth in the country by stimulating the consumer credit economy. Borrowers can be assessed for risk in an objective way based on credit payment history so credit can be allocated more efficiently. Many “new” borrowers in Namibia have no credit history, and assessment can be difficult with additional supportive reputational collateral. This reputational collateral can include: " proof of physical address 28

" ownership information on property " family associations " informal business history " etc. The existence of a Credit Bureau with sufficient information should assist growth by stimulating the consumer credit economy. Borrowers can be assessed for risk in an objective way based on their own histories so credit can be allocated more efficiently. Borrowing by high risk borrowers is also now controlled and the market is opened for new low risk borrowers. Lenders, consumers, businesses, government and central banks all benefit from Credit Bureaux. This is why the World Bank, IFC and USAID organisations are all promoting and facilitating the development of efficient and capable Credit Bureau services around the world. The effectiveness of a Credit Bureau varies depending upon a number of factors including data availability, data quality, operating ability and legislation. Supportive legislation and a sound technical infrastructure are crucial to effective operation. The services provided by a Credit Bureau expands from the basic credit report to extended financial information, historical factors, and in many cases, can assist in tracing the debtor in the case of default (debt collection). In Namibia, the banks are charging high fees and interest rates because of the “difficulties in assessing risk”, and the “unavailability of data”, especially regarding the physical address of clients. Dilemma collection of data It must be noted that the collection of data must be controlled to ensure there is no abuse of privacy rights. The CRIB database has been created with over 11,000 companies and 250,000 consumers. This data includes: " Full names " ID Number " Postal address " Physical address " Telephone " Employer records (Only +/- 25,000 records are complete) The creation, cleaning and mining of the data does meet standards of copyright, but such information must be regulated. It must be kept in mind, if an individual has been able to create such a database, what databases are being created and maintained by corporations in and outside of Namibia? Namibian Situation The databases available in Namibia range from

• private sector models that include information relating to your account details and histories, Multichoice, MTC, Sanlam, etc.; and • public sector, such as Home Affairs ID section, Electoral Roll, Municipal accounts, etc. At present, there is no legislation to:

1. control the information being held on a credit record; 2. avenue for corrections to be made; and 3. enforcing openness in regards the negative reply to credit application. The legislature also has the opportunity to regulate a range of charges that banks may charge according to the rating of individual consumers and businesses. (e.g. Basel in EU). 29

Proposal There is need for the establishment of an economic database that includes both consumer and commercial information. It is proposed that it should be a Private-Public Sector Partnership to protect the privacy rights (data protection) of individuals. The following will benefit from the establishment of the economic database:

• Small- and medium-sized enterprises • Business (trading) • Financial sector (credit providers) • Government • Regional and International trade

News 26 March 2009 (2009-03-26 20:35)
Hi, Milton here on Farm Okomitundu. I am still philosophising while writing my book - but had to ROFLOL when I read ”Culling of Wildebeest applies to Beer”. This week: 1. Government-owned Monopolies - the good, the bad... 2. Number portability My thought for the week: ”If you want to make enemies, try to change something.” - Woodrow T.Wilson Almost finished the first draft of the book. (The two articles above are part of it ;-0) Hopefully be at home by Easter. Regards Milton ROFLOL = Rolling On Floor, Laughing Out Loud

1.4

April

Keep you cell number - change your network (2009-04-12 17:54)
Number Portability Most countries around the world have opened their telecommunications markets to competition, which has accelerated the deployment of telecommunications services more quickly and cost-effectively than past monopolies have achieved. Some of these liberalisation efforts are being driven by regulations that call for number portability. For example, the European Union (EU) Universal Service and Users’ Rights Directive (2002/22/EC), Article 30 effective since July 2003 - imposes on all EU member states the following obligations: Member states shall ensure that all subscribers of publicly available telephone services, including mobile services, who so request can retain their number(s) independently of the undertaking providing the service: ” o In the case of geographic numbers, at a specific location; and 30

” o In the case of non-geographic numbers, at any location. As consumers we have must have the choice of which service provider we want to use. Most cellular and telephone subscribers however do not wish to lose their present number and therefore stay with the present provider. One of the toughest responsibilities facing the regulators in the Namibian telecom markets involves modernising our national numbering policies, numbering plans, and dialling plans. We have to establish a numbering policy that provides a legal, legislative, and regulatory basis for competition. Then, our regulator must decide on numbering and dialling schemes, services, technologies, and billing and tariff methods that support its chosen numbering policy. Lastly, it must also establish a fair, neutral office for numbering administration. (I have heard the argument of the costs of implementing such a system – this however is always only the argument of the company with the biggest client base.) The Namibia Consumer Protection Group welcomes number portability for ushering in greater freedom of choice, spurring competition and encouraging technological innovation. LNP removes barriers to switching and provides consumers with a greater choice of carriers and the convenience of keeping their existing numbers. It benefits the ratepayer, the consumer.Whether they have switched cell phone carriers or not, customers have already started reaping the benefits of lower prices and attractive packages offered by wireless carriers as inducements to keep customers from switching. That’s the benefit of freedom of choice and competition.

Monopolies in Namibia (2009-04-12 17:55)
Monopolies - the good, the bad the &.. What are Monopolies? Most people discuss monopolies and blame it for high allowing certain companies to get away with higher prices or unsatisfactory service levels. The argument here is that if competition is allowed, this would automatically mean lower prices or better service. In the following text I look at the various types of monopolies, how they came to exist, and most importantly is competition always a good thing? There are various types of monopoly. Let us look at the most common types in Namibia. - Selling monopolies - a company is the only supplier of a product and the customers must accept the prices it fixes - Producing monopolies - a company controls the manufacture or source of supply - Trading monopolies - a company controls the marketing channel between the source and the customers Furthermore, most monopolies are either national (countrywide) or local in geography. There are three main ways in which a monopoly gets its power, either through the government (a political monopoly); through economic control by a company of a natural resource; or through commercial monopoly agreements between competitors. A political monopoly comes about through a special government grant that forbids others to engage in this business activity. In countries ruled by monarchs this was often in the form of crown patents giving exclusive rights to carry out a certain business for example the collection of taxes. A second kind is the granted by a patent for an invention and copyright on books or music. In this form, the government encourages invention, research and writing by giving the full control of the ”intellectual property” to the inventor or writer. It is recognized by all of us that such a monopoly is earned! Also the patent or copyright is limited in time, 14 years for patents and copyright for the lifetime of the writer. Another typical political monopoly is those for the supply of electricity, water or telecommunications. This last kind is often granted to state companies and encourages them to invest in areas that are helpful to the country and that normal capitalist (profit making) companies might not invest in. This is why it is important to have a Universal Service Fund when such monopoly rights are removed! 31

Economic monopolies come about when scarce natural resources come under the control of a company (or companies) who agree on the price. In most cases such economic monopolies could have been prevented had it been foreseen. Trading monopolies come about when a company has ownership of subsidiaries that compete in the retail market in competition with companies that purchase its services wholesale. They are thus able to ”share costs”. Government Policy on Monopolies How does the man on the street react to monopolies or competition? Most of us agree that competition is a good thing in business as it brings about lower prices. Yet the same people would agree with me, the Zimbabweans are unfairly bringing down the wages or salaries we earn. This is where, dependent upon where we stand in relation to the practice or industry, our standpoints are developed. The question is then, when is it acceptable to have a monopoly. The answer must be: When it can be regulated by Government. Normally competition provides effective regulation. However, when a monopoly has too high prices, a competitor might build its own infrastructure, for example its own electricity or telephone lines next to the existing infrastructure. So we have to accept a policy of ”monopoly-accepted” as a necessary feature for the public regulation of rates. We accept in Namibia that these industries are those that need expensive, permanent and use public areas (roads, electricity lines, telephone lines, etc.). Conclusion Thus it is in the interest of country to have monopolies in respect of the development and maintenance of the infrastructure. However, competition must be allowed in the provision of services that use it. Thus, to prevent the third type of monopoly, namely a trading monopoly, we cannot allow these state monopolies from selling directly to the public. To use but one example, Telecom should become two separate companies. One, the owner of the physical infrastructure should continue to be the partner of government to ensure the roll-out of access to all Namibians (including receiving government funding where necessary). The second company must be a commercial company using the infrastructure at the same prices as its competitors and being able to sell directly to the commercial and individual customer. For further reading see: ”Modern Economic Problems” - Frank Albert Fetter, Professor of Economics, Princeton University, 1916

Search only Namibian websites (2009-04-12 18:02)
Hi, how do I search only Namibian websites for some information? Well for my research I kept getting too many other non-Namibian information. I created a Google Search Engine applications just for Namibian websites: http://www.google.com/coop/cse?cx=001210031332072355124:2xvxaxbcffq Thought you might enjoy it. Let me know if it is of any use. {Feel free to become a contributor of websites too - its for all of us.) Thought for the week: ”Whenever I found out anything remarkable, I have thought it my duty to put down my discovery on paper, so that all ingenious people might be informed thereof.”- Antonie van Leeuwenhoek Kind regards Milton P.S. You can alos see the searh engine on my website: www.nambiz.co.cc

32

God’s messages (2009-04-12 19:06)
An advertising company in USA put these up on billboards and buses. They really made me think twice this Easter. 1. Let’s Meet At My House Sunday Before the Game - God 2. C’mon Over And Bring The Kids - God 3. What Part of ”Thou Shalt Not...” Didn’t You understand? - God 4. We Need To Talk - God 5. Keep Using My Name in Vain And I’ll Make Rush Hour Longer - God 6. Loved The Wedding, Invite Me To The Marriage - God 7. That ”Love Thy Neighbor” Thing, I Meant It. - God 8. I Love You ... I Love You ... I Love You ... - God 9. Will The Road You’re On Get You To My Place? - God 10. Follow Me. - God 11. Big Bang Theory, You’ve Got To Be Kidding. - God 12. My Way Is The Highway. - God 13. Need Directions? - God 14. You Think It’s Hot Here? - God 15. Tell The Kids I Love Them. - God 16. Need a Marriage Counselor? I’m Available. - God 17. Have You Read My #1 Best Seller? There Will Be A Test. - God Lastly, I was thinking about how people read the Bible a whole lot more when they get older. Then it dawned on me they were cramming for their finals.

Love Freedom Profile (2009-04-13 20:37)
Got a new friend on Facebook. Loved her profile: ”Happiness is Contagious! Let’s make this world a better place by choosing to be happy and making the people around us happy. Let’s spread the Love and the Good Vibes! Happiness is our birthright as human beings. There is no doubt that life can be hard living in today’s world is not always easy especially with the overwhelming amount of negativity around us. But happiness is a choice. Make a conscious decision to be happy. You can be happy right now. It’s all up to you. Be a steward of happiness and good vibes! Do a random act of kindness everyday. It doesn’t need to be big; it could be a small deed or a gesture that will brighten up someone’s day! " Hold the door for someone " Compliment a friend " Let in a merging motorist " Carry groceries for a senior " Say good morning to a co-worker " Phone an old friend " Bring cupcakes to the office " & Or just give someone a friendly smile There are countless possibilities! The smallest good deed is better than hundreds of good intentions without action. START TODAY! ”Be the CHANGE that you want to see in the world” - Gandhi 33

On being Coloured (2009-04-14 19:15)
I am a Coloured. I am a coloured because my parents raised me as such, and because of the environment around me. Most importantly, I can answer my young daughters, (who were not born during Apartheid), when they ask me, “Daddy what am I?” I can laugh loudest and longest when I see a caricature of a coloured woman gossiping with her neighbour over the fence – it happens in my family even though now it is over the Cellphone, and sometimes in the doctor’s waiting room. The next observation by people is obviously the one about the typical coloured. It is either the “LBS, lieg, brag en steel” (lie cheat and steal) or the drinking, smoking drugs, swearing and loafing around – and most commonly having babies at a young age. I even had a white young lady tell me that I should not wear baggy clothes the way “the coloureds do”. DUH! And let’s not forget the one thing that carries over from one generation to another – our love of going to nightclubs and just hanging (“nee daddy, ons hang net”). These attributes are found across all cultures. The fact that as a group we are more tolerant, and probably make more fun of it ourselves does not mean that all coloureds are like this. These are activities which are often brought about by the political, social, economical and technological environment (PEST factors). I believe the perceptions of a drinking and marijuana smoking culture has its origins in the origins of our own “nationhood”. Most of our forefathers were the offspring of (male) European settlers who settled in the cape and their Bantu slaves (female). These bastards were rejected by their mothers’ family and not recognised by their fathers. It is a historical fact that many workers were paid with wine rather than money. Now consider being rejected by both sides of your family and paid in alcohol. What is your worth as a person? Are you worth 5 litres of wine? This cycle is obviously degrading and leads to a very low self esteem. This leads in turn to low confidence levels in your worth and that of your family. This is the big challenge facing the Coloureds with which we still struggle today. So, those who do drink, do drugs, swear and loaf around (in all cultures) are really broken people who have not realised their own true worth in life. So let’s leave the stereotyping out. So if we are not that, what are we as a tribe? Most of us (me included) has lost touch with what we are as a coloured tribe in Namibia, and the broader Southern Africa. Most importantly we must accept our history and be proud of what our forefathers have to done to get us to where we are today. It is time to stop using the terminology of we are “so-called coloureds”. We are Namibian Coloureds proud to be working to a better future for our family, tribe and country![1]
1. http://www.bloghints.com/

Chinese a good thing for Namibia (2009-04-16 10:08)
Many Namibians have expressed alarm at the number of Chinese workers and business people entering Namibia. The most often heard complaint is that the Chinese are taking work away from Namibian workers because they are “willing to work for too little and much harder – even over weekends”. Historically since the 1960’s, SWAPO has been a close ally of the Communist Party during the struggle for liberation. After Independence, these ties are still very good. Since 1990 China has provided more than N $ 1,2 billion in concessional and interest free loans. A further US $ 100 million credit line signed in 2007 has not yet been utilised. Looking at the trade statistics, Namibia already imports 25 % of its products (2006), and the rate is growing at 53 % per year. (These numbers refer to countries other than SACU members.) In my opinion the relationship with China is beneficial to our country. One of the most important things we 34

can learn from the Chinese is the ability to work. I believe that rather than complain at the willingness of the Chinese worker, we should emulate their example. As for the traders that have sprung up all over, this has been a good thing for our economy. It has increased the spending power of our consumers, provided jobs for our workers, and many of these entrepreneurs are marrying into our community. All of these have very beneficial long-term benefits. We must however guard against the creation of “china towns” that will lead to segregation rather than integration. I would further propose we invite the Chinese Government to open a Confucius Institute in Namibia so we can learn more about their cultures, and also have the opportunity to learn the Chinese language. It is a good opportunity for Namibia to offer our country as gateway for Chinese investment in the continent, specifically into the Southern Africa Customs Union.

Me and bad debts (2009-04-23 13:53)
In 2004 I returned from Germany and started up my company, NamBizDotCom, which is registered as a Close Corporation. I was working on two contracts at the time involving SME’s. The first was in cooperation with SMEs Compete and included a trip to South Africa and Angola to look for possible partners in these countries. The second contract, was for the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) and was to complete the SME Impact Assessment Survey for 2004. Unfortunately, my father was declared disabled and unable to continue working. He was 54 and no longer able to generate an income. This started a financial calamity that still haunts me till today. Firstly, the bank, FNB, passed on the insurance claim to Metropolitan Insurance who did not want to accept his disability and therefore allow for his insurance to cover the cost of the home loan. The buck was passed between the two institutions and this delay meant my father was in arrears on his home loan. The bank therefore duly put his house up for auction to recoup their loss, and advertised this in the local newspaper. As is my duty, I immediately went to my Father’s aid. After all, my two little brothers (aged 8 and 2 years old) would not have a roof over their heads if the bank and insurance giants were left unchallenged. Suffice to say, after a year of travelling between Rehoboth where my Father’s house was, and the bank head office in Windhoek, we were successful in getting the bank to settle his home loan through the insurance claim. (I must add tribute to the late Lazarus Ipangelwa, then MD of First National Bank, who allowed us a chance to put our case to the right person at the bank.) In the meantime, my own business had closed and I was responsible for the debts to the amounts of +/- N $ 8,000 to Trip Travel, and +/- 20,000 to Institute for Public Policy Research. This second debt had incurred legal and other sundry charges and was submitted to the courts as an amount of over N $ 25,000 – which is the threshold for admittance to the High Court rather than the Magistrate’s Court. So, I returned to Windhoek in January 2006 to face the two debtors, the one in the Magistrate’s Court and the other in the High Court. I take full responsibility for these debts and have attempted to pay the debts back through monthly payments of N $ 200 and N $ 500 respectively. Unfortunately, these debts are also listed on my credit record, which is accessed by most employers today and I found it difficult to find gainful employment after my return to Windhoek. Since then, I have spent three years as an hourly-paid lecturer and working part-time in an NGO. Let me state for the record, “If I could, I would pay the debt of immediately!” However, I have not been paid a salary since April 2008 and have survived by consultancy work. Perhaps with my next job I will be able to settle these debts once and for all. I do not wish to regale you with the arsenal available to the lawyers, or on the lack of information forthcoming from their offices of how far your repayment is coming. Needless to say, I will welcome a law that helps a debtor in relationship to these educated and learned professionals. On this matter, I wish to suggest a Consumer Ombudsman for citizens who have dealings with lawyers. On more than one occasion I have found an invoice for services from a law firm that has no basis in reality. It is 35

impossible to fight with a lawyer about any of their charges, after all they are better armed with the letter of the law. BTW - all details about the debt and the creditors and lawyers are public knowledge and printed in various local newspapers.

Finished my book! (2009-04-24 16:34)
Almost end of April 2009 and just finished my book, ”[1]Namibia’s Future -Smile my beloved Land”. Not sure if anybody will read it, but you never know;-). You can get a copy at by clicking the link. The next few lines were scribbled as I was printing a hardcopy: A swan song To much too drink Too much too think Thank you all But back to the mall; This had to be done I wish it could be someone Who cares a little bit more Someone who does not feel so sore; But this is my swan song: For better or worse, Thank you one and all, My curse is not suffered alone.
1. http://docs.google.com/fileview?id=F.174caa93-f6e4-43b4-883d-2c4d315b317b

1.5

June

Having children is not easy (2009-06-05 17:32)
Somedays I feel lika a character on an American sitcom, something like the father on Fresh Prince or the Huckstables. Completely past my sell-by-date! Don’t get me wrong, I love my children and wish I coud do more for them. The problem is that often I cannot do more. More than ever I appreciate now the institution of marriage. At least you have an ally and someone with whom you can discuss the problems and way to tackle them. It is also unfortunate we do not have support groupd for divorced fathers?[1]
1. javascript:void(0)

Being thankful in the face of adversity (2009-06-12 15:46)
I was once again reminded today of how we sometimes cannot see the forest for the trees. Sometimes our own problems are so big, we do not appreciate how a little kindness or thoughtfulness from our side can greatly improve somebody’s life. The problem that I am presently facing is the lack of cashflow - getting the money that I have worked for to 36

get into my pocket. A dear friend sent me a movie showing a child too hungry even too eat! AND I am the one complaining. So today my prayer is: ”Thank you for reminding me of all the blessings I have received. May I never forget to offer my assistance to others.”

1.6

July

Unionise the ICT / Data workers of Namibia (2009-07-20 17:14)
Employees and their Unions Workers are often unskilled, semi-literate and the working conditions allow for very little opportunity to become informed of their rights. Because of the nature of our independence struggle, most workers are however aware that the unions, through their affiliation to SWAPO, are an intimidating bargainer to employers. The worker in Namibia, who pays his or her membership dues, expects protection, better pay, better working conditions, more benefits and a sense of belonging. IT Workers In the modern world the distinction between white-collar and blue-collar workers are not the same as they used to be. This is particularly so in the Information Technology sector. The IT sector was previously considered white-collar, in that many of the employees were working as software engineers and programmers. Today, many of the IT workers are busy with the backbone or infrastructure as well as the data input and manipulation. The sector needs to become organised into an ICT Employers Federation and an ICT Workers Union. Such a Union must ensure educational standards, professional qualifications and be able to publish regular industry wage and salary scales. Most employers would argue that a unionised workforce is not desirable. Through my experience while working as secretary for the ICT Alliance, I have learnt to differ. An organisation such as the ICT Alliance is representing the Namibian employers in the field. They, as volunteers, have the interest of their Namibian company or institution at heart and are a lobby group for further Namibianisation of the industry. In the tri-partite labour environment we have in Namibia, they therefore represent the employers of Namibian owned companies. The data workers need to become organised as they are not only negotiating with Namibian companies, but more and more with international technology firms. As a Union they must: " be able to negotiate from a position of strength; " ensure standards of qualifications; " inform members of innovations and technology updates; and " provide health and pension plans. Organised labour is a must if we want to improve the economy of our country. Unions today The Union movement in Namibia has seen many changes since Independence. The functionaries are becoming associated more closely with the SWAPO party, many are also on the election list. In addition, the Namibia Union of National is becoming a profitable business. The following from the website of Bank Windhoek: “Nam-mic Financial Services Holdings (NFS) is the Group’s strategic empowerment partner. NFS holds investments in Capricorn Investment Holdings (7 %), Welwitschia Nam-mic Insurance Brokers (20 %), Consolidated Financial Services (5 %), Capricorn Life Assurance Company (25 %), Santam Namibia (10 %) and Corporate Benefit Consulting (35 %). The NFS subsidiary company, Nam-mic Financial Solutions offers 37

micro finance to union members in partnership with Bank Windhoek. ... The remainder of 72.5 % (of shares in NFS) is held directly or indirectly through investment companies of the National Union of Namibian workers, Mineworkers Union of Namibia, Namibia Public Workers Union, Namibia Food and Allied Workers Union, Namibia National Teachers Union, Namibia Farm Workers Union and the Namibia Transport and Allied Workers Union.” As for Nam-mic Financial Solutions – the micro-lender: “Alacrity will hold a 35 % stake in the company, while the balance will be controlled by the people of Namibia through the shareholdings of Nam-mic Investment Holding Company (35 %), Namibian Public Worker’s Union (20 %) and Namibian Food and Allied Worker’s Union (10 %).” These are a betrayal of the labour union movement ideals and can constitute a real danger to their continued existence. After all, who now represents the employees of these businesses in wage negotiations? There must be a clear differentiation of the activities of unions and the use of union funds to purchase and manage business.

Corruption (2009-07-25 12:41)
Corruption is bad for any country. It prevents growth by diverting funds, scaring foreign investment and encourages educated citizens to leave so as not to be also considered part of a corrupt state. The corrupt allocation of natural resources will lead to the depletion of these resources to the detriment of all citizens. It breaks the trust between the people and its government. Most importantly is puts in doubt the ability of the government, civil service and all politicians. In other words it endangers our democracy and the rule of law. Study proves corruption is less profitable “Not only do you get punished by God for corruption, now we know you get punished on earth too”, said one of the readers of a recent study on corruption. A recent study on ethics in business shows that companies that have high ethical standards and behaviour are more profitable than their competitors. Suppliers and customers alike prefer working with a company where the “rules are clear” and business decisions cannot be influenced by employees. Most politicians bend the laws of the land and steal money or solicit bribes because they need the funds to support networks of patronage. Others do it in order to reward their nearest and dearest or to maintain a lavish lifestyle when their political lives are over. A solution is to ensure that upon retirement, a politician is able to sustain their lifestyle through a regular pension payout. Of course, effective policing and long jail terms also provide deterrents. Effective Programme against Corruption To be effective, an anti-corruption programme must:

1. Persecute corrupt high profile public officials in public and private institutions, and even multinational companies. (the so-called “big fish”) 2. Investment in educating the public and government officials to encourage “civic pride”; 3. Liberalising and deregulating the economy. The less “red tape” or licensing procedures, the less the likelihood of corrupt practices to “facilitate business”. 4. Strengthening of the institutions such as the Anti-Corruption Commission, Police, Customs, the Courts and the Tax Authorities. The best solution to corruption remains a policy of no secrets. This means free, accessible, and available information circulated and discussed by opposition parties, free press, trade unions, business organisations and NGO’s. Without this, the fight against corruption is doomed to failure. With them it stands a chance. 38

1.7

August

Foundation of Education (2009-08-05 11:20)
“A child educated only at school is an uneducated child.” - George Santayana The foundation of education is found at the home. The traditions of culture, respect for the elderly, respect for the property of others and other moral values are part of the environment within which our children grow up. In our modern world however, more and more of the responsibility of the education of our children is expected to be at school. Our constitution guarantees primary education. I propose we introduce a further two year pre-primary care for our children. During these two formative years, children will be given the opportunity to practise their motor skills through sport, and provide an opportunity to learn the basics of music. Not all families can presently provide this necessary training, which includes teaching a child to concentrate, and it must therefore be the duty of the state to give the tools necessary to prepare the child for primary school.

(2009-08-06 11:16)
Education in the ICT (internet and telecommunications) is a must for each and every citizen of Namibia as we progress into the future. Every child attending school should be IT literate by the end of primary school. All children must have the equivalent of the Master in Microsoft Office (MCAS) or International Drivers Licence (ICDL). The government must put in place an incentive scheme to encourage companies to invest 1 % of their turnover on basic computer literacy skills (word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, emails and internet). A possible tax rebate can be offered if a company can prove computer literacy levels at all levels, especially of unskilled workers. Retrenchment packages should also include a computer training component.

Influence of teachers - in memory of Heidi (Persendt) Japhta (2009-08-07 13:30)
I have been asked on occasion to give an inspirational talk to learners at award functions or graduations. The most memorable, and first, of these was for me when I was asked to deliver a speech at the Academic Awards of Dawid Bezuidenhout Secondary School My wife was also a teacher at the school, (and I had finished my schooling there - under the late Heidi Japtha, nee Persendt) and had encouraged me to accept this honour. The following is the gist of the speech I gave: My mother was music and accounting teacher and my wife is an accounting and information sciences teacher. Many of the important people in my life were school teachers. One of the most important lessons I learnt from a teacher was during my Standard 6 (Grade 7) year when I was 14 years old. Mr. McKelvin was my Geography teacher and till today, I can still distinguish the differences in clouds because he made us lay on our back in the middle of the playground and then pointed out the various types. This was his lesson about life: “Sometime we find ourselves in a conversation and say something really stupid. Something like rubber is made from oil (rather than from a tree). Now a week or two later, we find ourselves among the same group of people. We remember the mistake we made so we are too frightened to say anything. So we miss the opportunity to participate because of our previous mistake. 39

Well, you are wrong. The other people also made mistakes, and they are too busy remembering their own mistakes to remember yours!” This has made me overcome one of the problems I believe we all have, admitting when we have made mistakes – and more importantly learning to laugh at ourselves. The next life lesson I remember from a teacher was about “asking God for something”. I had a successful career, happy family and most everything money could buy. During this time I prayed to God to help me establish my own business. But, instead of God answering my prayers, I found myself losing some of the wonderful things I had. One of my mentors saw how dejected I was and asked, “what’s the matter?” Upon hearing my story, he replied, “Oh, Milton. God is just making space in your hands for the next present. Your hands were just too full!” So whenever I face adversity and see my possessions becoming less, I know it is God making more space for that big gift he has prepared for me!

Loss of respect for the elderly (2009-08-13 13:30)
We are all going to grow old! ”Older people are the custodians of our traditions, our heritage and our cultures. They reflect our past and are the mirrors of our future. They have the right to a healthy, productive life, to live in a caring environment and to be treated with respect.” - South African Minister of Social Development at the United Nations Second World Assembly on Ageing in Madrid. As human beings were are the only conscious animal that is aware that one day our own existence will end. This is scary and many of us prefer to ignore this through denial and repression. However, we only know this because we have a memory of those who have passed before us. Our memories are not only there to remind us of the bad things (such as death), but also plays an important role in our development and survival. In the wild, it is the old, wily Kudu who lives the longest because he has learnt from experience and retains the memories. In all cultures, the history of a tribe, as well as the memories of past calamities was preserved only in the minds of the old people. Thus it was important before the written word, for all cultures to remember and pass on the knowledge of life saving information. The young thus stayed with in close proximity to their elders, and made effort to look after them in their old age. This is also one of the important foundations in worship of the forefathers. Earlier than in other cultures, Europeans memories have been passed on to the next through the written word. This has been an important reason for their world dominance. The less reliance needed on the old, led in turn to smaller family units and inevitably accumulation of power and wealth in the hands of the few. It also led to younger family members being able to hold their elders to account for their past actions and decisions. As the various cultures throughout the world have become civilised, they have gained the knowledge of the existing written word (mostly from the Bible) and often lost their own culture and memories before it is preserved in a written form. However, since the advent of the World Wide Web in 1994, more and more of our memories, and thus our past, are available to all. And to add injury to insult, it is the young who are able to access the Web the easiest. With this vast library of information available at their fingertips, it is becoming easier for the young to judge their elders. Our elders have lost the advantage of being the memory banks of our culture and history. In a similar vein, earlier communication between the generations occurred at night after the evening meal. During the story telling (imparting of past wisdoms), the young were to be seen “not heard”. This was an important gesture of respect for the old, and a way of ensuring your own survival if you should get into an unfamiliar and deadly situation. 40

Our modern technology now means we all have cellular telephones. However, it is often the younger person doing the calling. The purpose is often still the same – to get something, whether information or to request money. Now they cut the elder short during the normal greetings (a sign of respect) because “my credit is going to run out so listen quickly!” We need a law to protect our elderly. Such a law must include: " The right of older persons to live safely and without fear of abuse; " the assumption that older persons are competent to make informed choices and decisions about their lives; " the right of older persons to be treated fairly and be valued independently of their economic contribution; and " the right of older persons to have access to employment, health, welfare, transportation, social assistance and other support systems without regard to economic status. The law must also provide a mechanism punish abuse of the elderly.

Effective combating of crime (2009-08-18 10:48)
As quoted from Commission of Enquiry headed by Justice Brian O’Linn “Most Namibians agree that the administration of justice has fallen into disrepute and that the main causes are, inter alia: The laws, interpretation of the laws and application of the Constitution: the emphasis on rights without any emphasis on responsibilities; on the rights of the accused and convicted persons, but not the rights of the victims and law-abiding citizens; the unacceptable high rate of criminality and unacceptable low rate of literacy in the official language in the Namibian Police Force; generally the lack of a culture of professionalism, which includes pride in the profession, dedication and motivation; failure to put in place a culture of merit and non-discrimination in the place of racist criteria; the inexperience, lack of the necessary qualifications and/or training incompetence, physical fitness; insufficient equipment, vehicles and remuneration; the failure to incorporate magistrates into the judiciary in regard to appointment, control, professionalism and ethics; the inexperience and inadequate qualifications and training of some prosecutors and even some magistrates; insufficient courts and personnel to do the job; lack of proper organisation; the delaying tactics of legal practitioners for the defence; the increase in crime levels due to many different causes and problems – some of which are insoluble; lack of the necessary consistent leadership by many leading persons and institutions; outright abuse of power and corruption by too many of those in positions of power, trust and leadership; undermining of the rule of law; abuse of power and the consequent development of a culture of dishonesty, lawlessness, criminality and despondency. & Policemen should be appointed and promoted on the basis of education, ability, experience, expertise, performance, character, integrity and motivation.” “& there is a widespread misinterpretation that freedom means license to do whatever one likes without responsibility for these actions or the consequences. This interpretation extends to the misuse, vandalism and theft of public property and private property alike.” “Successful arrest and conviction must operate as a deterrent and the State should, within the limits of its undoubtedly constrained resources, seek to deter serious crime by adequate remuneration for the police force; by incentives to improve their training and skill; by augmenting their numbers in key areas; and by facilitating their legitimacy in the perception of the communities in which they work” Recommendations include making a highly qualified and professional group of security officers more effective in supplementing police inadequacies regarding the preparing of the statements of complaints and witnesses in criminal cases in which they become involved in the course of their professional duties.

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Bring back forced labour (2009-08-18 10:50)
Crime is a problem. It stretches from petty theft of cellular phones to murdering your own wife. Sometimes it seems as if our Independence has given us freedoms because the punishments have been taken away. The punishments done away with include corporal punishment in schools, the death penalty, and forced labour amongst prisoners. More importantly the shame that went with the crime is no longer there. Bring back forced labour, the Namibian Constitution Article 9(3)(a) allows for forced labour “required in consequence of a sentence or order of a Court”. Allow the prisoner to reimburse the victim and society for the wrongs they have committed.

Loving a prostitute (2009-08-21 12:18)
For a period of two years I lived in Ausspannplatz close to the police headquarters. This area was previously the place travellers would stop and leave their wagons before entering Windhoek. (“Aus spann” means to let the cattle free to graze.) There is a small park and two traffic circles in the area. This is the downtown of the city. As in most cities and towns around the world, the downtown has become a night life area filled with bars and casinos. Of course, where there is money and alcohol, there are also prostitutes and drugs. When my forefathers (the Plaatjies family) came to Windhoek, they had a business in the area – opposite where the Ministry of Transport and Works is today. Not surprisingly, I found some of the people still remember my family in the area. But it is the night life that was the most interesting. The area starts to come alive with the “night people starting around 16H00. The first “ladies” start appearing as their customers pass by before heading to their respective homes. Alcohol is being bought for the night ahead as it is cheaper from the bottle store than at the bar. The men in the area are either “boyfriends”, (who share the income with their girlfriends), drug peddlers – mostly marijuana, or petty thieves. I have spent many an interesting evening with the people of the area and have never felt threatened by anyone. However, life and death are ever present. This can be through knife fights, being shot by the robbery victim or police, or while asleep on the railway lines. During this period I met a young lady who was living in the area and we became more than just friends. I later moved to another part of Windhoek and she moved with me. However, this part of town and the people in the area were too part of her life. We later broke up and she returned to spending her day and nights in Ausspannplatz. Unfortunately, she became sick and as it was untreated it led to pneumonia. She passed away three days after being admitted to the hospital. Elmarie Motswana was only 24 years old. Her story began when she was 13 years old. Her mother and stepfather worked as labourers on a commercial farm close to Mariental. She became pregnant and had a baby boy at this age. Barely literate and with no hope, she moved to Windhoek to get another chance at schooling. Within a few months the lights of the city had bedazzled her and she went missing from her family’s house. She created a new history for herself and over the next ten years she became Elmarie Motswana. She had played soccer at school and had gone with the school team to Brazil. Her mother was a rich lady from Katutura, but she hardly went home because her stepfather did not like her. And so it went on with each passing year and less and less of the true Elmarie stayed behind. Only after her passing, was I able to piece together some of her past.

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White and Black Economic Empowerment (2009-08-25 17:37)
Namibia has gone through various political changes over the past two centuries. One thing however is always constant. Once the political change occurs, there is a realisation that political independence means very little without economic ownership change. When the English ruled over Southern Africa they had the economic might. The Afrikaner took over and had to create state institutions such as the “Eerste Nasionale Ontwikkelings Korporasie” (ENOK or First National Development Corporation) to allow Afrikaner businessmen to get a share of the economic pie. The also created other institutions that should be supported by their people to become as powerful as the English ones, for example banks and insurance companies (Sanlam, Santam, etc.). In much the same way, the black people of Namibia need to become participants in the economy. The first efforts were made in the early 1990’s to unite the two chambers of commerce, namely the Windhoek CCI and Windhoek Business Chamber. This resulted in the Namibia National Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the predecessor of the present NCCI. This was one of the most challenging times in my working life. The mistrust of decades had to be plastered over for the sake of the country and our newly created democracy. We succeeded. BUT, we only plastered over the problem. The black majority is still not participating in the meaningful way promised by the politicians. Or for that matter, the way the previous English and Afrikaner political movements allowed their voters to prosper.

1.8

September

SharePoint is the next thing you need (2009-09-01 11:45)
Twenty years ago most of us did not use word processing or spreadsheets. Today it is compulsory for all of us to be computer literate and probably be a super user with documents and spreadsheets. WELL, the next thing we must be able to is to collaborate with one another. A SharePoint Web site allows you to easily collaborate with colleagues from across the hall and around the world. The ability to create knowledge bases, online surveys, discussion boards, and chats can help produce, organize, and distribute project information. What is SharePoint Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 is an integrated suite of server capabilities that can help improve organizational effectiveness by providing comprehensive content management and enterprise search, accelerating shared business processes, and facilitating information-sharing across boundaries for better business insight. Additionally, this collaboration and content management server provides IT professionals and developers with the platform and tools they need for server administration, application extensibility, and interoperability. There are three levels of users, namely: 1. End users / Site Administrators 2. System Administrators / Architects 3. Developers / Architects In September and October I am focussing on SharePoint for all three levels of users. In my next blog I highlight some of the areas of work in SharePoint.

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Overview of SharePoint capabilities (2009-09-10 13:27)
The capabilities of Office SharePoint Server 2007 are focused in six areas: " Collaboration " Portals and personalization " Search " Enterprise Content Management " Business processes and forms " Business intelligence Collaboration You can use a SharePoint site to share information and get your work done more efficiently. A SharePoint site offers workspaces and tools that your team can use to track projects, coordinate schedules, and collaboratively create and edit documents. Improve team productivity by using a SharePoint site You can use a site to store routine information for a single department or short-term information for a special project that spans several departments. By using a collaborative workspace such as a team site, your team can become more efficient and more productive. Manage projects more efficiently You can use a site to manage projects and coordinate tasks and deadlines among team members. The Project Tasks list template includes a Gantt chart view where you can see task relationships and project status. Your team can coordinate their work with shared calendars, alerts, and notifications. You can also connect a calendar on your SharePoint site to your calendar in Microsoft Office Outlook 2007, where you can view and update it just as you do your personal calendar. Create, review, and publish documents Groups of people can create, review, and edit documents collaboratively on a SharePoint site. You can use document libraries to store and manage important documents, or use Document Workspace sites to coordinate the development of specific documents. Slide Libraries are a great place to share and reuse Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2007 slides in a central location. You can take document libraries offline in Office Outlook 2007 to enable people to view and edit documents while they are not connected to the network. Capture and share community knowledge You can use a team site to capture and share collective team knowledge or important information. Teams can create and capture community knowledge or document internal processes in a wiki. You can use surveys or discussions to gather information or encourage dialog, and then share your findings in a blog. Team members can use alerts or Really Simple Syndication (RSS) to track updates to your sites. Portals and personalization You can use portal sites to work collaboratively and access the people, information, and business applications that you need to do your job. Office SharePoint Server 2007 includes features that organizations can use to personalize the portal site for individuals or groups of users Search You can use search on a SharePoint site to help you find information, files, Web sites, and people. For more information about using search, click the following links. Enterprise Content Management Office SharePoint Server 2007 provides powerful Enterprise Content Management (ECM) features for creating, managing, and storing content throughout an enterprise. You can use workflows (workflow: The automated movement of documents or items through a specific sequence of actions or tasks related to a business process. Workflows can be used to consistently manage common business processes, such as document approval or review.) to help manage the process of creating, reviewing, publishing, and even managing the content that your organization creates. Document management Document management capabilities can help you consolidate content from multiple locations into a Document 44

Center, which is a centrally managed repository that has consistent categorization. Records management Integrated records management capabilities can help you store and protect business records in their final state. Web content management Web content management capabilities enable people to publish Web content with an easy-to-use content authoring tool and a built-in approval process. Business process and forms Office SharePoint Server 2007 provides many features that can help you integrate and streamline your business processes. You can create browser-based forms and gather data from organizations that do not use Microsoft Office InfoPath 2007. Workflows can streamline the cost of coordinating common business processes, such as project approval or document review, by managing and tracking the tasks involved with those processes Business intelligence Business intelligence is the process of aggregating, storing, analyzing, and reporting on business data to support informed business decisions. Office SharePoint Server 2007 provides a number of tools that can help you extract data from a variety of sources and present that data in ways that facilitate analysis and decision making.

Create an Internet Action Group for Namibia (2009-09-10 13:28)
Did you know? " The fifth biggest “country” in the world is Facebook. That’s right, a country that only exists on the Internet has over 200 million people sharing their thoughts, photographs, birthdays, love lives, interests and causes with one another. In the “Nation of Facebook” your every thought is shared with all your friends at once. They can indicate if they like it, or make a comment. In addition, you or a friend can “write on the wall” if you wish to send each other private messages. The photographs area allows you to upload any of your photos and share them instantly with those you know. The best feature is the ability to tag a friend, and everyone they know will be informed that a photo has been loaded. " In the Twitter application an actor, Ashton Kutcher, beat the news company CNN to having a million users following their “twitting” (Twitter is a service that allows you to send and post SMS messages to a network of contacts.) Kutcher had challenged CNN to the Twitter race, saying he would donate 10,000 mosquito bed nets to charity for World Malaria Day in late April if he beat CNN, and 1,000 if he lost. CNN agreed to do the same. ”It’s a turning point in media. He’s one person who uses a free media platform to reach a large audience. And that really hasn’t been done before,” Cherwenka said. ”He didn’t spend a penny on this. And that’s kind of the point of any kind of social activity on the Web.” " Digital divide is shrinking through the use of mobile technologies, in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria and Namibia especially in mobile telephony. More than half of the Namibian population has a cellular phone. " ICTs are technologies that enable us to receive, disseminate and share information and knowledge as well as to communicate – they are the foundation of the Information Society and Knowledge Economy. The Polytechnic of Namibia is a mirror site for most of the information libraries across the world and a key node for connecting Namibia to the information highway. " Telecommunication is technically defined as the transportation of information from point A to B. Telecom has a fibre optic cable covering almost all of Namibia – a fully digital transmission network (6500 km of Fibre Routes). What does all this mean for Namibia? Our challenges are: " Nationally – the imbalances in basic infrastructure, education, health and government services " Globally – the technological advances far outpace our national development 45

“Poverty does not only refer to lack of income, but also includes: " the deprivation of basic capabilities; " the deprivation of information needed for meaningful participation in society " and lack of access to: " education " healthcare " natural resources " employment " land and credit " political participation " services " infrastructure, etc. Neither investment in ICTs or access alone is sufficient for development to occur, ICTs must also mediate the delivery of useful services and civic interaction that contribute to the economic and social well being of the community.” Creating a better future, Today Namibia can use the latest technology to the benefit of all its residents. The attitude to education which is presently geared to becoming an industrial country, must be changed to a system where knowing where the information is available is more important than having the information in your head. This means moving from our present agricultural society to a knowledge-base society within five years. This leapfrogging into a knowledge-based society can be assisted by creating an ICT Action Group (IAG) reporting directly to the President. The IAG should consist of four staff members, of which two should be young people under the age of twenty-five. (The (male and female) staff member should each have software programming skills and should also participate in gaming leagues such as Starcraft. In addition, they should have a minimum competency in the number of words they can SMS per minute on their cellular phone.) The objectives of the IAG: " Advise the President and Cabinet on ICT. " Ensure ICT capability of all members of the Cabinet and their staff. " Create a Government Ministerial scorecard on Information and Communication Technologies. This includes a baseline survey of computer equipment and civil servant skills, as well as monitoring the information availability over government websites. " Oversee the creation of a central register for Namibia. " Ability to declare certain areas to be under-serviced and secure funds from the universal service fund to roll-out infrastructure " Identify international trends such as Facebook and Chat with the view of encouraging local sites that are able to provide the same service. A social network site for people located in Namibia (in other words within a national local area network) is within the capability of the Polytechnic or UNAM. This will encourage innovation and access to information. " Promote local content development to enhance the National Identity. " Host free internet websites for any resident of Namibia. The funding for the Internet Action Group will come directly from the Universal Fund that is contributed to by the telecommunications companies in Namibia.

What is love? (2009-09-24 15:27)
”Love is a temporary madness. It erupts like an earthquake and then subsides. And when it subsides you have to make a decision. You have to work out whether your roots have become so entwined together that it is inconceivable that you should ever part. Because this is what love is. Love is not breathlessness, it is not 46

excitement, it is not the promulgation of promises of eternal passion. That is just being ”in love” which any of us can convince ourselves we are. Love itself is what is left over when being in love has burned away, and this is both an art and a fortunate accident. Your mother and I had it, we had roots that grew towards each other underground, and when all the pretty blossom had fallen from our branches we found that we were one tree and not two.” -St. Augustine

1.9

October

History of the Namibian Coloureds (2009-10-06 11:13)
”History is the witness that testifies to the passing of time; it illumines reality, vitalizes memory, provides guidance in daily life and brings us tidings of antiquity.” - Cicero (106 BC - 43 BC), Pro Publio Sestio For the past three months I have once again been staying Khomasdal, in what was the old coloured area of Windhoek. It has been really fun meeting up with some of my old friends, especially when we take part in the coloured sport of drinking. ;-) I am staying directly behind my Grandmother’s house, which is now owned by my Uncle. Most of the people staying in the four blocks around my flat are the same people who have been staying there for the past 30 years or more. The area itself has changed very little, and the business districts are made up of primarily retailers, take-aways, night clubs, bottle-stores and shebeens. As I walk down memory lane and remember my past loves and sins, I realised very little of the history of the people has been written. So If not me, then who? I will thus be writing a book on the history of the coloured families and their influence on Namibia. It includes historical data,photographs and most importantly the personalities in politics, business, religion, education, etc. Feel free to contact me on miltonlouw@gmail.com or join [1]Coloureds in Namibia if you wish to collaborate.
1. http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=73318363577

Understanding Microsoft Certifications (2009-10-07 15:29)
In today’s world you need to continuously upgrade your skills and be able to provide proof of your expertise and skills. This is very clear in Namibia and can be seen by the number of tertiary training schools teaching business and technical skills. Once you have undergone the training, it is important to ensure that you are certified as well. In technology this means getting international certification, probably through Prometrix or similar examination board. These certifications provide the recognition you need to excel in your career and provides employers with validation of your skills. If you would like to understand the language IT people use to define their qualifications, read on about the Microsoft certifications below. Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) The Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) credential validates skills in using the 2007 Microsoft Office system and the Windows Vista operating system, meeting the demand for the most up-to-date skills on the latest Microsoft technologies. Candidates who successfully complete the program by passing a certification exam show that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. 47

To earn the Microsoft Office 2007 Master certification, you must pass the following MCAS exams: " MCAS: Microsoft Office Word 2007 " MCAS: Microsoft Office Excel 2007 " MCAS: Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2007 " MCAS: Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) The Technology series is designed for IT professionals and developers who want to demonstrate their skills and in-depth knowledge on a specific Microsoft technology. The Technology Series Certifications typically consist of one, two, or three exams, and are focused on a key Microsoft software or technology. They do not include job role skills, and are retired when mainstream product support for the related technology expires. Microsoft Certified IT Professional and Certified Professional Developer (MCITP and MCPD) The Professional series is designed for the experienced IT professional and validates a comprehensive set of technology skills necessary to be successful in a particular job role. It’s for the individual who wants to validate his or her skills beyond technology prowess, and includes design, planning, deployment, and operations management. By validating a more comprehensive set of skills, these credentials give candidates and their hiring managers a reliable indicator of on-the-job performance. The two Professional series credentials Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP) and Microsoft Certified Professional Developer (MCPD) typically consist of one, two, or three exams and require one or more prerequisites from the Technology series as well as periodic re-certification. Microsoft Certified Master Series Master Series Certifications identify individuals with the deepest technical skills on a particular Microsoft technology. The program recognizes experienced IT professionals who can successfully design and implement solutions that meet the most complex business requirements. The strength of the program is advanced, experience-based training and testing on Microsoft technologies that goes beyond any product training offered outside of Microsoft today. The Master Series Certifications have prerequisite exams from the Technology Series and Professional Series and require the candidate to attend and complete all training. A final qualification lab exam focuses on a single technology platform. Microsoft Certified Architect (MCA) The Microsoft Certified Architect program makes it easy for companies to identify experienced IT architects who have completed a rigorous peer review process and exhibit exemplary business IT skills and a proven ability to deliver business solutions. The MCA program identifies prestigious professionals that have a minimum of ten years of advanced IT industry experience and three or more years of experience as a practicing architect. They possess strong technical and managerial skills, and form an elite community. Unlike other industry certifications, this credential was built, and is granted by the architect community. The Architect Series Certifications have a rigorous and competitive entry process, require the candidate to work closely with a mentor who is a Microsoft Certified Architect, and culminate in an oral review in front of certified architects. Microsoft Certified Architects are required to periodically refresh their certification. Certifications for Microsoft Dynamics Microsoft Dynamics is a line of integrated, adaptable business management solutions that automate and streamline financial, customer relationship, and supply chain processes in a way that helps drive business success. The Microsoft Dynamics Certification program identifies individuals who can help deliver comprehensive business management solutions. There are two Microsoft Dynamics Certification titles Microsoft Certified Business Management Specialist and Microsoft Certified Business Management Professional. Microsoft Dynamics Certifications typically have single exams for each Microsoft Dynamics or related business technology, along with other exams for other Microsoft technologies, such as SQL Server. The pre-determined set of required and elective exams for this set of certifications focuses on three specific knowledge areas for one Microsoft Dynamic product: applications, developer, and installation and configuration.

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Inspiring children to read (2009-10-12 10:24)
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! I’m sorry to say so But, sadly it’s true That bang-ups and hang-ups Can happen to you. Let’s be sure when we step. Step with care and great tact And remember that Life’s a great balancing act. The above poem comes from Dr Seuss and I read it for the first time when I was around 13 years old. It is with surprise that when I look back at many of the things I believe in, and that drove me to become what I am, come from the reading material I had available. I must therefore, do more to ensure that those children who come after me, have the same (if not more) access to reading material.

God’s making space in my hands (2009-10-17 14:56)
A life lesson I remember from a teacher was about “asking God for something”. I had a successful career, happy family and most everything money could buy. During this time I prayed to God to help me establish my own business. But, instead of God answering my prayers, I found myself losing some of the wonderful things I had. One of my mentors saw how dejected I was and asked, “what’s the matter?” Upon hearing my story, he replied, “Oh, Milton. God is just making space in your hands for the next present. Your hands were just too full!” So whenever I face adversity and see my possessions becoming less, I know it is God making more space for that big gift he has prepared for me!

Sun is shining, weather is hot (2009-10-17 15:03)
Wow. My life is on the up and up. Since starting my book in January, I have often wondered the cost of this to me. I lost my place to stay (landlords renting out to corporates), furniture was taken (sheriff of the court), daughter moved out (arguing about curfew), etc. etc. Got a lucky break and started working for GijimaAst as the training manager for Microsoft training. This was fun and I have enjoyed every minute of it! The good part was: Trustco has hired me to be the Corporates Manager for Legalshield from the 1st November 2009. Not only is the money good, the job is a challenge. What more can I ask for?

1.10

November

Shortest job I ever had (2009-11-04 12:02)
I just probably had the shortest job in my life. A few weeks back I had been offered the job of Head: Corporate Sales at Legalshield Namibia and I thought it would be great opportunity to get back in the Corporate world 49

– rather than working for myself ;-). Anyway, was supposed to start on Nov2 and went there with high expectations. Unfortunately, they have believed someone else’s version of events of what happened at the ICT Alliance (If you remember – this was the organisation that could not pay me a salary for a part-time job but still wanted to have a disciplinary hearing after I had resigned at IIT.) So, twenty minutes later – I walked out and like always, thanked God for guiding my life. Funnily enough, one of my best friends for over 30 years had warned me about the job. He was arrested at his company on Wednesday and had wanted a lawyer. Even though he had paid-up membership of over three years, they refused him the services of a lawyer. So all’s well that ends well. I am back on my own and running NamBizDotCom – AND it feels good. Thought for the week: “You can discover what your enemy fears most by observing the means he uses to frighten you.”

Consumer Protection in Namibia (2009-11-13 09:40)
Whenever we hear about consumer rights, we must look closely, because there is sure to be a “consumer activist” in the area. What is this activist doing and what is their goal? According to definition, consumer activism is undertaken on behalf of consumers to assert consumer rights. Goals can include making products or services that are directed at consumers safer, of better quality as well as making them more readily available. The ideal goal is to push consumers to question the morality of a purchased product’s origins. Consumer activist tactics can include boycotts, petitioning the government, media activism, and organising interest groups The most common tactic is to have protest marches in order to gain political influence (make the politicians listen). By gaining this influence, the group gains new political opportunities as well as access to resources such as donor money, to use for their benefit. This in turns allows for funding of further activities to protest and get the message heard. One of the most important decisions by a consumer protection group must be the identification of a visible, clear, and despicable target that will allow for unification and mobilisation of consumers. In Namibia, there are many businesses (and their products) that make consumers angry. In an informal survey, they most common culprits are banks, insurance companies and government. As for products, the most often cited is the lack of control on freshness of products, be they fruit and vegetables, milk or bread. The most vexing question must remain however, what power do consumers have. It is easy to advocate not “banking for a day”, or not buying from a certain retailer, but this would need concerted effort from all consumers, not just the activists. Consumers need to stand up for their rights. Government has to enact legislation to protect consumers, AND punish businesses that do not comply. The Namibia Consumer Protection Group is holding a protest march on 15 March 2010 to push for recognition of this day as Consumer Rights Day. You can join the Namibia Consumer Protection Group on [1]Namibia Consumer Protection Group or at [2]NCPG on Facebook.
1. http://namconsumer.ning.com/ 2. http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=166649789666

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Induction Training for Parliamentarians (2009-11-16 10:27)
As part fo the run-up to our national elections, we have to consider the induction training that parliamentarians should be getting. As a nation we must understand and respect the institutions which propose debate and make our laws. Too many times I have heard people say “these politicians – they are only in it for what they can get”. The Parliament has as its duty the education of the citizens in how we can make use of them to improve our daily lives. Essentially, I would like to see private citizens being able to propose laws to their representatives and have these submitted in Parliament. Unfortunately most of us accept that our laws are submitted by bureaucrats (government employees) working under the orders of the Minster involved. Thus in fact not separating the executive from the legislature, but rather having the parliament become a rubber stamp for decisions made by the ruling party and its ministers. We also have to recognise that being a Member of Parliament is a way for an individual to contribute his or her experience for the improvement of our country, rather than a career path. In recent times we have seen young people become members of parliament only to be caught up in acts which bring disrepute to the institution. This can only be corrected if members of parliament have reached a certain amount of material independence to allow them to vote for what they think is right, and not what will ensure their present income. I propose the Parliament Administration create a school for potential parliamentarians. This can be done during the recess periods and will allow interested persons to gain first-hand experience on what would be expected from them if they enter the Parliament.

Charter of Namibian Consumer Rights (2009-11-17 10:41)
Proposed Charter of Namibian Consumer Rights 1. The right to basic goods and services which guarantee survival. 2. The right to be protected against the marketing of goods or the provision of services that are hazardous to health and life. 3. The right to be protected against dishonest or misleading advertising or labelling. 4. The right to choose products and services at competitive prices with an assurance of satisfactory quality. 5. The right to express consumer interests in the making and execution of government policy. 6. The right to be compensated for misrepresentation, shoddy goods or unsatisfactory services. 7. The right to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to be an informed consumer. 8. The right to live and work in an environment which is neither threatening nor dangerous and which permits a life of dignity and well-being.

Cultural Differences in Namibia (2009-11-24 15:06)
We have thrown the baby out with the bathwater. This is the only explanation of the total lack of information based on cultural affiliations in our census in Namibia. Unfortunately, this attitude of “let’s pretend it is not there” does not make it so. Even in South Africa, where the Apartheid system was the most formalised, they have recognised the need to keep the information and knowledge of all cultural groups as part of the “rainbow nation”. Discrimination because of race colour or culture is a thing of the past and is replaced by recognition and acceptance of our differences. We have also outlawed discrimination on the basis of gender, yet still need this categorisation to measure the 51

needed changes that must take place in our country for gender equality. In the same way it is important to note that when a previously marginalised group, such as the San people, have qualified teachers from within their own tribe and culture (Republikein – 14 April 2009). The lack of recognition of certain groups can have detrimental affects on our country. Look at what has happened to some of our pre-Independence orphans who returned from East Germany. More recently we have seen the SWAPO veterans and orphans also wishing to be recognised as a distinct group with specific needs. In the near future we will see a new group forming of AIDS orphans who have grown up differently with specific disadvantages that need to be addressed to allow them to fully pluck the fruits of our freedom. What culture shall all these groups inherit? There is a national culture Namibia. Thus we can refer to our language as Namlish with its peculiarities and pronunciations. We are known by our friends and foes on the sport fields as the Brave warriors and the Biltongboere. In business we refer to the marketing process. It starts with an analysis of the present and then moves to develop a strategy. In marketing it is recognised that to provide the best product for the customer you need to segment the market. Tools such as the Living Standards Measurement are used to focus our marketing efforts. A typical LSM would include age, gender, race or cultural group and income. (Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) household surveys have become an important tool in measuring and understanding poverty in developing countries.) The people of Namibia are the customer. To serve our people better we must recognise our difference not only in gender or language but also in race. The census in Namibia must measure the race and culture embraced by each resident in future. The tertiary education institutes in Namibia must then participate in research focussing on cultural, racial, gender, urban-rural economic and livelihood inequalities in Namibia. This ongoing research must continue to ask what the relationship is between the growth and spatial distribution of the public and private economic sectors. It must also encompass the formal and informal economy, the nature of poverty, the characteristics of poor areas, and socio-economic empowerment. 4CK9YP5E8CS2

Namibia Consumer Protection Group Complaint Form (2009-11-27 11:16)
IFRAME: [1]http://spreadsheets.google.com/embeddedform?key=tXoJuuWqoO9GERQ souOWhww Loading...
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1.11

December

Is a serious third party needed in Namibian politics? (2009-12-08 15:32)
This question came up recently in a discussion that was proposing a ”Workers Party” for Namibia after the last election. I had to think about it for a while, especailly as I am a SWAPO member. But then inspiration struck, if we want to tackle a political problem, why not look at how this has been done by consumer activitists (such as Ralp Nader in the USA). The most common denominator for people is their consumer experience in a society. Nader considered launching a third party around issues of citizen 52

empowerment and consumer rights. He suggested a serious third party could address needs such as campaignfinance reform, worker and whistle-blower rights, government-sanctioned watchdog groups to oversee banks and insurance agencies, ... I suggest that should a ”third-party” emerge it would only be viable if it had a coherent political platform. What should this platform be based on? Four things, namely the social movements, the peace movement, the civil rights movement, the environmental movement, and the labour movement. (Often referred to as the ”green movement”.) This would be a political platform I could follow!

Increasing employment - a government dilemma (2009-12-09 10:36)
The role of the Government in the developed world is to balance the creation of jobs against the expectations of the employees. The private sector is encouraged through various means to invest and create employment opportunities. However, the labour force, through its Unions, have become so powerful, they often influence decision-making that is detrimental to job creation. Bluntly put, an investor puts their money where they get the best return. If labour costs are too high, they go elsewhere. The Namibian Government has used a relaxation of the existing labour laws in its efforts to promote investment. The EPZ Act for example outlaws certain employee actions. This has not worked. Rather the government should work to streamline the hiring and firing processes across the board to allow flexibility for investors. It should rather provide incentives to employers who train and develop their existing workforce. For example, the Government could suggest a 1 % of turnover be spent of computer literacy of all levels of employees over a three period. Those employers, who can document through proof of International Computer Drivers Licences, will receive a tax rebate of 5 % for the five years thereafter. Too much attention is put on preventive measure in our present labour laws. We should work together to create reactive measures which will encourage better cooperation throughout the work environment.

Namibia Consumer Hotline (2009-12-11 10:19)
The NCPG is negotiating to establish a Consumer Hotline for Namibia. Consumers will be able to register their complaints telephonically and their complaint will be dealt with and hopefully, solved. A monthly newsletter will be sent to all members to inform them of the monthly issues and the percentage of issues that have been resolved. Remember you can also send a complaint to miltonlouw@gmail.com or fillout the [1]NCPG Complaint Form (<—–click here)
1. http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/2009/11/namibia-consumer-protection-group.html

Legal Insurance in Namibia (2009-12-15 11:40)
The cost of taking legal action can be prohibitive. Could you afford to claim compensation if you were injured in an accident, unfairly dismissed from work or had a dispute with a business? A friend of mine has had legal insurance for the past three years and believed he was covered. About a month ago, he was accussed of being involved in a theft syndicate at his work. He immediately called his 53

legal insurance company, but was informed they do not cover criminal cases. He was taken for a polygraph test (is that legal in Namibia), and informed that he had failed the test. This led to him leaving the job that morning to go speak to his legal insurer. Yeah right. They do not cover the expenses for a labour case either. WHAT is it with insurance companies that do not want to pay claims? If you complain at NAMFISA they do very little to help. If I am going to buy legal insurance I expect: Bail Assistance " Bail negotiations and applications on members’ behalf " Depositing of the bail amount/issuing of bail guarantee on behalf of arrested member Civil Law " Bank and insurance matters " Blacklisting " Building and construction matters " Contractual disputes " Debt collection " Letters of demand " Litigation " Personal injury claims, etc Criminal Law " Fraud, theft, robbery or assault " Arrests " Bail applications " Consumer issues " Driving under the influence " Reckless driving " Search warrants, etc. Family Law " Ante-nuptial contracts " Custody disputes " Divorces " Family violence matters " Interdicts " Maintenance disputes, etc. Labour Law " Dismissals " Disciplinary proceedings " Pension payout disputes " Restraint of trade agreements " Retrenchments " Unpaid wages " Working condition Surely this is not too much to ask?

Consumer Hotline for Namibia (2009-12-15 16:19)
The NCPG is negotiating to establish a Consumer Hotline for Namibia. Consumers will be able to register their complaints telephonically and their complaint will be dealt with and hopefully, solved. 54

A monthly newsletter will be sent to all members to inform them of the monthly issues and the percentage of issues that have been resolved. Remember you can also send a complaint to miltonlouw@gmail.com or fillout the NCPG complaint form at http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/2009/11/namibia-consumer-protection- group.html

55

56

Chapter 2

2010
2.1 January

Namibia needs a national register (2010-01-07 09:12)
Throughout the world there is a huge amount of resources being spent on research and development which in turn generates vast amounts of information that needs to be managed effectively, and efficiently. The pace of new technologies such as computers, their storage capabilities, and the ability to communicate with one another allows for ever larger quantities of information to be stored and analysed. A national electronic database will allow Namibia to move from a rural based economy to a knowledge based economy and meet its development goals. Namibia has the aim of creating a successful social market economy. When we look at the recent history after the Second World War, we see the rebuilding of the German economy as one of the economic success stories of the last century. Upon closer examination, the building blocks of the state have included the ability to know the movement of all its residents. For example, when a person moves from one city to another, they have to register themselves at the local “Rathaus” or municipality. When we investigate the ability of the German business to trade with another, and more importantly to provide suppliers credit, we notice the importance of trade registers, both government and privately created. The creation of a central public register in Namibia would have many benefits for the country. The most important would be the updating of information needed for planning purposes, without having to wait for the ten yearly censuses. Overview of databases A database is a collection of data, organised in a computer that allows rapid filtering and sorting of this information. A database is thus an electronic filing system. A Namibian national database will include a collection of varied information about our citizens and businesses. This will allow for a one-stop information base or storage facility for government ministries, State-owned Enterprises, municipalities and local districts. It will also allow access to the business community, both local and internationally, who require any information on Namibia. A closer look at how information is organised, stored, retrieved and managed in Namibia shows that Namibia as a nation has not strategically made any effort to have a central database system which will function by gathering data from all sectors of the economy and managing the data in such a way that it becomes accessible to all for the purpose of delivering an efficient government and business function. Benefits of database The overwhelming benefit is that it will instantly be clear which sector is non-performing, and allow corrective measure to be taken to achieve Vision 2030. Another benefit is that it can also reduce corruption; ensure greater transparency and good governance. As 57

we begin to benchmark the advanced countries in their development efforts, one thing that has helped their economies is a national database and the lower levels of corruption can be attributed to the institution of a database that is accessible everywhere in their countries. As a result the performance of one’s activity becomes a check on one another and there is no doubt that this makes people less corrupt and become more transparent. In addition, the creation of a national register will mean that the registration of voters will be a continuous process as part of the management of services to our citizens. Thus we will save large amounts of money presently being spent on voters’ registration, as well costly exercises in verification.

Sssshhhh.... I know your home address (2010-01-07 10:52)
So now I have a database of over 750,000 Namibians with their full names, date of birth and physical addresses. (and you can too). “A writer writes not because he is educated but because he is driven by the need to communicate. Behind the need to communicate is the need to share. Behind the need to share is the need to be understood.” - Leo Rosten Reality Bites. No two ways about it. Started this new year with such good intentions and then someone, somewhere does it again. Must I keep quiet about this (mis)managment of data in our country. You decide... For the past twenty years, I have made it a hobby to collect databases of every kind on namibia. It started with busienss directories, trade information, consumer records, etc. This has become a substantial dbase with over 11,00 companies and 250,000 consumers. Much to my surprise, I discovered a rather easy way to get access to another 500,000 consumer records that inlcudes their home addresses and dates of birth. Come on, now is the time to put in place a privacy and data protection laws!

Marginalization of Coloureds must end (2010-01-13 13:10)
29.12.2009 Marson Sharpley writes: WELL done people of Namibia, my fellow countrymen and women! We have to be proud of the manner in which we voted and behaved during the voting period. It is this that makes one proud to be Namibian! Having said that, I want to advance an argument that I hope will become part of the future debates of our population as we strive to find the best-suited leadership in the political, economic and social sectors of our society. I believe that we need to examine and interrogate the demarcations we have accepted in terms of the roles that people are supposed to be filling in our society. The Oxford dictionary describes or at least defines politics as the art and science of government or activities concerned with the acquisition or exercise of authority or government. The first point I would like to make and attempt to clarify is the fact that when we speak about “church”, “politics” and/or “society”, we tend to refer to these entities in the third person as though we who are referring to them are not part of them. Church is the people, politics is the people and society is the people! The idea of addressing these entities as some nebulous concept detached from us is, in my opinion erroneous! I am a human being, a son to my biological parents, a brother to my siblings, a husband to my wife and a father to my children and then I am a Pastor of my ministry as ordained by God. As a human being who ascribes Christianity as the foundational basis of my world view and philosophy of life, I am ordained to be a leader by God who instructs man to “take dominion” over creation. Making us all leaders in one-way or another. I must be frank at this point and make reference to my mixed raceness, 58

my colouredness in our context. With all that I went through during apartheid in both South Africa and Namibia and after my direct confrontation of racism, I have come to the conclusion that prejudice, tribalism and even racism continue to batter my life like the angry unabated waves of the ocean against the rocks. It is this sense of marginalization that forces me to trace my existence and roots way beyond the physical anthropological stigmatization to the spiritual genesis of who I am. Both science and the Bible inform me that as molecular and physically visible as I am, I was sound before that, and I was light before being sound and I was thought before being light and before thought you and I and everything were spirit. This then brings me to the realization and conclusion that I owe my existence to none other than God who created me. The sense of socio-political marginalization and the existence of an invisible ceiling because of being “Coloured” or “mixed race” in Namibia in this day and age makes me, together with other like-minded intellectuals who ascribe to the Bible, come to the conclusion that there is no other recourse but to organize all “Coloured” or “mixed race” people in this country into an entity that cannot and will not be ignored just as the Hereros, Namas, Owambos, Afrikaners, Chinese and Damaras etc are doing right before our very eyes. This is one of a myriad of reasons why I intend to vigorously campaign for the formation of a Coalition of Political Church Leaders. Oh yes, I voted as a resident of Windhoek rural and my vote remains influenced and informed by my revolutionary mileage and credentials. However, I realize that my kind both racially and religiously are marginalized because of belly politics. Any church leader who does not have a political impact will have missed the plot because Christianity is about the establishment of the Kingdom of God that is in itself a political exercise. What is happening in our country for “Coloureds” is that we are being informed without it being said that we are so useless that we are unable to be a Governor, a Permanent Secretary, an Ambassador, a Deputy Minister, a Minister etc. I do not see the need to grovel and beg to be given a position in Government just because I am “Coloured”. Oh yes, you must believe me when I say that I have a patriotism to Namibia that is well known and respected in both political and church circles. Why, I even encourage my pastors and congregations to sing the national anthem at the end of a church service. However, when I meditate and look and examine the modus operandi of the political sphere of Namibia, I realize that with all my eccentric patriotism, I belong to a group of people who are socially, politically and economically marginalized. Forming a Coalition of Political Church Leaders is going to work at developing a socio-political culture that will truly celebrate and utilize the tribal and ethnic diversity of all participants and transcend all prejudices. As a Pan-Africanist I am clear of my political homes in every African nation I come to, but that does not make me blind and stupid not to see that as a “Coloured” in my home country, I am not taken seriously. Besides being unfair, unrighteous and wicked, it is a devilish state of affairs that is no longer acceptable and calls for a serious response from my people, the “Coloureds”! Someone had the audacity and temerity to inform me the other day that “Coloureds” were not meant to be. As if they are a mistake. Now if that is the thinking in certain circles, then I believe the time has come to address such rubbish and begin to make it clear to all and sundry that actually we are not a walkover of drunks, hooligans and whores! I am actually wondering why the Colored community is not realizing and responding to the injustice that is being perpetrated against us. I really and truly never ever thought that I would find myself having to speak up as a “Coloured”. Having to write like this is to me an indictment against our democracy and what the constitution of the Republic of Namibia stands for! My only recourse as a political church leader is to stand on the Word of God, the Bible and to demand equality and full representation for Coloured people in Government. Coloured people on the other hand have to realize that as a community, leaders need to be identified and they must take responsibility to organize the “Coloured” community so that we are not taken for granted as is currently the case. The fact of the matter is that all the other races and ethnic groups in this country have clear leaders on both the political and traditional fronts of our society. Being Coloured is not being a sub-culture that is less African than any other African-born group of people, being Coloured is not a disgrace or a mistake, being Coloured does not mean being viewed as stupid and not caring! 59

Being Coloured is being a human being created in the image of God with aspirations, dreams and ambitions like all other African tribes, races and ethnic groups in Namibia and the African continent at large. It is this state of affairs that now warrants that I as a Coloured church leader should begin to address this matter as Esther in the Bible had to do for her people the Jews. I am a loyal member of this society and of my political party! I together with many other worthy Coloured leaders need to be respected and recognized nationally in our nation instead of being made to feel like second-class citizens. I also realize that this stance I am taking will not please many people, but honestly, I am quite tired of pleasing people who are happy with me as long as I remain a good “house nigger”! Rubbish! This is one debate I am prepared to die for so that my children do not despise who they are to the point of urinating on my grave one day because I did nothing when I should have. Yes, to you who have married or have offspring across ethnic and colour lines, your children will one day find themselves at a place they did not expect because they will be viewed as “coloured” and thus be treated as second class. Looking at the political party lists really was depressing because Coloureds have been clearly lost in the maze of it all! However I must also add that many Coloured people’s world view has been tarnished and contaminated by the racism of apartheid. This is something that the Coloured community cannot deny as it needs to be addressed! It comes from the fact that the custodians of apartheid indoctrinated the mixed race people that they were superior to the Black people, but lower than the White. Who am I? Am I a drawer of water and a hewer of wood? Am I just the filling in a sandwich? Am I a pen pusher who’s task it is to advance the comforts of the petty bourgeoisie? Who am I? Who are we?

Coloured issue can’t be ignored (2010-01-13 13:12)
28.12.2009 Marson Sharpley writes: As a man of God I realize that I cannot afford the luxury of being so heavenly minded that I become earthly useless. There are three distinct types within the Colored community that I have come to be aware of, i.e. those who consider themselves to be more Black than White, those who consider themselves more White than Black and those who are simply Colored and that’s it! In fact it has very little to do with skin pigmentation as much as it has to do with upbringing. Nevertheless, no matter what side of the racial divide they lean towards, Coloreds born in Africa are Africans who have the full right to be part of the action and have a piece of the cake. My previous article on this subject must not be viewed as an emotional tirade by what one newspaper termed “proud to be colored”. No, this matter I intend rationally and pragmatically addressing through systematically forming a delegation of eminent Colored leaders to go and seek an audience with His Excellency the President of the Republic of Namibia. The intention here is not to be subversive, undermining or destabilizing. The idea is to ensure that the status quo, which seems to be that Coloreds have to have leaders imposed on them because they do not have the ability and capacity to present their leaders, has to be stopped. The sense that the existence of Coloreds is ignored now has to come to an end because we are here and we are real. We are members of both the ruling party SWAPO and some among us are members of the opposition parties. However, the argument I am pursuing and putting on the table goes beyond party political matters and directly to the very existence and representation of a specific minority group of people who also need to have leaders that they can culturally identify with who will be able to address their specific concerns as a distinct ethnic and cultural group. The Colored community is made up of some of the best artisans and administrators in the country. Whilst the generalization of the love of strong liquor has established itself in the description of Coloreds, we are also intellectuals, revolutionaries, community activists, students, entrepreneurs, politicians, soldiers, civilian intelligence scientists, journalists, lawyers and doctors. With this capability I together with otherlike- minded members of the Colored community realize that if 60

we do not have national, political leadership in the RulingParty from our community, the exploitation of Coloreds will be automated. National political leadership status allows the individual(s) to have authority in the society and their community so as to be able to guide, organize and counsel the community or in this case the ethnic group. This will help to see Colored youth as part of the security apparatus, the diplomatic corps and other strategic areasof governance such as security detail for even the Head of State, and even as drivers for Government VIPs. We want to see our unemployed matriculants in the army, the police force and other sectors where they can be trained so that they become contributors instead of merely maintaining an existence of being parasitic consumers. We also need to see young people from the Colored community receiving bursaries to Cuba, Russia, USA, Europe and China. I would like to see Colored people also heading State Owned Enterprises and Parastatals. I am making this call in a bid to draw attention to the plight of an entire community that, if it does not have political representation to enhance and instill discipline, will in future breed a level of gangsterism through organized crime like Namibia has never imagined could exist within its borders. A good example of this is what happened on the Cape Flats in South Africa as recently as 2004. The tendency has been to confine us to tenders and church activity in the hope that that will satisfy us and make us ignore the fact that we have been politically hijacked and systematically marginalized. One of us is an Under Secretary in Cabinet or something like that, one of us is the Ombudsman, some of us are High Court judges, but who of us are going to be a Deputy Minister, a Minister, a Permanent Secretary, a Governor, a General in the army or a Commodore in the Navy? Who of us as Coloreds is trusted enough to even be the DG of the civilian intelligence apparatus? If the requirement here is the ability to speak, read and write an indigenous language(s), then let us know so that we can study the language by living in the target language community. Should the main requirement be loyalty, patriotism, commitment and determination to see Vision 2030 realized, then vet us, do background checks, do IQ checks, but for heaven’s sake, stop marginalizing us as Colored people. Please also understand that as a man of God and as a pastor, I am all things to all men just as the Bible requires, but my background will inform you that I did not just drop out of the sky as a pastor. Everyone in the ministry I lead with my spouse and many other pastors knows that I am raceless and do not tolerate any form of racism, tribalism or ethnic divisionist agendas. In my interaction with many of you as my political leaders, I realized that many of you have no clue of some of us and where we come from and what our capabilities and experience is. Some of you have been blinded by your own prejudice and tribal arrogance to the point where you have forgotten that we all have minds to think and that we have all been on life’s journey and seen and heard enough to inform us as to what our status is. Jesus Christ meets a woman at a well and he asks her for water, referring to his tiredness because of the long journey he has made. Metaphorically in the physical, but real in the spirit, the journey He refers to took him 4000 years to the point where He speaks to the woman at the well. Now that is the same with all of us as grown ups. We have journeyed, politically, academically, spiritually and been around many places and many people. We are NOT VILLAGE FOOLS AND IMBECILES, we are NOT! I believe that there is a need for a Coloured People’s Convention (CPC) within the next three months before posts and positions are allocated. The aim of such a convention will not be to lament how we are being unjustly treated, but rather to identify and elect legitimate and acceptable Colored leaders who have the capacity to fully work for Namibia as a country and for the Coloured people. Please note that any national leader, especially in the ruling party must be loyal to the party first and then serve the interests of the nation at large and then make sure that they represent their constituency, which is usually tribally and/or ethnically demarcated! That is a given! However, my concern here is the lack of Colored representation in Government on a more political, national level. Let’s talk, let’s deliberate, let’s discuss, let’s debate and let us reach an amicable win-win situation where I like any other parent can be at ease in this beautiful, peaceful country knowing that my children’s 61

future, like any other child is secure and not undermined just because of being Colored!

What is success? (2010-01-13 13:42)
I am successful! By definition, success is about attaining an objective. Thus to be successful means you meet your objectives. The catch is what are your objectives? How do you go about setting these aims? Is it a haphazard guess oooh I want to be rich? Or do you seriously sit down and take time to plan and concretise your objectives? I was fortunate to have many wonderful teachers and mentors who, from an early age, encouraged me to achieve my objectives because they believed in me. One of the most important lessons I learnt was how to set an objective. In school we are taught an objective should be SMART - that is: S - Specific M - Measurable A - Achievable R - Realistic T- Time-bound This is easier said than done!!!!!! Nevertheless, once an objective is SMART, success is bound to happen. One thing that has helped me over the years is the visualisation of my success. I spend time daydreaming about what it would be like to have achieved the success already. I even make a shopping list of the things I will buy with the money I plan on earning. Another important part of achieving success is making sure I do not use the measuring stick of others. If you find money important, then use it as YOUR measure. BUT, for me acquiring knowledge and helping others is my measure. In 1999, I was challenged to create a business plan for my business life. It took almost three years, but I completed a comprehensive plan in 2003. Of course, when I did the financials, I realised that at least N $ 10 million would be needed. Now, where was I going to get that kind of money? Then a funny thing started happening. As the years have gone on, I evaluate the objectives set in the plan and guess what? I always meet, if not surpass, all the objectives set out in my plan. WITHOUT THE MONEY? How do I do it you ask? The setting up of these objectives were SMART. The need for certain actions were written up. All I have to do is alighn myslef with what the universe has seen to be the end result. I got no other answer than that. So I end this with a suggestion to you. Prepare a Business Plan for your Life!

This Colour Thing in Namibia (2010-01-13 16:44)
Many years ago I was asked, “Who are you?” This was before Independence and I understood my credentials were being questioned. My reply was, “First, I am a human being, and secondly I am a Namibian. Last, and least important, I am coloured”. Now I am 40 and take the time to sit back and look back at the mileposts during my life. It is also the time to look forward to the end of my days, and consider where I have gone wrong, and perhaps where I have made a meaningful difference. It is most definitely like sitting in an armchair and contemplating “in order to understand itself and mentally grasp its own activity, that of the mind.” After all, “to be able to look back upon ones life in satisfaction is to live twice.” So in this last chapter I must also address mistakes that I have made in my feeble attempts at contributing 62

to the nationhood of our beloved land. I have thought it unimportant where my family comes from, what their cultures and beliefs were, and often thought these were to be considered and ultimately rejected as part of their living in a past dominated by the racial classification given by the system of Apartheid. Who I am is not dictated by our external environment, but rather by the internal. As humans we tend to blame our culture, society, government, employers and even our own families for things that goes wrong, but rarely give them credit for “our” achievements. As time has passed I have gone from reading science fiction to more biographies on the historical figures in our history. (Imagine my surprise when I found out that Benjamin Franklin had already added a thought for the month in his “Poor Richard’s Almanac, and written advice to a newly establishing tradesman.:) Reading through these biographies, and accessing their quotes has made a dramatic impact on my life. Throughout my book, Smile My beloved Land, I have often put forward an argument to find that a similar proposal has been done by great men before me. I was not the first, and hopefully not the last, to have these great expectations form the human race. Lastly, I address myself to the words of Albert Einstein, “He who cherishes the values of culture cannot fail to be a pacifist.”

I know, I know Not (2010-01-14 12:30)
There are four kinds of knowing. " Knowing you know, " knowing you know not, " not knowing you know and " not knowing you know not Let’s look at each one and what it means: Knowing you know - this is what we consider our education and training Knowing you know not - this is what we want to learn Not knowing you know - this refers to information you have gained, but are not aware of using in your life often recognised as trivia Not knowing you know not - this is the area you need to find out more about! Around twenty years ago, I realised that due to the place and time I grew up in, I had been kept in the dark about many things (censorship). This was especaily clear when it came to religion or as it is also known, metphysics. Below a list of things I did not know I did not know when I was twenty. Maybe you might find it useful? " Ramtha " Reiki " Dianetics – Scientology " Aristotle " 7 habits of successful people " The art of loving a woman " The art of keeping a good woman Perhaps, you know something I don’t know I don’t know?

Namibia Consumer Hotline (2010-01-22 16:36)
Great News! We have completed the agreement with telecom for our Consumer Hotline. The number is 0886 90909. We will kick this off early next week for testing and have it fully operation by 1 February 2010. 63

Desiderata - Be a person becoming by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 13:59)
Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter, for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love, for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment, it is as perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be. And whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace in your soul. With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.

”A Prayer” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:00)
Let me do my work each day; and if the darkened hours of despair overcome me, may I not forget the strength that comforted me in the desolation of other times. May I still remember the bright hours that found me walking over the silent hills of my childhood, or dreaming on the margin of a quiet river, when a light glowed within me, and I promised my early God to have courage amid the tempests of the changing years. Spare me from bitterness and from the sharp passions of unguarded moments. May I not forget that poverty and riches are of the spirit. Though the world knows me not, may my thoughts and actions be such as shall keep me friendly with myself. Lift up my eyes from the earth, and let me not forget the uses of the stars. Forbid that I should judge others lest I condemn myself. Let me not follow the clamor of the world, but walk calmly in my path. Give me a few friends who will love me for what I am; and keep ever burning before my vagrant steps the kindly light of hope. And though age and infirmity overtake me, and I come not within sight of the castle of my dreams, teach me still to be thankful for life, and for time’s olden memories that are good and sweet; and may the evening’s twilight find me gentle still.

”Whatever else you do” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:10)
Whatever else you do or forbear, impose upon yourself the task of happiness; 64

and now and then abandon yourself to the joy of laughter. And however much you condemn the evil in the world, remember that the world is not all evil; that somewhere children are at play, as you yourself in the old days; that women still find joy in the stalwart hearts of men; And that men, treading with restless feet their many paths, may yet find refuge from the storms of the world in the cheerful house of love.

”Reforming Oneself” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:11)
It has been raining again. I have been indoors, meditating on the shortcomings of life. I wish there were more kindly persons in the world. Our competitive life develops selfishness and unkindness. I am determined to do something about it. I cannot hope to convert many persons. To convert one person, I shall do well. I will begin with the person I know best - myself. When it rains and one is much indoors one is likely to meditate on the shortcomings of life. Let me think - how shall I make myself kind, gentle considerate? I do believe it has stopped raining. I can go out now. I’ll go and shoot on the archery range. I’ll not bother to reform myself today. Perhaps tomorrow - if it is raining, and I must stay indoors, and meditate on the shortcomings of life.

” Dark Days” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:13)
What fool shall say, ”My days are fair, God’s in his world and all is well,” When half mankind shrieks in despair Worse than in Dante’s flaming hell! I cannot sing in happy mood While hostile armies take their toll. On these dark days I toil and brood With starless midnight in my soul. And yet, O World, O Life, O God! I find myself, jest as the fool, Believing in thy chastening rod, Believing still that love must rule.

65

”Wanderers” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:14)
A clear, cool night. I have been reading, but the thoughts of man do not solace me. I raised the curtain and looked at the moon, clear and silvery; and I brushed some of the unrest out of my mind. I know all the theories of the moon. There have been times when the symbols of science have robbed me of some of its mystery and charm. But no one can explain the moon any more than a grasshopper can explain me. In youth, the moon promised too much. But now I understand better; that was not the moon’s fault. Also the moon and I have this in common: We both are wanderers across the night.

Cinderella - Roald Dahl (2010-01-29 14:26)
I guess you think you know this story. You don’t. The real one’s much more gory. The phoney one, the one you know, Was cooked up years and years ago, And made to sound all soft and sappy just to keep the children happy. Mind you, they got the first bit right, The bit where, in the dead of night, The Ugly Sisters, jewels and all, Departed for the Palace Ball, While darling little Cinderella Was locked up in a slimy cellar, Where rats who wanted things to eat, Began to nibble at her feet. She bellowed ’Help!’ and ’Let me out! The Magic Fairy heard her shout. Appearing in a blaze of light, She said: ’My dear, are you all right?’ ’All right?’ cried Cindy .’Can’t you see ’I feel as rotten as can be!’ She beat her fist against the wall, And shouted, ’Get me to the Ball! ’There is a Disco at the Palace! ’The rest have gone and I am jealous! ’I want a dress! I want a coach! ’And earrings and a diamond brooch! ’And silver slippers, two of those! ’And lovely nylon panty hose! ’Done up like that I’ll guarantee ’The handsome Prince will fall for me!’ The Fairy said, ’Hang on a tick.’ She gave her wand a mighty flick And quickly, in no time at all, 66

Cindy was at the Palace Ball! It made the Ugly Sisters wince To see her dancing with the Prince. She held him very tight and pressed herself against his manly chest. The Prince himself was turned to pulp, All he could do was gasp and gulp. Then midnight struck. She shouted,’Heck! I’ve got to run to save my neck!’ The Prince cried, ’No! Alas! Alack!’ He grabbed her dress to hold her back. As Cindy shouted, ’Let me go!’ The dress was ripped from head to toe. She ran out in her underwear, And lost one slipper on the stair. The Prince was on it like a dart, He pressed it to his pounding heart, ’The girl this slipper fits,’ he cried, ’Tomorrow morn shall be my bride! I’ll visit every house in town ’Until I’ve tracked the maiden down!’ Then rather carelessly, I fear, He placed it on a crate of beer. At once, one of the Ugly Sisters, (The one whose face was blotched with blisters) Sneaked up and grabbed the dainty shoe, And quickly flushed it down the loo. Then in its place she calmly put The slipper from her own left foot. Ah ha, you see, the plot grows thicker, And Cindy’s luck starts looking sicker. Next day, the Prince went charging down To knock on all the doors in town. In every house, the tension grew. Who was the owner of the shoe? The shoe was long and very wide. (A normal foot got lost inside.) Also it smelled a wee bit icky. (The owner’s feet were hot and sticky.) Thousands of eager people came To try it on, but all in vain. Now came the Ugly Sisters’ go. One tried it on. The Prince screamed, ’No!’ But she screamed, ’Yes! It fits! Whoopee! ’So now you’ve got to marry me!’ The Prince went white from ear to ear. He muttered, ’Let me out of here.’ ’Oh no you don’t! You made a vow! ’There’s no way you can back out now!’ ’Off with her head!’The Prince roared back. 67

They chopped it off with one big whack. This pleased the Prince. He smiled and said, ’She’s prettier without her head.’ Then up came Sister Number Two, Who yelled, ’Now I will try the shoe!’ ’Try this instead!’ the Prince yelled back. He swung his trusty sword and smack Her head went crashing to the ground. It bounced a bit and rolled around. In the kitchen, peeling spuds, Cinderella heard the thuds Of bouncing heads upon the floor, And poked her own head round the door. ’What’s all the racket? ’Cindy cried. ’Mind your own bizz,’ the Prince replied. Poor Cindy’s heart was torn to shreds. My Prince! she thought. He chops off heads! How could I marry anyone Who does that sort of thing for fun? The Prince cried, ’Who’s this dirty slut? ’Off with her nut! Off with her nut!’ Just then, all in a blaze of light, The Magic Fairy hove in sight, Her Magic Wand went swoosh and swish! ’Cindy! ’she cried, ’come make a wish! ’Wish anything and have no doubt ’That I will make it come about!’ Cindy answered, ’Oh kind Fairy, ’This time I shall be more wary. ’No more Princes, no more money. ’I have had my taste of honey. I’m wishing for a decent man. ’They’re hard to find. D’you think you can?’ Within a minute, Cinderella Was married to a lovely feller, A simple jam maker by trade, Who sold good home-made marmalade. Their house was filled with smiles and laughter And they were happy ever after.

”I go my way” by Max Ehrmann (2010-01-29 14:49)
All round is haste, confusion, noise. For power and wealth men stretch the day From dawn till dusk. But quietly I go my way. For glitter, show, to taunt the crowd, Desire-tossed in wild dismay, 68

Men sell their souls. But quietly I go my way. The green of all the fields is mine; The stars, the night, the wind at play, A peaceful heart, while quietly I go my way.

”Happiness” by Max Erdmann (2010-01-29 14:50)
To be without desire is to be content. But contentment is not happiness. And in contentment there is no progress. Happiness is to desire something, to work for it, and to obtain at least a part of it. In the pursuit of beloved labor the busy days pass cheerfully employed, and the still nights in peaceful sleep. For labor born of desire is not drudgerey, but manly play. Success brings hope, hope inspires fresh desire, and desire gives zest to life and joy to labor. This is true whether your days be spent in the palaces of the powerful or in some little green byway of the world. Therefore, while yet you have the strength, cherish a desire to do some useful work in your little corner of the world, and have the steadfastness to labor. For this is the way to the happy life; with health and endearing ties, it is the way to the glorious life.

2.2

February

Abortion - what else do we have to offer? (2010-02-05 11:46)
Human Rights Watch considers abortion within the context of human rights, arguing: ”Abortion is a highly emotional subject and one that excites deeply held opinions. However, equitable access to safe abortion services is first and foremost a human right. Where abortion is safe and legal, no one is forced to have one. Where abortion is illegal and unsafe, women are forced to carry unwanted pregnancies to term or suffer serious health consequences and even death. Approximately 13 % of maternal deaths worldwide are attributable to unsafe abortion between 68,000 and 78,000 deaths annually” I have often been asked what my opinion of abortion is. My Christian upbringing immediately jumps in and shouts “No”. I see no wrong in contraceptives as a form of birth control, but the abortion issue becomes too emotional, too quickly. However, what are we doing as a community to support pregnant young girls? Is there a social safety net for unwed mothers who cannot, or do not, want this child? It is sad to hear of another case of infanticide, but I have never heard of the father also being held responsible. We need to as a community, provide support structures through homes for unwed mothers, or even drop-off points for unwanted children.

Extended CreditWise Consumer Protection (2010-02-05 11:47)
The CreditWise Consumer Protection Plan is also offering additional services. This includes an online filing cabinet for medical records, financial information and more. Wallet / Purse Backup 69

have you lost your wallet, or worse had it stolen? With our Wallet Section you can save the following information: Banking and insurance information, such as account numbers, bank card numbers, and insurance, health, car and home insurance data Identification records, like ID documents, drivers licenses, passports, social security numbers and even your educational certificates Identity Theft Cover If your identity is stolen we will help you deal with the problems that arise and get your life back on track. Medical History Do you know your blood group, or those of your family? Would you be able to answer a medical question in an emergency? In the medical section we allow you store information such as: Allergies, medical conditions, family health records, your personal medical history, including medications you have taken or are taking, immunization records, surgeries/procedures, and medical devices. Information about your various healthcare providers (doctors, dentists, etc.) and other vital medical documents. Emergency contact information that is connected to an ICE (In Case of Emergency) card you will receive in the mail with your subscription All this information is available 24/7 via our online or telephone service.

I am a Success! (2010-02-05 11:50)
I am successful! By definition, success is about attaining an objective. Thus to be successful means you meet your objectives. The catch is what are your objectives? How do you go about setting these aims? Is it a haphazard guess oooh I want to be rich? Or do you seriously sit down and take time to plan and concretise your objectives? I was fortunate to have many wonderful teachers and mentors who, from an early age, encouraged me to achieve my objectives because they believed in me. One of the most important lessons I learnt was how to set an objective. In school we are taught an objective should be SMART - that is: S - Specific M - Measurable A - Achievable R - Realistic T- Time-bound This is easier said than done!!!!!! Nevertheless, once an objective is SMART, success is bound to happen. One thing that has helped me over the years is the visualisation of my success. I spend time daydreaming about what it would be like to have achieved the success already. I even make a shopping list of the things I will buy with the money I plan on earning. Another important part of achieving success is making sure I do not use the measuring stick of others. If you find money important, then use it as YOUR measure. BUT, for me acquiring knowledge and helping others is my measure. In 1999, I was challenged to create a business plan for my business life. It took almost three years, but I completed a comprehensive plan in 2003. Of course, when I did the financials, I realised that at least N $ 10 million would be needed. Now, where was I going to get that kind of money? Then a funny thing started happening. As the years have gone on, I evaluate the objectives set in the plan and guess what? I always meet, if not surpass, all the objectives set out in my plan. WITHOUT THE MONEY? How do I do it you ask? The setting up of these objectives were SMART. The need for certain actions were 70

written up. All I have to do is alighn myslef with what the universe has seen to be the end result. I got no other answer than that. So I end this with a suggestion to you. Prepare a Business Plan for your Life!

The lady on the farm (2010-02-05 11:52)
I cannot believe you have left, On the way to the airport, Not knowing what you have done, Or understanding what I caught. We both were stuck with heartache, Shared it with each other for while, Feeling much better now knowing, Others need not understand our style. Most of the other family and guests around us, Probably thought it was only a holiday fling, But we both know better about our hearts, And the joy to our insides it did bring. I am sorry that I had to act nonchalant, And pretend there was nothing between us, Because your family need only have looked at me, And in my eyes have seen the lust. Now you left back for your home, Thank god that we have facebook, Now every day we can chat and laugh, And get ready for the next holiday u book.

Celebrating four decades (2010-02-05 11:54)
“There are two mistakes one can make along the road to truth...not going all the way, and not starting.” I stand today at a crossroads in my life. In this past year I have spent considerable time in looking at my past, and specifically my motivations for the actions that I have undertaken. Now as I stand on the brink of turning 40, it is time to build on the foundations I have laid. The one thing that I can say is, I have fought the temptation to take the easy way. My choice has more often than not been the ”road less travelled”. This coming year will be rather a harsh one. If I have done what was required, and my planning was right, all will be well.

On being a father (2010-02-05 11:55)
My daughter, Ziana, just passed her Grade 10 with flying colours. Being a divorced father, I realise ”..fatherhood isn’t easy like motherhood”. So pasted below a few quotes for us fathers out there: The father who would taste the essence of his fatherhood must turn back from the plane of his experience, 71

take with him the fruits of his journey and begin again beside his child, marching step by step over the same old road. Angelo Patri There’s something like a line of gold thread running through a man’s words when he talks to his daughter, and gradually over the years it gets to be long enough for you to pick up in your hands and weave into a cloth that feels like love itself. John Gregory Brown, Decorations in a Ruined Cemetery, 1994 Henry James once defined life as that predicament which precedes death, and certainly nobody owes you a debt of honor or gratitude for getting him into that predicament. But a child does owe his father a debt, if Dad, having gotten him into this peck of trouble, takes off his coat and buckles down to the job of showing his son how best to crash through it. Clarence Budington Kelland

Forgiving is a hard journey (2010-02-05 11:56)
“We achieve inner health only through forgiveness - the forgiveness not only of others but also of ourselves” This year I decided to face the anger and pain in my heart. Unfortunately, like a boil, you first have to pierce it and let the puss out before you can treat it. This I did and was heartened by the many friends on FB who commented on this angry outburst. My inspiration for this Xmas period and beyond is: ”Forgiveness is not always easy. At times, it feels more painful than the wound we suffered, to forgive the one that inflicted it. And yet, there is no peace without forgiveness.”

To my ex-wife (2010-02-05 11:56)
This year I am giving myself a Xmas present. I am relieving myself of having to lie on your behalf again. For the past eight years I have kept quiet while you act the martyr - and bad-mouth me as a bad father. Enough is enough. Do you remember I offered everything including the house and the car in the divorce? AND then you went and perjured yourself by accusing me of rape. Do you remember I spent 48 hours in police custody? Do you also remember the police let me go because they knew you lied? Why did I keep quiet, I hear you say? Because there are real woman, real mothers out there that need the protection of the law - even if I had to get jail for 15 years for the lies of some vindictive bitch. So, we have an agreement on our divorce. Then you went and lied to the Observer newspaper giving them your first allegations (rather than the public document), and you expect me to let you be? Now my eldest daughter is 18, and you have to face up to the fact that I will no longer keep quiet and let you terrorize me by coming to my work every time I get a job. Tot hier toe en nie verder nie. So to myself: Milton, as my gift to you this Xmas I absolve you of all feelings of guilt and release you with full pardon. Walk away, feel proud and do not hesitate to tell the truth anymore. Oh, one more thing, start ”Fathers for Justice” in Namibia to help those other poor fools who are being abused by women.

Brotherhood among us (1987) (2010-02-22 12:23)
Can’t we all come and meet each other And no matter what colour we may be 72

Be able to show we love one another And then together we’ll stand, you and me The leaders of Tomorrow, Planning for what is to come Otherwise there will be lots of needless sorrow Over killing which are quite dumb. So come closer now and grab my hand And we’ll accept each other as brothers And then together we’ll be able to stand To show our Father and Mothers We want to plan for a common future No matter what our race, colour or culture.

2.3

April

Fire Nampower MD! (2010-04-14 11:37)
This is completely unacceptable! Nampower loses money on political decisions to support Zimbabwe and we, the Consumers, must now pay the price. Not only should we reject this increase, we should demand the heads of the management at the company. Nampower is looking at INCREASING ELECTRICITY by 35 %. If the public have anything against this increase they can send an e-mail to the following address: mayame@ecb.org (ECB is the Electricity Control Board of Namibia) Please note that this email should reach them before the 6th of April (next Tuesday). Please forward this address to all Namibians in your address book.

World Consumer Rights Day 2010 - ’Our money, our rights’ (2010-04-14 11:37)
The global consumer movement will once again unite for a day of action on 15 March 2010. The theme for World Consumer Rights Day (WCRD) 2010 is Our money, our rights’ and will highlight consumer issues in relation to financial services. The Namibia Consumer Protection Group is presently working at attaining membership of Consumer International. Consumers International (CI) is the world federation of consumer groups that, working together with its members, serves as the only independent and authoritative global voice for consumers. With over 220 member organisations in 115 countries, CI is building a powerful international movement to help protect and empower consumers everywhere. Founded in 1960, the organisation is now needed more than ever. This modern movement is essential to secure a fair safe and sustainable future for consumers in a global marketplace increasingly dominated by international corporations. Campaigns and programmes CI campaigns on the international issues that matter to consumers everywhere. This means achieving real changes in government policy and corporate behaviour while raising awareness of consumer rights and responsibilities. In campaigning for the rights of consumers across the world, CI seeks to hold corporations to account and 73

demands government action to put consumer concerns first. To this end, CI is committed to acting as a global watchdog: campaigning against any behaviour that threatens, ignores or abuses the principles of consumer protection. CI is doing this by: Working with national member organisations to influence governments, highlight marketplace abuses and raise grass roots support. Pressing consumer concerns through official representation global bodies such as the United Nations (UN), World Health Organization (WHO), International Organization of Standardization (ISO), and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Raising awareness about purchasing choices through clear, engaging and accessible communication.

Nampower management should be fired (2010-04-14 11:38)
Namibian Economist - FRIDAY, 09 APRIL 2010 11:03 Written by Nyasha Nyaungwa The Namibia Protection Group (NPG) has called for the sacking of the managing director of Nampower, Paulinus Shilamba and his management. The call follows an announcement by the power utility last week that it will be seeking a 35 % tariff increment from the Electricity Control Board of Namibia (ECB). In an interview, founder of the NPG, Milton Louw said the proposed 35 % electricity increase was reason enough for Shilamba to be fired. “Surely we can expect better management that realises the importance of electricity in the daily lives of our people. This kind of increase will lead to a decrease in economic activity, and job losses. This is reason enough to ask for his (Shilamba’s) replacement. “The MD and his management must be tackled directly. They are responsible for the long-term planning and if this has gone wrong they must take the blame. Pity this will probably not happen,” Louw added. Instead of increasing, electricity tariffs, Louw implored the government to urgently finalise the Kudu Gas Project. “We must get the Kudu Gas Project going now. This project never seems to get off the ground. Second, let’s build a nuclear power station (explained fully in my book) that is a compromise on our supplying uranium,” Louw said. Contacted for comment, officials at the ECB refused to comment on the matter. An official from the PR department who refused to identify himself could only say that the issue of whether a 35 % increase will be granted or not will be based on the outcome of the consultation process that is scheduled to end this Friday, 9 April. “If the majority of the stakeholders are against the proposed tariff increase, a compromise will have to be reached as we basically have two groups to protect, namely: Nampower and the consumers,” the official said.

How to get FB without accessing the site (your company blocked it) (2010-04-14 11:38)
*NOT an original post of Milton Louw* Just to help those of us who are not so techie to get FB: I follow it through a feed reader (in my case, Google Reader). Besides the obvious benefits to this, one great side effect is that you never, ever see the output of applications (e.g., quiz results) or the other useless noise like ”so-and-so is now friends with someone else you already know”. The only drawback I’ve found is that you also don’t see notifications about photos that your friends have uploaded. (You do see links that they post, however: just not Facebook-hosted photos. It’s a bizarre 74

omission.) Anyway, I just had to explain to someone how to accomplish this feat, which made me realize how completely non-obvious Facebook has made this. Finding these feeds is a complete pain in the ass. They’ve really gone out of their way to hide the URLs you need to use. So. You have to subscribe to three or four different feeds. Posts: Find the Posts feed by going to [1]http://www.facebook.com/posted.php. On the upper right of the page is a gray box, and at the bottom of that box is a link entitled ”My Friends’ Links” with the RSS logo next to it. Copy that URL. Subscribe to it in your feed reader. This is the RSS URL for any links and (external) images that your friends post. Notes: Find the Notes feed by going to [2]http://www.facebook.com/notes.php and repeating the above. This is the RSS URL for things that your friends post via the ”Notes” app, which is (I guess) the more blog-like way of posting long things to Facebook. Notifications: Find the Notifications feed by going to [3]http://www.facebook.com/notifications.php and repeating the above. This is the RSS URL for things like ”so-and-so commented on your status”. You might not care to subscribe to this one because you can get all of these kind of notifications in email. Status Updates: This is the RSS URL for the ”What are you doing?” Twitter-like part of Facebook. This is the one you probably care about, and it is trickier, because Facebook no longer links to the feed URL! Nice one guys. You have to construct this URL by editing one of the above URLs. E.g., take the ”Notes” URL and change the part of the URL that says ”friends notes” to ”friends status”. Keep the parts of the URL before and after that, including the magic numbers at the end.
1. http://www.facebook.com/posted.php 2. http://www.facebook.com/notes.php 3. http://www.facebook.com/notifications.php

Crucifixion vs. Resurrection (2010-04-14 11:39)
Last night I had dream: Since the crucifixion of Jesus there has been a family of one of his disciples that managed to take down his cross and keep it hidden. This family stayed in the Middle East and found things becoming very difficult during the time of the Ottoman Empire as they had become Christians. The Patriarch decided to entrust their mission of looking after the cross to one of his most trusted friends to happened to be of the Muslim faith. The Muslim family has been keeping the secret of the safekeeping of the cross of Jesus since this time. Recently, the descendants of the original family wished to have the cross returned to them. The two families have always been close and a meeting was held to discuss the matter. The head of the Muslim family was however not agreeable with the suggestion and kept putting up obstacles to the return. The Christian Patriarch discovered that since the time of the handover to the Muslim family, many unexplainable things had happened to the family and their success, riches and fame had increased tremendously. Obviously, the task of looking after the cross had benefited this family and they would be reluctant to part with it. This difficulty caused problems with the relationship between the families and they became every distant and mistrusting of one another. After much thought, he realised the truth of the matter. They were spending much time talking about the object representing the crucifixion, rather than recognising it is the resurrection that is important. 75

My understanding of the dream: We spend too much time telling others about our suffering, rather than rejoicing on how we overcame it.

No to leaderless consumer protest actions in Namibia (2010-04-19 09:30)
The NCPG is a non-profit Namibian organisation that campaigns for customer rights and focuses on illegal and unethical behaviour by Namibian companies. As a lobby group, we believe that we need to be involved with Government, State-Owned Enterprises, Community-Based Organisations and the Media in our efforts to protect the rights of the consumer. In this regard, we believe strongly in interaction to find solutions facing us all in Namibia. During the past two weeks we have been calling for action against the Nampower proposal for a 35 % price increase in the provision in Electricity. Our website and email newsletter started a petition that clearly states our objections and is aimed at the Electricity Control Board who is the body responsible for deciding upon the increase, or not. This was taken one step further by the “We don’t accept the 35 % electricity price increase from Nampower” group on Facebook started by UK-based community activist Jade McClune. It is with regret that we wish to inform the public through this statement, that we no longer can support the unilateral decisions being proposed by Mr McClune for us here in Namibia to undertake street actions. Such protest should be organised locally and have clear indications of who the leaders are, and these leaders must be present to show they are in the forefront of such action. As much as we desire attention to this cause, we cannot condone actions that are not clearly aimed at addressing the problem, rather than becoming a platform for unrest. Thus, while as individuals we will attend the planned protest march, as a lobby group we must insist that such actions have clearly defined leadership that is present at such actions. We assure all the consumers in Namibia that we will continue to work in your best interest by working together with Government and business in ensuring your rights are respected. We will continue the fight for consumers. It is “Our Money, Our Rights”. Milton Louw Founder

Open letter to Lodewyk van Graan, Chairperson of the ICT Alliance of Namibia
(2010-04-26 16:19)

Dear Lodewyk, I am glad the ICT Alliance is eventually having its AGM tomorrow and I hope many people attend. But please stop blaming me for all the mishaps at the organisation. I quote ”We all have concerns regarding the upcoming AGM as we have been left in a lurch by the previous secretary to a certain extent. Much of our documentation and records were lost as a result of what I believe to be malice from our previous secretary after being implicated in unethical behaviour and who was duly terminated. We have, since his departure been building up our records again and will to the best of our ability present an accurate report on the past term of the Alliance. ” You cut me off from the server at IIT before we even had a disciplinary hearing. Quite honestly, it was the best thing you ever did. Even for me, having a hearing find me guilty in a job that has not paid me a salary 76

for a eight months was great!! It gave me a chance to write a book and now I head over 5,000 members of the Namibia Consumer Protection Group on issues such as the Nampower increase. So please, if you want to put blame somewhere, leave me out of it. Malice (A desire to harm others or to see others suffer; extreme ill will or spite) is not something you would ever find in me. That is what you did when you called Legalshield and got them to withdraw their job offer the morning I was supposed to start. And even for that I am happy. By not taking the job, I now have 500 hectares in the Otjimbingwe district. Kind regards, I will always be thankful to you for the opportunity to teach so many Namibians while at your company, Milton ”A noble heart cannot suspect in others the pettiness and malice that it has never felt. ”

2.4

May

Lodewyk van Graan responds to Open Letter (2010-05-24 13:19)
Dear Milton Thank you kindly for your response. Congratulations on your new found success, and what seems to be a positive future. You still however need to settle the past. You are once again misrepresenting the facts for your own benefit. I’ll leave it at that and not go into the specifics. Should anyone at any time require us to provide proof of anything you did we shall be happy to do so. I have no clout with legal shield and believe them quite capable of making decisions about who they emply on their own. Their decision might have been influenced by other factors such as the 2 court judgements against you for, shall we say questionable business practices. Our organisation and the IPPR still want these resolved but even after numerous attempts from us and the IPPR to discuss this with you, you have always managed to avoid us and the messenger of the court finding you. I am very surprised to hear from you and very happy. Please be so kind as to provide me with your physical address and more detail of the fixed assets you refer to so that we can settle the legal wrangling that you have with both the IPPR and our organisation. Regards Lodewyk van Graan (Note: Mr. Lodewyk van Graan is the chairperson of the ICT Alliance of Namibia. He also is the owner of the Institute of Information Technology (IIT). The Alliance is the organisation that has not paid the salary, while IIT is the company that advanced monies against the salary that was due. After Mr. van Graan indicated to me that I cannot work for both organisations, I decided to work for the ICT Alliance and improved the ICT environment. Unfortunately, Mr. van Graan as Chairperson of the Alliance as well as the owner of the company making money from my tutoring, made this impossible.) My reply: Thank you Lodewyk. I am a person who believes in really letting it all out. I am glad you wish to do so too. Funny, the Messenger of the Court is using my data and they know my exact details - even have a nulla bona signed because of the behaviour of creditors who use legalese to get debt written up. I am even advocating a law to provide debt counselling to poor Namibians. 77

Be that as they may I look forward to making this a discussion about my past. Do yourself a favour though, read my book. Everything you are alluding to is stated in it - including my debts and how they were occurred. Perhaps also read my blog in this regard: [1]http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/2009/04/me-and-bad-d ebts.html - - I will also now add the IIT problems with cheques signed by board members in your presence and the none payment of my salary - and of course the money that you got from the Ministry of ICT to go to Brazil that has still not been explained. Feel free to rebuff and use the hearing report that states ICT Alliance was acting illegally by not paying me - and this did not give me the right to act unethically. I once again thank you for publicising more of the information. These things need to get out there. Kind regards and look forward to your next correspondence
1. http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/2009/04/me-and-bad-debts.html

Are our Educational Institutions simply ripping us off ? (2010-05-24 13:52)
Charlotte writes to Consumer Protection group: Are our Educational Institutions simply ripping us off ?? Is the Price of Education a Realistic reflection of what we get for money? Are universities (and private institutes) in Namibia in it for the education or the money? [1][2]Private Institutions of Learning Our constitution states: (4) All persons shall have the right, at their own expense, to establish and to maintain private schools, or colleges or other institutions of tertiary education: provided that: (a) such schools, colleges or institutions of tertiary education are registered with a Government department in accordance with any law authorising and regulating such registration; (b) the standards maintained by such schools, colleges or institutions of tertiary education are not inferior to the standards maintained in comparable schools, colleges or institutions of tertiary education funded by the State; Tertiary education schools are mushrooming all over the country. They provide everything from art classes, computer literacy and business skills. The problem is the standards are not very good, and most students receive a qualification which is not worth the paper it is printed on. Let us look at a typical example and call it the Tertiary Education Academy. TertiaryEducation Academy(TEA) The owner TEA is a businessman without any qualification in education, after all, the Academy is a business and was started to make a profit. None of the staff members, including the Principal, has any professional training or recognised educational qualification. The lecturers at the Academy are also not qualified teachers. TEA offers the following courses: · Typing skills · Bookkeeping · Computer Literacy – Microsoft Office · PC Engineering – A+ and N+ · Software Programming The Academy also offers Diplomas in Tourism, Public Relations, Business, Finance and Personnel Administration. The Academy is a very profitable business and they owner is planning on offering further diploma courses. Great! However, most of the students (and their parents) are not aware that the lecturers are not professionally qualified. Furthermore, imagine the students’ dismay when they find out that none of these courses are recognised by the Namibian Qualifications Authority. Even worse, the diploma courses are not worth more than a Grade 12 according to the Universities. 78

Now before we start closing all these schools, institutes and academies, let us examine their role in our country. More and more students are completing their schooling and not finding place at the University or Polytechnic. Their parents or care-givers cannot afford the study fees in other countries, so these students have to look for employment. Having no marketable skill, they often do not find employment and become one of the unemployed. The private tertiary education institutes offer the students an opportunity to gather knowledge about business and prepare them for gainful employment. So what can we do? We need to have a body that actively encourages that “the standards maintained by such schools, colleges or institutions of tertiary education are not inferior to the standards maintained in comparable schools, colleges or institutions of tertiary education funded by the State”. The NQA must be publicise the names of those that are registered and meet their standards. Furthermore, the NQA must be given teeth to close down those who do not meet the standards set within a period of time. Note: Mr. Louw is the founder of the Namibia Consumer Protection Group but answers these submissions in his personal capacity. Mr. Louw has been a trainer at IIT (Institute of Information Technology belonging to Lodewyk van Graan) and the Secretary for the ICT Alliance of Namibia for a period of three years. Mr. Louw is presently a part-time lecturer at the Polytechnic of Namibia.
1. http://www.blogger.com/post-edit.g?blogID=7754137909221642247&postID=4902809418743845767 2. http://www.blogger.com/post-edit.g?blogID=7754137909221642247&postID=4902809418743845767

(2010-05-26 16:53)
THE RELEVANCE OF BLACK ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT (BEE) TO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF COMPETITION POLICY AND LAW IN NAMIBIA IS IT AN IMPERATIVE? MIHE GAOMAB II Windhoek, Namibia 26th May 2010 Mihe Gaomab II is the Secretary and CEO of the Namibia Competition Commission. He is the Founding President of the Namibia Economic Society and remains an honorary member. This Article was adapted from a NES speech presented at a Seminar on BEE in South Africa organized by DELTACON, a BEE Auditing and Verification Company on the 4th November 20009. Madam Moderator and Facilitator Distinguished Panelists Ladies and Gentlemen, Good Morning and allow me from the onset to thank NES for making it possible for me to present to you a contemporary yet crucial topic which is the Black Economic Empowerment in Namibia. This presentation of this topic is pioneering in the sense that I have been requested to present the relevance of BEE from a Competition Policy and Law perspective. Competition Policy and Law in Namibia 79

As you are aware, at independence, Namibia realized that it faces developmental challenges based on an economy which was dualistic with high unemployment and an economic structure which is enclaved and concentrated around few sectors. The developmental challenges which are to reduce poverty, create employment, reduce inequalities across individuals and regions thereby ensuring balanced economic growth became a prime driver of focus for our government. This developmental objectives have been addressed at varying levels to a large extent by our government but government further realize that to ensure that this developmental policy objectives are addressed, it needs reorientation or rather a transformation of the economy. These are clearly espoused in the development plans and Vision 2030. Hence the need also to create a regulatory environment that would cater for private sector development. But more importantly an institutional process that would assist for in ensuring a market based outcomes that optimizes efficient allocation of our resources be it in form of capital and labour. Such outcomes were already focused on private sector to expand its manufacturing base through the development of white paper on industrial policy in 1992, EPZ Act of 1995, Foreign Investment Act 1990, Manufacturing Incentives, and host of other measures. There were other policies done for other sectors as well is indeed commendable on the part of our government. These include the promotion of SMEs through enacting SME Policy in 1996, promoting employment through enactment of 2007 Labour Act, and looking after a broader based of us Namibians by drafting the Transformation Economic and Social Framework (TESEF), especially those of us that were historically lessened or deprived due to skewed policies of that time. Now empirical data and experience points to the fact that by creating a competitive economy especially among business or the private sector, a country is able to develop faster, withstand external shocks, and even assist in rates of per capita growth through employment and investment promotion. There are documented facts that in countries such as Peru, Australia and South Africa, who started off well with competition authorities in the 1990s, the impact assessments shows that by having a competition law and policy as well as entrenched competition culture, despite costs encountered, the economic benefits are enormous with welfare implications for consumers, wage incomes and employment creation leading to overall economic growth and government revenue. The question that still needs a lot of advocacy on is what is competition policy and law. Competition Policy refers to a set of government measures that details the strategic direction of the Ministry of Trade and Industry to regulate the competitive behaviour of firms and business in the country. The government put in place competition policy as far as the late 1990s to assist in reorientation and re-structuring of the economy, with the ultimate aim to reorient our economy towards higher growth as envisioned in Vision 2030. The policy is thus a integral part of the overall macroeconomy of which our Commissioners have been entrusted to use as a policy that is supportive and is cross appealing across aspects such as trade measures, industrial, investment, finance, planning, poverty reduction, employment, growth, and welfare considerations. Regulation of competition issues was introduced in 2003 through the Competition Act of 2003 (Act No. 2 of 2003) in the country. In the past, competition issues in Namibia were regulated by the Regulation of Monopolistic Conditions 80

Amendment Act, 1958 (Act 14 of 1958). However, this was a South African Act, which was not applied in Namibia after independence. The main overarching objective for the implementation of the Competition Law as a competition policy instrument is to enhance the promotion and safeguarding of competition. The urgency of having a competition policy and law rests fundamentally on three key issues. Firstly, Namibia’s economic competitiveness still needs a lot of work on as it is consistently ranked not among the top five of countries which are Botswana, Tunisia, South Africa, Mauritius, and Egypt. Secondly, although Namibia’s competitiveness is characterise as a lower middleincome country with an average per capita income of above US $3,000 and its macroeconomic fundamentals are sound and proper, the Namibian economy is characterised by a large, non-tradable sector (government services), and an export oriented primary sector, mainly fisheries, agriculture and mining. Namibia is also a small open economy heavily relying on imports, which are sometimes subjected to distorted pricing, dumping of undesirable and defective products and anti competitive behaviour. The economy therefore remains enclaved and is structurally biased in terms of service and production towards satisfying external markets rather than domestically. Currently, there are no meaningful transformation with albeit lack of forward and backward linkages between key sectors, an important precondition for any restructuring from a micro economic point of view of sectoral transformation and development. Here the need for a competition policy becomes more urgent to regulate by law the competitive behaviour of industry, firms and business in terms of ensuring a just, orderly, safe and optimal competitive process in the economy. Lastly, there is also general recognition by our government that economically there has been instances of market failures i.e. private sector sometimes not doing what it ought to do in terms of proper and orderly competitive conduct in market place. There is anecdotal evidence that a market economy with a thriving and robust private sector can be the key to economic growth and development. This situation can hold long term sustainable increases in consumer welfare. However, it is proven empirically that markets can fail because of anticompetitive practices. Hence the need for developing competition policy that creates a just orderly conduct of the market place allowing for a fair production process through an efficient competitive process that benefits the customers and the economy as a whole. It also proven that an effective competition law and policy will encourage the use of the most efficient methods of production, and will guide resources to the uses society values most highly and can give rise to continuing incentives for innovation to increase productivity and general efficiency of markets through improved transparency of the rules that apply to business transactions. The Namibian Competition Commission has been established in terms of the Competition Act (Act No. 2 of 2003). It is tasked with promoting competitive market conditions through investigation and prosecution of anti-competitive activities, reviewing and approving mergers and exemption applications, and disseminating information to businesses, consumers and other stakeholders. Namibia’s competition law not only covers the three major competition concerns of anti-competitive agreements, abuse of dominance, and anti-competitive mergers, but it also takes into account the public interests provisions on 81

protecting consumers by safeguarding competitive prices and product choices as well as promoting employment, investment and advancing the social and economic welfare of Namibians. It also has special requirements of its economy, which are the protection and promotion of small undertakings as well as promoting a greater spread of ownership of historically advantaged persons. The essence of decisions that NaCC is empowered to make is therefore analyzed, investigated and adjudicated upon taking into account that there needs to a BEE component to ensure localization and involvement of Namibians. This particularly applies to Merger approvals of some odd 60 000 odd businesses in the country. The Commission is cognizant however that at the time of writing, the empowerment emphasis was on the word ownership. But we all know that the word BEE should amply read BBEE to encompass broadness broad based. The Competition Act of 2003 has been therefore futuristic to include the essence of broadness by indicating the promotion of a greater spread of ownership of historically advantaged persons. We are considerate that TESEF will aim to ensure that all relevant definitions and analytical interpretations will assist from a legal and policy point of view to clearly articulate such terms and words from a BBEE implementation point of view, of course using the SWAPO Manifesto, NDPs and Vision 2030 as guiding documents. The reasons are that there is a lot of debate on the concept of Broad based BEE within the context of the development of Southern Africa, notably in South Africa, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. There are increasingly a lot of controversy and confusion regarding the term and the definition, nature, form, implementation and conduct BBEEE has today, Namibia needs to avoid this by implementing our Presidents call for having a well targeted BEE policy and law in the country that aims to empower most Namibians (never mind the word Black) within the mainstream in Namibia. Madam Moderator Is BEE an Imperative in Namibia, lets rather firstly look at the historical context of BEE developments. The origin, imperative and the need for having a BEE policy in place within Southern Africa can only be predicated on the basis that an economy can only flourish if it can meet the needs of all its economic citizens, people and their enterprises in a sustainable and developmental manner. Such predicaments are evidenced in Benhabib, Jess and Mark M Speigel in “The Role of Human Capital in Economic Development: Evidence from Aggregate Cross Country Data,”, Journal of Monetary Economics, 1994, 34, 143-173. The conclusions of this scientific research are broad ranging in the sense that human and economic development can only be possible if the systems be it economic, social, legal or political builds on the full potential of all persons and communities across the length and breadth of a country. The colonial historical context of the countries in Southern Africa in particular South Africa and Namibia witnessed a period of protracted economic development which even though created a necessary capital infrastructure which is commendably in place today created a human capital that is largely unskilled, uninformed and restricted from meaningful participation in the economy. The historical context of appreciating human capital towards economic and development shows however that where, human capital was suppressed or alienated from the economic developmental process, it had a profound effect on the standard of living of its people and status of developing an economy. This is clearly proven empirically in Nathan Nunn (2007) where the effect of 82

human capital suppression and its long term associated effect on Africa’s development are well researched in “Slavery, Institutional Development, and Long Run Economic Growth in Africa”. The evidence suggests that slave trade as a form of human capital suppression had an adverse negative effect on economic development in Africa. Of relevance will be to consult the Bertocchi, Graziella and Fabio Canova (2002) titled “Did Colonialism Matter for Growth in Africa” where it empirically explore the historical causes of Africa’s development due to Colonialism. European Economic Review, XLVI. Pages 1851 – 1871. In Southern Africa, the assets, skills, positions and opportunities of millions of people were directly and indirectly restricted either through some sociopolitical/ economic policy. Such a process created a capital accumulation process where it confined the creation of wealth to a minority population and constricted underdevelopment and poverty on the majority of the population. In South Africa and Namibia for example, the result is an enclaved and skewed economic structure that today, in essence, still excludes the vast majority of its inhabitants. Imperative for BEE in Southern Africa Madam Moderator The basic vision of an economy that meets the needs of the people in a more equitable manner goes back to the ANC’s Freedom Charter of 1955 in South Africa and the Swapo’s Manifestos in the 1960’s of Namibia. Since the political transformation in 1990 of Namibia and 1994 of South Africa, the respective economies have undergone rapid consistent economic growth, albeit for the East Asia Financial Crisis 1998/09 and the Global Economic and Financial Crisis in 2008/09. Generally, these countries had profound macroeconomic stabilisation which has provided largely a platform for a sustained economic growth rates. Compared to pre 1990’s, both economies has become increasingly integrated into regional (SADC and SACU) as well as global markets (EU, US, BRICS, East Asia, MECOSUR) and both countries became a successful exporter of base metals and minerals (Gold, Uranium, Diamonds etc) and for instance in case of South Africa, manufactured goods and value-added services have proliferated. Because of that sustained economic growth, in terms of GDP and GDP per capita, Namibia is increasingly been viewed as a upper middle income country and South Africa is now able to position itself as an emerging manufacturing economy. Further, both economies have consistently put in place appropriate broad economic strategies to transform the economies. In Namibia, National Development Plan I, II, and III which serves as a five year plans for economic development with an explicit target of around 7 % on average according to the long term plan Vision 2030 was continuously emphasised. In South Africa, the Reconstruction and Development Programme (1994) and GEAR (1998) has been the focus of a broad strategies along with others such as the Microeconomic Reform Strategy, Integrated Manufacturing Strategy and the National Research and Development Strategy that has underpinned the South African miracle of economic growth of close to around 5 %, a visible improvement taking into account negative growth it encountered in the 1980’s. Despite the sustained economic growth successes and a host of developmental plans, policies and strategy introduced and implemented, there is another statistical picture that paints a grim reality of entrenched income inequalities characterising both economies. Once could argue that this pervasive inequality act as a deterrent to future economic growth, economic development, 83

employment creation and poverty eradication. There is no denying the fact that there is still evidence of vast racial and gender inequalities in the distribution of and access to wealth, income, skills and employment. The end result is that these unequal income hinders economic development and we all black and white alike loses out because our economies continues to perform below its long run economic potential thus robbing us of future growth dividends for our next generation and for ensuring a sustainable growth path that we can be proud of as South Africans and Namibians. This grim picture of the South African and Namibian situation shows further that the economy has not re-oriented or transforms to cater for an absorption of the population towards a majority segment. These could be because the economic structures of both countries are still fundamentally rigid in the sense that it neither has nor fundamentally transformed itself from the historical years of skewedness in terms of resource endowment, entitlement, capital, positions and access. The virtual economic exclusion of ensuring the inclusion of the majority of the population means that the economy is not growing on a broad based basis and that any growth is only as a result of the hitherto structurally enclaved sectors (mainly in agriculture, mining, fishing and to a lesser extent manufacturing) that are not link on a backward and forward basis, to the rest of the economy to cater for or absorb the economic potential of the population. Such an enclaved growth further explains the susceptibility of the South African and Namibian economies to the global and regional forces as evident from the recent global economic and financial crisis as well as the economic effects of climate change. Madam Moderator Once could argue that the current turmoil of economic crisis in Namibia and South Africa are over but still it does not bring comfort to justify that we need to attain and sustain high levels of economic growth than what we have currently. These high levels of economic growth unfortunately cannot be realized without the presence of broad based participation of the majority of its population. In order to grow and develop the South African and Namibian economy, there is a need to empower on a broad and shared basis by encouraging through appropriate mechanisms the economic and social re-engineering of wealth and opportunities to the majority of the population. Developments of BEE in South Africa and Namibia The Black Economic Empowerment is and continues to be an unfolding process happening in Namibia and South Africa. Despite its controversy, BEE seem to have taken root in South Africa where a comprehensive and focussed strategy has been drafted and consulted upon with stakeholders ironing out the economic analytics of the day on BEE in 2004. The essence of that strategy rested on policy statement and policy instruments that the government will consistently and predictably use including the formalisation of partnerships and charters’ with the private sector; the use of a balanced scorecard’ approach to gauging success; and an Act that allows for the formalisation of guidelines and codes and the establishment of an Advisory Council. In addition the introduction of an exclusive BEE fund as a financial support measure were also introduced and aligned with the BEE strategy developed in 2004. At the current moment, BEE Policy in Namibia in the form of TESEF, the “Transformation Economic and Social Framework” has been developed, and consulted with stakeholders in 2008. This has been submitted to the Prime 84

Minister’s Office. TESEF in a sense learns from best practice employed by South Africa and includes the formalization of partnerships and charters’ with the private sector; the use of a balanced scorecard’ approach to gauging success. From the experiences of South Africa and Namibia for example, the strategic policy thrust of BEE are centered around six key pillars: (a) direct ownership, management, control of enterprises and productive assets (b), SME enterprise development (c) human resource and skill development, (d) achieving employment equity, (e) preferential procurement or balanced tendering, (f) and corporate social investment in social related programmes and community development initiatives. Controversy surrounding BEE? There is no need to go into each of these pillars as you all are familiar with it and are Masters of Trade when it comes to the development and selling of BEE as a viable instrument. However as you are all aware, there are controversies surrounding the concept, nature and implementation of BEE. In terms of the concept, the word Black Economic Empowerment (or Swart Ekonomiese Bemagtiging) is in essence just what the words encompass but it seem to be termed divisive and ascribed to a zero sum game. This means that BEE is been viewed as a means of an economic empowerment of those people previously disadvantaged at the expense of the previously advantaged. Hence the definition of ”black” that refers from a policy perspective to the previously disadvantaged communities and individuals that were subjected mostly to exclusion in the historical past are increasingly been seen as the “Swart Gevaar”. The sensitivity of “Wat gebeur met die Wittes as Swartes bemagtig word” seem to be the stereotype surrounding the word “Black” and what it means to economic empowerment for the benefit of all South Africans and Namibians alike. I am here to inform you that there is no need to despair, provided we follow certain principles that I will outline further below. The nature of BEE is also increasingly questioned. BEE is viewed as a front for “Black Elite Enrichment”. There are notable worthy names that got rich through the process of implementing BEE as legislation in South Africa and de facto in Namibia. When those names are mentioned, there are negative sentiments expressed that they are neo-whites or that they are a Black Skin in White Wool and that they enriches themselves and are becoming billionares whereas the rest of the country is still in a poverty trap. Unfortunately, there is an increased realization that BEE can only take root if there is a Championing process on a Black Empowerment process. It is unfortunately the first phase of a successful BEE transformation. Take the example of WEE or “White Economic Empowerment” as it were. WEE can be termed a success ceteris paribus if ascribed to capital accumulation, assets, positions, skills of whites in South Africa and Namibia. The essence of entrenching White Economic Empowerment or WEE with due respect was quite self evident and its importance of capital accumulation and creation of necessary infrastructure in South Africa and Namibia cannot at all be viewed as “throwing the baby away with bathwater”. South Africa and Namibia are having the best infrastructure in Southern Africa (roads, rail, ports, power, etc) and seemed to integrate with ease regionally and globally upon the era of political transformation in 1990 and 1994 respectively. One can even argue that the current maintenance culture of such infrastructure can be termed an “apartheid dividend” in terms of capital accumulation. I just wish that such an “apartheid dividend” could have been applicable in terms of 85

human resource accumulation across the Board of ensuring that more people come onboard within the economy. This would have created a broader scope of opening up doors for white and black empowerment processes that involves “Human Economic Empowerment” or HEE. This could further had economic spinoffs of job creation, rural development, urban renewal, poverty alleviation, specific measures to empower both white and black, women and the disabled, skills and management development, education, meaningful ownership, and access to finance for households and for the purpose of conducting proper business. But all is not in vain. A current reality show that is where we are moving albeit pain stakingly. Whites and Blacks are realizing that together we aim to implement BEE but divided we aim to fail BEE. This standing together is compromised however by how we are implementing BEE. Whites on the one hand are accused of “fronting” or “black renting” the BEE process whereas Blacks or the Black Elites are accused of “quick bucks investment” syndrome or “fly by nite” companies. But all of us seem to realize that BEE in its current form is unsustainable. Although the championing process that I support seem to have its narrow based impact, all Whites and Blacks are realizing that BEE in its current form should be a transitory process and that in order for it to be credible and have a desired broader impact in terms of economic development it needs to transform into a Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE). The question that is now on everybody’s mindset is. Have we failed as economic agents the concept of BEE? Does the latest development inform us that we are not well equipped to get this vital process off the ground? Are we as two nations now saying let’s give up on the idea and start to look at alternatives of empowering our people? The above leads me to enter a dangerous terrain that of “psycholising” BEE. We all know that we still a need a process to empower people and I mean more people. Hence the concept BEE is as highly relevant as it was 10 years ago. We just need to realize that just like any economy goes into stages of development, BEE has come to a point where its relevance has actually undergone metamorphosis or transformation. The transformation to the word “Black” is “Human”. BEE in its transformative form is not it that it aims to separate Whites from Blacks but in my view it is been used just to ensure identity of purpose, that is to empower those left out during the apartheid and colonial times. It should not also be used to set-off blacks against whites but for a common economic good for us all. Madam Moderator In my view economic empowerment is about developing mechanisms, pathways and people so that access to the main stream of the economy is a real possibility. It involves a win-win situation for both blacks and whites and should not be treated as a traditional zero sum game. By that I meant that there should be recognition of the dual need not only to encourage and nurture the participation of black persons or the previously disadvantaged in the economy, but should also be accommodative enough of allowing economic room for white or the originally advantaged to together work under some economic code of conduct and social contract to expand the economic cake of our economies. This can only be realized if a synergy is created that will retain the experience, expertise and knowledge of the white person but also to augment those traits in the black person. These economic codes of conduct should be underpinned by economic structures 86

that should be created to ensure broad based economic empowerment. One notable deal of BBBEE in Namibia was the Old Mutual group that has signed a BEE deal worth N $308 million (R308 million) with a broad-based group on behalf of its own operation, as well as Nedbank Namibia and Mutual & Federal Namibia. The transaction includes employees, strategic business partners, distributors, trade union members and their families, women’s organisations and church groups. Others in Mining and Telecoms Industries launched a BEE procurement policy. This was done without any legislation backing it, but out of the need identified by the company to drive empowerment within the country. The Tender Board Act is recently reviewed to look into preferential treatment of locals and small business. The Ministry of Trade and Industry is busy on a strategic approach to reserve certain petty retailing and transport avenues for locals. There are other measures which for brevity sake I won’t mentioned here but which points to the fact that there is growing realisation of BEE inspired efforts to ensure local ownership and involvement on part of government and private sector sectors alike. Is BEE Still Relevant in Modern Times? The implementation process of the Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) remains however not without its faults. There are proponents that argue that the nature and the participation of those involved make it narrower in disguise. BBEEE should never be seen as a short term gain but as a medium to long-term process that will only work if sound corporate governance, business and economic principles are followed. Artificial means on both White and Black to hi jack the noble goal of broad empowerment can be beneficial for the parties involved in terms of capital and human resource gain in the short term but I can guarantee you that it would be detrimental in the medium to long term for any economy that desperately needs higher levels of sustained local economic growth and development. It is important to look for long lasting solutions on BBBEE rather than ones of a quick fix nature. The role of mentorship and skills transfer cannot be overemphasized in the path to broad based empowerment. Many companies afford these tremendous opportunities to young, newly qualified black managers. The value of experience, coaching, mentoring and hands-on tactics should not be discounted. It is noteworthy that certain international companies in South Africa and Namibia have also engaged in models of in-house mentorship and incubation of fledgling black entrepreneurs in their field. This model ensures long-term sustainability through strong management and entrepreneurial spirit being built. Special emphasis must also be placed on training, upgrading and real participation in ownership to de-lock the mind on “easy gains” but to engage consistently in a “Road Less Travelled”. The source of broad based BEE for the majority of Namibians and South Africans will not be found for the future in the formal private and public sectors. There seem to be limits on their growth potential given the current regional and global constraints. There is need to shift the mindset in Namibia and South Africa of innovating and creating ideas within the Small and Medium Enterprises sector to make it grow as it is the only sector that is responsive to advancing technologies in the knowledge service orientation, corporate social investment oriented avenues, renewable energy to tackle climate change and home grown or creation of indigenous products such as arts, crafts, health products, agro processed products. 87

These alternative economic activities which are entrepreneurial such as the SME’s must be fostered with finding an expansive domestic and export markets as it is the only enterprise development in the SME sector which can have multiplier effects and gauged by many to be the most significant future contributor to job creation and economic growth in the country. SME’s role is still under emphasised in Namibia and to a lesser extent in South Africa but it is the only sector in Southern Africa which is cross cutting across sectors such as mining, tourism, leisure, manufacturing, etc and can assist in absorbing a majority of the excluded population into the economic sphere of Namibia But for such a sector to take off, there is a need to develop better mechanisms of ensured access to finance, entrepreneurial skills, values, talent and culture and Government and Private Sector must put heads together and spark the liveliness of this sector for it to take off properly. To achieve a credible and effective BEE in Namibia and South Africa which is broad based and does address the “real” empowerment of those to be empowered, it is crucial to structure BEE in our economies. BEE needs to be implemented within a framework where a consistency of approach, appropriate flexibility to respond to different economic and enterprise conditions and the ability to measure the progress on BEE implementation has to be fostered. In terms of a consistency of approach, it is crucial that when ownership is transferred to black ownership, that there needs to be innovative ways of financing the empowerment deals that will support effective BEE transactions. The companies that want to transact BEE with its empowered partner needs to realize that they must first employ best practice finance models for BEE transactions? BEE ownership transfer deals does not entail “one-size-fits-all” approach but needs to be done taking a consistent approach in terms of best practice implementation. The various types of finance mechanisms that are available to successfully achieve sustainable empowerment shareholding which includes Government funding, Share schemes, Grants and incentives; Debt finance, Project finance, Joint ventures, and Venture capital need to consider on the nature and type of a BEE deal taking into account what kind of players are involved as well. Of all this type of finance mechanisms, South African experience and to a lesser extent in Namibia the consideration of debt finance seem to be the most logical and attractive options which is easily implemented in terms of BEE deals. It involves a process whereby the empowerment partners because of their inability to have ready capital available to transact the BEE, incurs a loan structured in such a way to repay such a loan or debt from cash flows generated by the company. Such an approach involves a process where massive wealth is transferred to the empowerment partners leading to a possibility of black fronting, and transfer of assets without real value addition. When other broad BEE players are brought on board to make it look broad based such as Women and Trade Unions and regional or provincial players, such approach does not necessarily solve the problem of black fronting and seem to be broad in disguise and does not really lead to real empowerment but again to those who have the transaction right to the BEE deal. The debt financed BEE transaction deals which are currently still been considered is not in my view a sustainable empowerment mechanism as it invokes the moral hazard problem as it sounds more like sharing in “money on a silver platter without any contribution”. Further, the partners are trapped in deals that take up to 20 years 88

to realize dividends, if at all. The debt finance deals are also supplemented by sole vendor financing (the white BEE partner) and issue of share options and grants to its black empowerment partner. Through this approach, debt is then raised against the shares the BEE partner possess in the company and hence the deal is more structured at arm’s length basis whereby the BEE partner is passively involved in the growth, value addition and profitability of the company. Increasingly, experiences with BEE transactions are showing that empowerment partners need to at least bring some capital to ensure BEE transactions to work effectively. Hence, various new options are considered that BEE partners in Namibia and South Africa can take advantage of. One attractive option is equity financing where a BEE partner needs to find actively an investor as partner to start its business, normally a SME. There are two main potential categories that can make equity financing successful which also bring in an element of broad based economic empowerment. These are (a) venture capitalist or risk-loving equity funding companies, (b) or engaging employee, women and/or trade union investors. The real value addition of these broad based options is to ensure that these partners are entitled to contribute in some sort towards the empowerment process. It does not always have to be money but can be also goodwill and commitment. Women Associations for example can be made mandatory as a empowerment partner to train a number of woman in finance skills per annum whereas trade unions will be required to contribute to work ethic, efficiency and productivity of a company through shared performance assessment and performance policy towards increased profitability of all. Another innovative option involves debt financing raised against its assets and not shares as it is traditionally used to be. Given that BEE partners do not have sufficient assets to transact BEE, white BEE partner can sell assets to its BEE black partner which in turn borrows money from the bank against those assets to pay for them. This model called also the leveraging model represents a robust sustainable long term (usually 10 to 20 years) process where moral hazard problems are avoided and where both the financier (bank), vendor (white BEE partner) and empowerment partner share in the risk and the growth and development of the company. This kind of models I am to learn are proven to be more attractive in South Africa as success models among SME’s and where large companies such as Anglo American and Ingwe, an empowerment partner has financed it successfully. With regard to appropriate flexibility to respond to different economic and enterprise conditions, BEE companies need to realize that they are confronted by changing domestic, regional and global economic, political and social factors that can impinge on the success of their enterprise and hence be mindful of those developments. BEE companies need to successfully build an affirmative procurement policy to create a sustainable empowerment initiative in their company. Concerns such as whether your company is BEE compliant, or sourcing its goods and supplies from BEE suppliers adhering to proper ethical guidelines are matters that requires immediate attention if the BEE partners wants to make success of its business. Madam Moderator Another issue concerns whether the BEE Company applies effective employment equity plan, policies and programmes that promotes efficient human resource development and growth in their entity and is aligned to the affirmative action act of the country? Here the success to Broad Base BEE is Skills, Skills and &more 89

Skills. BEE Companies need to be conscious of treating skills development as the foundation of real broad base BEE. BEE companies need to continuously answer questions such as is there an accelerated skills development and training initiatives that further enhance the company of BEE goals. Has the BEE company master the appropriate techniques to effectively build a social investment and enterprise development policy for its stakeholders are also another matter that BEE enterprises must take into account to respond adequately to any socially developmental activity such as an HIV/Aids prevention and invest wisely for health retention of its own staff for example. In conclusion, experience so far on BEE Structuring shows that the current debt financing of BEE transactions is not successful and BEE companies are under renewed pressure to actively transact their BEE deals through private equity capital. Such is the urgency of executing BEE transactions that the traditional private equity industry has virtually been turned into a BEE financing industry in South Africa for example and Namibia is actually following that example. This type of financing represents a most noble approach towards structuring BEE in Namibia and South Africa and needs to be encouraged especially as funding mechanism for the emerging and fast growing SMEs. To end on a positive note, Broad based BEE is a must taking into account similar success in Malaysia to address this skewed perpetuating socio-economic situation in the 1960’s. In Malaysia, a concerted policy called “Bumaputra Malays” to address the indigenisation of Malays from the expatriate Chinese was also implemented to ensure development of the economic infrastructure in which the Malays find themselves in to ensure increased opportunities in terms of positions, assets and income.

The relevance of Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) to the implementation of competition policy and law in Namibia (2010-05-26 16:54)
Windhoek, Namibia 26th May 2010

Mihe Gaomab II is the Secretary and CEO of the Namibia Competition Commission. He is the Founding President of the Namibia Economic Society and remains an honorary member. This Article was adapted from a NES speech presented at a Seminar on BEE in South Africa organized by DELTACON, a BEE Auditing and Verification Company on the 4th November 20009. Madam Moderator and Facilitator Distinguished Panelists Ladies and Gentlemen, Good Morning and allow me from the onset to thank NES for making it possible for me to present to you a contemporary yet crucial topic which is the Black Economic Empowerment in Namibia. This presentation of this topic is pioneering in the sense that I have been requested to present the relevance of BEE from a Competition Policy and Law perspective. Competition Policy and Law in Namibia As you are aware, at independence, Namibia realized that it faces developmental challenges based on an economy which was dualistic with high unemployment 90

and an economic structure which is enclaved and concentrated around few sectors. The developmental challenges which are to reduce poverty, create employment, reduce inequalities across individuals and regions thereby ensuring balanced economic growth became a prime driver of focus for our government. This developmental objectives have been addressed at varying levels to a large extent by our government but government further realize that to ensure that this developmental policy objectives are addressed, it needs reorientation or rather a transformation of the economy. These are clearly espoused in the development plans and Vision 2030. Hence the need also to create a regulatory environment that would cater for private sector development. But more importantly an institutional process that would assist for in ensuring a market based outcomes that optimizes efficient allocation of our resources be it in form of capital and labour. Such outcomes were already focused on private sector to expand its manufacturing base through the development of white paper on industrial policy in 1992, EPZ Act of 1995, Foreign Investment Act 1990, Manufacturing Incentives, and host of other measures. There were other policies done for other sectors as well is indeed commendable on the part of our government. These include the promotion of SMEs through enacting SME Policy in 1996, promoting employment through enactment of 2007 Labour Act, and looking after a broader based of us Namibians by drafting the Transformation Economic and Social Framework (TESEF), especially those of us that were historically lessened or deprived due to skewed policies of that time. Now empirical data and experience points to the fact that by creating a competitive economy especially among business or the private sector, a country is able to develop faster, withstand external shocks, and even assist in rates of per capita growth through employment and investment promotion. There are documented facts that in countries such as Peru, Australia and South Africa, who started off well with competition authorities in the 1990s, the impact assessments shows that by having a competition law and policy as well as entrenched competition culture, despite costs encountered, the economic benefits are enormous with welfare implications for consumers, wage incomes and employment creation leading to overall economic growth and government revenue. The question that still needs a lot of advocacy on is what is competition policy and law. Competition Policy refers to a set of government measures that details the strategic direction of the Ministry of Trade and Industry to regulate the competitive behaviour of firms and business in the country. The government put in place competition policy as far as the late 1990s to assist in reorientation and re-structuring of the economy, with the ultimate aim to reorient our economy towards higher growth as envisioned in Vision 2030. The policy is thus a integral part of the overall macroeconomy of which our Commissioners have been entrusted to use as a policy that is supportive and is cross appealing across aspects such as trade measures, industrial, investment, finance, planning, poverty reduction, employment, growth, and welfare considerations. Regulation of competition issues was introduced in 2003 through the Competition Act of 2003 (Act No. 2 of 2003) in the country. In the past, competition issues in Namibia were regulated by the Regulation of Monopolistic Conditions Amendment Act, 1958 (Act 14 of 1958). However, this was a South African Act, which was not applied in Namibia after independence. 91

The main overarching objective for the implementation of the Competition Law as a competition policy instrument is to enhance the promotion and safeguarding of competition. The urgency of having a competition policy and law rests fundamentally on three key issues. Firstly, Namibia’s economic competitiveness still needs a lot of work on as it is consistently ranked not among the top five of countries which are Botswana, Tunisia, South Africa, Mauritius, and Egypt. Secondly, although Namibia’s competitiveness is characterise as a lower middleincome country with an average per capita income of above US $3,000 and its macroeconomic fundamentals are sound and proper, the Namibian economy is characterised by a large, non-tradable sector (government services), and an export oriented primary sector, mainly fisheries, agriculture and mining. Namibia is also a small open economy heavily relying on imports, which are sometimes subjected to distorted pricing, dumping of undesirable and defective products and anti competitive behaviour. The economy therefore remains enclaved and is structurally biased in terms of service and production towards satisfying external markets rather than domestically. Currently, there are no meaningful transformation with albeit lack of forward and backward linkages between key sectors, an important precondition for any restructuring from a micro economic point of view of sectoral transformation and development. Here the need for a competition policy becomes more urgent to regulate by law the competitive behaviour of industry, firms and business in terms of ensuring a just, orderly, safe and optimal competitive process in the economy. Lastly, there is also general recognition by our government that economically there has been instances of market failures i.e. private sector sometimes not doing what it ought to do in terms of proper and orderly competitive conduct in market place. There is anecdotal evidence that a market economy with a thriving and robust private sector can be the key to economic growth and development. This situation can hold long term sustainable increases in consumer welfare. However, it is proven empirically that markets can fail because of anticompetitive practices. Hence the need for developing competition policy that creates a just orderly conduct of the market place allowing for a fair production process through an efficient competitive process that benefits the customers and the economy as a whole. It also proven that an effective competition law and policy will encourage the use of the most efficient methods of production, and will guide resources to the uses society values most highly and can give rise to continuing incentives for innovation to increase productivity and general efficiency of markets through improved transparency of the rules that apply to business transactions. The Namibian Competition Commission has been established in terms of the Competition Act (Act No. 2 of 2003). It is tasked with promoting competitive market conditions through investigation and prosecution of anti-competitive activities, reviewing and approving mergers and exemption applications, and disseminating information to businesses, consumers and other stakeholders. Namibia’s competition law not only covers the three major competition concerns of anti-competitive agreements, abuse of dominance, and anti-competitive mergers, but it also takes into account the public interests provisions on protecting consumers by safeguarding competitive prices and product choices as well as promoting employment, investment and advancing the social and 92

economic welfare of Namibians. It also has special requirements of its economy, which are the protection and promotion of small undertakings as well as promoting a greater spread of ownership of historically advantaged persons. The essence of decisions that NaCC is empowered to make is therefore analyzed, investigated and adjudicated upon taking into account that there needs to a BEE component to ensure localization and involvement of Namibians. This particularly applies to Merger approvals of some odd 60 000 odd businesses in the country. The Commission is cognizant however that at the time of writing, the empowerment emphasis was on the word ownership. But we all know that the word BEE should amply read BBEE to encompass broadness broad based. The Competition Act of 2003 has been therefore futuristic to include the essence of broadness by indicating the promotion of a greater spread of ownership of historically advantaged persons. We are considerate that TESEF will aim to ensure that all relevant definitions and analytical interpretations will assist from a legal and policy point of view to clearly articulate such terms and words from a BBEE implementation point of view, of course using the SWAPO Manifesto, NDPs and Vision 2030 as guiding documents. The reasons are that there is a lot of debate on the concept of Broad based BEE within the context of the development of Southern Africa, notably in South Africa, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. There are increasingly a lot of controversy and confusion regarding the term and the definition, nature, form, implementation and conduct BBEEE has today, Namibia needs to avoid this by implementing our Presidents call for having a well targeted BEE policy and law in the country that aims to empower most Namibians (never mind the word Black) within the mainstream in Namibia. Madam Moderator Is BEE an Imperative in Namibia, lets rather firstly look at the historical context of BEE developments. The origin, imperative and the need for having a BEE policy in place within Southern Africa can only be predicated on the basis that an economy can only flourish if it can meet the needs of all its economic citizens, people and their enterprises in a sustainable and developmental manner. Such predicaments are evidenced in Benhabib, Jess and Mark M Speigel in “The Role of Human Capital in Economic Development: Evidence from Aggregate Cross Country Data,”, Journal of Monetary Economics, 1994, 34, 143-173. The conclusions of this scientific research are broad ranging in the sense that human and economic development can only be possible if the systems be it economic, social, legal or political builds on the full potential of all persons and communities across the length and breadth of a country. The colonial historical context of the countries in Southern Africa in particular South Africa and Namibia witnessed a period of protracted economic development which even though created a necessary capital infrastructure which is commendably in place today created a human capital that is largely unskilled, uninformed and restricted from meaningful participation in the economy. The historical context of appreciating human capital towards economic and development shows however that where, human capital was suppressed or alienated from the economic developmental process, it had a profound effect on the standard of living of its people and status of developing an economy. This is clearly proven empirically in Nathan Nunn (2007) where the effect of human capital suppression and its long term associated effect on Africa’s development are well researched in “Slavery, Institutional Development, and Long 93

Run Economic Growth in Africa”. The evidence suggests that slave trade as a form of human capital suppression had an adverse negative effect on economic development in Africa. Of relevance will be to consult the Bertocchi, Graziella and Fabio Canova (2002) titled “Did Colonialism Matter for Growth in Africa” where it empirically explore the historical causes of Africa’s development due to Colonialism. European Economic Review, XLVI. Pages 1851 – 1871. In Southern Africa, the assets, skills, positions and opportunities of millions of people were directly and indirectly restricted either through some sociopolitical/ economic policy. Such a process created a capital accumulation process where it confined the creation of wealth to a minority population and constricted underdevelopment and poverty on the majority of the population. In South Africa and Namibia for example, the result is an enclaved and skewed economic structure that today, in essence, still excludes the vast majority of its inhabitants. Imperative for BEE in Southern Africa Madam Moderator The basic vision of an economy that meets the needs of the people in a more equitable manner goes back to the ANC’s Freedom Charter of 1955 in South Africa and the Swapo’s Manifestos in the 1960’s of Namibia. Since the political transformation in 1990 of Namibia and 1994 of South Africa, the respective economies have undergone rapid consistent economic growth, albeit for the East Asia Financial Crisis 1998/09 and the Global Economic and Financial Crisis in 2008/09. Generally, these countries had profound macroeconomic stabilisation which has provided largely a platform for a sustained economic growth rates. Compared to pre 1990’s, both economies has become increasingly integrated into regional (SADC and SACU) as well as global markets (EU, US, BRICS, East Asia, MECOSUR) and both countries became a successful exporter of base metals and minerals (Gold, Uranium, Diamonds etc) and for instance in case of South Africa, manufactured goods and value-added services have proliferated. Because of that sustained economic growth, in terms of GDP and GDP per capita, Namibia is increasingly been viewed as a upper middle income country and South Africa is now able to position itself as an emerging manufacturing economy. Further, both economies have consistently put in place appropriate broad economic strategies to transform the economies. In Namibia, National Development Plan I, II, and III which serves as a five year plans for economic development with an explicit target of around 7 % on average according to the long term plan Vision 2030 was continuously emphasised. In South Africa, the Reconstruction and Development Programme (1994) and GEAR (1998) has been the focus of a broad strategies along with others such as the Microeconomic Reform Strategy, Integrated Manufacturing Strategy and the National Research and Development Strategy that has underpinned the South African miracle of economic growth of close to around 5 %, a visible improvement taking into account negative growth it encountered in the 1980’s. Despite the sustained economic growth successes and a host of developmental plans, policies and strategy introduced and implemented, there is another statistical picture that paints a grim reality of entrenched income inequalities characterising both economies. Once could argue that this pervasive inequality act as a deterrent to future economic growth, economic development, employment creation and poverty eradication. There is no denying the fact that there is still evidence of vast racial and gender 94

inequalities in the distribution of and access to wealth, income, skills and employment. The end result is that these unequal income hinders economic development and we all black and white alike loses out because our economies continues to perform below its long run economic potential thus robbing us of future growth dividends for our next generation and for ensuring a sustainable growth path that we can be proud of as South Africans and Namibians. This grim picture of the South African and Namibian situation shows further that the economy has not re-oriented or transforms to cater for an absorption of the population towards a majority segment. These could be because the economic structures of both countries are still fundamentally rigid in the sense that it neither has nor fundamentally transformed itself from the historical years of skewedness in terms of resource endowment, entitlement, capital, positions and access. The virtual economic exclusion of ensuring the inclusion of the majority of the population means that the economy is not growing on a broad based basis and that any growth is only as a result of the hitherto structurally enclaved sectors (mainly in agriculture, mining, fishing and to a lesser extent manufacturing) that are not link on a backward and forward basis, to the rest of the economy to cater for or absorb the economic potential of the population. Such an enclaved growth further explains the susceptibility of the South African and Namibian economies to the global and regional forces as evident from the recent global economic and financial crisis as well as the economic effects of climate change. Madam Moderator Once could argue that the current turmoil of economic crisis in Namibia and South Africa are over but still it does not bring comfort to justify that we need to attain and sustain high levels of economic growth than what we have currently. These high levels of economic growth unfortunately cannot be realized without the presence of broad based participation of the majority of its population. In order to grow and develop the South African and Namibian economy, there is a need to empower on a broad and shared basis by encouraging through appropriate mechanisms the economic and social re-engineering of wealth and opportunities to the majority of the population. Developments of BEE in South Africa and Namibia The Black Economic Empowerment is and continues to be an unfolding process happening in Namibia and South Africa. Despite its controversy, BEE seem to have taken root in South Africa where a comprehensive and focussed strategy has been drafted and consulted upon with stakeholders ironing out the economic analytics of the day on BEE in 2004. The essence of that strategy rested on policy statement and policy instruments that the government will consistently and predictably use including the formalisation of partnerships and charters’ with the private sector; the use of a balanced scorecard’ approach to gauging success; and an Act that allows for the formalisation of guidelines and codes and the establishment of an Advisory Council. In addition the introduction of an exclusive BEE fund as a financial support measure were also introduced and aligned with the BEE strategy developed in 2004. At the current moment, BEE Policy in Namibia in the form of TESEF, the “Transformation Economic and Social Framework” has been developed, and consulted with stakeholders in 2008. This has been submitted to the Prime Minister’s Office. TESEF in a sense learns from best practice employed by South Africa and includes the formalization of partnerships and charters’ with the 95

private sector; the use of a balanced scorecard’ approach to gauging success. From the experiences of South Africa and Namibia for example, the strategic policy thrust of BEE are centered around six key pillars: (a) direct ownership, management, control of enterprises and productive assets (b), SME enterprise development (c) human resource and skill development, (d) achieving employment equity, (e) preferential procurement or balanced tendering, (f) and corporate social investment in social related programmes and community development initiatives. Controversy surrounding BEE? There is no need to go into each of these pillars as you all are familiar with it and are Masters of Trade when it comes to the development and selling of BEE as a viable instrument. However as you are all aware, there are controversies surrounding the concept, nature and implementation of BEE. In terms of the concept, the word Black Economic Empowerment (or Swart Ekonomiese Bemagtiging) is in essence just what the words encompass but it seem to be termed divisive and ascribed to a zero sum game. This means that BEE is been viewed as a means of an economic empowerment of those people previously disadvantaged at the expense of the previously advantaged. Hence the definition of ”black” that refers from a policy perspective to the previously disadvantaged communities and individuals that were subjected mostly to exclusion in the historical past are increasingly been seen as the “Swart Gevaar”. The sensitivity of “Wat gebeur met die Wittes as Swartes bemagtig word” seem to be the stereotype surrounding the word “Black” and what it means to economic empowerment for the benefit of all South Africans and Namibians alike. I am here to inform you that there is no need to despair, provided we follow certain principles that I will outline further below. The nature of BEE is also increasingly questioned. BEE is viewed as a front for “Black Elite Enrichment”. There are notable worthy names that got rich through the process of implementing BEE as legislation in South Africa and de facto in Namibia. When those names are mentioned, there are negative sentiments expressed that they are neo-whites or that they are a Black Skin in White Wool and that they enriches themselves and are becoming billionares whereas the rest of the country is still in a poverty trap. Unfortunately, there is an increased realization that BEE can only take root if there is a Championing process on a Black Empowerment process. It is unfortunately the first phase of a successful BEE transformation. Take the example of WEE or “White Economic Empowerment” as it were. WEE can be termed a success ceteris paribus if ascribed to capital accumulation, assets, positions, skills of whites in South Africa and Namibia. The essence of entrenching White Economic Empowerment or WEE with due respect was quite self evident and its importance of capital accumulation and creation of necessary infrastructure in South Africa and Namibia cannot at all be viewed as “throwing the baby away with bathwater”. South Africa and Namibia are having the best infrastructure in Southern Africa (roads, rail, ports, power, etc) and seemed to integrate with ease regionally and globally upon the era of political transformation in 1990 and 1994 respectively. One can even argue that the current maintenance culture of such infrastructure can be termed an “apartheid dividend” in terms of capital accumulation. I just wish that such an “apartheid dividend” could have been applicable in terms of human resource accumulation across the Board of ensuring that more people come onboard within the economy. This would have created a broader scope of 96

opening up doors for white and black empowerment processes that involves “Human Economic Empowerment” or HEE. This could further had economic spinoffs of job creation, rural development, urban renewal, poverty alleviation, specific measures to empower both white and black, women and the disabled, skills and management development, education, meaningful ownership, and access to finance for households and for the purpose of conducting proper business. But all is not in vain. A current reality show that is where we are moving albeit pain stakingly. Whites and Blacks are realizing that together we aim to implement BEE but divided we aim to fail BEE. This standing together is compromised however by how we are implementing BEE. Whites on the one hand are accused of “fronting” or “black renting” the BEE process whereas Blacks or the Black Elites are accused of “quick bucks investment” syndrome or “fly by nite” companies. But all of us seem to realize that BEE in its current form is unsustainable. Although the championing process that I support seem to have its narrow based impact, all Whites and Blacks are realizing that BEE in its current form should be a transitory process and that in order for it to be credible and have a desired broader impact in terms of economic development it needs to transform into a Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE). The question that is now on everybody’s mindset is. Have we failed as economic agents the concept of BEE? Does the latest development inform us that we are not well equipped to get this vital process off the ground? Are we as two nations now saying let’s give up on the idea and start to look at alternatives of empowering our people? The above leads me to enter a dangerous terrain that of “psycholising” BEE. We all know that we still a need a process to empower people and I mean more people. Hence the concept BEE is as highly relevant as it was 10 years ago. We just need to realize that just like any economy goes into stages of development, BEE has come to a point where its relevance has actually undergone metamorphosis or transformation. The transformation to the word “Black” is “Human”. BEE in its transformative form is not it that it aims to separate Whites from Blacks but in my view it is been used just to ensure identity of purpose, that is to empower those left out during the apartheid and colonial times. It should not also be used to set-off blacks against whites but for a common economic good for us all. Madam Moderator In my view economic empowerment is about developing mechanisms, pathways and people so that access to the main stream of the economy is a real possibility. It involves a win-win situation for both blacks and whites and should not be treated as a traditional zero sum game. By that I meant that there should be recognition of the dual need not only to encourage and nurture the participation of black persons or the previously disadvantaged in the economy, but should also be accommodative enough of allowing economic room for white or the originally advantaged to together work under some economic code of conduct and social contract to expand the economic cake of our economies. This can only be realized if a synergy is created that will retain the experience, expertise and knowledge of the white person but also to augment those traits in the black person. These economic codes of conduct should be underpinned by economic structures that should be created to ensure broad based economic empowerment. One notable deal of BBBEE in Namibia was the Old Mutual group that has signed a BEE 97

deal worth N $308 million (R308 million) with a broad-based group on behalf of its own operation, as well as Nedbank Namibia and Mutual & Federal Namibia. The transaction includes employees, strategic business partners, distributors, trade union members and their families, women’s organisations and church groups. Others in Mining and Telecoms Industries launched a BEE procurement policy. This was done without any legislation backing it, but out of the need identified by the company to drive empowerment within the country. The Tender Board Act is recently reviewed to look into preferential treatment of locals and small business. The Ministry of Trade and Industry is busy on a strategic approach to reserve certain petty retailing and transport avenues for locals. There are other measures which for brevity sake I won’t mentioned here but which points to the fact that there is growing realisation of BEE inspired efforts to ensure local ownership and involvement on part of government and private sector sectors alike. Is BEE Still Relevant in Modern Times? The implementation process of the Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) remains however not without its faults. There are proponents that argue that the nature and the participation of those involved make it narrower in disguise. BBEEE should never be seen as a short term gain but as a medium to long-term process that will only work if sound corporate governance, business and economic principles are followed. Artificial means on both White and Black to hi jack the noble goal of broad empowerment can be beneficial for the parties involved in terms of capital and human resource gain in the short term but I can guarantee you that it would be detrimental in the medium to long term for any economy that desperately needs higher levels of sustained local economic growth and development. It is important to look for long lasting solutions on BBBEE rather than ones of a quick fix nature. The role of mentorship and skills transfer cannot be overemphasized in the path to broad based empowerment. Many companies afford these tremendous opportunities to young, newly qualified black managers. The value of experience, coaching, mentoring and hands-on tactics should not be discounted. It is noteworthy that certain international companies in South Africa and Namibia have also engaged in models of in-house mentorship and incubation of fledgling black entrepreneurs in their field. This model ensures long-term sustainability through strong management and entrepreneurial spirit being built. Special emphasis must also be placed on training, upgrading and real participation in ownership to de-lock the mind on “easy gains” but to engage consistently in a “Road Less Travelled”. The source of broad based BEE for the majority of Namibians and South Africans will not be found for the future in the formal private and public sectors. There seem to be limits on their growth potential given the current regional and global constraints. There is need to shift the mindset in Namibia and South Africa of innovating and creating ideas within the Small and Medium Enterprises sector to make it grow as it is the only sector that is responsive to advancing technologies in the knowledge service orientation, corporate social investment oriented avenues, renewable energy to tackle climate change and home grown or creation of indigenous products such as arts, crafts, health products, agro processed products. These alternative economic activities which are entrepreneurial such as the SME’s must be fostered with finding an expansive domestic and export markets as it is 98

the only enterprise development in the SME sector which can have multiplier effects and gauged by many to be the most significant future contributor to job creation and economic growth in the country. SME’s role is still under emphasised in Namibia and to a lesser extent in South Africa but it is the only sector in Southern Africa which is cross cutting across sectors such as mining, tourism, leisure, manufacturing, etc and can assist in absorbing a majority of the excluded population into the economic sphere of Namibia But for such a sector to take off, there is a need to develop better mechanisms of ensured access to finance, entrepreneurial skills, values, talent and culture and Government and Private Sector must put heads together and spark the liveliness of this sector for it to take off properly. To achieve a credible and effective BEE in Namibia and South Africa which is broad based and does address the “real” empowerment of those to be empowered, it is crucial to structure BEE in our economies. BEE needs to be implemented within a framework where a consistency of approach, appropriate flexibility to respond to different economic and enterprise conditions and the ability to measure the progress on BEE implementation has to be fostered. In terms of a consistency of approach, it is crucial that when ownership is transferred to black ownership, that there needs to be innovative ways of financing the empowerment deals that will support effective BEE transactions. The companies that want to transact BEE with its empowered partner needs to realize that they must first employ best practice finance models for BEE transactions? BEE ownership transfer deals does not entail “one-size-fits-all” approach but needs to be done taking a consistent approach in terms of best practice implementation. The various types of finance mechanisms that are available to successfully achieve sustainable empowerment shareholding which includes Government funding, Share schemes, Grants and incentives; Debt finance, Project finance, Joint ventures, and Venture capital need to consider on the nature and type of a BEE deal taking into account what kind of players are involved as well. Of all this type of finance mechanisms, South African experience and to a lesser extent in Namibia the consideration of debt finance seem to be the most logical and attractive options which is easily implemented in terms of BEE deals. It involves a process whereby the empowerment partners because of their inability to have ready capital available to transact the BEE, incurs a loan structured in such a way to repay such a loan or debt from cash flows generated by the company. Such an approach involves a process where massive wealth is transferred to the empowerment partners leading to a possibility of black fronting, and transfer of assets without real value addition. When other broad BEE players are brought on board to make it look broad based such as Women and Trade Unions and regional or provincial players, such approach does not necessarily solve the problem of black fronting and seem to be broad in disguise and does not really lead to real empowerment but again to those who have the transaction right to the BEE deal. The debt financed BEE transaction deals which are currently still been considered is not in my view a sustainable empowerment mechanism as it invokes the moral hazard problem as it sounds more like sharing in “money on a silver platter without any contribution”. Further, the partners are trapped in deals that take up to 20 years to realize dividends, if at all. The debt finance deals are also supplemented by sole vendor financing (the white BEE partner) and issue of share options and grants to 99

its black empowerment partner. Through this approach, debt is then raised against the shares the BEE partner possess in the company and hence the deal is more structured at arm’s length basis whereby the BEE partner is passively involved in the growth, value addition and profitability of the company. Increasingly, experiences with BEE transactions are showing that empowerment partners need to at least bring some capital to ensure BEE transactions to work effectively. Hence, various new options are considered that BEE partners in Namibia and South Africa can take advantage of. One attractive option is equity financing where a BEE partner needs to find actively an investor as partner to start its business, normally a SME. There are two main potential categories that can make equity financing successful which also bring in an element of broad based economic empowerment. These are (a) venture capitalist or risk-loving equity funding companies, (b) or engaging employee, women and/or trade union investors. The real value addition of these broad based options is to ensure that these partners are entitled to contribute in some sort towards the empowerment process. It does not always have to be money but can be also goodwill and commitment. Women Associations for example can be made mandatory as a empowerment partner to train a number of woman in finance skills per annum whereas trade unions will be required to contribute to work ethic, efficiency and productivity of a company through shared performance assessment and performance policy towards increased profitability of all. Another innovative option involves debt financing raised against its assets and not shares as it is traditionally used to be. Given that BEE partners do not have sufficient assets to transact BEE, white BEE partner can sell assets to its BEE black partner which in turn borrows money from the bank against those assets to pay for them. This model called also the leveraging model represents a robust sustainable long term (usually 10 to 20 years) process where moral hazard problems are avoided and where both the financier (bank), vendor (white BEE partner) and empowerment partner share in the risk and the growth and development of the company. This kind of models I am to learn are proven to be more attractive in South Africa as success models among SME’s and where large companies such as Anglo American and Ingwe, an empowerment partner has financed it successfully. With regard to appropriate flexibility to respond to different economic and enterprise conditions, BEE companies need to realize that they are confronted by changing domestic, regional and global economic, political and social factors that can impinge on the success of their enterprise and hence be mindful of those developments. BEE companies need to successfully build an affirmative procurement policy to create a sustainable empowerment initiative in their company. Concerns such as whether your company is BEE compliant, or sourcing its goods and supplies from BEE suppliers adhering to proper ethical guidelines are matters that requires immediate attention if the BEE partners wants to make success of its business. Madam Moderator Another issue concerns whether the BEE Company applies effective employment equity plan, policies and programmes that promotes efficient human resource development and growth in their entity and is aligned to the affirmative action act of the country? Here the success to Broad Base BEE is Skills, Skills and &more Skills. BEE Companies need to be conscious of treating skills development as the foundation of real broad base BEE. BEE companies need to continuously answer 100

questions such as is there an accelerated skills development and training initiatives that further enhance the company of BEE goals. Has the BEE company master the appropriate techniques to effectively build a social investment and enterprise development policy for its stakeholders are also another matter that BEE enterprises must take into account to respond adequately to any socially developmental activity such as an HIV/Aids prevention and invest wisely for health retention of its own staff for example. In conclusion, experience so far on BEE Structuring shows that the current debt financing of BEE transactions is not successful and BEE companies are under renewed pressure to actively transact their BEE deals through private equity capital. Such is the urgency of executing BEE transactions that the traditional private equity industry has virtually been turned into a BEE financing industry in South Africa for example and Namibia is actually following that example. This type of financing represents a most noble approach towards structuring BEE in Namibia and South Africa and needs to be encouraged especially as funding mechanism for the emerging and fast growing SMEs. To end on a positive note, Broad based BEE is a must taking into account similar success in Malaysia to address this skewed perpetuating socio-economic situation in the 1960’s. In Malaysia, a concerted policy called “Bumaputra Malays” to address the indigenisation of Malays from the expatriate Chinese was also implemented to ensure development of the economic infrastructure in which the Malays find themselves in to ensure increased opportunities in terms of positions, assets and income.

Black Economic Empowerment is needed in Namibia (2010-05-28 13:03)
Black Economic Empowerment is about enlarging participation in the economy of the country. It’s a tool to create wealth and opportunity to people who were previously excluded and achieved through partnership between white and black business people. Namibia has gone through various political changes over the past two centuries. One thing however is always constant. Once the political change occurs, there is a realisation that political independence means very little without economic ownership change. When the English ruled over Southern Africa they had the economic might. The Afrikaner took over and had to create state institutions such as the “Eerste Nasionale Ontwikkelings Korporasie” (ENOK or First National Development Corporation) to allow Afrikaner businessmen to get a share of the economic pie. The also created other institutions that should be supported by their people to become as powerful as the English ones, for example banks and insurance companies (Sanlam, Santam, etc.). In much the same way, the black people of Namibia need to become participants in the economy. The first efforts were made in the early 1990’s to unite the two chambers of commerce, namely the Windhoek CCI and Windhoek Business Chamber. This resulted in the Namibia National Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the predecessor of the present NCCI. This was one of the most challenging times in my working life. The mistrust of decades had to be plastered over for the sake of the country and our newly created democracy. We succeeded. BUT, we only plastered over the problem. The black majority is still not participating in the meaningful way promised by the politicians. Or for that matter, the way the previous English and Afrikaner political movements allowed their voters to prosper.

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2.5

July

Legal shielding products a rip off ! (2010-07-06 18:19)
A recent article of the Namibian newspaper (July 2010), quotes a study which has found that ”Regulators need to up their game”. The study ”expressed concern about the conduct of the industry and has warned that the reputation of the Bank of Namibia (BoN) and the Namibia Financial Institutions Supervisory Authority (Namfisa) will suffer unless they step up supervision.” In the study, mention is made of certain insurance companies that make use of misleading advertising when offering products as ”free”. This has to be a wake up call to us as consumers. As a lobby group, we have regularly been contacted by customers who do not receive the service they expected when they bought the products as advertised. A common complaint is about the legal insurance product so widely advertised in our newspapers, radio and television. In these adverts, the consumer is made to believe that a monthly premium will give them access to legal assistance should the need arise. A typical example of how this insurance company works is what happened to Marco H. Marco was a client of ”legal insurance” and was not worried if something should go wrong. One morning, his employer informed him that there were suspicions of theft and the employees had to each take a lie detector test. Marco called his legal insurance company but was told that they do not cover labour issues. he then reluctantly took the lie detector test. The employer decided to lay criminal charges with the police after the tests and the whole group of employees were taken to the Windhoek central police station and charged. He called his legal insurance company, and was informed they could not assist him in a criminal case. Luckily for Marco, he was able to call up a friend that could get him bail arranged and he was thus not forced to spend the weekend in jail. On the Monday, he duly went to his legal insurance company at their big headquarters building to get some assistance. After reporting at the reception, he was rather rudely informed that his case did not meet the standards of a claim. This was definitely a case of misleading advertising if not theft. BUT what can Marco really do? Very little. Even the institutions that are supposed to do something, cannot help. We once again point out that we need consumer laws, and consumer protection agencies that have teeth to prevent these companies for abusing the Namibian consumer. Please see attached below a message on the same issue sent to our members last year November. Kind regards Milton Louw Founder Namibia Consumer Protection Group The cost of taking legal action can be prohibitive. Could you afford to claim compensation if you were injured in an accident, unfairly dismissed from work or had a dispute with a business? A friend of mine has had legal insurance and believed he was covered. About a month ago, he was accussed of being involved in a theft syndicate at his work. He immediately called his legal insurance company, but was informed they do not cover criminal cases. He was taken for a polygraph test (is that legal in Namibia), and informed that he had failed the test. This led to him leaving the job that morning to go speak to his legal insurer. Yeah right. They do not cover the expenses for a labour case either. WHAT is it with insurance companies that do not want to pay claims? If you complain at NAMFISA they do very little to help. If I am going to buy legal insurance I expect: Bail Assistance " Bail negotiations and applications on members’ behalf " Depositing of the bail amount/issuing of bail guarantee on behalf of arrested member 102

Civil Law " Bank and insurance matters " Blacklisting " Building and construction matters " Contractual disputes " Debt collection " Letters of demand " Litigation " Personal injury claims, etc Criminal Law " Fraud, theft, robbery or assault " Arrests " Bail applications " Consumer issues " Driving under the influence " Reckless driving " Search warrants, etc. Family Law " Ante-nuptial contracts " Custody disputes " Divorces " Family violence matters " Interdicts " Maintenance disputes, etc. Labour Law " Dismissals " Disciplinary proceedings " Pension payout disputes " Restraint of trade agreements " Retrenchments " Unpaid wages " Working conditions Surely this is not too much to ask?

On tribal integration in Namibia (2010-07-20 09:25)
Tjitunga Elijah Ngurare wrote: Just wondering: is tribal unity the same as national unity in Namibia or Africa? In other words, is our being wambos, kavangos, hereros, damaras, namas, caprivians, basters, coloureds, twanas, afrikaners, germans or english in Namibia more important than being Namibians and our being Namibians more relevant to being Africans: what is your honest opinion? I start by addressing the words of Albert Einstein, “He who cherishes the values of culture cannot fail to be a pacifist.” I must first address mistakes that I have made in my feeble attempts at contributing to the nationhood of our beloved land during the past twenty odd years. I have thought it unimportant where my family comes from, what their cultures and beliefs were, and often thought these were to be considered and ultimately rejected as part of their living in a past dominated by the racial classification given by the system of Apartheid. Who I am is not dictated by our external environment, but rather by the internal. As humans we tend to blame our culture, society, government, employers and even our own families for things that goes wrong, but 103

rarely give them credit for “our” achievements. We have thrown the baby out with the bathwater. This is the only explanation of the total lack of information based on cultural affiliations in our census in Namibia. Unfortunately, this attitude of “let’s pretend it is not there” does not make it so. Even in South Africa, where the Apartheid system was the most formalised, they have recognised the need to keep the information and knowledge of all cultural groups as part of the “rainbow nation”. Discrimination because of race colour or culture is a thing of the past and is replaced by recognition and acceptance of our differences. We have also outlawed discrimination on the basis of gender, yet still need this categorisation to measure the needed changes that must take place in our country for gender equality. In the same way it is important to note that when a previously marginalised group, such as the San people, have qualified teachers from within their own tribe and culture (Republikein – 14 April 2009). The lack of recognition of certain groups can have detrimental affects on our country. Look at what has happened to some of our pre-Independence orphans who returned from East Germany. More recently we have seen the SWAPO veterans and orphans also wishing to be recognised as a distinct group with specific needs. In the near future we will see a new group forming of AIDS orphans who have grown up differently with specific disadvantages that need to be addressed to allow them to fully pluck the fruits of our freedom. What culture shall all these groups inherit? There is a national culture Namibia. Thus we can refer to our language as Namlish with its peculiarities and pronunciations. We are known by our friends and foes on the sport fields as the Brave warriors and the Biltongboere. In business we refer to the marketing process. It starts with an analysis of the present and then moves to develop a strategy. In marketing it is recognised that to provide the best product for the customer you need to segment the market. Tools such as the Living Standards Measurement are used to focus our marketing efforts. A typical LSM would include age, gender, race or cultural group and income. (Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) household surveys have become an important tool in measuring and understanding poverty in developing countries.) The people of Namibia are the customer. To serve our people better we must recognise our difference not only in gender or language but also in race. The census in Namibia must measure the race and culture embraced by each resident in future. The tertiary education institutes in Namibia must then participate in research focussing on cultural, racial, gender, urban-rural economic and livelihood inequalities in Namibia. This ongoing research must continue to ask what the relationship is between the growth and spatial distribution of the public and private economic sectors. It must also encompass the formal and informal economy, the nature of poverty, the characteristics of poor areas, and socio-economic empowerment. Lastly, we must learn to say ”We are Namibian (Wambos, Hereros, Coloureds, etc.) proud to be working to a better future for our family, tribe and country!

2.6

August

Namibia and Integration (2010-08-14 12:40)
Most of the Namibian peoples have come to this area leaving behind war or oppression of some sort or the other. They chose this inhospitable place to settle and live peacefully, not only with one another, but also with the natural environment they found themselves in. During periods of oppression they have not had a choice but to react to ensure their continued peace and stability. After Independence, it was only natural that Namibians should choose to have one of the best constitutions 104

in the world that ensures this peace and continued peaceful co-existence with one another. The policy of reconciliation was as natural for its people as breathing and eating. Today, Namibia is a model that few other countries can emulate. Worldwide, countries struggle with problems of integration. These differences take the form of religion, language, customs or race. In Namibia these differences are recognised, but do not form the basis of either government policy decisions or social interaction. As Namibians we have a lot to offer the world, and more specifically our neighbours in Southern Africa. We are an “Institute of Integration” where peoples from other parts of the world can come to learn what we know – we have a dependency on our fellow human beings and the natural environment in which we stay.

Local economic development in Otjimbingwe (2010-08-18 11:01)
Okay. Its fine to spout rhetoric and say lets do this or that. The proof of the pudding is in the eating. The Otjimbingwe Research Centre is preparing a localised study to test out certain socio-economic development proposals. I am preparing the Situational Analysis. lets see if I have it in me?

Namibian Ministries Re-engineered (2010-08-19 12:27)
I do not present a case for how the Cabinet should be structured, but rather concentrate on the individual tasks of Departments. In other words, the discretion of which Ministers should be appointed is not for my efforts, but rather only the makeup of the individual Departments into Ministries that could combine certain tasks. Re-engineering the Public Service It is easy to be critical of the government and the “bureaucracy of the state”. However, it is not always easy to provide an alternative plan or structure. In the following section, I suggest not only how government ministries and departments can be restructured based on my perception of economic and political changes, but also changing social needs, and new technologies available. 1) Office of the President " The Office of the President shall include a Minister of Presidential Affairs. " The following shall resort under the Office of the Minister of Presidential Affairs: i. Auditor-General ii. Director-General of the Central Intelligence Service iii. Director-General of Planning (Each of the above-mentioned shall have its own administration with its own Permanent Secretary) The Presidential Economic Advisory Council will also be housed in the Office of the President. It shall consist of 5 individuals recognised for their knowledge and experience in business. The Chairperson of the PEAC shall also be one of the Presidential appointments to the National Assembly. 2) Office of the Prime Minister " Shall be the leader of Government business in Parliament; " Shall co-ordinate the work of the Cabinet and shall advise and assist the President in the execution of the functions of Government; " Shall be responsible for the Public Service (government employees); " Shall represent the Government as employer in labour relations; " Shall be responsible for the Public Service Information Technology Management; 3) Ministry of Foreign Affairs " Shall be responsible for interaction with other nations, regional and international organisations; 105

" Shall be responsible for trade policy and external trade relations; " Shall be responsible for the promotion of investment opportunities in Namibia (foreign direct investment); " Shall be responsible for the promotion of Namibia as a tourist destination 4) Ministry of Home Affairs " Shall be responsible for the establishment and maintenance of a central register. This shall include: i. Register of Residents; ii. Register of Marriage Contracts; iii. Register of Business; iv. Register of Professions; v. Register of Property Ownership (land & vehicles); vi. Register of Licences for Natural Resources and Utilisation; vii. Register of Trademarks, Patents and Copyright viii. Register of External Trade; ix. Register of Court Sentences, Proceedings, Declarations x. Register of Bankruptcies and Insolvencies xi. Register of other legal entities: 1. Non-Government Organisations 2. Religious Organisations 3. Welfare Organisations " Shall make available to every resident any, and all, information recorded and stored concerning that resident. " Shall be responsible for the control of immigration points and border posts " Shall be responsible to maintain law and order in the country (Police) 5) Ministry of Environment and Resources " The Ministry shall be responsible for the following economic activities with the objective of securing economic growth, prosperity and a life of human dignity for all Namibians: i. Agriculture ii. Energy iii. Fisheries and Marine Resources iv. Forestry v. Mining vi. Tourism vii. Water " Shall co-ordinate the sustainable management of Namibia’s resources; " Shall be responsible for the granting of licences, and other administration tasks, in the afore-mentioned economic activities. " Shall co-ordinate land reform and land resettlement policies and programmes; 6) Ministry of Finance " Shall be responsible for State Income and Expenditure " Shall collect all monies payable to the state, in the form of taxes, duties, licence fees, or any other state income; 7) Ministry of Works, Transport and State-owned Enterprises " Shall be responsible for: i. Government owned properties ii. Government owned businesses (state owned enterprises) " Shall be responsible for Transport (Aviation, Maritime Affairs, Road and Rail); " Shall be a project management unit for all infrastructure development and maintenance; 8) Ministry of Labour Relations " Shall be responsible for the tripartite relationship with employees, employers and the state. (In the case of state employees, the Office of the Prime Minister shall represent the Employer.) " Shall maintain a database of occupations and work together with the Ministry of Home Affairs and Ministry 106

of Education to provide matching services for skills. 9) Ministry of Trade and Industry " Shall be responsible for: i. Consumer Protection ii. Industrial Development iii. Export Development iv. Entrepreneurship 10) Ministry of Education " Shall be responsible for Primary, Secondary and Tertiary education. " Shall be responsible for all institutions of learning, both private sector and state. (This will include registration and standards of education provided.) 11) Ministry of Information and Communication-enabled Technologies " Shall be responsible for disseminating information on the government, its structure and programmes. " Shall be responsible for the National Library and Information Services; " Shall oversee developments in ICT for the development of Namibia; " Shall create and support of Community Centres at all regional and constituency levels. These community centres shall provide information services through broadcasting, print and internet technologies " Shall regulate the Telecommunications and Broadcasting sector; " Shall be the custodian of the Access to Information Act 12) Ministry of Justice (The administrative functions of the judiciary will be done by a department that is headed by a DirectorGeneral appointed by the Parliament of Namibia.) " Shall consist of the following: i. Office of the Attorney-General ii. Office of the Prosecutor-General iii. Office of the Ombudsman 13) Ministry of Health and Social Services " Shall provide clinics, hospitals and health services to all residents; " Shall oversee the national social security and national pension scheme; " Shall be responsible for the payments of old age pensions, war veterans allowances and disability grants; 14) Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare " Shall be responsible for equality of women in all areas of government; " Shall be responsible for all areas of child welfare from birth through to primary education 15) Ministry of Regional and Local Government " Shall assist and regulate the activities of the regional and local governments; " Shall be responsible for the programme of decentralisation; " Shall provide administrative support services to regional and the constituency level offices. 16) Ministry of Defence " Shall be responsible for the defence of the country from external threats; " Shall be responsible for the protection of our natural resources, on land or in the sea; 17) Ministry of Correctional Services " Shall be responsible for the carrying out the sentences of the courts; " Shall identify work programme for the prisoners sentenced to forced labour 18) Ministry of Youth, Sport and Culture " Shall oversee the Directorate of Youth and the National Youth Council; " Shall be responsible for Sport and Culture in Namibia

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Lady of my Dreams (2010-08-21 13:13)
Chorus What is love but a tender feeling A feeling I wish you felt for me. I know I have that feeling And, it’s a feeling for you; The lady of my Dreams At night I go out and romance With women I don’t even know And dream its you with who I dance The Lady of my Dreams. Now even my waking moments are bound in dreams While where I want to be, is simply near you. This feeling of love makes me want to scream All because I know I cannot have you; The Lady of my dreams. Repeat chorus. I’d really like to know your name (I’m not kidding with this request, even though you think it’s a game) But to me you’ve become an obsession, The lady of my Dreams. Repeat “Dreaming of you, the Lady of my Dreams” (softly fading away)

Do you love me? (2010-08-21 13:16)
Chorus I thought I could go through life And never think about getting a wife But now I suddenly know Down the aisle with you I want to go But, I’m forced to wonder Do you really love me too? I’ve decided to write this song Because I’ve really got to ask you And try and right this wrong Because I’ve really want to know Do you really love me too? I’ve decided to ask you one more time And maybe if I’m really lucky The wedding bells for us will chime; I know this could be premature I’m sure you’ll say yes. So once again ask & Do you really love me too? 108

Repeat chorus Today you spoke about another guy And I pretended not to notice But inside I thought, O why? So I’ll have to ask again, Do you really love me too? Now you may be wondering why And this is my simple reply, “Because I really do love you!”

My True Feelings (2010-08-21 13:17)
I’ve got this urge once more To write a poem declaring my love Because you’re the one who makes my heart real sore! Why, I’ve even asked advice from the one above But I realize that’s real unfair As I have to ask you the one for whom I care, And so to you I put this test, Am I really the one you love best? Now once again I’ve asked that question Not because I doubt your word, But because I find it hard to believe You love me, even though I’m such a turd! Now as I end this poem To you a promise I want to make, A promise that no matter what happens My feeling for you, I’ll never forsake.

Love thoughts (2010-08-21 13:28)
Love is a piece of heaven which fell Down to earth to give me problems. I gave you my heart as if it were a ½cent Cash it in and its worthless, but keep it and you’ll have priceless memories Love is like a bag of fruit, wonderful to chew on but hard to preserve. Thinking of you is fun; being near you, & better. Love is like a rose, beautiful to hold, but real prickly to hold. Love is like bubblegum, too much chewing and it goes stale Love is & talking to the one you love! 109

Why do you like a guy like me? (2010-08-21 13:29)
A friend of yours told me that you like me But I want to hear it from you personally! I’m actually a very shy guy And that’s why I keep asking myself, why? Why do you like a guy like me? Chorus I’ve watched you many times with admiring eyes So tell me now, without any lies, Why, Please tell me, why, do you like a guy like me? I’ve seen you with a couple of other boys And I’m sure you did not think of them as toys You see, I’m a kind of doubting Louw And for this reason I’ve just got to know, Why do you like a guy like me? I now wish I had a car So I could take you and ride out far And there I’ll perform once more this task Because I’m just wanting to ask, Why do you like a guy like me? Repeat chorus

Song on my Radio (2010-08-21 13:29)
Today a song played on my Radio And as it began to play, I lost myself in loving memories As the words seemed to touch my soul Because my heart they seemed to tease, And the suddenly I realized To me, You Are The Greatest Love of All! Chorus I know my song will never be as good as Whitney’s But I’m sure my message you’ll understand And maybe one day, when I begin my own band You’ll hear my song on your radio! My ears are once more tuned To the song playing so sweet And, then, I know that if I lose you My heart will cease to beat, So move closer now And together we’ll produce a band new beat! And now as it plays to an end My heart seems to turn to lead As I’m forced to think About all those really mean things I said 110

And so with this melody I write I really mean to say “I’m sorry!” And that, I still love you! Repeat Chorus No matter what I seem to do I’m continually reminded of you Which definitely proves, I only love you!

Heart – thief (2010-08-21 13:38)
This verse may not rhyme But maybe in time You’ll understand what I’m trying to say Because the truth is I don’t want Janey, Felicity or Dianne As I want you, the one who makes me feel like such a man. But you still believe what others say about me, even though most of it is lies, and if you really don’t believe me, watch me close and look in my eyes while I tell you, You’re the one whose stolen my heart! Heart-thief, why did I meet you now, after I promised myself that for love I’d wait, But now I’ve suddenly up and realized I’m far too late, As you’ve already stolen my heart! I’ve known many girls, some named, Yvonne, Janice and Elaine But they think I’m going quite insane, Because I left them all for you. I’ve written you a couple of letters, and meant everything from within my heart But now its seems you are willing with me to part But, no matter with how many girls I’ll go out with my years I’ll always prefer (and wish) it was you so I could draw you near, Because you’re the one whose stolen my heart!

Head over Heels (2010-08-21 13:57)
Today you kissed me once again But then you did something real bad And it makes me believe you’re playing with me And this thought makes me quite sad 111

Because I’ve fallen head over heels in love with you. Why do you play with me, And think of me as just another boy With whose feelings you can play as if it were a toy But, I’m different you see Because I don’t like being treated like dirt And this is what is really making my heart hurt Because I’ve fallen head over heels in love with you. I keep telling you about how I feel But I don’t think you believe everything I say And if you don’t stop playing with me We’ll be forced to part one day Even though I’ve fallen head over heels in love with you. Next time we kiss as we did today Just promise you won’t do it again And I’ll promise to make sure you get home, early, as this is not just a simple game Because I’ve fallen head over heels in love with you.

Prisoner of Love (2010-08-21 14:00)
I tried pretending about how I felt towards you girl But I realize now I can’t keep on lying to myself As I’ve got to swallow this pill Which says to me I’m still in your power. Chorus For a long time now I’ve been trying out this verse Wondering how I can say I love you And that I always will, even “for better or worse” As I’m kind a glad I’m still in your power. The other day I even tried out someone new But this came to nothing as I soon knew That I’d rather have this bout with you As I’m fully aware I’m still in your power. My songs just seem to be getting worse and worse Because I realize I don’t need them as I’ve got you And without you I’d probably end up in a hearse Because I know I’m still in your power Repeat chorus What’s this power you hold over me I’m kind of hoping its love Because my hearts real precious see And now I’m thanking the one above That I’m still in your power 112

Repeat “In your power is where I want to stay” (softly fading away)

I want you!! (2010-08-21 14:03)
I wish I were older So I could know just what to do Because lately we’ve got a bolder And now I feel my heart pounding Cause I want to make love to you. Sometimes I think maybe I’m just scared But I want you to realize I’m waiting till the day we wed But sometimes I don’t think I can wait that long Cause I want to make love to you. The other day we were nearly caught But I don’t think they’ll believe That of that day came nought So now I’m trying to cool down real fast Cause I still want to make love to you Having sex sound so crude I try to think of it a little different Just thinking of it as kind of nice with both of us being nude And now you have to give me a break Cause I want to make love to you. Looking at you naked gives me a chill But we both know what’s right And if you go on the pill It’ll certainly change things Cause I want to make love to you.

Doing it for you, Collette (2010-08-21 14:04)
My life has been turned upside down As I never realized how much you love me And now I know; I’m wearing a crown And even though it’s made of thorns I’ll still do it for you At school, life is turning out funny As they putting pressure on me Thinking I was out just to get money But even if I had the same choice again I’ll still choose you forever. Chorus I’d love to start our friendship again 113

And this time I’m willing to listen And even try acting a little sane So I can keep you, Cause all this I’ll do for you As I know I love you Collette And that’s something on which you can bet! Now once more I’m getting lots of flak Cause people think we don’t fit And how you stuck me in my back And our relationship has come to an end But with you, I’m willing to try again People often say I’m a Casanova Just because I’ve know a lot of girls But they’re all blown over As I know what I want And I know what I want And you the one I’m trying to keep.

Proving our love (2010-08-21 14:11)
Last night we watched video’s till late And soon as the others were gone Neither of us could really wait To jump into each others arms Which proves to me really do love each other. Chorus Its real pity about what your family said – They seem to have a funny idea in their heads Which makes them think I’ve had you laid But I realize we’ve got it made Because even with this charge against me We’ve stayed together see To prove we really do love each other. I’ve been close to other girls at times And I’ve never been tempted away Because it all seemed like mimes When I’m not with you Which proves to me I really do love you Once, not so long ago I tried to break away from you But my heart said no, don’t go Stay with this girl force you die Which proves to me I really do love you. Repeat chorus Now you’ve taken me back And I’m really glad Because with me you’ve got a knack To keep me forever happy 114

Which proves to me, you really do love me.

Your Love has shown me (2010-08-21 14:40)
I’ve been listening to “Love Notes” And I realize they know what they are singing about Because love is definitely a wonderful thing This I know beyond a doubt As your love has shown this to me. I know they are singing from experience But there’s still one thing bothering me, And that’s that they thing of love as a “physical thing” While I don’t think that’s really necessary, As we seem to be getting along just fine Without having to hop into bed Because I know you are totally mine Without this “proof of love” And even though we come close, I’m kind of glad we didn’t, Even though I could have done with a dose Of having your body joining with mine, I know it would have been wrong And this is my way of showing you. My real reason for writing this song – To tell you I really do need you But, that I’d rather wait, Until we are truly wed But of late I’ve been wondering again And in the process nearly going insane But I know we have been right (Even though I’d still like to sleep with you at night) As your love has show me the way, And that’s the best, no matter what others have to say!

Thank you! Collette (2010-08-21 15:01)
Thank you for your wonderful (love) – letter, I know no guy could have got a better And it makes me doubly happy Because you say you really do love me, And I can say the same too As I do really love you Cause this feeling is really good And this feeling is really good And that’s the way it should 115

I love you plenty And this is my way to say I’m glad you love me As I really do know so And maybe together –one day – we’ll stay, And I hope that you won’t then say no!

The Leftist Capitalist (2010-08-23 12:52)
Start early life – short go through Extreme hardship and good luck. But still walk off the edge Do something wrong Get another chance – begin at the Beginning – a place I knew Still live large – larger than you Can dream in a year – night after night Have it bad – yet have it all The most beautiful Girl in the world I had not yet met Material Girl’ was the way I judged Didn’t go away – yet did study Was against politics – what a fool Became the best politician Learning the dangers of the Gravy train A goddess was given to me To name as in the time of Adam Thought I was god – Really messed up That’s when I lost sight of reality Cancer – was very lucky in the beginning Understood that I had never been taught Tried new things – became the boss Resigned because of principles not Fortune Ran away – luckily I had friends People who at least made an effort Got there made a home, without her Missed them to much Came back master of destiny A phoenix arisen – to fly – Kalahari Down to earth – working at night Paper millionaires who cannot file Was all I learnt a waste No! I grew up knowing nothing feeling hurt Made to learn to appreciate Thank you teachers one and all From the first who loved me – till the last Now I understand the burden 116

The one of the leftist capitalist Get paid for what you do well Neither under or over – charge Earn fairly, pay slightly better Enjoy the fruits of your labour Yet bury the seeds. By being happy that you are moneyed You give back equally Try to teach another, to be us lucky as You!

Our Big Brother – South Africa (2010-08-23 15:16)
South Africa used to be our colonial master. The ant-apartheid struggle in South Africa was also our struggle. Many of us have family on both sides of the Orange River. We import most of our consumer goods from South Africa. Our money, the Namibian Dollar is directly equal to the Rand. All, but one, of our banks is South African owned. These are facts we must accept, there are the good, the bad and the difficult things in this relationship. The Good Namibia is a member of the oldest custom union in the world, namely the Southern Africa Customs Union (SACU). The members are Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, Swaziland and South Africa. Being part of a customs union means that all goods brought into the Union will face the same amount of customs duty. More importantly, all goods produced by any member will not face duty when sold in one of the other member countries. In effect this means a company can choose to produce in Durban, Port Elizabeth, Gaberone, or Oshakati and have the same access to all the consumers in our countries. The only difference is in the local labour or services, transport costs between markets, and the quality of life in each of these locations. So, Namibia should have an active investment promotion policy to: a) attract companies wishing to penetrate the southern African market; and b) encourage South African companies to open factories in Namibia To do this will mean preparing a comparison list to other localities in the region, and making sure we are the first choice in all regards. It is important to remember that all aspects, such as the quality of education available to children at the investment location, can be pivotal in decision-making by the management who have to relocate. SO HOW BIG is the Namibian Market? The Namibian market consists of more than 200 million people – all residents of SACU are our market. The Bad Just like any big brother, South Africa can sometimes use its muscle to bully the smaller states in the Union. This can lead to companies “protecting” their markets by using dumping for example to prevent a business from being able to establish itself locally. Because of a larger range of products, companies can also insist retailers do not stock any of their competitor’s products. This has happened in the case of candles, toilet paper, cement, school desks, to name just a few. Namibia must use the facility (already written in the SACU agreement) to protect its infant industries. At the same time, I must warn about the measures sometimes used to protect local industries. In the early 1990’s the government enacted regulations to stop empty glass bottles from leaving Namibia. This was to protect our local Namibia Breweries. It was possibly a good measure, but inadvertently has led to a pollution problem. If you investigate any of the glass bottles being thrown away, you realise bottles are all from foreign bottlers. The reason, only Namibian Breweries offers a refund and reuses their bottles – the others cannot take the empties across the border. 117

The Difficult Our dependence on South Africa also means that when something goes wrong there it affects us directly. If the World Cup is held in RSA, we receive indirect benefits, but when there is a political problem, we also receive the negative coverage.

An exploration into the Coloured market (2010-08-24 12:28)
(This article was originally published on Marketingweb a few months back. It drives home some key points that we’ve been trying to emphasise here on Bruin-ou.com since the site was launched, that the Coloured community is unjustifiably neglected by corporate South Africa and in so doing, is incapable of properly advancing in South African society today. We’d love to hear your views on this article.) Fragmented, stereotyped and misunderstood, South Africa’s 4.4 million strong Coloured market is as big as the white market in South Africa (9.1 % of the population vs. 9 %) and yet so many marketers have made the mistake of overlooking opportunities within this previously disadvantaged group. This is a shortsighted, given that the Coloured market makes up 63 % of the total population in the Western Cape (Stats SA 2009), and therefore it is no surprise that so many brands that are successful elsewhere fail to connect with consumers in this province. To understand this complexity, one just has to start by looking at issues of Coloured identity. A debate rages around the meaning of the term ”Coloured” - does it refer to a group of people lumped together in the past, and therefore share the same history, or does it rather refer to certain characteristics? It would seem that defining the term ”Coloured” is no longer as one dimensional as many people believe it to be. As a result there have been books written about it, movies made and a number of blogs and social networking sites dedicated to the issue. The Cape Coloured market comprises a diverse group of people. These individuals differ in terms of mindsets and lifestyle. Since 1994 this market has evolved and become highly complex, and is not the single homogenous group that many believe it to be. The Coloured market acknowledges their differences and thus there is a strong need for them to differentiate themselves based on their lifestyle and mindsets. Strategy and research company OIL has conducted an in-depth study in an attempt to provide marketers with a deeper understanding of the dynamics within the Coloured market in the Western Cape. The study used a mixture of methodologies, including ethnographic research backed up using AMPS/TGI data; and insights gained from social networking sites. Aside from looking at the consumer behaviour and mindsets of this market, this cutting-edge study highlights key insights into this market and, most importantly, offers vital untapped marketing opportunities for brands. In this study, OIL identified four segments within the market that aim to improve marketers’ understanding of the Coloured market and help them create effective brand communication strategies. The segments are The Escapers, The In-Betweeners, The Achievers and The Silver Spooners. The Escapers, referred to within the community as ”gam”, are a segment defined by the legacy of Apartheid. They are characterised by a so-called ghetto lifestyle with a tendency to escape their everyday reality, living day-to-day and with a very short-term focus. Escapers are loud and proud of who they are, and embrace the Cape Coloured stereotypes - from kombuistaal to passion gaps The In-Betweeners are an aspirational segment; those who often find themselves caught between two worlds - the upper and the lower income communities. Although they are aspirational, they are not willing to compromise their lifestyle for long-term success. They have a medium focused approach by showing aspiration through the conspicuous consumption of branded goods. They embrace the term ”Coloured” and focus on the positive associations of Coloured culture - from having a great sense of humour to having fun like no other culture. The Achievers are defined by their success through hard work and determination. The majority of this segment comprise individuals who have fought through the struggle of Apartheid and are aware that their lifestyle has not come easily to them. There is a continued drive for excellence and success, especially with 118

their children. Although they are successful, they still remain grounded in their community and proud of their background. The Silver Spooners are the children of the upper income Achiever parents and live an affluent lifestyle. This elite segment makes up a very small percentage of the Cape Coloured population and has not been exposed to mainstream Coloured culture. They, therefore, cannot relate to the Coloured culture as much as other segments. Even though there are various segments, these individuals share certain commonalities. Cooking and food are considered important elements for bringing a family together. There are a lot of Malay influences with the food prepared by both Christians and Muslims. Coloured families are very close and often have more than the immediate family living in a household. They also tend to live within close proximity to each other, as family is considered to be a strong support pillar. Religion also plays a very important role and there is great emphasis placed on teaching children their religious values. There is a shared desire for the younger generation to show status through wearing branded sneakers and ”pimping” old cars, as opposed to driving the latest luxury vehicle. There is also a strong interest in English soccer teams, far more so than local teams. This can be seen with the English soccer branded paraphernalia within each household. Due to the lack of research into this market it is not surprising that there are so many misconceptions and stereotyping surrounding the Coloured community. This market has the spending power of over R60 billion a year; therefore this is an opportunity that marketers should not ignore.

My Birthday girl - (Collette Campher 17 June 1987) (2010-08-25 10:54)
I’ve finished writing you a poem So I thought maybe I’ll write a song; To you how much I care And how our love just can’t be wrong; So here’s looking at you, Birthday girl. You’re entering the magic years of youth now The time you should be free So if at any time you want your freedom Just come and tell me Because I’ll do anything for my Birthday girl. As you get older, you get more beautiful And that can’t be proven as a lie Cause I’ve seen the guys looking at you All wishing I’d just peg off and die So they can get a chance with my Birthday girl This song is up to s(peep)t It seems I just can’t think straight, I keep getting side-tracked by memories of you And the nights when we stayed up till late – So here’s to memories of you Birthday girl. I hope you like these couple of lines And that you’ll realize I mean every word And not laugh your head off Because you think them real absurd So think once more of me My Birthday Girl 119

Birthday Poem (17 June 1987 – Collette turns 18) (2010-08-25 10:56)
Well I’ve decided to write you a birthday poem Something to make you think a little of me right now And of the day we plan to set up a home But don’t ask, as right now I don’t know how This poem has started to sound real silly to me And I thought about starting another one But, I’ve got to have something special for you, So I’ll just have to go on till it’s done. Maybe I should write about the way I feel; Or, about how I really want you again; Or, about how your heart I want to steal; Well, I better decide quick otherwise I’ll probably go insane. I know this poem isn’t much of a present But until I’m qualified that’s all I can afford But you got to realize every word is meant So please, when you read this, don’t get bored! Why the heck can’t I be rich, rolling in money? So I can buy everything your heart desires Whether it be clothes, pots containing real honey, Or even a hot set of tires. But my lot I suppose I must accept And the most I can do is to give you respect And a promise that one – day soon I’ll even be able to give you the moon! Happy Birthday! Gesëende dae vorentoe is my wens vir jou!

Love Triangle (2010-08-25 10:57)
Love is never very straight – forward, As once again my love for you proves this to me. I realize now that I should have worked out something see And then we could have worked out something see And not to be stuck in this damn Love Triangle. You have your boyfriend, I have my girl Why then, do I think we will fit better? But, I suppose in your way you’re right When you say you don’t want to hurt her; But that still leaves me in a Love Triangle Chorus Love Triangle You’re busy running my life: A girl I have, but I want another for my wife. 120

So perhaps with a little help from above I’ll be able to get the one I really love And break up this Hosted Love Triangle We talked quite a lot, or at least I did And maybe you right, I should have lied And not told you about her, but I can’t Cause if you’d found out I’d have died And I would still have been stuck in a Love Trianle Now I cannot sleep with my thoughts As they keep returning to think of you girl And I realize I don’t know what to say As without you, ill always be in a silly whirl And in my heart I’d still stuck in a Love Triangle

Unopened Love bud (2010-08-25 11:43)
I spoke to you once more today And I realize the following words I should not say But I feel in love with you once And that feeling is still with me today; Even though you think we should just stay friends How many times haven’t I wondered, Wondered: - if things weren’t the same: Would you and I have been a pair, And maybe even shared a surname, And been “happy forever after”? I know its no use thinking that way As things are the way they are But this won’t stop me saying what I have to say As I’m continually wishing on a falling star That one-day I will know for sure. I often make jokes with you About the two of us becoming a pair And you probably never took any notice So I write these words to show I really care, Care about you: More than what a friend should. So please remember these few words These words that comes out of my heart: I really like you a lot see; As to me you’re a beautiful piece of priceless art And my feeling for you increase your value for me.

My Philosoply on Life (2010-08-25 12:35)
What is the meaning of life? If you know please tell me:121

Some say its finding a compatible wife Others: knowing how to help those in strife. To me it means; - (1) being able to love And having some special to receive it; (2) Being able to worship the one above; And (3) being remembered by those you love. I’ve seen people trying the first and last But never caring much for the second As they want to live in the lane marked fast And in so doing never really achieve happiness that can last My next question would then naturally be What are we doing to find meaning in life? Why I ask is quite simple see, Cause everyone only cares for “I; Myself and Me” So how do I achieve it you ask. I’m not sure but I’m trying real hard And I must admit it’s quite a hard task But I’ll keep with it till I’m put in a cask. So why don’t we all try To achieve these three ideals Cause then there’ll be much less reason to cry And none of us with the Devil will have to fry!! God knows what your problem is So carry your burdens and problems to his feet, Ask for His guidance in all matters And I’m sure success and happiness you’ll meet.

A girl called Bernadette (2010-08-25 16:06)
I met a girl called Bernadette And now I’m really glade we’ve met Cause she really intrigues me And what that is what I like in a girl, see! I know she’ll probably think this poem’s dumb But it is the fault of her& Cause when I see them, my brain goes numb. (-Because they don’t look like washing pegs!) Why am I writing this poem? I don’t know either: but just wait:Maybe she and I will set up Home If she turns out to be the ideal mate. This is the end of the lyric And to be quit honest, it is quite sick.

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Can I be sure? (2010-08-25 16:07)
A friend of yours has been whispering a lot in your ear lately and I’m getting worried; She seems to be carrying messages from other guys with whom I don’t what you did So tell me, can I be sure of your love? Sometimes I wonder how its possible that a beauty like you can like a guy like me and all I seem to get for an answer is – that you like my personality; but how do I know that will always keep you true? I’ve always tried to pretend that I’m not the jealous type who watches you with other guys But lately I just can’t control myself and keep watching you to see if you tell any lies Cause I’m quite in love with you, that’s for sure! I was kinda wondering real heard about how much you care for me when I wrote this song And that’s why I ask you these questions so I can look in your eyes and see I’m wrong Cause now I’m real sure of your love for me!!

Incomprehensible Poem - By: A Broken Heart (2010-08-25 16:08)
Its been a long time sine I wrote something decent Something out of my heart that is really meant And this is because my heart was too sore But now I’ve found out that to life there is more More than just loving you You did the same as the others And I hate all girls for being mothers! Now I feel heart healing As Cupido to me a new hand is dealing In the form of another Heart –breaker! But all of those who broke my heart You were the only one about who I didn’t get smart So revel in the fact that you’ve won And I’ll worry about what you done As you girls are all the same!

You’re the one for me! (Dedicated to Yolanda Esterhuisen) (2010-08-25 16:08)
Sitting here looking at you I don’t know what to say Cause all I have on my mind Is seeing you each and every day. I know I have to study And you also have many years ahead But I’m a patient kind of guy So I’ll just wait until we can get wed. There’s a bunch of stories about me Stories about me being a Dad But I know you won’t believe them 123

Because you know I ain’t that bad! Your mom mounted at me the other day And the worst part was: I didn’t know what to say But that has all been left behind Cause now I have made up my mind “That you are the girl for me!”

Being with you (2010-08-25 16:09)
I remember the first time we met And now I’m really happy we did Even though I acted like a real wet; Which you probably didn’t even notice Cause you were laughing too much. Chorus Your laugh is something I enjoy hearing As it makes me think you’re happy – And that’s makes my heart want to sing As it is me making you laugh. Now I’m sleeping out a lot And my Dad has spoken to me about it But I don’t mind as it’s you I got And that’s the most important thing As I care about you!

Missing you! (2010-08-25 16:10)
You mean a lot to me And I know its now too late to see But I still wish these words I did utter Instead of always “nothing” mutter As to me you are lost Even though I still want you back! (No matter what the cost: As in Love I’ll make up for the money I lack.)

Wanting you Again (My love for you still lives) (2010-08-25 16:14)
I feel so sad these days When I sit and think of what we had And I wish things I could change So they wouldn’t turn out so bad! But this is a useless hope As you found someone new 124

And without you I’ll just have to cope! I’m trying real hard to forget you; To think just about what lies ahead But all I do is revert to memories When I lay myself down on my bed. “Memories of wonderful times we spent When everything was happy And every loving word we meant”. You once wrote down the words of a song, And I like to think you meant what you said When you wrote “I just can’t stop loving you!” Cause these are words that stuck in my head As these words for me are true! Now it seems you’ve forgotten me And that kind of makes me feel blue. So many things have happened in between That I wonder what is still to come – Whether things will work out for us Or whether our feelings for each other Will just go numb. I’m hoping it won’t end that way: So if you find someone else to love Please forgive me for these things I say. I’m wondering whether I should give you these verses Or just keep them for me alone to see – But that wouldn’t be right As it would just remind me of the hurt inside of me! I don’t know what I write But I have to do something As I just can’t sleep tonight. Please don’t think I’m forcing you to do Anything As I’m willing to be a patient guy So take your time deciding whether you want me back Or if you’d rather to me say good-buy. I hope your choice is not the latter Cause if you choose the first I’ll definitely start to feel better! So no matter what you decide Just remember this Collette: I’ll always be ready and waiting for you And that’s something on which you can bet! Now as I end this poem I’d like to end this with a special wish: “I hope that one – day we can set up home!”

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Freedom Flight (2010-08-25 16:16)
An eagle soars the sky, Floating high above the earth, He looks down on tiny specks of life He knows not what they think, Cares not! Cause he is free. Yet in life all this is a lie For even from our birth We are living lives filled with strife Caring only for ourselves Never others All wishing to be free. But all of you I’ll defy As I too am free Soaring Never captive Yet, one – day I’ll be no more – And who’ll remember?

Memories (2010-08-25 16:16)
Your beauty never ceases to amaze me And I know now I never deserved your love But I’m thankful for what we had And everyday I thank the one above For loving memories we share! Chorus Oh these wonderful memories we share Of so many fun times we had Times when we were totally bare Even though we weren’t really “Bad” Oh memories can’t you stop eating at me And just please, please leave me be! Do you member the times& We promised each other we’d get wed? That we fell asleep in each other arms? And meant every word we said When we said “I love you!”? How many times didn’t I promise you the world? Promise to forget your (and my) past? Promise to love you forever and ever? At least I’ve kept the last And I promise I always will! Repeat chorus Are these memories a blessing or a curse? 126

I don’t know! But they are things I’ll Always in my heart nurse!

Captives of Freedom (2010-08-25 16:20)
High above the earth he soars Alighting here, then there Never still He is free, Can come and go when he wishes He is King of the sky, He is an eagle. I too, feel akin to him Never stopping, never still Moving forth Always free Coming and going as I wish Living out a lie Pretending to live Yet both of us are wrong We are captives of freedom We are caught by it Longing for it, Thirsting, Never getting enough. Yes mighty bird, You and I are kin Captives of freedom Captives of life Always free Yet never!

Secrets (2010-08-25 17:05)
The words of songs run through my head Scenes, flashes from the past Remembering me of what I’ve lost What I’ll never regain; Lost forever. I’m always this way when I’m lonely Thinking back – about the two of us What we used to dream of What we will never achieve; Not together. True love was supposed to be forever Yet it seems to be a force 127

As it only remains in me You have already forgotten; Our paradise. Now I weep when I’m alone at night Thinking on the past we used to share Wishing I could have it back Treasuring thoughts from the past, Loving memories. Maybe my secret dream will one-day be true And you and I will be one Sharing, regretting time lost Going forth in life; As one.

Wander Lust (2010-08-25 17:13)
What makes me so restless Causes me to search Looking, never finding Continuing on this lonely path Without ever getting rest, Peace of mind? I always blame others for this Yet I know it seems from inside Deep in my soul, This search for something Never minding the pain, The pain I cause others. I want answers, Answers to questions not yet asked; I want truth, So I know how to lie; I want knowledge Knowledge to impress others with; I want fame, Yet standing in a cocoon of privacy; I want things Yet I never give to anyone, Yes all this I want, and more Yet none are what I seek; So I will always have to keep searching.

The Blues (2010-08-25 17:35)
What Now? Nothing 128

Where too? Nowhere. With whom? No – one Why? Don’t know. Will I accept this? Why not!

Reality (2010-08-25 17:41)
Life used to be lonely and dreary Then you came into it; It was fun. Then it Ended. Now it’s lonely and dreamy again Cause I’m without you living on my dreams losing touch of reality

No More (2010-08-25 17:58)
What am I living for I’ve no reason to live no more! I use to manage Now no more I live on the edge Now no more I thought you really loved me Now No More!

Friends (2010-08-25 17:59)
For what we are to receive, dear Lord Make us truly doubly Thankful. Friends in times of need Who prove they are friends in deed, In times of heart-ache Our days to make, When tears may fall 129

Or laughter won’t come at all They’ll stand you by Never letting you lay down and die That’s what being friends is all about, This is stated without any doubt Cause True Friends are Friends Forever!

Unexpected Love (2010-08-25 18:06)
What hit me? This night of the 22nd I won’t forget Cause something really special happened As our hearts (and bodies) eventually met. I know I promised to forget And tomorrow will be just another normal day But inside me, my heart will be going wild And I’ve never ever had it feel this way. Why weren’t we willing to accept it? Others saw it before we did While we always joked about it But only ourselves it seems we were trying to kid Now, whatever happens between us I hope we give it a chance to work Otherwise we’ll both end up sad While in our hearts this love will lurk. Tonight I’m not going to be able to sleep And if I do, I’ll dream of you Because tonight you and I said those three magic words I Love You’

Valentine 89 (2010-08-25 18:06)
Last night I promised you a poem So now read this and think of me And you might not have believed my words But can now these feelings on paper see It all started at registration When you came in all dressed in pink I nearly felt of my chain right then Cause at the sight of my heart started to sink. (Just don’t ask why, O.K?) Yesterday was lots of fun I enjoy walking with you through town; Even though I talked too much And continuously acted like a clown. But this is because you intrigue me 130

As its not often I meet a girl I admire A girl who knows what she wants And from responsibility never tire. This poem is starting to sound real weird And that’s like my feeling towards you too And my heart is going wild Because I know I like you!

Something Read – Something Said! (2010-08-25 18:07)
I always wanted to be a writer And this is something I’ll be I’m sure But the problem is what to write about So people will sit up and take head. That is why I wish my skin was whiter So people will stop thinking they are more pure Because they are wrong have no doubt As we were all created equal And that’s why I wrote this poem: So everyone the truth can read!

A Fleeting moment of Happiness (2010-08-25 18:07)
Tonight I got peace in my soul, A song in my heart And a smile on my lips All because I know once more what it is to love. I’ve always said this feeling is not for me I believe that loving was not possible Because I never found someone But now I have, And it’s you I know I love!

Brotherhood among us (2010-08-25 18:08)
Can’t we all come and meet each other And no matter what colour we may be Be able to show we love one another And then together we’ll stand, you and me The leaders of Tomorrow, Planning for what is to come Otherwise there will be lots of needless sorrow Over killing which are quite dumb. So come closer now and grab my hand 131

And we’ll accept each other as brothers And then together we’ll be able to stand To show our Father and Mothers We want to plan for a common future No matter what our race, colour or culture.

Why?? (2010-08-25 18:08)
“Look at me my white brothers Come closer to me And show you care about the others By letting us all live free” This request may sound funny But you all are enjoying your lives While we struggle for money So we can feed our children and wives Now I know what the laws are But they are really quite unfair And so if you’ll lift the colour Bar It will prove you really care. So now that you’ve heard my cry Go home and ask yourselves; Why?

Child of Africa (2010-08-25 18:09)
My brother and I once lived together as one But life was bad for me back then You see, he’s white while I’m not But, these are all rules set but mortal men And I’ve often wondered why they said such thing, Things that really hurt me deep inside, While they pretended they were kings. Now I’ve come to realize that they lied Because we are all equal And even though our skins don’t match Everybody should be entitled to follow his own will But if I said this, the jail door behind me they’d latch! Now, I know these words may not mean a lot But the truth is, they all I’ve still got.

Legislation for informational privacy in Namibia (2010-08-30 14:41)
The ability to save information on a computer (for example in the central register) will also necessitate new legislation to be promulgated. These laws are especially necessary in our Information and Communication 132

enabled society where information is stored on electronic retrieval systems. Legislation for informational privacy The Namibian Constitution states in Article 13 Privacy: “(1) No persons shall be subject to interference with the privacy of their homes, correspondence or communications save as in accordance with law and as is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the protection of health or morals, for the prevention of disorder or crime or for the protection of the rights or freedoms of others.” The Constitution thus guarantees only “Physical Privacy”. The storage of personal and business information (“Informational Privacy”) must have legislation that will prevent misuse of this information. In addition, the individual in Namibia must be able to access any, and all, information that is stored by the state (public institutions). There are thus things that are needed to guarantee informational privacy: 1. Data Protection Act; 2. Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations; 3. Freedom of Access to Information Act Data Protection Act The Data Protection Act gives you the right to know (access) the information being held on you. It also sets certain key principles that anyone who handles personal information must comply with. The Act also establishes an Information Commissioner. The data covered is any information which can be used to identify a living person. This includes names, birthdays, addresses and other contact details. It only refers to information stored on computers. The key principles of the Act must include: " Data may only be used for the specific purpose that it was collected; " Data may not be shared with others without permission of the individual whom such information is about – unless there is a legitimate reason; " It is illegal for other parties to obtain this information without permission; " Individuals have the right to the information about them subject to certain conditions; " Personal information should not be kept longer than necessary; " All businesses that collect personal information must register with the Commissioner; and " Incorrect information must be corrected when it is brought to the attention of the data storage business. Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations These regulations must control the people that wish to send out electronic direct marketing, for example email and text messages (SMS). Individuals have the right to refuse unsolicited marketing messages (“junk mail”) by fax, phone email and text message. Companies and organisations have the right to refuse marketing messages by phone or fax. A register needs to be created to store the individuals and companies that refuse to receive such marketing messages. Freedom of Access to Information Act The Constitutions states in Article 95 Promotion of the Welfare of the People: “& (e) ensurance that every citizen has a right to fair and reasonable access to public facilities and services in accordance with the law;” This Act must give the individual the right to obtain information being held by the state (public institutions) unless there are good reasons that such information should be kept confidential. These institutions include government departments, regional and local government as well as schools. (The access to information held by private institutions is expected to be covered by the Data Protection Act.)

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2.7

September

Panarotti’s Thursday eat all you can (2010-09-03 16:09)
Took my daughters out for a birthday celebration last night and they ganged up on me and wanted to go to Panarotti’s for ”Eat all you can Thursday”. Well, we got there past seven and waited for almost an hour and a half for a table (we were 9 people in total). I did not mind the wait, but when we sat down we were informed the special only went till 9 ’clock. Whoaw. I can eat as I like in half an hour. Nowhere in the advertising does it state it stops at 21H00. Especially after waiting so long. But would you believe it! the waiter arranged that we can pay the special price, and arranged at least five bottomless pizza (including a seafood) for the same price. I am not sure if it is because I have five daughters, or this is the normal service. So from my side, congratulations to Panarotti’s Windhoek for good food and EXCELLENT service. I hope we all get such service elsewhere this weekend. ”Service which is rendered without joy helps neither the servant nor the served. But all other pleasures and possessions pale into nothingness before service which is rendered in a spirit of joy.”

Are Namibian coloureds a distinct cultural/indigenous group? (2010-09-20 14:42)
According to wikipedia: A contemporary working definition of ”indigenous people” for certain purposes has criteria which would seek to include cultural groups either: before or its subsequent colonisation or annexation; or alongside other cultural groups during the formation and/or reign of a colony or nation-state; and who furthermore have maintained at least in part their distinct cultural, social/organisational, and/or linguistic characteristics, and in doing so remain differentiated in some degree from the surrounding populations and dominant culture of the nation-state. To the above, a criterion is usually added to also include: peoples who are self-identified as indigenous, and/or those recognized as such by other groups.

A consumer law in Namibia should protect people who are renting (2010-09-23 17:01)
A Namibian Consumer Protection Act should specifically target unfair discrimination and enforce the right of equality in the consumer market. The Act must put the onus on the landlord to prove that he is not discriminating in any way against a tenant on the basis of things like race, gender, nationality, and even income. In addition, we believe the new Act should allow for automatic renewal of the rental agreement. This will prevent landlords from using this as an excuse to terminate when the tenant wishes to stay. At present many agents and landlords are using the end of the year contract to get rid of tenants so they can increase the rent amount for the next person. Normally the rent will only go up by around ten percent, and the landlords are pushing up the prices to the new tenants by a lot more. Lastly, we propose that the Consumer protection Act must include the right to fair and honest dealings. “No physical force, coercion, undue influence, pressure, duress or harassment may be employed to evict a tenant 134

or compel them to sign a lease.” As an example, I quote from personal experience. Last year, I was a renting near to the Zoo Park in Windhoek. I was on the farm at the time and had made arrangements as to my monthly payment. As agreed, I came from the farm and paid my outstanding rent and prepaid for two months. The owner in the meantime decided to cancel the lease agreement with all tenants and change the building into office space. They thus gave all tenants two months notice to leave. I had paid a deposit so knew that I still had sufficient funds with the agent till the end of the period. But the renting company wanted to get rid of all the tenants and make sure they were gone. So the estate agent ”forgot” to enter my late payment and had their lawyers prepare a judgement. As you can imagine, I was very shocked to have the Sheriff of the Court appear at my door to throw me out. The worst part is that the Sheriff took my furniture even though the outstanding amount on the account had been paid. Of course, there was nothing I could do. The lawyer for the company was also a Director of the same company and would not listen to any explanation. Once the sheriff had sold my furniture, the lawyer had the audacity to let me know there was a shortfall on the outstanding account. I called the lawyer and estate agent and explained that they were using a wrong account and the estate agent still owed me my deposit - which was more than any outstanding amount. They promised to come back to me. Yeah right, almost a year later and still no response. So what can you do before the law is in place? You should write down the events that took place and make copies of all correspondence between yourself and the landlord. Once you have completed a written explanation, send this to the Estate Agents Board of Namibia. This is a statutory body under the Ministry of Trade and Industry responsible for making sure these landlords and estate agents comply with the law. Now you might wonder why I did not follow this advice. The Sheriff of the Court under instructions of the agent had taken all my furniture including my computer equipment, thrown all my belongings on to the street. Poof, all my documentation and proofs of payment were gone. Interview with Milton Louw on the above issues: 1. Does Namibia have a Consumer Protection Act? No. However, the Namibian consumer is protected by various other laws, mostly industry specific such as in banking, insurance, medical, etc. 2. Is there plans to table such a law in parliament? The Ministry of Trade and Industry has been talking to various role-players such as business, statutory bodies, consumer groups, etc on what form the law should take. Their ”primary considerations were that Namibian consumers were experiencing unscrupulous and unfair trading practices, and that existing avenues to obtain redress are inadequate or completely absent.” A workshop on this topic was held in September 2009 and the Ministry of Justice was requested to prepare a draft law. We have not had any more feedback since March this year. 3. What are the issues you would like to be put into the law? You referred in your email newsletter and on the Internet to issues with people hiring house and flats? A Namibian Consumer Protection Act should specifically target unfair discrimination and enforce the right of equality in the consumer market. The Act must put the onus on the landlord to prove that he is not discriminating in any way against a tenant on the basis of things like race, gender, nationality, and even income. 4. How will this affect the complaints about high rentals in Namibia We believe amongst others that the new Act should allow for automatic renewal of the rental agreement. This will prevent landlords from using this as an excuse to terminate when the tenant wishes to stay. At present many agents and landlords are using the end of the year contract to get rid of tenants so they can increase the rent amount for the next person. Normally the rent will only go up by around ten percent, and the landlords are pushing up the prices to the new tenants by a lot more. 135

5. What about landlords or estate agents throwing out people on to the street we propose that the Consumer protection Act must include the right to fair and honest dealings. “No physical force, coercion, undue influence, pressure, duress or harassment may be employed to evict a tenant or compel them to sign a lease.” 6. What can a consumer do if they feel unfairly treated by an estate agent? The Estate Agents Board is under the Ministry of Trade and Industry with the mandate to regulate and control certain activities of estate agents in the public interest. They can be contacted about any complaint and they have specific procedures to deal with complaints.

More Namibians have access to banking – World Bank (2010-09-24 08:34)

By: Milton Louw The banking population in Namibia has increased substantially in 2009 according to the World Bank’s Financial Access 2010 report released on Thursday, 16 September. The number of deposit account holders in Namibia has grown by 23 percent, with statistics confirming the resilience of the seven commercial banks during a year weighed down by the international financial crises. According to the report, more than three quarters of the population (752 per 1000 adults) hold deposit accounts and 20 percent have loans with financial institutions. In comparison, the report shows that subSaharan Africa had an average of 163 deposit accounts per 1000 adults and only 28 bank loans per 1000 adults. In addition the report shows that the disbursement of loans shrank across sub-Saharan Africa last year, with Namibian loan accounts declining in volume by 36 percent. The most remarkable was that Namibia scored the highest with 1185 “Depositors with Other Depository Corporations” per 1000 adults. No other country on the Continent, or in any developing country for that matter, scored as high. In fact, Namibia is placed 16th in the world. To put that in perspective, Austria at number one scored 4785 and Italy, two places above Namibia, scored 1285 per thousand adults. The Financial Access 2010 Report stresses consumer protection, financial literacy and rural, SMME and savings promotion as critical in the spread of services and products to unbanked populations. The World Bank’s researchers note that while consumer protection legislation is in place in most countries, implementation and enforcement is often lacking. ”Legislation is often broad and does not cover issues specific to the financial industry,” said a researcher. ”Only half of the economies (studied in the Report) have legal provisions restricting unfair and high-pressure selling practices and abusive collection practices. ”Regulators in only about half of the economies are empowered to issue warnings or impose fines on financial institutions violating consumer protection regulations. A public notice of violation - one of the most effective deterrence tools - can be used in only about a third of economies.” According to the Report, Namibia scores well across five critical areas, which include consumer protection, financial literacy and rural, SMME, savings and microfinance promotion. The Financial Access 2010 Report encompasses survey responses from 142 economies, including Namibia, and analyses changes that took place in the banking landscape in 2009. The Financial Access 2009 Report covered 139 economies.

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2.8

October

Motion on Unemployed Namibians with or without Professional Qualifications
(2010-10-19 13:39)

PARLIAMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FEBRUARY 2009 BY: Chief Ankama, SWAPO MP Comrade Speaker, I regard this motion as an extraordinarily important one, not just to me but to other many Namibians if not all. This is the third time that I move this motion in the house. It first lapsed during the first term of 2008 when parliament went into recess and then re-introduced during the last term of last year but ended without reaching its intended goal, the goal of finding a lasting directive to solving unemployment situation in Namibia. Now comrade Speaker, I am here again standing to re-introduce the motion on unemployed Namibians with or without professional qualifications, accompanied by some amendments. The motion seeks to: 1. discuss, assess and ascertain the seriousness of unemployed Namibians with professional trainings and qualifications obtained from recognized educational institutions here in Namibia or abroad; 2. this motion equally should include in our discussion the general unemployment of all able bodied people in Namibia in view of government sponsored initiated projects such as the green schemes, agricultural colleges in the country and vocational training institutions as a matter of example. 3. This motion should further challenge the government and private sector partnership to open up in the provision of relevant skills and creation of job opportunities for the unemployed Namibians. Correspondingly this motion urges that unemployment be critically investigated in relation to our national investment policies and further discover the unemploy-ability of all the above mentioned people for recommendation and appropriate action in favour of their predicament. RATIONALE We all know or see many Namibian graduates from the University of Namibia, Polytechnic, Vocational training institutions, colleges of education and some with foreign qualifications. Individuals as they are, they talk about their disappointment and frustrations with regard to institutions where they obtained qualifications. They also talk about “a corrupt” recruiting system in both the public and private sector. That people with no professional qualifications, for instance with grade 12 are being preferred for professional job opportunities above trained candidates. This may be the reason why some divisions, departments and offices both in public and private services, do not perform to the expected standard of their clients. Further, when we come to work every day, we see many able bodied Namibians sitting at traffic lights or along the street pavements in hope for someone to pick them up for a casual one –off job for a day if lucky. Many of these are very young Namibians whose energy could be maximally utilised for the good of this country. Comrade Speaker, hon. Members, we are all witnesses to this degrading situation of unemployed Namibians with or without qualifications. Many if not all of these people are very young, energetic, full of zest and thus able to do some good work. However the questions are; 1. Why and how come that we keep on training people for fun while Namibia is in dire need for skilled people? 2. Why can’t we create incubation centres or units within the sectors of Agriculture, forestry, construction or fishing industry just as an example for us to produce? These could help equip the unemployed Namibians with practical skills. Such incubation centres can collaborate in terms of academic theory with our national institutions of education and training for a joint certification of the in-service trainees. After graduation, those who wish can then be organised in co-operative companies with start-up facilities and grow themselves both socially and economically into the world of 137

authenticity. Others may want to go their own way by establishing own companies or sell themselves to work abroad because of their skills, and thereby bringing money into Namibia. The system of incubation centres /units will also help the country in general to unlock competition of productivity and trade, thus stimulating fast economic growth. APPROACH Comrade Speaker, hon. Members I am 1001 % convinced that establishment of a centralized research centre in the country, with decentralized data bank to, readily facilitate access of data for private and collective research and planning, is essential. I know we have a number of research units in various institutions around the country, such as in ministries, institutions of education and those in private, but do you know how difficult it is to access data from many of these institutions? This is one of the many reasons why we fall short in planning to determine e.g., the number of classroom needed for the first graders, space of learners for grade 10, we fail to determine how many math, science teachers we will need in 5 years time or the quota for electrical engineers we shall need in 10 years time. Having a one-stop research centre in the country does not mean that we should to away with the existing ones. It simply translates in improving our efficiency in planning, budgeting and service delivery. With an ICT act soon in place, ministries, entities and individual citizens may be able to access data on line when they so want for own purposes. In simple terms, this will help individual students or anybody so wish to do appropriate planning, advising, setting up projects goals, reviewing successes of programs, prioritising students’ careers etc, etc. Comrade Speaker, hon. Members To address the situation of unemployment and do better placement of our professional cadres where they can perform with vigour, we need to plan better, and to do so, we need to be guided by empirical data. Data that are correlated, continually updated and data that are ever accessible when needed. This is a necessary foundation for us to meet our national developmental agenda. Having this in place, we will have low risk of having both semi and professional trained human resource roaming our streets. In addition, we will be in a better position as a country to tackle the overall unemployment situation countrywide. CONCLUSION I appeal that this motion be discussed with the zeal it deserves to lead to a desirable resolution. Further it is my appeal that finally this motion be referred to an appropriate committee for research, public input and proper recommendations. So I move comrade Speaker!

Contribution to the Employment Service Bill By Chief Ankama (2010-10-19 14:46)
PARLIAMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA NATIONAL ASSEMBLY September 2010 BY Chief Ankama, SWAPO MP & Deputy Minister: MWT Comrade Speaker Fellow MPs The Bill on the floor of this eminent House in my view is long overdue. Almost two years ago for three consecutive sessions of parliament I tabled here a motion on unemployed Namibians both professional trained and those without. When I motivated the said motion for the first time, the idea was to get a prompt reaction from the floor of this august house across the political spectrum represented here. Sadly the debate was 138

shoddy and it had to tabled for the second time in hope for improved contributions. Even for the second motivation many of us in this house did not take the motion on unemployed Namibians as serious shown by the poor debate and therefore the motion was re-tabled for the third consecutive time. Comrade Speaker Honourable Members The Employment Service Bill squarely responds to motion on unemployed Namibians with or without professional qualifications as tabled during the last session of our parliament which was aimed to; (quoting myself-open quote) 1. discuss, assess and ascertain the seriousness of unemployed Namibians with professional trainings and qualifications obtained from recognized educational institutions here in Namibia or abroad; 2. which further examine the general unemployment of all able bodied people in Namibia in view of government sponsored initiated projects such as the green schemes, agricultural colleges in the country and vocational training institutions as a matter of example. 3. it challenged the government and private sector partnership to open up in the provision of relevant skills and creation of job opportunities for the unemployed Namibians. 4. and insisted that unemployment be critically investigated in relation to our national investment policies and further discover the unemploy-ability of all those unemployed for recommendation and appropriate action in favour of their predicament. (Close quote) Comrade Speaker Honourable Members Now the Employment Service Bill before us as introduced by the Hon. Minister of Labour and Social welfare, seeks our undivided support for us to meet the unemployment situation in our country head-on and thereby suppress financial dependency, economic trauma and criminal activities just to mention but a few. My focus is more on the Employment Service bureau –article 13 and my concern is mostly centred on the questions of; 1. how much we know about employees and employers out there including private institutions and individuals who by hooks or crooks hop from one employment opportunity to the other without notice (as employees) or those (employers) who fire and hire job-seekers without registration. In other words, the regulatory mechanism thereof. 2. Reference to the motion on unemployed Namibians with or without professional qualifications tabled earlier here I called for the “Establishment of a centralized research centre in the country, with decentralized data bank to, readily facilitate access of data for private and collective research and planning. “ This tallies with article 14 sub-articles 1 and 2 under the heading integrated employment information system’ on page 10 of the Employment Service Bill. Comrade Speaker Honourable Members I cannot let go without taking issues with the current system of recruitment and filling of vacancies in our ministries and perhaps state owned enterprises. One can call it a confusing and perhaps discriminatory or some kind of a pathetic recruitment system. Such a questionable system comrade speaker is bamboozled by individuals within our employment, those dishonest people who are entrusted with responsibilities of recruitment and management. It may partly be due to a number of conflicting laws we have which some may need be repealed or those which may need amendment including the public service act and the likes of tender board act and some others. Comrade Speaker Honourable Members Recruitment in our system has become a serious concern. Some departments in our ministries and agencies are turned into mini-empires and are run in a mafia style management where some individual heads of such units freeze vacancies which budgeted for on their establishment for years allegedly waiting for their next of kin to graduate from institutions of learning or to complete the required years needed for consideration of promotion. Instead other Namibians who may be readily qualified for promotion are prevented from applying 139

as a result of frozen vacant posts. I was also reliably informed that even foreigners are benefitting from these crooking behaviours by being extending their contracts indefinitely. Comrade Speaker Honourable Members It is therefore in my view not just enough to pass the Employment Service Bill alone without identifying those laws that need be repealed, those need amendment and those need harmonised. I further would like stress review of policies and regulation which go along with the laws that we are enacting in order to simplify for example the SWAPO party election manifesto which is the SWAPO party government working document leading this vibrant nation towards vision 2030.

Proposal for Joint Education Programme for Israeli and Palestinian Administrators
(2010-10-25 08:50)

Background The Israeli–Palestinian conflict is an on-going dispute between the Jewish and Arab peoples living in Palestine under Ottoman or British rule. There are numerous issues to resolve before a lasting peace can be reached, including strong emotions relating to the conflict on both sides; Palestinian concerns over Israeli settlements and land; status of Jerusalem; Israeli security concerns over terrorism, safe borders, incitements, violence and Palestinian refugee issues. These are encapsulated as the six core issues: " Jerusalem " Palestinian refugees of the 1948 war " Israeli settlements in the West Bank " Israeli security concerns " International status " Water resources Peace proposals Generally speaking, the peace process is driven by the US and Israel’s Arab neighbours, most prominently Egypt. The proposals are for either: a. Two-state solution This would entail the creation of an independent Palestinian state alongside an independent Jewish state. b. One-state or binational state This would mean all of Israel, the Gaza Strip, and West Bank would become a bi-national state with equal rights for all In either of these scenarios, it is expected that Israeli and Palestinian administrators will have to work together to manage the day-to-day running of their state(s). These include issues such as border control of goods and people, education systems, water resource management, etc. Education Proposal It is proposed that present and future administrative employees (public administration graduates) be identified from both sides and be invited to participate in training programmes in Germany that focus on these specific administrative issues. The curriculum will focus not only on the necessary educational qualification necessary but will also include classes on integration, and the potential solutions for the six core issues. It is also possible to have some of the classes presented by recognised experts (in administration issues and politics) from both sides of the conflict.

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Namibia: WACS cable will arrive in 2011 but monopoly legacy holds back prices and growth (2010-10-25 09:01)
Namibia’s regulatory position is like stepping back ten years if you’re more used to the competitive rough and tumble in Africa’s more developed markets. The historic incumbent Telecom Namibia still has some monopoly privileges and the new incumbent, Government-owned mobile operator MTC is in danger of behaving in much the same way. Sadly the country has closed its regulator with a view to opening a new one. However, this has meant all things regulatory have gone into a holding pattern. Russell Southwood looks at the key market barriers that are holding things back. Historic incumbent Telecom Namibia has an infrastructure monopoly and although the power utility NamPower has fibre assets, it has only recently tendered them: MTC (which may build a link to South Africa), Telecom Namibia and some ISPs are all interested in the capacity. Telecom Namibia invested in what was then Africa’s only real international cable, SAT3 but didn’t invest enough to get a landing station. This is something it has regretted ever since because for many years South Africa’s incumbent Telkom South Africa would over-charge it for transit to the SAT3 landing station in South Africa. But now if you want to get fibre access to South Africa to Telkom South Africa’s SAT3 landing station, you have no choice but to use Telecom Namibia. According to one of its customers:”The route this side of the border is 45 % more expensive than what Telkom South Africa offers (in a competitive environment) on a distance basis on the other side of the border.” Telecom Namibia also has a deal with Neotel (in which it is a shareholder) for Seacom bandwidth, further limiting alternative competitive offers. The new WACS cable will arrive in Q2, 2011 but there are understandable concerns in the market that Telecom Namibia will be the monopoly owner of the only international landing station with no other independent competitive route to South Africa being available. If MTC opened up a route, it would simply be a second Government company offering an alternative and one run by a management that is probably the least price competitive on the continent. In other African countries joint public-private partnerships are being set up to ensure equitable access to the landing station and fair, cost-oriented pricing but there is not even a discussion about this in Namibia. Pricing has not been set and Telecom Namibia’s formal response to its customers is “it’s too early to say”. But well-informed industry sources say US $ 1,686 per mbps has been discussed. Currently customers are paying US $2,248, about three-quarters of the current satellite equivalent. Both prices seem very high when compared to the kind of wholesale prices available across the border in the more competitive South Africa. Inevitably this has a knock-one effect to retail pricing strategy for the Internet. One aggrieved customer told us:“At a retail level, we’re paying US $15-20 per mbps. It’s immoral and they should be sent to hell for it”. Telecom Namibia is owned by NPTH, a state holding company that also holds the Post Office, the new mobile incumbent MTC and a properties division for all three companies. The CEO of Telecom Namibia is the Chair of MPTH. Whilst most acknowledge that there has yet been no practical example of a conflict of interest, it is undoubtedly as one person told us “a fundamentally incestuous” way of running the different companies. There are no currently plans to privatise Telecom Namibia. It has international shareholdings in Multitel in Angola and Neotel in South Africa but looks likely it might pull out of the former. Both policy and regulation in the sector seem to be in a holding pattern for as one industry insider told us: “The biggest problem is the Namibia Communications Commission (NCC), which is supposed to be changed to the Communications Regulatory Authority of Namibia (CRAN). There’s very few staff left from NCC and not enough are qualified.” There were only 7 staff when NCC ceased to operated. There has been no sign yet of the Gazetted announcement promised in early October to give life to the body. A good example of the impact of the regulatory holding pattern is number portability. NCC wanted number portability (which might open up competition in the mobile market) but whether this goes ahead, it will now wait for CRAN to “get its feet under the desk”. The new Chair of CRAN is Lazarus Jacobs, a businessman, co-owner of the Windhoek Observer and a pioneering stand-up comedian (No jokes, please.) In terms of the mobile market, there are three players: Telecom Namibia (with its Switch product); Leo 141

and MTC. Switch (a CDMA 2000 product) was an attempt by Telecom Namibia to act as a spoiler to Leo’s entrance into the market. There was subsequently an argument as to whether the service should be limited to the towns only and in the end there was a trade-off in which it got permission to have national coverage in exchange for there being more than one international gateway. It says it currently has 200,000 subscribers. However, Switch is likely to be closed down and Telecom Namibia will go into GSM. This makes Leo, which was launched 3.5 years ago, the main challenger. It was set up by local investors including NamPower and Old Mutual with a Norwegian management contractor. Eventually 100 % of its shares were bought by what was then Orascom’s Telecel subsidiary. By all accounts, it has the cheapest network to call on but has not made much of dent on MTC, which had many years as sole operator in which to entrench itself. Leo started to offer 3G in Windhoek a couple of months ago and has recently launched Blackberry handsets. MTC is the largest mobile player and is 66 % owned by the Government through NPTH and 34 % by Portugal Telecom, which provides strategic management and key personnel. It is offering iPhones (which it did before South Africa) and iPads but does not have a Blackberry offer. It has 85 % of voice business and probably 60 % of all markets by value, enough for it to be considered as having significant market power. There is an agreement between CRAN and the Competition Commission on addressing issues of this kind either jointly or by CRAN alone but action will depend on CRAN getting its teeth into the barriers that affect the market. None of the mobile operators operate m-money services like M-Pesa but Mobipay was recently launched. The Bank of Namibia gave Mobicash Payment Solutions authorisation to operate a mobile payment system where clients pay for goods, as well as transfer money, using money that is virtually stored on their cellphones. The absence of number portability makes it hard for the challenger to peel off new subscribers from the incumbent mobile operator:”People don’t shift their number easily,” was the refrain from all sides. Leo does dual SIM card Samsung handsets (in which unusually, both SIMS are active and you don’t have to switch manually) in an effort to overcome this problem. In terms of the Internet, there are probably around 120,000 subscribers and MTC has 3G subscribers in the low tens of thousands. By all accounts, it is a relatively slow-moving and conservative market. There are no signs of triple play offers and no e-commerce worth speaking of. Telecom Namibia’s iWay subsidiary is the largest market player with 60 % of the market and it launched ADSL two years ago. The key players are: MTN Business or corporate customers (formerly Verizon/UUNet); ITN (locally owned) and Africa Online (Telkom South Africa) which is completing its merger with MWeb. Telecom Namibia supplies ADSL wholesale to ISPs but it took one ISP 15 months to get a reseller agreement and obviously it needs to forced to offer wholesale and retail in an equitable way to all players in the market. ITN and Africa Online offer Wi-MAX services. Although small in population terms, Namibia has a buoyant economy and a great deal more potential than is currently being realised. Perhaps the arrival of CRAN will help take off the artificially imposed brakes but don’t hold your breath.

Mobile Contacts Databases for sale: (2010-10-27 11:59)
The company Credit Information Bureau Namibia has developed a consumer and business database of Namibia. The complete database comprises of approximately 1 million individuals and 10,000 businesses. CRIB provides mailing and telemarketing lists to clients in the financial and personal services industry. The company has filtered this database to create a ”Professionals Database” made up of over 15,000 mobile numbers of high-net worth professionals throughout Namibia. HOW LIST RENTAL WORKS Most of the lists we have available are offered on a list rental basis, ie they are supplied for once off use only at a rate quoted as a cost per 500 individual consumers or company executives. For example - the cost to rent 1,000 professionals from the Namibian Professionals Database will be 1,000 x N $ 3.50 per 1000 for once 142

off telephone, mailing and fax usage = N $ 3,500.00 excluding VAT. A processing charge of N $ 500.00 is also charged for any order. We will supply you with counts and quotes based on your selection criteria at no cost. Once you have decided what you want to rent we will invoice you and ask you to sign a list order confirmation. Once we have received the signed confirmation and proof of payment we will supply a zipped file of the data via e-mail in the file format you require (usually MS Excel). You can contact Milton Louw at tel +264 61 222 227 for further information.

2.9

December

What your credit listing means (2010-12-06 16:20)
Your bank manager looks at your credit report – Not at You. This is one list you never want to be on – the Credit Blacklist. A bad credit rating can put your life on hold for many years as it makes getting credit impossible. More and more Namibians are getting caught out, sometime unfairly, and the Namibia Consumer Protection Group felt more information must be circulated to consumers about the issue. A credit default is a black mark against your name that doesn’t wash away and the three Credit Bureaus, (Transunion ITC, Compuscan and Credit Information Bureau Namibia) currently list over 50 000 Namibians that are branded as credit lepers. I have found that mostly young Namibians are prone to having problems with credit. The advertising makes it sound so easy, “Buy Now, Pay Later”. Unfortunately, when it comes time to pay, these items are not always first on their list. This then causes problems as they start falling in arrears and eventual find themselves blacklisted. Often, a person does not realise they have a credit black mark on their name till the next time they apply for credit. Recently, a consumer approached the NCPG about a problem they were facing. “I have recently had the chance to buy my Uncle’s house. The Government (where I work), has already agreed to give me a housing loan and I qualify for enough from the bank. But now the bank does not want to grant me credit for a black mark from a cash loan company. I spoke to the cash loan company and it turns out they did not cash one of my cheques for the amount owing. I spoke to my bank and explained but they do not accept the explanation.” The consumer, in tears stated, “I cannot believe it. Through no fault of my own, someone is allowed to list me as a bad person!” There are many other horror stories out there and it would fill an entire magazine to tell them. What is a credit report? A credit report is a collection of information about you and how you pay your accounts. It may also include information about how much credit you have available, what your monthly debts are, and other information that can help a lender such as a bank to make a decision about whether you are a good or bad credit risk. The report itself does not say you are a good or bad credit risk. It is only a tool to assist the lender. Unfortunately, most lenders reject you outright if you are listed at a credit bureau. Where does all this information come from? Credit bureaus, (or credit reporting agencies) collect this information from companies, doctors, or any person that you have done a credit business with. These businesses are providing information to the bureau in exchange for information they might require on other customers. The credit bureau sells your data for lenders to make a decision on your creditworthiness. What is in my report? Personal identifying information This includes your name, address (current and previous), ID number, telephone and cellular number, your 143

current and previous employers, and possibly also your marital status. Credit History This section includes information on your banking history, stores where you have credit cards, and possibly also business who have granted you credit such as doctors, dentists, and even your pharmacy. It includes information about each account you have, such as when did you open it, what type of account is, how much credit you have been given, what your your monthly payment is and how well you pay your account. Public records This includes judgements against you or any other court interventions. This is easily available from the courts. Inquiries This section indicates any credit business that has requested to see your information. This section is not always available to you as an individual. It should also include any companies that have bought your information for marketing purposes. What is not on my report? " Income " Bank account balances " Race (cultural group) " Religion " Criminal records " Driving records (speeding fines, drinking convictions, etc.) " Maintenance defaults (not yet) What should you do? Get a copy of your credit report, have a look at it and make sure you understand it so that before you apply for your credit you know where you stand

Code of conduct for debt in South Africa (2010-12-08 11:28)
A code of conduct released this week between credit providers and debt counsellors is expected to significantly improve the debt counselling process and possibly puts South Africa at the forefront globally in dealing with over-indebtedness. An estimated 8-million South Africans are indebted with 110 000 people under debt review making debt repayments of R214-million a month with total outstanding debt at R40-billion of which 75 % is made up of mortgages. Every month a further 7 000 people apply for debt counselling. There are 92 000 people whose home loans are now delinquent and face repossession. The codes of conduct seek to streamline the debt counselling process by standardising the content of debt proposals and payment plans; establishing an ombudsman scheme to resolve disputes; and providing clear guidelines for debt counsellors to determine whether consumers are able to afford to take on more debt. As part of this code of conduct, realistic timeframes have been set for the repayment of debt and in order to meet those timeframes and ensure that the consumer is able to be fully rehabilitated within a reasonable period, the credit providers have agreed to lower or even cancel their interest on the loan. Read MORE: http://www.mg.co.za/article/2010-12-07-code-of-conduct-on-debt

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SMS Services that hurt (2010-12-09 10:42)
http://www.taramo.me DO NOT USE THIS. They are a Namibian company that will charge you N $ 8.00 per week though there is no service you receive. They have this in their fine print and not on their front page. Hidden in their Terms of Service: 5. PAYMENT To participate, you must sign-up at www.taramo.me .Part of the mobile services provided by us will include reverse billed premium rate text SMS services. When you participate, you agree to be bound to the following: We charge a weekly subscription of N $ 8.00 (excluding VAT). Because it is a weekly subscription, subscription is not automatic, therefore, if you wish to continue to use this services, you must subscribe again. You receive on the first day a free grab-feed activation; We charge a daily fee of N $0.99 grab-feed activation; All transactions and/or payment are final and errors are billed.

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Chapter 3

2011
3.1 February

My life is good - living the jet-setting life in Düsseldorf (2011-02-04 16:26)
I am just finishing off this note then I am on my way to my flat here in Düsseldorf, Germany. The past few months have been an uphill battle to get here, but WOW, it was worth it. This morning I woke up and looked out the window. (First, I must add, that the flat I am in has the most wonderful central heating;-) The view was one of the Rhine river and the skyline of Düssledorf. After a shower, small breakfast with some great coffee - it was off to work. My office is less than 10 minutes walk away and the pathway travels along the river almost the whole way. At the office most of the collegues greet me and always have time to ask how I am getting along with the German langhuage, and the updating of my knowledge on their new software systems. At lunch, have to choose from so many various types of bread to go with my chees and salami sandwich (Have decided to take the same filling, just change the bread everyday.) After lunch, received my laptop (the iPad is not yet ready - damn) and the we finish work at 15:30. Off for the weekend. Now why am I telling you? The past eleven years I have had a dream of creating a centralised computerised economic modelling system for countries in southern Africa. For most of this time, I have struggled and not been financially well off. BUT, I have enjoyed myself. And when on days like these (85 days in EU), I must remember that all good things come to those who work for them.

NTN -National Theatre of Namibia needs help - online Facebook management
(2011-02-15 15:03)

Just tried to help the National Theatre of Namibia. Told them not to repost so often (every minute four times come on! All this does is show their own link over and over again on their advert - they of course do not see it, but the rest of us get it posted under each other four times) Guess what they do. Tell me that is marketing. Well they are now officially part of the type of marketing not to do. They also get the bad customer service award for this week for not appreciating customer feedback. (BTW got a picture of the post for posterity) If anyone knows the person responsible at NTN - PLEASE help them.

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Solving Namibia’s economic problems - excerpt from Future Namibia (2011-02-15 15:05)
I read a very interesting piece on “Solving Africa’s Commercial Poaching Pandemic” by Ron Thomson and use his analogy below in relation to our economic problems. “To begin to solve the problem we have to identify its real causes. This can be likened to the approach to the AIDS pandemic. In AIDS, like in economics, there are two levels that must be looked at. The underlying or “proximate” cause of an AIDS patient’s death – even though he dies of pneumonia or TB – is his primary infection with HIV. Pneumonia and TB – the “ultimate” cause of death – can be treated with modern medicines; but they do not work when the patient’s immune system has been destroyed by HIV. You cannot save an AIDS patient’s life by treating only the ultimate disease unless the proximate cause of the illness is removed. Namibia’s economic problems have both proximate and ultimate causes, too. The solution must eliminate its proximate causes which are multiple and complex. They include: a hugely expanding rural population that is moving to the urban areas; illiteracy – especially in regards Information Technology; lack of adequate schooling and medical care facilities; and their constantly escalating states of poverty. But the principal proximate cause is poverty. Removing poverty from the equation will take lots of money. But where will the money come from if the solution is to be sustainable for Namibia?” [i] It is time for us to stop the blaming game of “colonial masters” or “the white man”, and tackle our problems with both hands to show that Namibia can solve its own problems. In this book I have used a wide variety of experiences and quotes from other people around the world that I think can influence and shape our future direction. Not only have I researched the history of countries and economic policies, where possible, I have also consulted with experts in various fields to provide specific solutions which we can use in Namibia. (While doing my research for this section of the book I spent a lot of time on research and quite a bit of time reading through some of the Ancient Greek philosophers. I especially enjoyed reading “A treatise on Government” by Aristotle and would suggest it to any reader. These, and others, I got free of charge from the Project Gutenberg – over 25,000 free books available online.[ii] ) These lessons and advice has been added to my experience and is summarised as policies for a future Namibia at the end of my book. [i] Paraphrased from - Ron Thomson, Solving Africa’s Commercial Poaching Pandemic – African Sporting Gazette (Volume 11· Issue 3) [ii] www.gutenberg.org

Complaint about Reliance Motors cc (2011-02-15 15:07)
The following was received from a member of the public I hereby wish to lodge a formal complaint against Reliance Motors cc for poor after sales service delivered to us. I also want to put forward a serious vote of no confidence in this dealer. Reliance Motors cc is not as trustworthy as their name implies, maybe their cars but definitely not their service. The truth is that they are very reluctant to deliver good after sales service. We had a mechanical breakdown with our car on the 3rd of November 2010 and took it to them on the 4th of November for repairs. The staff of Reliance Motors is simply not concerned about time, the inconvenience and humiliation we suffered throughout this ordeal. Client service is not a priority for them. They did not even have the decency to inform us once about their progress. We were the ones to phone and enquire on daily basis and even offer our help to speed up things, but to no avail. They simply have no sense of urgency to get the work done or simply do not care. We are commuting daily to work and need our car desperately and are tired of their excuses, unprofessional and incompetent behaviour. We write this letter out pure frustration, unhappiness and helplessness with our 148

predicament. Is there any regulation body out there where one can report these arrogant car dealers?

List of my Facebook Friends - 19 January 2011 (2011-02-15 15:09)
’Simoné Ziegelmüller Abdul Khadar Abdul Salaam Ya David Abel Tcheeli Tcha Willy Abigail Ntlai Abiud Karongee Abner Axel Xoagub Abrida Gaoses Adeline Husselmann Adminus Teamus Adrian Schofield Adrianus Smith Afra Schimming-Chase Africa Climate Agnes Kleophas Agnes Nandjila Anghuwo Aida S Nocturnal Aimy Aimlizo Aishah Shigwedha Akuunda Josef Alan Tait Alayshya Meredith Clarke Albert Ndopu Albertina Anderson Albertina Niilonga Nangolo Aldrin Chantell Abrahams Alex Madjarov Alex Pfeiffer Alex Zacharia Alexander Priburk Alfred Ilukena Alfred Ward Ali Tee Alistair Arthur Africä Alistaire Marquard Allysiah Emvula Alynsia Platt Alzenna Roxanne Fayne Thomas Ama Klutse Amalia Vixenne Laz Amanda Rhode Ambrosius Nameya Amor King 149

Amor Mc Nab Amunyela Gwanuusiku Analize Olivier Andeline Kloppers Andi Meng Andre Grobbelaar Andre Le Roux Andre Van Vuuren Andre Vd Merwe Andreas Oshefi Kalumbu André J. Gariseb Andréa Guerreiro Angela Angie Ochurus Angelique Danielz Angula DiCaprio Anna-Etuhole Nicodemus AnnaJuicy Auala Annaly Eimann Anne Thandeka Gebhardt Annemarie Saunderson Annes Muller Anri Minnie Ansie Hanekom Anthony Nikolaus Bessinger Antoinette Wentworth Anuschka Beukes Anya Sonet Links Areatha Grove Dickson Arlene Louw Arnold Farmer Arthur Stephanus Ashley Ashes Roberts Ashley Stephanus Aston Ashley White Aubrey Prinz Auburn Mouton Audrey Nortje Augetto Graig Aulden Harlech-Jones Aupindi Tobie Aupindi Auriel Aweries Autti Ipinge Avel Ntini Aveshe Dishena Axel Omega Azaan Sitzer Ba Munyanya Kulobone Baltwin Loock Barbara Snyders Barry Tshikesho 150

Basil Rickerts Beaulla Kazondovi Belinda Scharneck Green Benjamin Barry G. Visagie Benjamin BenZo Ambambi Benjamin Lyon Bernadette Bock Bernadus Swartbooi Berney Beukes Berny Menyah-Artivor Betsy Basson Beulah Sinden Bhekie Don Swazi Methula Bianca Maasdorp Bicardo Brandt Bill Nekwiyu Bill Torbitt Blondel Nyamkure Blue Di Matteo Bolokang Motshwane Boni Paulino Boris Claasen Braam Cupido Brandon Oosthuizen Brian Claasen Brian Izaaks Brian Julius Brian Prinz Bridget Pickering Brijendra Singh Jasrotia Bryan Wild Buks Koekemoer Byron Joseph Camilla Kotze Carl Schafer Carlos Lopes Carlos Marques Carmen Carmi Coetzee Carmen Dunn Caroline Kotze Catherine Korengkeng Ceaseria Matiti Cecil Moller Cecilia Eva Pretorius Cedric Hammond Celestine Selborne Charles Ash Charles Jansen Charles Quenton Charlie Paxton 151

Charmaine Christ Morkel Charmaine Louw Charmaine Marais Charmaine Weii Charmelle Johr Charmelle Mo Johr Charny Strauss Chloé Jade StaRr Christa Biwa Christa Sowden Christel Roos Christel Vries Johannes Christian Nickenig Christian Senkel Christie Benade Christophina Ivula Christy Nicole Perestrelo Chrséle MissBoss Rispel Chrys de Klerk Clarice Theys Claudia Uapingene Claus Drotsky Clemence Kauatuuapehi Clifford Lyners Colin Coertzen Colin Millar Colin Stanley Colleen Kurz Collin Mpumzile Connie Owoses Conrad Vermaak Cooks Kunamwene Corbin Benade Cuana Angula Cynthia Malgas Cynthia Rukira Cyrlene Claasen D’Beertjie Tigerlover Louw Daizy Schwartz Dalton Hashondali Ashikoto Danie Botha Daniel Hagemann Daniel Kanyanga Danielle Ellitson Danielle Ellitson Danmil VwFreak Claassen Danny van Rooyen Dany Kuriakose Darren Nathan Solomon Dauredama Areseb 152

David Nuuyoma Debbie Mouton Dee Sauls Deejay Cmbaville Delicia Phillips Delstin Smith Delvalene Greeve Denise Dewaldt Denise Mannel Denver Anderson Denver Chanvall Kramolowski Deolinda Hapulile Deon Louw Deon Rautenbach Deon Tertuliano Vilas Deovanni Van Zyl Derek Fredericks Deria van Wyk Derick Schoonbee Desderia Nuusiku Ipumbu Desiré ’Dolly’ Arnold Dewald Kleynhans Didier Nyembo Dietlind Dietterle Dina Nguripo Tuaandi Dirk Fourie Booysen DjBirdy Shipanga Dolly Shafashike Dolly Simon Donavin Tjihoreko Doris Roos Douglas Kaura Dries Duvenhage Droopy Namibia Duke Rt Kempel Duwayne G-wakee Scholtz Ebben Kalondo Eddie Holloway Eddie Stevens Eduan ’Boeta Goggs’ Claasen Edward Ward Edwin Pagel El-John Chelsea Bruce Elfriede Mungunda Elias Ambambi Elisabeth Eck Elma Taylor Elmone Kim Rhode Elone Selborne Elsa de Jager 153

Elsie Rowyena Eises Elvirah Muchali Elzene Nicole Asino Emilia Mkusa Emmarencia van Wyk Emsie Esterhuizen Eneas Nampala Enginie L. Black Enrico Weissjunge Erchwynn Nissan-boy Jansen Ercilia Neri Afonso Augusto Eric Osiakwan Eric Quest Erica Gebhardt Eriq Simon Ernest Morne Jackson Errol Van Wyk Esau Mbako Esi Chase Ester Ndafapawa Kashihakumwa Esther Burkhardt Esther Nandjila Groenewaldt Eucane Markus Evangelene Jepthas Evaristo Kavikairiua Zemburuka Evelyn Shilamba Evilastus Kaaronda Exposé Namibian Newspaper Exsaviour Hillton Joseph Fatimah A-towns Finest Fauvé Auwsum October Fenny Konstantin Feo Von Francois Ferdie Feris Ferdie Wolfie Malherbe Ferdinand Tjombe Fernando Möller Festus Kadhila Flip Beukes Forra Lalele Namwenyo Fran Thomas Frances Ferreira Francois Francis Francois Lottering Frankie Lehman Ricky VanderPloeg Franklin Chilinda Freddie Strauss Frieda Taapopi Gabriella Gabby Delgado Gagary Francisco 154

Gail Ferris Gaolly Tjejamba Garth Prinsonsky Garth William Petersen Gatsen Tjirare Gebson Shipena George Ellis Weston George Karunga George Odd Georgy Porgy Gerald Theodore du Preez Gerhard Louw Gero Knupp Gerrit Jacobus Smit Gerson Taupolo Topolo Hailundu Gideon Nhundu Gilliam Brandt Gillian Davies Gillian Parenzee Gina Domingues Alves Ginger Lynn Giovanni Nova Mouton Gisella Gowases Gita Adams Glenda Locke Gloria Amakhoes Stoepie Owoses Gloria Sifile Gosetz Emsie Goseb Grace Kamanya Graham ’Graampies’ Christians Griffin ’Goepsie’ Fisch Grizelda Dunn Grizelda Majiedt Gunter Wenk Gérsy Nelondo Zzinho Hage Siegfriedt Hans Diergaardt Hans Edward Karon Hans MagicMushroom Strydom Hansie Jacobs Hardray Coombs Haroldt Urib Harriet-ann Naftali Harry Gonteb Hartmut Wenk Heather Van Harte Heicky Nekongo Heidi Rhodes Christ Hein Scholtz Helge Schütz 155

Hella Nghifindaka Helmien Jansen van Vuuren-Visser Heloise Beukes Henriette Krohne Henry Beukes Henry James Kruger Herbert Stanley Hilja Katshuna Hilmer Beukes Hns Travels Hobie Clark Howard Basson Hylton Ferreira Iggy Shixwameni Ilke Platt Illodine Louw Immanuel Ganuseb Immanuel Ndiwakalunga Immo Böhm Imms Shawana Nashinge Ingeborg von Luttichau Ingrid Kloppers Irma Solomons Isabella Hurihe Hauses Isabella Ndinelago Kapolo Isac Hiriua Ivan Selborne Izak de Kock Izelle Faaitjie Fielding J.J. Hengari-Kandjou Jackson Kaujeua Jr Jacky SoulChild Jacob Heim Jacqueline Ronell Bassingthwaighte Jacques Kritzinger Jacquie Francis Jaimè Klazen Jakes Stramiss Jan Buys Jan Hendrik Duvenhage Jan Poolman Jane Al Saman Jane Jelinda Owoses Janice Lee-Anne Greyton Janko Tatarik Jannie Robbertze Japie Strauss Jason Maasdorp Jason Naule Jason O’Leary 156

Jason Prior Jc Joe Lalla Vries Jean Nel Jeanette Farao Jeevan Naidoo Jemima Beukes Jemimah Silva-shock West Jenni-Lee Meyer Solomon Jennifer Bassingthwaighte Jennifer Kays Jens Schneider Jené Neya-Bbk Petersen Jerry Muadinohamba Jesaya Mukwambi Jienie Van Wyk Jim Martin Jo Nghishidi Jo-anna Amore Blue Jo-anne Bella Smith Joachim Bernstein Joani Kittler Jocelyn van der Westhuizen Johan Badenhorst Johan Nel Johan Schutte Johan Stander Johan Strydom Johann Louw Johanna Cloete Johanna Ousie Amakali Johannes Batista Simon John Garcia John Grobler Jolene Rachel Isaacs Jonas Alweendo Jonathan Sam Jonathan Strauss Joseph Kafunda Josephine Mutenda Josia JPesiano Joseph Jossel Hindjou Josue William Vemba Joy Hank Joyli Johanna Naftali Juanita Bampton Juanita Jordaan Bennie Buys Judene Matthyse Judy Van Wyk Julene Scheepers Julia Sade 157

Julian Ashley Comalie Junaid Suleman Junior Achievement Namibia Justine Eling Justine Kavamba Jörn Geider Kaleni Hiyalwa Kalli Nkandi-Shankala Kamayo Ntwala Kamel Khairalla Kapee Ndjiharine Kambirongo Kathleen Gauises Kayofad Tuhafeni Kc Bravo Kela Hamutenya Kennedy Hamutenya Kennedy Kenna Nambahu Kenneth Abrahams Kerstin Halfkann Kesja Gandhi Khachas Kiback Phimmasen Kim Tabs King Frans Indongo King Mandume Muatunga Kweku Schimming-Chase Lahja Samuel Laina M Kalumbu Lana Louw Langa Bantuana Thomas Lars Roemheld Laurika Williams Lavinia Winter Lawrence-Milica Davids Lazarus Jacobs Lazarus Jacobs Lee Dia Lee Louw Lee Mieze Lee-Ann Lola Delgado Legg-Ghetto Amagulu Lenniveve Dedekind Leonard Lawal Lesley Stephen Strauss Lesley-ann Mckaila Vries Letichia Januarie Letta Divanez’z Xawes Levi Lee Shigwedha Liefy Choc Divine Linah Ndengu Linda Ndahafa Nambandi 158

Lindsay Scott Lindsey Happygolucky Rhodes Liz Kangandjo Lizette Feris Lizzie Petersen Lola Sinclair Lazarus Loretta Smith Lorna Shingenge Lorraine Barbara Dausab Louis ’Villa’ Maletzky Lourencia V Kaitjizemine Love Freedom Loveeyes Eises Lowie Potgieter Lownan Wambüseun Nangombe Loychen Mouton Lucy Kautwima Lulu ’daddys Princess’ Lenga Luzette Walters Lydia Aipinge Lydia Cilliers Lydia Jackson Lydia Niilenge Lynda Gill du Preez Lyndon Sauls Lynette Jansen Lysias James Hekandjo III Ma Pelz Mabel Groenewald Mac-t VanTsandi Madelaine Van Der Merwe Madlayne Eichas Maggy Beukes-Amiss Maggy Namundjebo Maggy Ndenguh Magreth Magcutey Kalangula Mandy Collins Manfred Mash Manolito Carballo Mara Baumgartner Marbeline Goagoses Mwashekele Marc Andre Wolgast Marchell G-wakee Theron Marcus Tollhausen Margaret Mensah-Williams Maria Dax Maria Huudu-eli Hiwilepo Maria Magdalena Indongo Maria Mombola Mariana Alweendo 159

Mario Locke Marita Jantjies Marius Visser Mark Wiliewipskut Klazen Marlene ’Lindy’ Enssle Marlene Slabbert Marsela Nur Rita Marson Sharpley Martha Mbombo Martwill Hartman Mary C Kocks Mary Ferreira Allan Masupah WaKudumo Matheus Nangolo Mathilde Shihako Matthew Mvula Max Hamata Mbeuta Ua-ndjarakana Mc-grant UncleTom Mc-Moses Meke Melkizedek Melanie Prinsloo Meldrid Gorases Melissa Raymond Melissa SonnyJames Mouton Melly Bæby Melvin Pearson April Melza Groenewald Mercia Cloete Merle Oosthuizen Mervin Mokez Witbeen Mia de Klerk Michael Gaweseb Michael Radway Michael Robinson Michaela Hübschle Michelle ’Browny’ Hummel Michelle Blokkie Barry Michelle De Koe Micki Shabalala Mihe Gaomab II Mikaila Louw Mike Kühn Mike Phori Mildred Hendricks Millicent Ortell Mimi Tenjiwe Krüger MisCandy Shaanika Moira Delie Moira Delie Mondela De Bruin 160

Monica Uupindi Monika Dennis Monika Michael Moresia Carlos Moricia-Ann Johr Moses Mk Shuuya Mpho Towe Mtileni Magret Mubiana Leon Mubiana Musa Manyando Mwala Kambole Mwatile Ndinoshiho Mwilima Mabakeng Móñiqúé Bássón Naano Noona Nadia de Koe Naftaline Kaurimuje Nairoby Carmell Namenzi GoodGirl GoneBad Namibia Power Namibian Crafts Centre Ncc Nangolo Amutenya Naomi Izaaks Nasheja Med Natalie Dominique Louw Natalie Majiedt Natalie Steven Natasha Diamond Eyes Pohamba Natashia Blommetjie Cloete Natashia Selborne Nathaniel Bustamante Haufiku Naufiku Kandaku Navin Morar Nazneen Hoaes Ndaluliwa Mweukefina Neelum Mukhtar Neilia Heyman Neiman Neimgozi McKenzie Netisha Groenewaldt Neville Andre Nevin Nel Neyon Diàz Ngamane Karuaihe-Upi Nghidi Mondjila Ngondi Pewa Tjiramue Katire Nicky Katapa Mutenda Nicola Niki Tromp Nicolene Kotze Maritz Nina Schloemer Ninette Delie 161

Nolan G-wakee Vd Westhuizen Norma Pinky Hodson Ntn Namibia Nuusiku Sylvia Antsino Nyasha Francis Nyaungwa Obert Sanyambe Odile Madeline Gertze Olamilekan Mukaila Saliu Olivia Bee Tjiuongua Olivia Ndjadila Olivia Sishando Omkondy Sipho Orata YaToronto Otria Limbo Oummy Hoaes Pamela-Ann Titus Parminder Bansal PatNolan Van Wyk Patricia Biggar Patricia Eyéz Amunyela Patricia Schlicht Patrick Delie Patrick Imologhome Patrick Swartz Paul Bekker Paul Egelser Paul Giffen Paul Oosthuizen Paul Rowney Paula Shawen Paulina Hango Paulo de Almeida Paulus Alumbungu Senior Paulus Endjala Paulus Hawanga Peter Denk Peter Mietzner Peter Rhode Petra Hamman Petrina Nandjila Peya Kapiya-Nathinge Phanuel Kaapama Philemon Nahum Phillip Mwansa Phozia Z Mouton Piereta Mumpasi Piero La Merveille Pierre Mare Pieter Slabber Pietie Husselmann 162

Pius Dunaiski Pohamba Shinime Pooventhran Moodley Postrick Kapule Precious Grace Nanyemba Preston CoolCat Izaaks Priscilla Rose Ockhuizen Prude Kandido Queeny Cloete Quido Hustle Mohamed Quinton Adriaans Quinton Liebenberg Rachel Valentina Nghiwete Rachel van Neel Rainer Volkmann Ramos Ramirez Randal Yuri York Randall Louw Raphaël Nkolwoudou Ras Levi Ras Sheehama Rauna ’nandi’ Ndeilenga Rayfield Wright Raymond Farmer Raymond Hausan Raymond Venables Rayno Burger Rebecca Dolores Mensah Rebecca Giorgio Immanuel Redette Klazen Regina Shikongo Renaldi Snowy Henckert Renthia Nancy Kaukungwa Reza Mckay Riaan Solomon Riana Hamilton Visser Richard LeeBankz Aipinge Richardine Nadine Bunz Kordom Richardt N Jolanda Tjikongo Rico Quinteiro Rihan Jacobs Rinelda Mouton Ritsuko Shimabukuro Abrahams Rob Parker Rob Smorfitt Robert De Mello Koch Robert Dedig Robin Tyson Robyn Amber Plaatjies Roche Manas 163

Roger Lyners Roishe Bock Rolanda Lyners Rolene Boer Ron du Preez Ron Sikerica Ronald Kubas Ronel Kazenambo Kazenambo Ronelle R Phillander Ronnie Greeff Rose-bella Engelbrecht Rose-Marie De Waldt Roux-che Locke Rowan Kleintjes Roxanne Diergaardt Roy Izaaks Roy Klassen Rubeen Husselmann Ruben Gurirab Rueben ’Mwb’ Greeves Rushni McLeod Russell Crowley Russell Wilmot Ryan Swano Ryuzo Barth Sally Hansen Salomao Dassala Salomon Andjaba Salvadore Morkel Sam Imms Sam Januarie Samantha Heartjie Mensah Samantha Isaacs Sandra Angula Sarafina Rose-mary Sarah Chairmaine Somses Schalk Esterhuizen Scharl Möller Scott Ryan Sebastian Gregory Namaseb Sebastian Spidaman Scholz Sechzelle Ockhuizen Secilia Ndeuhala Mario Ferreira Selbirne Mariska Selborne Selborne Schauroth Selma Shapwa Selwyn Brian Sneyd Serena Martin Sergio Gustavo Seth Ncawa-Eise 164

Shahid S. Dickson Shahida Mouton Shahida Shasha Beukes Shahil Morar Shali Kapepo Shalli Ben-Elungu Shanco Renton Shane Dappa-Cash’lafamilia Steckel Shanice Biggar Shanicè Santos Fashionfreak Shanon Rautenbach Shanwell Adams Shareen Thomas-Thude Sharne-lee Walters Sharon Ernst Sharon Maasdorp Shawn da Silva Shayna Shani Schimming Shem Yetu Shenaaz Vetji Tjejamba Sheniel Moller Sheree-Amor Lippiez Klazen Sheri Andrews Sheriva Riefie Vernooy Sherizaan Johr Sherisoentjies Shifeta Pohamba Shirl Afr Shiwa Debby Nghinamwaami Shouli Classic-Guy Betuel Sima Mpoyi Simanekeni Inkenamis Simao Pombili Jolonium Sito Cloete Smile Beloved Land Solie Swan Solo Andjaba Sonia Maffeis Sonja Darwin Sophia Schumann Sorenta Jantjies Stacey Price Stan Poet Stanley Makale Stanley Shanapinda Stanley Stoffberg Stanton Biggar Stefanie Hoster Stella Cerina Erasmus Pieterse Stephan Traut Stephen Kotze 165

Stephni-Leigh Schroeder Steve Leukes Steve Motinga Sunny-Girl Hauwanga Suoma Negumbo Sven Moegenburg Swapo Namibia Sydney Plaatjies Sylvester Black Sylvia Moller Sylvia Mundjindi Symen Shinguadja Ta Editing Consultancy Taapopi Simeon Taffy Chirunda Taimmy Chazmelh Negumbo Tameca Wilhelmina Gaoses Tania Reid Tanya Louw Tarah Shaanika Tarence Rieth Tate Tangeni Tatjana Will Tau Mailula Tega Kadicha Uushona Tekla Nandjix Smiley Embubulu Teofilia-Maria Martin Terry Oosthuizen Theo Redelinghuys Theodore Stanley Theodorus Klein Theonilla Amwaanyena Theopoldine Shekupe Theoylan Erasmus Theresa Bock Theresia Jenneth Aochamus Theresia Van Wyk Thomas Howard Thomas Ileni Thorsten Hubner Tiekie Du Plooy Tina James Tina Ndengu Tjeripo Tjihoreko Tjitunga Elijah Ngurare Tobias Nambala Tommy Petrus Tracey Kandaha Tracy Tobin Transfer Excellence 166

Trophy Hunting Namibia Tuna Asino Tunakie Uushona Tuutaleni Kamosho Twama Nambili Twapewa Selma Mudjanima Ulrike Haupt Uschi Ramakhutla Vaino Engombe Valerie Apollus Valerie Garises Valery Coleman Vanessa Basson Vanessa Carpel Veli-Antti Savolainen Vere Dixon-Smith Vernon Gamxamub Veronica Gebhardt Veronique Goliath Veronique Palmer Victor Beukes Victor Hamutenya Victoria Matjila Vincent Fernando Majiedt Vincent Wagoneka Viola Mwilima Visiontwentythirty Namibians Debating Vivian Muinjo Wafaa Tajri Waithy Kariazu Waithy Kariazu Waldamar Van Wyk Walter Hankey Wayne Harlech-Jones Weldra Jantjies What’s On Windhoek Whitney Whittaz York Wilfried Brock Willem Hanse William Smilley Amagulu William Van Rooyen Willie Olivier Willie van Wyk Windhoek East District Winston Douman Winston Neville Sivertsen Yanna Erasmus Yi BGroup Yolanda de Nysschen Yolanda Feris 167

Yul Dean Andrews Zac Visser Zandré Zanaz Rittmann Zanna-Lee Fleermuys Zelda Quèén Tábby Naibas Zenith Michelle Ferreira Zennith Kaumbi Zenobia April-Malema Zenobia Mckay Ziana Louw Zoe Aspara Zoe Titus Zulaikha Stanley

How Government should intervene in the financial sector (2011-02-15 15:23)
I have just received a briefing paper from the Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik / German Development Institute concerning ”The potential of pro-market activism as a tool for making finance work for Africa: a political economy perspective”. The author argues that: ”This suggests that information on creditworthiness is basically a public good, in the sense that it is non-rival in consumption and it is very costly to exclude anyone from using it. When the market fails to let banks appropriate the returns of information about their costumers, banks will under-invest in the acquisition of such information. ..... Credit registries give access to clients’ credit history and increase the transparency of borrower quality, which makes it safer for financial institutions to lend to new customers. ....... The Kenyan Central Bank (CBK) took the initiative and issued a regulation which mandated financial institutions to share information with credit bureaus.” They are funded by Bundesministerium für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung (BMZ) and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH. The project this is done under is called ”Making Finance Work for Africa (MFW4A)” copyof the paper can be found oline at http://www.die-gdi.de/CMS-Homepage/openwebcms3.nsf/(ynDK contentByKey)/ANES-8DNAK4/ $FILE/DP %202.2011.pdf

Predictions for the future of social networking (2011-02-15 15:26)
.... on the future of social networking from the consumer point of view, based on Cheskin Added Value’s research in this area: Multiple linked social networks: We will be able to customise our social networks for different purposes, and the one-size-fits-all Facebook-type network will decline. We’ll have networks of college friends, real personal friends, personal acquaintances, business contacts, fellow book lovers, Zynga game players, neighbors, foodies, etc. And we won’t have to log into multiple different networks with different rules to make this possible. 168

Track responses across social networks: We’ll be able to easily track and find posts across different networks and email services. Right now, I communicate with people on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, my Android phone texts, work email, and personal email. It’s hard to remember which service I need to respond to in order to get back to someone. Reduction of information overload: It will be easier to get relevant articles, blogs, and posts networked to us. It’s more than recommendations from our social graph, because right now that social graph is way too broad. I don’t want to read about desalinization plants, just because a friend is into that topic. Even on Twitter, it’s hard to reduce the amount of input to something I can keep up with. I have to cut off whole people, rather than narrow the topics I want to hear about. Again, this is the holy grail of social networking – to be able to mine our contacts and interests to get the information we want easily. Social networking should reduce information overload, not add to it. The promise of the future is a much improved Stumbleupon. Ability to have real conversations: We’ll have networks, especially business-related, that have vibrant conversations, the way FriendFeed used to. People commonly have this on Facebook about personal interests, but I haven’t found anything that works well for business, perhaps excepting those uber-connected folks who can get responses quickly. Twitter’s 140 character limit doesn’t work very well for real conversations. Social networking sites will reshape the future of search: With Facebook potentially rising to challenge the dominance of Google’s users and traffic, and/or integrating to provide greater synergistic value. Social search will become a core part of search, as the social web expands in volume and value. http://memeburn.com/2011/02/conflicting-ideas-on-the-future-of-socia l-networking/

Who Am I? (2011-02-18 12:45)
by Dietrich Bonhoeffer Dietrich Bonhöffer, a young theologian of great promise, was martyred by the Nazis for his participation in a plot against the life of Adolf Hitler. His writings have greatly influenced recent theological thought. This article appeared in the Journal Christianity and Crisis, March 4, 1946. Who am I? They often tell me I stepped from my cell’s confinement Calmly, cheerfully, firmly, Like a squire from his country-house. Who am I? They often tell me I used to speak to my warders Freely and friendly and clearly, As though it were mine to command. Who am I? They also tell me I bore the days of misfortune Equally, smilingly, proudly, Like one accustomed to win. Am I then really all that which other men tell of? Or am I only what I myself know of myself? Restless and longing and sick, like a bird in a cage, Struggling for breath, as though hands were compressing my throat, Yearning for colors, for flowers, for the voices of birds, Thirsting for words of kindness, for neighborliness, Tossing in expectation of great events, Powerlessly trembling for friends at an infinite distance, Weary and empty at praying, at thinking, at making, 169

Faint, and ready to say farewell to it all? Who am I? This or the other? Am I one person today and tomorrow another? Am I both at once? A hypocrite before others, And before myself a contemptibly woebegone weakling? Or is something within me still like a beaten army, Fleeing in disorder from victory already achieved? Who am I? They mock me, these lonely questions of mine. Whoever I am, Thou knowest, 0 God, I am Thine!

Is there such a thing as coloured? (2011-02-21 17:27)
I quote from a paper by R van der Ross at the Symposium on Slavery 2008 – “The question of identity is one which elicits wide, wordy and largely useless response. In this country there is continuous debate about the matter, and mostly about and from the Coloured people. Who are we? Why? Where from? Where to? Some even ask: Are we? Are there Coloured people? The ridiculousness of these questions is compounded by the attempts at answers: “We are not; we are not Coloured; we are simply human; we are, but we refuse to be called Coloured,” and so into various degrees of assininity. If the matter of mixed descent is raised, it will most likely be met with the response that all the peoples of the earth are mixed. Of course there is some truth in this, but it evades the other truth namely that which the philosophers call “immediate perception.” We are Coloured because people look at us and regard us as Coloured. Finish en klaar.” [1]http://alturl.com/f4k9w
1. http://sun025.sun.ac.za/portal/page/portal/Administrative_Divisions/Argief/Home/Symposium_on_Slavery_2008/ Van%20der%20Ross%20slavery%20today.pdf

Who is best on (Namibian) Twitter? (2011-02-21 18:01)
The whole world is becoming focussed on social media and the number of users on Facebook, Twitter, etc. However, very little reliable information or statistics seems to be available about Namibian user and their preferences. So, while I had very little to do this weekend while sitting in a cold Düsseldorf, I decided to look at what figures I could put together. This first place to start was Twitter. Twitter is the site where I get most of my introductions to a topic after which I may decide to look into it further and click on the link. Because of the limit of only 140 characters, I don’t have to worry much about missing a comment by a friend because some other “friends” has loaded dozens of pictures or played lots of games. News providers I started my Twitter search by looking at the Namibian media, that is, the companies or websites who provide information on Namibia. This is what I found in order of the most followers (as at 22.02.11): #namibia news - 1,980 followers. Most recent tweet 18 February 2011. #radiowavefm – 220 followers. Most recent tweet 22 February 2011. #unam974 – 151 followers. Most recent tweet 26 December 2010 #namibiansun – 136 followers. Most recent tweet 18 February 2011. #namibiaelection – 125 followers. Most recent tweet 30 March 2010 #freshfm1029 – 129 followers.Most recent tweet 25 October 2010. 170

#thenamibian – 122 followers. Most recent tweet 11 February 2011. #exposenewspaper – 113 followers. Most recent tweet 10 February 2011 #mynamibiainfo – 108 followers. Most recent tweet 22 February 2011 #99fmnam – 83 followers. Most recent tweet 22 February 2011. (The DJ’s of this station also have their own tweets and followers) #namibeconomist - 15 followers. Most recent tweet 13 September 2011. #republikein na – 14 followers. Most recent tweet 13 January 2011. As for my tweets, I have 43 followers and my most recent tweet was 17 February 2011. Just for fun I also looked up #airnamibia. They have 209 followers and their last tweet was 22 June 2009. Why give this information? Perhaps by looking for information about tweets on Namibia will provide more people in Namibia a reason to use this social site. Compared to our uptake of Facebook, the usage on Twitter is way behind.

Free business textbook for studying International Business Diploma (2011-02-21 18:02)
Many business owners and managers need to have reference textbooks close at hand when dealing with issues outside their usual focus. To assist, the Institute of Management and Entrepreneurship (IMEN)put together this short list of free text books available online to assist you in your business. The same textbooks are used in the curricula for the International Diploma in Business. Business Organisation Management Basics - http://alturl.com/rp6fk Commercial Awareness for Managers - http://alturl.com/ew5di Thinking Strategically - http://alturl.com/jj96b Effective Business Communication Effective Communication Skills – http://alturl.com/yz2am Finance Finance for non-financial managers - http://alturl.com/4dmn7 Human Resources Managing the Human Resource in the 21st century - http://alturl.com/2f2rm Generational challenges in the workplace - http://alturl.com/gm2hi Marketing Effective Marketing - http://alturl.com/ggeim Customer Relationship Management - http://alturl.com/58b5s

What does Reconciliation mean (2011-02-25 12:31)
What Does Reconciliation Entail? taken from: Reconciliation as a conflict handling mechanism entails the following core elements: a) Honest acknowledgment of the harm/injury each party has inflicted on the other; b) Sincere regrets and remorse for the injury done: c) Readiness to apologize for one’s role in inflicting the injury; d) Readiness of the conflicting parties to let go’ of the anger and bitterness caused by the conflict and the injury; e) Commitment by the offender not to repeat the injury; f) Sincere effort to redress past grievances that caused the conflict and compensate the damage caused to the 171

extent possible; g) Entering into a new mutually enriching relationship. Reconciliation then refers to this new relationship that emerges as a consequence of these processes. What most people refer to as healing’ is the mending of deep emotional wounds (generated by the conflict) that follow the reconciliation process. The essence of reconciliation is the voluntary initiative of the conflict parties to acknowledge their responsibility and guilt. The interactions that transpire between the parties are not only meant to communicate one’s grievances against the actions of the adversary, but also to ...................engage in self-reflection about one’s own role and behaviour in the dynamic of the conflict. In other words, in this kind of dialogue, as much as one attributes guilt and responsibility to the adversary for the damage generated by the conflict, one has to also be self-critical and acknowledge responsibility for his or her own role in the creation or perpetuation of the conflict and hurtful interaction. The aim of such interaction is that, in the final analysis, each of the parties acknowledges and accepts his or her responsibility and out of such recognition seeks ways to redress the injury that has been inflicted on the adversary, to refrain from further damage, and to construct new positive relationships. Identifying ways in which offenders are assisted to redress the material and emotional damage they have inflicted through self-reflection, acknowledgment of responsibility, remorse, and compensation would be an important step towards establishing an environment of reconciliation.

What does Reconciliation mean in Namibia (2011-02-25 12:37)
Why is Reconciliation important to me - My father was in the South African Army that occupied this country. Even when I was arrested in 1988 as part of the uprising, he could not understand my views. With the policy of reconciliation, I was better able to understand and forgive him. It was disturbing today to look at some of the pictures printed by the Swapo News Editor, Asser Ntinda, today 25 February 2011. The pictures were truly gruesome - but that was not the most disturbing.The writer seemed to miss completely the spirit of what Reconciliation is. Identifying ways in which offenders are assisted to redress the material and emotional damage they have inflicted through self-reflection, acknowledgment of responsibility, remorse, and compensation would be an important step towards establishing an environment of reconciliation. I therefore cut some excerpts from an online paper to once again define what our National Reconciliation should entail in Namibia What Does Reconciliation Entail? taken from: http://www.gppac.net/documents/pbp/part1/2 reconc.htm Reconciliation as a conflict handling mechanism entails the following core elements: a) Honest acknowledgment of the harm/injury each party has inflicted on the other; b) Sincere regrets and remorse for the injury done: c) Readiness to apologize for one’s role in inflicting the injury; d) Readiness of the conflicting parties to let go’ of the anger and bitterness caused by the conflict and the injury; e) Commitment by the offender not to repeat the injury; f) Sincere effort to redress past grievances that caused the conflict and compensate the damage caused to the extent possible; g) Entering into a new mutually enriching relationship. Reconciliation then refers to this new relationship that emerges as a consequence of these processes. What most people refer to as healing’ is the mending of deep emotional wounds (generated by the conflict) that follow the reconciliation process. 172

The essence of reconciliation is the voluntary initiative of the conflict parties to acknowledge their responsibility and guilt. The interactions that transpire between the parties are not only meant to communicate one’s grievances against the actions of the adversary, but also to ...................engage in self-reflection about one’s own role and behaviour in the dynamic of the conflict. In other words, in this kind of dialogue, as much as one attributes guilt and responsibility to the adversary for the damage generated by the conflict, one has to also be self-critical and acknowledge responsibility for his or her own role in the creation or perpetuation of the conflict and hurtful interaction. The aim of such interaction is that, in the final analysis, each of the parties acknowledges and accepts his or her responsibility and out of such recognition seeks ways to redress the injury that has been inflicted on the adversary, to refrain from further damage, and to construct new positive relationships. Identifying ways in which offenders are assisted to redress the material and emotional damage they have inflicted through self-reflection, acknowledgment of responsibility, remorse, and compensation would be an important step towards establishing an environment of reconciliation.

Kuli Riberts article Sunday World - Jou ma se kinders - Eish, I miss daai lippies vannie Kaap (2011-02-28 15:52)
Jou ma se kinders - Eish, I miss daai lippies vannie Kaap - Sunday World (South Africa) 27 February 2011 Bitches Brew Column: Nomakula Roberts Being from Cape Town, I miss say I miss Cape coloured women. When I was young, I used to love playing with their silky hair and wished I could get rid of my kinky course variety. ”What’s wrong with you?” asked my friend while applying skin lightener. ”Black is beautiful, why would you wanna be any other race?” I ignore her and her weave and go back to my dreams of being yellow and speaking like I’m singing. Coloured girls are the future for various reasons: They will never leave dark foundation on your shirt after a hug; You will never run out of cigarettes; You will always be assured of a large family as many of these girls breed as if Allan Boesak sent them on a mission to increase the coloured race; They don’t have to fork out thousands on their hair as they mostly have silky hair that doesn’t need relaxers or weaves; They always know where to get hair curlers and wear them with pride, even in shopping malls; You don’t have to listen to those clicks most African languages have; They are the closest thing to being a white woman and we know you black men love them as they look like they’ve popped out of an Usher music video; Their bruises are more obvious than ours, so if you hit her it will be easier to see; They don’t have to send their sons to initiation school, where they stand a chance of getting a horrendous infection and even dying. My friend disagrees with me about coloured women. She insists that black guys don’t date crazy people. ”What?” she says. ”Coloureds are nuts because: They drink Black Label beer and smoke like chimnys; They shout and throw plates; They have no front teeth and eat fish like they are trying to deplete the ocean; They love to fight in public and most are very violent; They’re always referring to your mother’s this or that; 173

They know exactly what Tik is; They love designer clothes; They love making love, and leave even the randiest negro exhausted; They walk around in their gowns and pyjamas during the day. What is wrong with my friend? I wonder. So what if folk walk around in their gowns and pyjamas during the day, especially since they will eventually go back to bed? Why waste washing powder? Shouting is also sometimes necessary, especially when you speak to folk like Jimmy Manyi, who might not have a clue what he is talking about. Designer labels are mostly made in the Cape, so why should they not love them? Referring to one’s mother should also not be an issue, unless a monkey gave birth to you. Besides, reminding you of your mother shouldn’t be a bad idea. Call her now. What the hell is wrong with loving sex? Should they hate it? Just because my friend is a lousy lay doesn’t mean the entire coloured nation should not like protected sex. Knowing what tik is doesn’t necessarily mean one is using it, I told my daft friend. Saying they are violent is also a generalisation. I know plenty of coloured fraudsters and coloured Hari Krishnas. Of course I miss coloured people. Which other race do you know that is more obsessed with naai masjiene. Oh, and I don’t mean sewing machines. Besides, only in the Cape would you hear somebody screaming out: Jou ma owe jou hond sex geld!” (keeping a copy before it gets deleted)

3.2

March

Namibia, Etosha NP (2011-03-02 15:27)
IFRAME: [1]http://www.youtube.com/embed/OMyj8pfdgI8?fs=1
1. http://www.youtube.com/embed/OMyj8pfdgI8?fs=1

Women in civil society in Africa continue to face major hurdles (2011-03-08 14:42)
Women in civil society in Africa are particularly prone to intimidation and harassment says a new report released today by CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation. CIVICUS calls on African governments, regional bodies, the international community and civil society to do much more to protect women human rights defenders on the continent. Released to coincide with International Women’s Day, the report outlines the major challenges faced by women in civil society in Africa. These include deeply entrenched patriarchal norms and an increased risk of sexual harassment and violence due to the nature of their work. The report argues that the overall environment for women in civil society in Africa is particularly challenging. “Even in countries with ratified laws and protocols on the protection of women’s rights, there are clear instances where government officials and security forces have shown lack of understanding of these laws, and in some situations, blatant disregard for them,” says Mandeep Tiwana, CIVICUS Policy Manager and one of the co-authors of the report. Women human rights defenders (WHRD) are more prone to intimidation and harassment due to the nature 174

of their work as compared to their male counterparts, CIVICUS said. Civil society groups working exclusively on women’s rights, have to negotiate around additional sets of challenges and hurdles. The report, which contains compelling testimonies from activists, points out that rather than engaging with the critical voices from civil society, governments have frequently chosen to silence them, often through harassment, intimidation, threats of closure, arrests and worse. For African women activists and women’s organisations, these threats are magnified. Defending women’s human rights is often seen by state authorities, and even by communities and family members, as a challenge to their culture, tradition and way of life. On-going armed conflicts on the continent place women activists at even further risk of violence. “The report is a testament to the courage of hundreds of women civil society activists who carry out their work amid attacks on their reputations, threats to their families and their own personal safety” says Tiwana. The report found that often WHRDs are viewed with distrust and vilified as women of loose morals, traitors or spies because they do not conform to societal norms. In Kenya, Tunisia and Egypt, they reported on-going intimidation by dissenters who labelled them “loose women” and their respective organisations “training grounds for lesbians”. The report cites Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Sierra Leone as countries where WHRDs continually confront sexual harassment and assault with only minimal response from their respective governments. The report contains this statement from a WHRD in the DRC: “They finally got me when they threatened my children - I couldn’t focus any more. They called and told me, we have your daughter, and we are raping her now’.” In stamping out the gender abuse of WHRDs in Africa, the report highlights the need for space for the voices of WHRDs to be heard and for civil society to work on strategies to protect women activists. In addition, governments need to be implementing human rights instruments with a gender lens. “The absence of strong accountability institutions and widespread impunity has left the door open for human rights violations to go unpunished,” Tiwana said. “In many countries independent safe watch dog bodies to protect WHRDs do not exist and in other places they have been co-opted and made redundant by politicians.” CIVICUS produced the report The challenges faced by women in civil society in Africa with support from the African Women Development Fund and Trust Africa. It is available for downloading from the CIVICUS website: http://www.civicus.org/images/stories/ civicus/Challenges Faced by Women in Civil Society in Africa.pdf.

Press release:
(2011-03-10 16:50)

Outright discrimination against Coloured community nothing new

The coloured community of South Africa has recently been in the spotlight as a result of some inflammatory and exceptionally offensive statements by prominent ruling party representatives and journalists (Jimmy Many, Kuli Roberts). One can be forgiven for thinking these pejorative and demeaning perceptions of the Coloured community in South Africa could not possibly hold any real currency in the public sector, however, local non-profit organisation SAME (the South African Movement for Equality) says otherwise...and the group says it has conclusive and damning proof. SAME has in its possession conclusive and damning proof which shows that the institutional and disdainful disregard of the coloured community of South Africa is nothing new and is instead an entrenched and systemic malaise that extends deep within South Africa’s public institutions, most notably, the SABC (the South African Broadcast Corporation). “Since 2008, SAME has been involved in discussions with the SABC at the highest level over the continued and outright exclusion of coloured South Africans from enjoying equal access to public broadcaster facilities. The coloured community of South Africa, a legal and census defined population group which accounts for 9 % of the South African population, is the only census defined group for which the SABC continues to provide absolutely no specific and targeted public broadcaster radio services to, as is the case with every other census defined group. The 175

constitution speaks of equal access to state resources, yet the SABC still does not provide a national radio platform for the coloured group” says SAME chairman, Ronald Dyers. “This media exclusion fuels the feelings of disenfranchisement and gives tangible credence to the coloured community’s claims of exclusion and discrimination by the ruling party”. “In October 2008, SAME entered into discussions with SABC management at the highest level and while a signed undertaking and course of action was agreed upon to remedy the media exclusion of the coloured community from state broadcast facilities, the coloured community still does not have any national radio station and very little in the way of targeted television programming” says Mr Dyers. “Is it any surprise then that the coloured community in South Africa continues to feel excluded and shut off from the mainstream while even the public broadcaster is guilty of exercising the most pernicious and blatantly visible form of discrimination against a highly vulnerable and irrefutably disadvantaged minority group in South Africa?” says Dyers. “Government may try to do damage control by distancing itself from the deeply hurtful statements of Jimmy Manyi and the subsequent response by Trevor Manuel, however, it is clear that the anti-Coloured sentiment within government extends to the highest echelons of state apparatus and is a seemingly accepted modus operandi for state bodies, particularly the SABC”. “SAME would like to call on all progressive and equality loving South Africans who wish to build a more integrated and representative South Africa, to join SAME in its pursuit of equal access to state media for the coloured community and to bring an end to the SABC and the ANC government’s hurtful and extremely prejudicial exclusion of the Coloured community from enjoying the edifying fruits of state media facilities. We have a responsibility to uphold our constitution and to empower the youth within our communities to ensure that government does not pay lip service to its espoused ethos of non-racialism on the one hand, while on the other hand, continuing to practise a most vile and regressive form of discrimination against one of South Africa’s most vulnerable minority groups. Clearly, it seems that in South Africa, in the ANC government, some groups are more equal than others” http://www.same.org.za/component/content/article/1-latest-news/49-pr ess-release-outright-discriminationagainst-coloured-community-not hing-new

Manuel slams ANC spokesman on coloureds’ remarks (2011-03-11 10:51)
JOHANNESBURG – A powerful member of the African National Congress yesterday accused the new government spokesman of making racially insensitive comments that echoed the injustices of the apartheid era. The fallout could hurt President Jacob Zuma and his African National Congress who are facing local elections in May. Economic Planning Minister Trevor Manuel, the former finance minister, said spokesman Jimmy Manyi brought shame to the dreams of Nelson Mandela and tarnished the non-racial policies of the ANC by making disparaging remarks in a television interview about a mixed-race group of people classified as coloureds’. “I know who Nelson Mandela was talking about when he said from the dock that he had fought against white domination and he had fought against black domination,” Manuel, himself coloured, said in an open letter quoted by the Star newspaper. “Jimmy, he was talking about fighting against people like you,” the letter said. Manuel was not available for comment and Manyi told the Sapa news agency he would not comment. His remarks were made in 2010 but sparked a national outcry after they were posted on YouTube last week. The ANC has called Manyi’s comments, made before he was appointed government spokesman last month but while he was a leading official in the Labour Ministry, “unacceptable” but has not asked him to step down. Manyi, appointed to help Zuma’s government prepare for the polls and push expensive job creation pro176

grammes, said in the television interview that there were too many coloureds in the Western Cape - the area that includes Cape Town. Manyi, speaking in his capacity as a government official and the president of the Black Management Forum, an organisation created to help non-white managers, said coloureds should “spread in the rest of the country ... so they must stop this over-concentration situation because they are in over-supply where they are”. He then said the concentration in the Western Cape “is not working out for them”. Coloureds - descendants of the British, Portuguese, African tribes and others - were forcibly concentrated in the western region under apartheid and have mostly remained there 17 years after the end of the racially oppressive system. The ANC controls all of South Africa’s nine provinces except the Western Cape, where coloureds have helped the opposition Democratic Alliance take control of local government. Coloured South Africans constitute about three million of the country’s 50 million population made up mostly of blacks. Whites make up around five million. In his letter Manuel, respected for his role in the fight against apartheid, said Manyi, a black, had “the same mind that operated under apartheid”.– Nampa-Reuters

RACISM, COLOURED PEOPLE AND BLACK NATIONALISM (2011-03-11 10:52)
I WAS shocked by the article Manuel slams ANC spokesman on coloureds’ remarks’ (The Namibian, 3 March) for being such a racist article itself! While addressing a racist incident in South Africa, the journalist made some disturbing racist statements: 1) The article refers to & a mixed-race group of people.’ This is the language of the mentally-challenged apartheid ideologues and the fascists with their delusions about racial purity.’ Some of the recent incidents in Windhoek show how mentally challenged the racists are. The question of racism remains relevant to us in Namibia since we are dealing with the same kinds of issues here. 2) Coloureds – descendants of the British, Portuguese, African tribes and others – were forcibly concentrated in the western region&’ The coloured people were subjected to the Group Areas Act, but were never forcibly concentrated’ as they have always lived in that region. It would seem that this racially-challenged article was written by some journalist who clearly does not understand the history of southern Africa. The historical fact is that most coloured people originate from the Khoi-San, while the descendants of Malay slaves make up the second biggest group in this tribal/ethnic category. The tribal label coloureds’ was invented by British imperialism (to cover up its mineral theft) and perpetuated by apartheid (to continue the looting). 3) &coloureds have helped the opposition Democratic Alliance take control of local government.’ In a democratic society, people can vote for whoever they prefer. Only an autocratic mindset expects coloured people to only vote for one political party. The coloured people in the Western Cape are split right down the centre in that the middle class support the ANC and the working class does not. It is primarily a social class issue in the context of high unemployment in that region. The ANC’s secret economic negotiations with the apartheid regime agreed on downgrading the secondary industries (especially clothing) and this led to massive job losses in the Western Cape. The coloured working class has not forgiven the ANC for this betrayal. In any case, the Western Cape has a long history of modern left-wing politics (since 1934) and the people there have never been impressed with black nationalism. So, the insinuation in the article that coloured people in the Western Cape are racist for not voting for the ANC is far-fetched. Since when does black nationalism represent real liberation when it seems to be only interested in going on with the plundering? Perhaps black nationalism is so invested in these tribal categories to cover up its own looting. For the record, it is mainly due to the voting of white’ South Africans in the Western Cape that the right-wing DA is in power there and it is interesting to speculate about how come the media focus on coloured people. Is it easier to scapegoat a small group perceived to be politically and economically weaker? In the Northern 177

and Eastern Cape, the coloured people vote for the ANC because of different political dynamics. So, maybe one cannot generalize about this issue. We should also say to Jimmy Manyi and all the black nationalists of southern Africa: there is an over-supply’ (like commodities?) of coloured people in the Western Cape because their ancestors have lived in southern Africa for 15 000 years! We want black nationalists to get rid of their oppressive idea that they are the only true Africans. Jimmy Manyi, as an example of a black nationalist, does not grapple with the real causes of unemployment and ends up making racist remarks. Besides dehumanizing and degrading coloured people, Manyi promotes a divisive and potentially violent discourse. His statements reveal the disastrous nature of racial affirmative action instead of social-class affirmative action. Black nationalism does not have the answers and represents a danger to progress with its social conservatism. With regards to the title of this questionable article, it might also be noted that Manyi is not an ANC spokesman, but a South African government spokesperson. Spokesman’ is such a sexist word. Besides being sloppy journalism, this article is factually incorrect and outright racist. What a pity that the name of the journalist was not printed. Finally, we should say again that our refusal to accept tribal/ethnic labels is part of the ongoing struggle for social justice in southern Africa. We should build anti-racism. Non-racialism remains our great contribution to humanity. J B Cloete Windhoek

William Jordan (1849-1886), Coloured settler in Namibia (2011-03-11 19:14)

Coloureds in Namibia since 1884: William Worthington Jordan, was a ”coloured” man from the Cape Colony in South Africa. His father was British and his mother cape coloured. He was a hunter and trader in Botswana, Namibia and Angola. On 21.04.1884 Jordan obtained a land and minerals concession of 50,000 kilometres around Otavi and Grootfontein from Ondonga King Kambonde kaMpingana, king of the Ondongas in the interior of Namibia. Kambonde hoped to strengthen his position against his main rival for control of the Ongonda chiefdom, Nehale Mpingana. Jordan had traded with the Dorsland Trekkers and a group of trekboers on their way back from Angola were invited to stay on this concession he called the ”Republic Upingtonia” - that on 20 Oct 1885 was founded as a settler polity with Grootfontein as its capital. He purchased the area on payment of 300 English pounds, 25 rifles, a slated horse and a barrel of brandy. Subsequently the name is changed to Lijdensrust(Lydenrust)in 1886 and accepts German protection. The first, and only President, George Diederik P. Prinsloo (b. 1820 - d. 1888), presided from 20 Oct 1885 - June 1887. Flag of Upingtonia 178

[1] Jordan’s killing on the orders of Ondonga King Nehale lyaMpingana on 30.06.1886 marked the end of the ”Republic Upingtonia”, and most of the Boers trekked back to Angola. Jordan’s concession was auctioned in Cape Town after his death, and formed the basis for the South West Africa Company. (By August 1892, Cecil Rhodes had come to dominate the SWAC which had the sole rights to operate railway lines between Sandwich Harbour and the Kunene River.The ”Otavi Minen- und Eisenbahngesellschaft (OMEG)” was founded in Berlin on 6 April1900. The major shareholders were the German Disconto-Gesellschaft and the South West Africa Company (SWAC). The mining rights of Jordan were now held in this company which was in later years to become Tsumeb Corporation Limited.) Following this, the German government at Windhoek asserted control over the region and ended Lijdenrust’s independence. It would be a stretch, but in essence the first coloured settler created a settler colony in 1885. He was killed in the fight between two Ondonga brothers to take over as Chief. Upon his death,the Germans took control of this territory. Thus, the first coloured settlement in Namibia had ended. Sources: Max Du Preez in his book, Of Tricksters, Tyrants and Turncoats (Zebra Press Cape Town 2008) refers to him in a chapter entitled “The Darkie Boer”. Chronology Of Namibian History Author: Klaus Dierks Published 1999 – Namibia Scientific Society
1. http://www.worldstatesmen.org/de1871.gif

Consumers International Blog: Financial service providers must go back to their roots
(2011-03-15 11:30)

[1]Consumers International Blog: Financial service providers must go back to their roots
1. http://consumersinternational.blogspot.com/2011/03/financial-service-providers-must-go.html

African People’s Organisation / first coloured pressure group in Namibia (2011-03-15 18:22)
The African People’s Organisation (APO), originally the African Political Organisation, was formed in Cape Town in 1902 and was initially the most prominent ”coloured” pressure group in South Africa. Its interest in SWA/Namibia goes back to at least 1918 when it opposed the transfer of the former German colony to the South Africa Authority. The first SWA branch of the APO was established in Windhoek in February 1923. 179

In informing the colonial authorities of the establishment of the branch, the leaders stated that the aims of the organisation were to defend ”the Social Political and Civil Rights of the Cape Coloured Community throughout the SW Protectorate. Another political organisation which devoted itself to representing the Coloured community in SWA, the African National Bond, was also launched in Windhoek in 1925. The APO, although it recruited its members from the relatively small group of educated and economically comfortably off Coloureds, was to become the most influential political organisation for Coloureds for almost forty years. Although it collapsed as an organisation in the early 1940s, having to give way to more radical organisations, the APO shaped black political thought and culture for decades after its demise.

What happened to multicultural identity? (2011-03-21 13:46)
[1]What happened to multicultural identity?: ”A few years ago, the Harvard Committee on African Studies asked me to address them on some of the challenges facing our new democracy.” Political institutions structured around identity is a recipe for disaster. The current provinces deepen ethnic identities and identity interests around being coloured or Indian or Zulu or Xhosa or Pedi. They should be abolished. A common South African identity will remain elusive for as long as we do not have a much more cosmopolitan view of space. Gauteng is an example of the kind of geographical cosmopolitanism I have in mind. There is no ethnic group that can claim exclusive ownership of the geographic space given the multiple origins and identities of the people who live there. This principle needs to be elevated to the national level.
1. http://www.citypress.co.za/Columnists/What-happened-to-multicultural-identity-20110319

A Crown For Your Brow, And a Key For Your Hand (2011-03-21 18:25)
on Namibia’s 21st birthday, 21 March 2011 This morning once more my country awakes This day is no normal day though, No, today my country has come of age, It is no longer a child, But an adult member of the world. I remember its birth many sunrises ago When I was chosen to raise our new flag, Looking out from that first maternity ward Over the rolling hills of our capital Windhoek The skyline created by the colonialists. Today, my country receives its key, The key to unlock things before hidden, Things that were forbidden to do, Now maturity must lend a hand And help in the choices it makes. During its teenage years, I became worried as it flirted, Its political alliances changing shape Hard words being exchanged during puberty 180

Crying tears of unanswered love. As my country becomes more self-assured Exerting its own will and wants It is time to step quietly aside, Assuring it of my undying, continued love While letting it achieve its own greatness. Smile, my beloved land on your crown birthday, You have overcome many a fall or scrape Some of the scars will remain as proof All of it part of growing up and learning Preparing for your role in life Do not care about your past The bitted words of things you cannot change Mould yourself into a strong unified character Reconciliation will always be your guide Making every citizen a part of the motherland From Today, as always, make us proud.

What is a social entrepreneur (2011-03-21 19:01)
Social entrepreneurs are individuals with innovative solutions to society’s most pressing social problems. They are ambitious and persistent, tackling major social issues and offering new ideas for wide-scale change. Rather than leaving societal needs to the government or business sectors, social entrepreneurs find what is not working and solve the problem by changing the system, spreading the solution, and persuading entire societies to take new leaps. Visit the Ashoka Website for more information: [1]What is a social entrepreneur [2]
1. http://www.ashoka.org/social_entrepreneur 2. http://www.ashoka.org/sites/all/themes/ashokacore/collages/default.jpg

Replays - Social Entrepreneur Empowerment Series (2011-03-22 17:47)
[1]Replays - Social Entrepreneur Empowerment Series Interviews with some of the best social entrepreneurs around
1. http://www.socialentrepreneurempowerment.com/replays/

(2011-03-23 18:47)

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The way things are ... in Africa (2011-03-24 16:16)
[1]http://www.namibiansun.com/story/way-things-are-africa Pashu Shuudi writes: ALTHOUGH hard to swallow, us black people despise everything that looks like us. To prove my point, not so long ago fellow blacks who run away from atrocities in their African countries were beaten, burned and some even killed by fellow blacks in South Africa. In Namibia, black supporters of the ruling party SWAPO and the opposition parties clashed in 2009 and we are still hearing of such quarrels or violence just in the name of politics. Through history, I have come to learn that we actually disliked one another before colonialism, hence fierce tribal fights during those years. Colonialism united us all in the fight against a common enemy. After colonialism, we saw the rebirth of what we thought was buried long time ago, tribalism, regionalism, favouritism, etc. Although we do not like others from other tribes, we all love things that we do not produce. We love fine branded clothes, (Polo, Paris Hilton, Luis Vuiton, Nike, Adidas, Lacoste, Timberland) from Europe, we love American and German-made cars, we love expensive wine, we like Jameson whisky, Jack Daniels, Johnny Walker, Red Label, Bell’s, Scottish brandy, the beer. Yet no African person brews any of them. All we own, unfortunately, are thousands of shebeens where we drink ourselves to death, stab each other with knives/bottles, infect each other with the HIV virus, make lots of unwanted babies and then blame others for our miseries. We love all sorts of expensive foreign made items and show them off. Yet we look down at our indigenous products that we fail to commercialise. As blacks, we know very little about investments, whether in stocks, or in properties. All we know is how to invest our money in things that depreciates or evaporate the fastest - like clothes, cars, alcohol, and when we are at it, we want the whole world to see us. I know some brothers driving BMWs, yet they sleep on the floors, no beds because nobody will see them anyway. This is what we love doing and this is the black life, a life of showing off for those who have. A black millionaire tenderpreneur’ living in Ludwig’s Dorf, Kleine Kuppe, Olympias, in Windhoek will drive to the notorious Eveline Street in Katutura for a beer where he will show off his expensive car and look down on others. We sell our natural resources to Europe for processing, and then buy them back in finished products. What makes us so inferior in our thinking that we only pride ourselves when we have something made by others? What compels us to show off things that we don’t manufacture? Is it the poverty that we allow ourselves to be in? Is it our navigated consciousness, our culture or just a low self-esteem possessing us? For how long are we going to be consumers or users of things we do not produce? Do we like the easy way out, such that we only use and consume things made by others? Do designer clothes, expensive wine or changing our names to sound more European make us more confident in ourselves? Our leaders scream at us how bad the Europeans are, yet they steal our public money and hide it in European banks. We know how Europeans ransacked Africa but we are scandalously quiet when our own leaders loot our countries and run with briefcases under their arms full of our riches to Europe. The Europeans took our riches to Europe but our African leaders are again taking our riches to Europe. Mubarak of Egypt, Gadaffi of Libya, Mobutu Sese Seko of the then Zaire, all had their assets allegedly frozen in Europe. Why do our African leaders who claim to love us run to invest their’ money in Europe? Again, when they get sick they are quick to be flown to Europe for treatment yet our relatives die in hospital queues. Don’t our leaders trust the health systems they have created for us all? Why are we so subservient, so obedient to corruption when committed by our very own people? Nobody can disagree with me in this country that we are like pets trained to obey the instructions of their masters. I am sure we look down when we think of our broken lives, but what do we see when our thoughts are down? I wonder if we realise how we sell our dreams to our leaders for corruption, miseries, poverty, 182

unemployment, underdevelopment and all other social evils affecting us. How long are we going to let our manipulated minds mislead us, from womb to tomb?
1. http://www.namibiansun.com/story/way-things-are-africa

Aiming morality at the youth (2011-03-28 18:08)
If students are to be encouraged to be active citizens, they have to be engaged as they are, where they are, find out what their aspirations are and make space for their cares within our agendas. Morality is not going to suddenly become appealing through a document that binds you to “obey the laws of our country, ensure that others do so as well, and contribute in every possible way to making South Africa a great country”. Morality is not easily made attractive, but its cause is not helped by a disregard for the voices of young people to whom we’re preaching active citizenship http://www.thedailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2011-03-27-finding-an- anthem-for-a-doomed-youth

Oldest coloured owned business in Namibia (2011-03-29 16:28)

[1] Johannes Wilhelm Krabbenhoeft was the son of Friedrich Wilhelm Krabbenhoeft who established the trading house Krabbenhoeft and Lampe at Lüderitz, and his wife Lucie Krabbenhoeft née Forbes. He was born on 20.09.1882 at Keetmanshoop. Due to the fact that his mother was a ”coloured” woman from the Cape Colony in South Africa, he had later difficulties in the Schutztruppe during the German colonial period. [2]Present Day (2010) What am I doing by writing about this? The sociology of race and of ethnic relations is the area of the discipline that studies the social, political, and economic relations between races and ethnicities at all levels of society. This area encompasses the study of racism, residential segregation, and other complex social processes between different racial and ethnic groups. The sociological analysis of race and ethnicity frequently interacts with other areas of sociology such as stratification and social psychology, as well as with postcolonial theory. At the level of political policy, ethnic relations is discussed in terms of either assimilationism or multiculturalism. Anti-racism forms another style of policy, particularly popular in the 1960s and 70s. [3]On Wikipedia The overall sense one has regarding Coloured identity in the new South Africa is one of fragmentation, uncertainty and confusion. For the greater part of its existence, Coloured identity was accepted as given by its bearers, and in the latter phases of the apartheid era, the emergence of a rejectionist movement created 183

a schism between those who accepted and those who eschewed it. But the new South Africa has witnessed the emergence of a wide spectrum of positions on the nature of Colourness and a plethora of initiatives to change or influence the ways in which it is expressed. Such attempts have thus far failed to have much of a popular impact because they lack resonance with the Coloured masses and are driven by small groups of intellectuals and community activists with limited influence. The evidence indicates that many people who have gone beyond simply accepting racial categories as given are wrestling with questions about the extent to which they should express their identity as black, as African, as South African, as Khoisan, as descendants of slaves or whether they should take a stand on the principle of nonracism. There is often confusion about whether Colouredness is inherent or imposed from outside, whether it is something negative to be discarded or something positive to be embraced and affirmed. Today, Coloured identity remains in flux and is experiencing a degree of change unparalleled since its emergence in the late nineteenth century’
1. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-rXyG4Sw3p4A/TZHsgG6xupI/AAAAAAAAACM/2-e1i4XNEpQ/s1600/krabbenh%25C3%25B6ft%2B-% 2Boldest%2Bcoloured%2Bbusiness.jpg 2. http://www.panoramio.com/photo/17349607 3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sociology_of_race_and_ethnic_relations

Teach history warts and all (2011-03-31 18:44)
[1]But maybe memory is what young people need to be taught before they can be taught actual history.
1. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/49e9f7de-5721-11e0-9035-00144feab49a.html#ixzz1ICDrbw6c

3.3

April

Statistics for Namibian websites -1 April 2011 (2011-04-01 10:36)
This no April Fool’s Joke What are the most popular sites in Namibia (.na domain)? What are the values of some of these website? 1. www.bankwindhoek.com.na , Points: 9.04212 2. www.bankwindhoekarts.com.na Points: 8.93036 3. www.grnnet.gov.na Points: 8.34682 4. www.namibiatourism.com.na Points: 5.22759 5. www.met.gov.na , Points: 5.02721 6. www.interact.com.na Points: 3.61174 7. library.unam.na Points: 3.22020 8. www.tasa.na Points: 3.00227 9. www.taleni.com.na Points: 2.96004 10. www.airnamibia.com.na Points: 2.89882 11. www.nied.edu.na Points: 2.60780 12. www.internet.na , Points: 2.58421 13. www.oasys.com.na , Points: 2.51922 14. www.nnf.org.na , Points: 2.20978 15. www.sysex.com.na Points: 2.19372 16. millennium.unam.na Points: 2.12801 17. wwwisis.unam.na Points: 2.12801 184

18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67.

www.e-tourism.com.na Points: 1.96130 www.npc.gov.na Points: 1.85357 www.parliament.gov.na Points: 1.64096 www.nwr.com.na , Points: 1.61660 www.immersion.com.na Points: 1.53357 www.namibian.com.na , Points: 1.50227 www.span.org.na , Points: 1.49141 www.schoemans.com.na Points: 1.44968 www.newera.com.na Points: 1.41717 www.africaonline.com.na , Points: 1.29728 www.nacobta.com.na Points: 1.29211 www.schoolnet.na Points: 1.21311 www.rcchurch.na , Points: 1.08497 www.uunet.com.na , Points: 1.08346 www.desertexpress.com.na , Points: 1.08346 www.nammic.com.na Points: 1.06024 www.un.na , Points: 1.05882 www.holidaytravel.com.na , Points: 1.04173 www.bon.com.na , Points: 1.03112 www.edsnet.na , Points: 1.00446 www.hansahotel.com.na , Points: 1.00000 www.intenet.na Points: 1.00000 www.itd.com.na Points: 1.00000 www.verizonbusiness.com.na Points: 1.00000 www.discoveryskills.com.na Points: 0.96273 www.cecsnamibia.com.na Points: 0.96273 www.polytechnic.edu.na , Points: 0.88291 www.caa.org.na , Points: 0.85714 www.meatco.com.na , Points: 0.81024 www.republikein.com.na , Points: 0.79804 www.unam.na , Points: 0.73375 www.mfmr.gov.na , Points: 0.71637 www.az.com.na , Points: 0.66767 www.namweb.com.na , Points: 0.66666 www.namfisa.com.na Points: 0.55555 www.renaissance.com.na Points: 0.54629 www.swakopmund-museum.org.na Points: 0.53176 www.huntnamibia.com.na Points: 0.50000 www.oanob.com.na Points: 0.50000 www.vieranasbowhunt.com.na , Points: 0.50000 www.benefit.org.na , Points: 0.49003 www.economist.com.na Points: 0.45902 www.natmus.cul.na , Points: 0.41729 www.agra.com.na Points: 0.41679 www.proteawalvis.com.na , Points: 0.40657 www.seasidegroup.com.na Points: 0.40657 www.hans-kriess.com.na Points: 0.40657 www.ovisume.com.na Points: 0.40657 www.blueskynamibia.com.na , Points: 0.40657 www.secretgarden.com.na Points: 0.40657 185

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Consumer Protection an absolute Necessity in Namibia! (2011-04-01 10:39)
Mihe Gaomab II Friday 1st April 2011 is the watershed event in the historical development for a broad based consumer movement in South Africa. South Africans have lived in something close to the consumer dark ages for many years that was plagued by historical legacy of disempowerment for consumers. The consumers in South Africa and Namibia alike are suffering enormous weight of “small print” and tedious “terms and conditions” when almost about buying anything under the sun. These were made further difficult by purposefully having unclear hire purchase contractual arrangements to paying the price for a service provider’s inability to cancel a contract whether subscribing for a gym facility or paying for a unwanted service on a periodic basis, which is normally a year. Ever since political liberation and independence for South Africa and Namibia, concentrated economic sectors and lack of strong consumer and political will against the need for effective consumer protection have greatly disenfranchised and disempowered consumers. This is greatly to change on 1st April 2011, when the new Consumer Protection Act (CPA) comes into effect with strong support from the consumers and politicians alike. Namibian support for the need for consumer protection has also culminated with a strong and effective consumer division at the Ministry of Trade and Industry. There has also been increased awareness created led by the vibrant grassroots consumer organisations such as the Namibia Consumer Trust, Namibia Consumer Protection Group, and the Namibia Consumer Lobby. All these bodies are increasingly using social media such as “Facebook” to increase awareness on consumer issues and the need to ensure legislation for the consumer. The Law Reform and Development Commission have also been aggressive lately to ensure that Namibia follows suit on the heels of South Africa to develop Consumer Protection Policy and Law in Namibia. Further, Ministry of Justice held in 2009 a ground breaking workshop to sensitise on consumer protection from a legal perspective. There is also considerable effort in terms of financial literacy to bring consumer rights to the public domain in the country. Ministry of Finance, Bank of Namibia and NAMFISA as well as other cooperating partners such as SME Compete, NCCI and GIZ can indeed be complemented with embarking on a nationwide financial 189

literacy programme to educate the public on consumer financial education. The Namibian Competition Commission has started to interrogate the link between consumer protection and competition policy and law. In fact, the Commission is busy drafting a historical research study that will as an outcome propose concrete recommendations with regard to the strong relevance between Consumer and Competition Protection in Namibia. As evidence shows, having only one without the other compromises the attainment of the purpose for which the Competition Commission has been established for. But then, what really does the Consumer Protection do and how is it link to the Competition Policy and Law. In short, what will the Act do the South African consumers now that they have reached his historical milestone. Undoubtly, the Act will have many implications for businesses, who will be called to account, legally speaking, in instances that traditionally generated only a knee jerk reaction of consumers that they can’t do anything. Businesses have also been apologetic to any credit agreement dispute with consumers and in fact power relations remain highly skewed in favour of businesses when consumers wanted to follow up on contract terms, product safety, fair pricing, or even product defects to mention but a few. One thing is clear, consumers will be significantly more empowered. In fact, South African consumers can now stand up for ourselves and be counted. The Consumer Movement will be revolutionised and enforcement can assist them to score on big points with businesses. All does however not look rosy. Consumers need to become educated to know more about the provisions of the Act, and how to approach the consumer in a confident, purposive and responsive manner knowing that the law is on our side. The success of the Act depends on how Consumer Bodies in South Africa get their act together and all effort depends however on their willingness and effort to expose any infringement on consumer rights. Lawyers are told to take a back seat but they are also crucial to bring the consumer complaints to book and to make sure that businesses pay for their alleged malpractices. The yeast of the truth is that the Consumer Protection Act has real teeth and its National Consumer Commission is given the bark it needs to bring businesses in line. Companies and Businesses that fail to comply with its terms can face penalties as severe as an administrative fine of up to 10 % of annual turnover - or a fine of R1 million. Businesses in South Africa has realised this and are proactively changing their operations to conform to the provisions of the Act. Of course, to be an active consumer, there is need that South Africans need to understand their rights, and the responsibilities of service providers, industry players and government are clearly defined in the Act. Namibians ought to take heed and here are some of the highlights of the Act: “Oshoto” or Lounge Privacy finally – Most South Africans and Namibians have been bombarded and harassed by businesses of taking unsolicited sales calls, junk emails and SMS’s. The Act takes very necessary privacy action, allowing you to demand that any company that contacts you without you asking them to do so removes you from its database. Even better, when you’re filling out a contract or membership form, online of offline, you must be given the choice to specify that you do not want to be bothered by advertising. At last Swakopmund Coastal Cooling off – Ever regret that buying a Vacuum Cleaner from a Sales guy visiting you at home just to get rid of him or her. Alas, no need to despair. The Act says companies must now offer you a cooling off period to cancel an advance reservation, booking or order. This measure gives consumers the ability to recover from the heat of sales moment and confirm their decision after consideration. The act also makes it illegal for companies to automatically renew contracts as they expire. From now on, they’ll need permission in writing from you before they can renew. And, even better, suppliers and service providers you hold contracts with are now obliged to communicate with you when they increase prices. No more gobbledekook or English jargon- One of the most important changes the Act brings is a legal obligation on companies communicating with consumers to do so in plain, simple language. Companies now have to communicate with consumers in plain language that any reasonable person can understand in their adverts, media statements and terms and conditions. This isn’t only a measure to reduce overwhelming consumer annoyance – it also seriously empowers consumers and means companies can no longer dupe you with fine print you haven’t read. Your right to say no to misleading or false marketing and advertising. The Act will make it far easier for 190

consumers to take action when a company provides bad or defective goods or services. According to the Act consumers can stop legally misleading and false and deceptive advertising, marketing, and service. Consumers have also a legal right to cancel any promotional scheme they signed up for within 20 working days’ notice. Sounds fair, isn’t it! Do unto those as they would like to be done unto you; Remember that time you got thrown literally to a different flight because the airline had ’overbooked’ or remember when businesses require you to choose their service no matter what by constrained choice? Remember how frustrated you are when deals are offered by discounts and promotions and yet it is so ridiculous? Well, Namibians, times have changed in South Africa. Now, if you miss a flight because the airline sold more tickets than it had seats, the airline must refund your ticket, with interest, and not just hand out vouchers for the missed booking. This Act also looks to protect consumers against generally fraudulent schemes and offers (remember pyramid related schemes or Ponzi schemes in Namibia, BON take note). To put it simply, companies indulging in overselling (a polite term for commercial lying) and under delivering will be punished. Once locked in Contract, you are forever doomed is over - Signing your life away by mistake is no longer going to be so easy, thanks to the Act. Even if you have agreed to a contract with your signature, companies creating one-sided contracts that clearly favour themselves will be taking a real chance. The court now has the power to redraft clauses or to order the company to change unfair terms and conditions. Good Deal, Good Product, Good Life - The Act also includes clauses designed to ensure that consumers receive goods that are of ”good quality, free of defects and reasonably suitable for the purpose for which [they were] required”. In a nutshell that means when the product is delivered, it must do what they say it will in the advert. If it clearly doesn’t, or if it arrives in a terrible condition, you, the consumer, are totally within your rights to take action. Voetstoots and SMS Competitions - Suppliers, particularly in the car industry, will have to let consumer know of all defects of your purchase and consumer have to agree to buying the product in that condition. When entering competition, consumer will not be allowed to charge an exorbitant R5 or R10 to enter an SMS or MMS competition, but will have to stick to the preapproved rates by regulation. All this things above seem to be too good to be true. In fact, knowing consumer rights before and treatment mooted to them by businesses in the past, the Act in fact will make it far easier for South Africans to enforce their rights as consumers, and, importantly, to go through the process of claiming damages or compensation when consumers have ended up on the wrong end of a commercial transaction. The Act is also small business friendly in the sense that companies who earn less than N $3 Million are not subjected to the conformity of the Act and Hawkers from the informal sector do not have to comply thus avoiding any cost of regulation associating to full compliance. But they are all protected as a consumer. This development in South Africa can’t be divorced from Namibia given the closeness and semblance of the two economies. One thing is clear. All involved in consumer issues in Namibia are going to watch developments with keen interest in South Africa and remind themselves continually that they wish they can be there as well on the 1st April 2011. Hell. No need to despair. It can happen in Namibia as well. Namibia can also develop its Consumer Protection and ensure some level of responsibilities to institutions concerned on consumer matters. In fact, it is encouraging that the Law Reform and Development Committee is taking the judicial lead to develop the Act. With an energetic Chairman and eager Secretary, the Act will find its home in Namibia, I am sure. The Minister of Trade and Industry, Dr Hage Geingob should be commended for its visionary direction of centralising consumer protection on the developmental agenda through creating a necessary institutional capacity at the Ministry as well as pushing the Namibian Competition Commission in defining its competition space from a consumer point of view. One thing is clear increasingly from the Commission’s point of view. Consumer rights are here to stay in Namibia in the near future. The Commission knows that its success lies in the purpose of the Competition Act, 2003 around economic and consumer welfare in terms of the three P’s, (competitive) Pricing, Product (choice) and Promotions (honest ethical advertising) In conclusion then, going forward there cant be effective competition policy and law in Namibia unless there is response to give greater weight to consumers that should not only benefit from lower prices, better quality 191

and a greater variety of goods and services but such situation can lead to an efficient business transactions, that provides transparent information availability to the consumers. Mihe Gaomab II is the Secretary and Chief Executive of the Namibian Competition Commission.

NGO’S need to be regulated in Namibia (2011-04-01 17:44)
There was a proliferation of NGO’s created during the pre-Independence and immediately thereafter. They are involved in business development, cultural groups, agriculture, Aids, etc. They include international organisations such as the Red Cross, or local chapters of internationally accepted bodies such as the Namibian Society for Human Rights (NSHR). Local NGO’s can work at gender issues such as the Women’s Action for Development (WAD), or animal rights such as the SPCA. They also include a variety of welfare organisations such as the Blood transfusion service or industry interests such as the NCCI or ICT Alliance. While most NGO’s are doing a good job in Namibia, unfortunately, some have not. They have abused their mandate or become a vehicle for an individual who is seen as the driving force or even “responsible for the success of the organisation”. This leads to the next question, “How do we distinguish between a good and bad NGO?” The following questions provide us with a litmus test: " Are their financial statements open for scrutiny? " What percentage of their budget is spent on salaries and perks for the organisations employees? " What part of the budget is contributed by governments, directly or indirectly? " How many of the NGO’s operatives are in the field, catering to the needs of the NGO’s ostensible constituents? " Which part of the budget is spent on furthering the aims of the NGO and on implementing its promulgated programs? I suggest that we have Non-Government Organisation Bill. In this Bill should be addressed the issues of mandate and good governance, and the mechanisms in the case of abuse. It should include a restraint on creation of new frequently unnecessary NGOs (that are mostly more helpful to the creators of the NGO than the people they are designed to serve).

Google Science Fair: Calling All Jr. Scientists (2011-04-04 16:27)
Google is looking for bright youngsters (aged 13 - 18) from around the world to submit interesting and creative Science projects that are relevant to the world today. [EMBED] It would be fantastic to see a Namibian student emerging as one of the 15 finalists who each get

• a $25 000 scholarship, • An internship (at CERN, Google or Scientific American) • personalized Lego kits • Digital Access to Scientific American for their school 192

If I was still in high-school, I’d be scheming to win this thing. For more information, check out the Google Science Fair website.

Open Letter to Robin Sherbourne / Nedbank Namibia & Old Mutual Namibia
(2011-04-06 13:31)

I am sitting in Germany struggling to establish a Credit Register System in Namibia. I have been working on this project for over 12 years in the hope that with such a system there would be more affordable credit for poor people and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME’s) in my country. With very little funding (and no salary), I have managed to get this idea on to the national agenda. All financial institutions and supervisory bodies understand the need for a credit register system to allow financial inclusion - access to banking services especially by the poor, black people of our country. To get this idea to the public I have been sending emails to individuals within government and the business sector since 1997. This morning (6 April 2011) I sent a copy of a blog about the need for a Credit Register in India to the financial services community in Namibia. ”... one of the major complaints against micro-finance institutions (MFIs) is the widespread trend of multiple borrowings by poor people. Though unaware of the credit histories of their borrowers, MFI lenders were carried away by the belief in their ability to recover loans and gave loans without proper due diligence. The result was poor people saddled with multiple loans from different MFIs, with atleast some of them being merely used to reschedule or repay older loans. ” Great was my surprise when I received the following email from Robin Sherbourne, Group Economist, Old Mutual Namibia (email address: [1]RobinSh@Nedbank.com.na). Please stop sending me emails. The IPPR is still trying to recover money you owe us from 2004. I can’t believe how duplicitous you have been yet you have the nerve to write about ethics and helping SMEs – unbelievable! You give BEE a bad name. Robin Robin Sherbourne Group Economist Old Mutual Namibia [2]+264 (0) 61 227950 begin of the skype highlighting +264 (0) 61 227950 end of the skype highlighting (telephone) [3]+264 (0) 61 259701 (fax) [4]+264 (0)081 129 2502 (mobile) [5]RobinSh@Nedbank.com.na (E-mail) [6]www.oldmutual.com.na * duplicitous - marked by deliberate deceptiveness especially by pretending one set of feelings and acting under the influence of another I have previously written about my bad debts in my book, [7]Future Namibia, as well as numerous times on my blog, so will not bore you with it here. (See end note later) My immediate reaction was one of anger. After all, I am fighting to get a Credit Register established to assist the consumers of my country without any return on that investment after twelve years. Then I carefully reread his email. I don’t mind the personal words. ”Sticks and stones, Will break my bones, But names will 193

never hurt me.” BUT I do mind the sentence, you give Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) a bad name. Wow racism has become very sophisticated in Namibia. Do you mean to tell me that because I am not white, and have a default judgement, you, Nedbank Namibia and Old Mutual are no longer interested in the ”public good”¹? No Mr. Sherbourne, you clearly indicate a lack of understanding of what it is to be financially previously disadvantaged or why the banking services need to be forced to bank the unbanked. 1. public good in reference: ....private banks may not find it worthwhile to incur the high costs of screening and monitoring SMEs because, once these borrowers have a good credit history, they can obtain credit from other lenders, who will not have to bear the initial costs for screening. This suggests that information on creditworthiness is basically a public good, in the sense that it is non-rival in consumption and it is very costly to exclude anyone from using it. When the market fails to let banks appropriate the returns of information about their costumers, banks will under-invest in the acquisition of such information. Endnote: Yes, I have a default judgement in favour IPPR (a private research organisation). I don’t often get paid for what I do, but when I do, I have been paying this debt. However, the IPPR and their lawyers have made it a habit of harassing me whenever I get employment by delivering a summons. Then of course, I leave that office of employment and we do the merry dance again.

The IPPR has made it clear that the data I collect is free (to them) and part of publicly available data. Okay, so I continue to provide it free of charge and make no money with which to pay them. Call this lack of charging income because of the outstanding judgement my equivalent of a ”Namibian stand-off”.

Full blog here: [8]http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/2009/04/me-and-bad-deb ts.html
1. mailto:mludewig@oldmutual.com 2. tel:%2B264%20%280%29%2061%20227950 3. tel:%2B264%20%280%29%2061%20259701 4. tel:%2B264%20%280%29081%20129%202502 5. mailto:mludewig@oldmutual.com 6. http://www.oldmutual.com.na/ 7. http://www.scribd.com/full/19256913?access_key=key-2ee0rqng9bcotrl8ipc4 8. http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/2009/04/me-and-bad-debts.html

Namibia Home Affairs Application Forms (2011-04-07 15:26)
All Namibian and visitors know what a hassle it is to collect application from Home Affairs. Now a collection of these forms are available. Just visit [1]Milton Louw’s Blog and all the forms can be downloaded from a list on the left. Just another service to keep ”Namibia -the smile on the face of Africa.”
1. http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/

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Open Letter to Robin Sherbourne / Nedbank Namibia & Old Mutual Namibia - No. 2
(2011-04-08 09:29)

This week I sent out an email about an email between myself and Messr. Sherbourne of Nedbank. I though I should just explain why I felt it to be a remark based on racial stereotyping. This week, once again it has been proved that we need to have a system that forces the white-owned financial institutions to make decisions that are not based on the race or gender of a person. Mr Robin Sherbourne, Economist of Nedbank, replied to my email: Please stop sending me emails. The IPPR is still trying to recover money you owe us from 2004. I can’t believe how duplicitous you have been yet you have the nerve to write about ethics and helping SMEs – unbelievable! You give BEE a bad name. It is true that I have a default judgement against me for a business transaction I was involved in. (more on my blog at http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/2011/04/open-letter-to-robin-sherbou rne-nedbank.html). The fact of the matter is that in South Africa I am registered as a white male and do not qualify for black economic empowerment (where BEE is the law). What could the statement ”... you give black economic empowerment a bad name”? Putting that as a statement after referring to my bad debt must mean that my bad credit has something to do with his perception of my race. This is exactly why I believe we need a credit register in Namibia that does not allow an individual to make credit decisions based on their own assumptions. Kind regards Milton Louw Debtor

Internal Struggle for Namibia’s Independence - 1985-1989 (2011-04-13 18:02)
During the 1980’s the battle for the hearts of the Namibian people was being fought. The PLAN combatants were waging war with their Angolan, Cuban and Russian allies, but this was taking place outside the borders of the country. Inside the country, the battle was in the form of protest and civil disobedience. [EMBED] The internal struggle included famous Namibians such as Hendrik Witbooi, Danny Tjongarero, Niko Bessinger, Anton Lubowski, John Pandeni and Ben Ulenga. They were harassed, beaten and arrested continuously by the South African regime. However, the regime felt it was winning. They had created ethnic authorities and many of these leaders had convinced the people of the need for managed democracy versus the communist take-over by SWAPO. All that changed when the students started participating in the struggle. In 1987 the police were unable to control and prevent the students from running through Katutura and Khomasdal, with some of the marchers reaching the central business district. By mid 1988, the South African regime and their puppet government was losing control. Over 75 000 school students were boycotting schools throughout the country in protest at the South African army and police repressions. The boycotts began at the Ponhofi Secondary School in Ovamboland. Laws such as the Protection of Fundamental Rights Act (No. 16 of 88) were being used to prevent the gathering of any kind. This specific law was contested by the Namibian National Students Organisation and others and was found to be unconstitutional. This legal battle is still used around the world when discussing human rights as it ”creates criminal offences for activities which in democratic societies have been perfectly acceptable and legal.”[i] 195

In legal literature, ”The period of 1985 to Independence ... an historical prelude because it arguably sets the stage for the constitutional development that followed Independence.”[ii] Unfortunately, this internal struggle for Independence has largely been neglected. This publication is a first step in bringing this story into the common memory of all Namibians. [1]http://www.scribd.com/full/52317421?access key=key-1su694cazh8mkmptl651 Photo album of photos from the 1987/8 student unrest in Namibia Comments collected during the two weeks of 21 March - 1 April 2011 via Facebook. All photographs courtesy of John Liebenberg. [i] Namibia National Students’ Organisation & Others v Speaker of the National Assembly for South West Africa 1990 (1) SA 617 SWA, at 627. [ii] Constitutional jurisprudence in Namibia since Independence - George Coleman and Esi Schimming-Chase
1. http://www.scribd.com/full/52317421?access_key=key-1su694cazh8mkmptl651

List of Namibian bloggers / 2011 (2011-04-21 16:11)
A list of Namibian bloggers which I hope to expand with your help.

• [1]Change your life • [2]Creating Wealth • [3]Daves Boring Blog • [4]Dune Sieben (German) • [5]End forced Sterilisation • [6]Frantic Naturalist • [7]Girl Uncovered • [8]I present Roxanne • [9]Making a better Namibia • [10]Namibian DJ|s • [11]Namibia Facts • [12]Namibia Welcome • [13]One Stoned Crow • [14]The Joys Of My Splintered Life In SMALLTOWN • [15]Vakwetu Style • [16]Vieranas Safaris • [17]the new Der/die/das Namibia/er auf Deutsch • [18]Sinisterstuf 196

Thanks
1. http://v-changeyourlife.blogspot.com/ 2. http://theodorestanley1.blogspot.com/ 3. http://davesboringblog.wordpress.com/ 4. http://dunesieben.wordpress.com/ 5. http://endforcedsterilisation.wordpress.com/ 6. http://frantic-naturalist.blogspot.com/ 7. http://enigma.iblog.co.za/ 8. http://www.myspace.com/marvinsanzila/blog 9. http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/ 10. http://www.namdjs.com/ 11. http://www.namibia-facts.de/blog/ 12. http://groups.google.com/group/namibia-welcome 13. http://onestonedcrow.blogspot.com/ 14. http://splinteredlife.blogspot.com/ 15. http://www.vakwetu.blogspot.com/ 16. http://namibiahuntsafaris.blogspot.com/ 17. http://www.i-namibia.de/ 18. http://blog.sinisterstuf.org/

3.4

May

Minister Clears Hostel Boss Aziz Kyababa (2011-05-15 12:21)
A GOVERNMENT investigation has decided that Asian workers who occupied a former Windhoek railway hostel did so without acting improperly. The finding lets Aziz Kyababa, the man behind the occupation, off the hook after his decision to move Ramatex factory workers into the Philip Troskie building raised eyebrows. 17 November 2003

Charlotte’s Guest House - managed living (2011-05-15 22:48)
I have just returned to Windhoek, Namibia and am happy to be home. I have been looking for a managed apartment or guest house environment where I do not have to worry about meals, washing or even security. I have found such a place in Charlotte’s Guest House. Charlotte’s Guest Home is a stately and luxurious home away from home situated in the heart of Namibia’s capital city, Windhoek. The guest house offers guests quality bed and breakfast or self-catering accommodation options in tastefully decorated rooms with a range of activities for guests to enjoy in the area. It is run by Mr Aziz Kyababa and his wife and its truly a home for me. If you are single (or divorced) try a managed apartment environment - it gives you the freedom of movement, with the feeling of home.

197

Future Namibia - Foreword by Andimba Toivo ya Toivo (2011-05-20 15:48)
I feel very much honored to be asked to write a foreword to this book by a political and economic researcher about our country and our times. The author of this book has spent many years studying the political and economic set up of our country. In my opinion, he has come up with many constructive ideas that can contribute to Namibia‘s development. During the liberation struggle, we were building our sand castles and dreaming of how we wanted an independent Namibia to be. After we took the reins of power, we realized that it was not so easy to realize our dreams. It became apparent that even if the leaders of the government have good ideas, they cannot implement programmes and projects alone, but must rely on the commitment of civil servants to work in the interest of the Namibian people. As we set about to transform a system that has been based upon apartheid and colonialism, we were also challenged to transform the thinking of some staunch supporters of the old regime whom we had inherited as civil servants. These were not easy tasks, and we undoubtedly made mistakes. This was to be expected, because in life, one cannot completely avoid mistakes, and as politicians, we had no formula for how to build a prosperous and stable new nation. One of our biggest shortcomings is that we have not been able to develop our economy to provide sufficient employment opportunities for our young people. It is pathetic to drive around the streets and to see young people standing along the side of the road from early morning, waiting for a Good Samaritan to give them any type of work. It is also disturbing that even some young people who have obtained university qualifications, either in Namibia or abroad, are not productively employed. We know that this problem cannot be solved simply be ensuring that employers have capital and equipment to build their businesses. Their business cannot grow without appropriately-skilled workers. It is obvious that we must think “out of the box” and test new solutions to the problems of unemployment and underdevelopment in order to eradicate the plague of poverty in a country that has every possibility of becoming prosperous. Fortunately, we have intellectuals outside the government who follow national developments closely and with a critical eye. The author of this book is one such person. Milton Louw has been observing and studying the progress made by political leaders of our country and has now come forward to share his insights and recommendations for governance, economic and social development and for how to avoid mistakes in the future. I am proud that we have Namibians who have the courage and the discipline to develop their ideas and to bring them to a public arena for consideration. I am particularly impressed that Mr. Louw has made proposals for: greater transparency in governance; education of young people in morality and ethical behavior; expansion of consumer rights; promotion of information and communications technology; measures to nurture entrepreneurism and to support business development; and strengthened social protection of vulnerable people. Because he is outside government, he may not be aware that some of his proposals are similar to government initiatives already in operation or in preparation. We need not agree with every aspect of Mr. Louw‘s broad-ranging analysis or with all his proposals in order to benefit from his ideas. I recommend that readers, including present and future political leaders, consider his ideas in the open manner that he has presented them. I hope that this will encourage more Namibians to bring to the public their ideas and proposals for how to better build our nation, through writing books and opinion articles and through scholarly research. I commend Milton Louw for his efforts and hope that many will follow his example. Andimba Toivo ya Toivo 13 May 2011

198

Call Me Ambassador Louw (2011-05-22 14:41)
According to Wikipedia ”An ambassador is the highest ranking [1]diplomat who represents a nation and is usually accredited to a [2]foreign sovereign or [3]government, or to an [4]international organization. Sometimes countries also appoint highly respected individuals as [5]Ambassador at Large who are assigned specific responsibilities, and they work to advise and assist their governments in a given area. The word is also often used more liberally for persons who are known, without national appointment, to represent certain professions, activities and fields of endeavor.” So please call me Ambassador Louw - representative to the Internet. Just a fun thought on a Sunday afternoon.
1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diplomat 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovereignty 3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government 4. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_organization 5. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambassador_at_Large

Two years of Status Updates (2011-05-23 20:51)
Sat May 21, 2011, 9:25 am: People with many interests live, not only longest, but happiest. Fri May 20, 2011, 10:11 am: POSSLQ - Persons of the Opposite Sex Sharing Living Quarters Thu May 19, 2011, 3:56 am: Child No. 3 is 18 today. My wish for all my friends who are Fathers: We can do more.... Wed May 18, 2011, 10:17 am: No good deed shall go unpunished. Tue May 17, 2011, 7:11 am: You are forgiven for your happiness and your successes only if you generously consent to share them. Mon May 16, 2011, 6:37 am: Food for thought: ”Independence did not just bring freedom for the oppressed African peoples. It braught freedom for the Boer people as well. The Boer people where freed firstly from an Afrikaner regime with it’s roots in British Colonialism (See the Anglo-Boer War)... Sun May 15, 2011, 7:44 am: Two blonde guys were standing at the base of a flagpole, looking up. A woman walked by and asked them what they were doing. ”We’re supposed to measure the height of this flagpole,” said blonde guy number one, ”but we don’t have a ladder.” The woman took a wrench from her purse and loosened some bolts. The guys helped her lay down the flagpole. Sun May 15, 2011, 6:45 am: If you’re trying to achieve, there will be roadblocks. I’ve had them; everybody has had them. But obstacles don’t have to stop you. If you run into a wall, don’t turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it. Sat May 14, 2011, 3:01 pm: Stop leaving and you will arrive. Stop searching and you will see. Stop running away and you will be found. Fri May 13, 2011, 10:01 am: And I thought life could not get better. WRONG. Just received a very complimentary foreword for my book from Andimba Toivo ya Toivo. ”Each moment a blessing of abundance, each breath a prayer of thanksgiving” Fri May 13, 2011, 5:51 am: â¬SIf a man loves the labour of his trade, apart from any question of success or fame, the gods have called him.⬕ Thu May 12, 2011, 9:35 am: You are not as fat as you imagine. Don’t worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum. Thu May 12, 2011, 4:56 am: Happy Birthday to the Founding Father, Dr Sam Nujoma. â¬SA leader is one 199

who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way.⬕ Wed May 11, 2011, 9:56 am: I am happy to announce to all my FB friends: I am now the proud co-owner and Editor of the consumer news namibia Magazine. Soon my partners and I will be helping you be an empowered consumer. Somedays cannot become better - and then they do Wed May 11, 2011, 8:02 am: Anyone know of a take-away for sale in 061? Preferably CBD Wed May 11, 2011, 5:06 am: What a wonderful day. Found me a place to stay in Windhoek east and life is looking up. (Within my budget too....) Thu May 5, 2011, 9:44 am: After much thought about Cassinga Day, the best I could do is quote: But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. Thu May 5, 2011, 9:31 am: â¬SIf I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.⬕ I have stood on the shoulders of Namibian giants, and I see far! Tue May 3, 2011, 11:12 am: Looking for a flat in Eros / Klein Windhoek (Windhoek East Constituency). Around 3,500 per month. HELP? Tue May 3, 2011, 10:37 am: Just bought a copy of John Arthur Liebenberg’s book - Bush of Ghosts. Something worthwhile to remember on Cassinga Day Tue April 26, 2011, 7:02 am: booking in electronically. Waiting for the taxi - feels like a first date. Namibia you’re the queen of my heart Your love is like Tears from the stars Namibia, I just want you to know Lovin’ you is like food to my soul Tue April 26, 2011, 4:33 am: IANAL Tue April 26, 2011, 4:24 am: TOPCA - Til Our Paths Cross Again Tue April 26, 2011, 3:27 am: Dear FB friends. Will be back in the land of the brave tomorrow morning. Will be flying in early and hope to see the green below me in the dawn’s new light. Morning has broken, may your day also be blessed with sunshine. Thu April 21, 2011, 5:02 am: NIGYYSOB: Now I’ve Got You, You Son Of a B*tch Thu April 21, 2011, 3:05 am: When you are joyous, look deep into your heart and you shall find it is only that which has given you sorrow that is giving you joy. When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight. Tue April 19, 2011, 7:20 am: There was once a young man who, in his youth, professed his desire to become a great writer. When asked to define ”Great” he said, ”I want to write stuff that the whole world will read, stuff that people will react to on a truly emotional level, stuff that will make them scream, cry, howl in pain and anger!” He now works for Microsoft, writing error messages. Tue April 19, 2011, 2:55 am: Glad to see FB has taken away the ability to send a link in a message. I had the same picture of a girl popping up all over the place yesterday. Tue April 19, 2011, 2:01 am: The hardest job facing kids today is to learn good manners without seeing any. Mon April 18, 2011, 10:48 am: The speed of growth of a Facebook Fan page can be measured. <–Speed–> INamibia = 28.04 Namibia = 18.00 Namibia is the most beautifulest country ever :) = 16.55 <–No of fans–> Namibia = 15,000 fans Namibia is the most beautifulest country ever :) = 7,000 fans iNamibia = 3,000 fans Mon April 18, 2011, 5:38 am: Many a man claims to have unfailing love, but a faithful man who can find? Thu April 14, 2011, 11:17 am: Congratulations to INamibia. You have reached 3,000 - and many more to come Thu April 14, 2011, 9:01 am: need to use mobile access more. Getting an android phone Thu April 14, 2011, 4:57 am: A little knowledge that acts is worth infinitely more than much knowledge that is idle. Wed April 13, 2011, 11:33 am: Crowded elevator smell different to midget. Wed April 13, 2011, 8:57 am: And think not you can Direct the course of love, For love, If it finds you worthy, Directs your course. Wed April 13, 2011, 3:28 am: ”When you are sorrowful, look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight.” To all my FB friends - we walk in the light together 200

Tue April 12, 2011, 9:18 am: Nation builders are not defined by income, influence or status, but by choice. Nation builders choose to be people of integrity, innovation and inspiration. Nation builders are driven by choice not comfort, Nation builders are driven by conviction not corruption. Mon April 11, 2011, 6:41 am: INamibia â¬SProsperity is a way of living and thinking, and not just money or things. Poverty is a way of living and thinking, and not just a lack of money or things.⬕ - Eric Butterworth Fri April 8, 2011, 7:59 am: gebruik ’n skuilnaam en skuil photo vir die naweek. Enjoy the weekend peeps. Me going drinking along the River Rhine Fri April 8, 2011, 6:51 am: sitting in Germany - listening to I’m in love with the DJ from an internet radio in Swakopmund. Love technology. Fri April 8, 2011, 6:39 am: ”Love, an emotion so strong that you would give up everything. To just feel it once, to know that you are part of something special. To know that you can feel what love really is; to know, to feel, to love.” Fri April 8, 2011, 4:15 am: It is that kind of Friday again. Big demonstrations are planned in Jordan and Egypt, where things will probably remain calm, but also in Yemen and Syria, where it could well get bloody. Fri April 8, 2011, 1:18 am: Good Morning my FB friends. I have a deep dark secret to share this morning. In South Africa, I am registered as a white male and do not qualify for black economic empowerment. Now I wonder, what did Robin Sherbourne mean when he wrote:”..You give BEE a bad name.”. Who was he stereotyping? Thu April 7, 2011, 7:50 am: shake, rattle and roll, got time on my hands and the devil is itching to use them Thu April 7, 2011, 2:54 am: Why do I get the most comments on my updates when I ask about racism? Wed April 6, 2011, 9:41 am: U besonderhede na my binne doosie - inbox me Wed April 6, 2011, 4:31 am: Is it racist if a white economist at a commercial bank tells me: â¬SYou give BEE a bad nameâ¬S because I have a default judgement against me? Mon April 4, 2011, 11:11 am: No. For me, and my children probably, we are too part of being ourselves rather than our cultural heritage. The daughters are born in Upington, Rehoboth, and Windhoek. Then add a my: Sister living in UK, married to an Indian with a daughter born in London. Brother living in South Africa, Uncle married and living in America...... Just too many border crossings, cultural classifications to fit into just one box Mon April 4, 2011, 3:29 am: ”Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behaviors. Keep your behaviors positive because your behaviors become your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny. ” Fri April 1, 2011, 10:44 am: I suggest that we have Non-Government Organisation Bill. In this Bill should be addressed the issues of mandate and good governance, and the mechanisms in the case of abuse. It should include a restraint on creation of new frequently unnecessary NGOs (that are mostly more helpful to the creators of the NGO than the people they are designed to serve). Fri April 1, 2011, 3:27 am: Thank you to my friends who have proposed me as the Namibian Ambassador to Facebook. I am deeply honoured. I shall ensure Facebook continue to disregard the privacy of all Namibians. Thu March 31, 2011, 11:32 am: Too busy today to Facebook. Damn must have been working? Wed March 30, 2011, 2:45 am: Today would have been my 20th wedding anniversary. Instead its my 10th divorce anniversary. So to all my married FB friends, ”Stay married, divorce is to easy and it almost always ends in regret.” âÜ® Tue March 29, 2011, 6:44 am: Who came up with words such as: duidelik, jits, tienaan, aweh, gwa, gaba, goffel, chuppie? Mon March 28, 2011, 10:16 am: Those who educate children well are more to be honored than parents, for these only gave life, those the art of living well. Mon March 28, 2011, 8:01 am: ”When we honestly ask ourselves which person in our lives means the most us, we often find that it is those who, instead of giving much advice, solutions, or cures, have chosen rather to share our pain and touch our wounds with a gentle and tender hand..... Fri March 25, 2011, 4:17 am: How many people living in Namibia are on Facebook? 107,720 people who live 201

in Namibia age 18 and older who are not already connected to Milton Louw Thu March 24, 2011, 10:36 am: Dear FB Friends> If a photo shows I have tagged you, it is for interest. If you are finished and want it to no longer appear on you wall, please just remove tag. This should be called the Egyptian tag / it gets messages across fb really fast. Thu March 24, 2011, 8:32 am: What is Namibia’s motto? Wed March 23, 2011, 10:44 am: My liewe neef Louw, my neus jeuk nou. Jeuk my liewe neef Louw se neus ook nou? Tue March 22, 2011, 10:05 am: Welcome to Milton’s folksonomy INamibia Milton Louw - Namibian Social Commentator Tue March 22, 2011, 5:28 am: Note to Gaddafi: â¬SWe are living in a time of violence and this violence is born out of inequality. We could have much less violence if the worldâ¬"s riches, including science, technology and morality ⬓ those great human creations ⬓ were spread more evenly.⬕ INamibia Namibia Mon March 21, 2011, 5:26 am: ”When I admire the wonder of a sunset or the beauty of the moon, my soul expands in worship of the Creator” (Mahatma Gandhi) Thu March 17, 2011, 11:27 am: New ways of thinking about journalism. From local news (village, town) to even specialised curated news INamibia John Grobler Robin Tyson Marbeline Goagoses Mwashekele Fran Thomas Mario Locke Wed March 16, 2011, 7:39 am: Translated into Afrikaans SWAPO would be: Volksorganisasie van SuidwesAfrika? Right? Wed March 16, 2011, 4:33 am: You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, ”I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.” You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Tue March 15, 2011, 11:19 am: The African People’s Organisation (APO), originally the African Political Organisation, was formed in Cape Town in 1902 and was initially the most prominent ”coloured” pressure group in South Africa. Its interest in SWA/Namibia goes back to at least 1918 when it opposed the transfer of the former German colony to the South Africa Authority. Tue March 15, 2011, 9:44 am: On 1 January 1899 - Credit regulations are promulgated by the German Administration (Namibia). It is established that no person can be sued for any credit. However, the traders force the administration to suspend this regulation (on 22.02.1899) Mon March 14, 2011, 8:22 am: so the first boer republic in Namibia was on land owned by a coloured. Good to know..... Fri March 11, 2011, 9:48 am: wow. this tsunami is wide. now hitting california.... Fri March 11, 2011, 9:40 am: U are looking phat - Pretty Hot And Tempting Fri March 11, 2011, 9:07 am: got me two and a half men (season 2 &3) glee, and the boondocks. plus goodwhiskey.com Fri March 11, 2011, 6:43 am: Whatever women do they must do twice as well as men to be thought half as good. Luckily, this is not difficult. Fri March 11, 2011, 5:40 am: For those who family and friends in Japan and other Asian countries: Tsunami Alert for New Zealand, the Philippines, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Hawaii, and others. Waves expected over the next few hours, caused by 8.9 earthquake in Japan. Fri March 11, 2011, 5:02 am: An important part of achieving success is making sure I do not use the measuring stick of others. If you find money important, then use it as YOUR measure. BUT, for me acquiring knowledge and helping others is my measure. Thu March 10, 2011, 9:05 am: ”We allow our ignorance to prevail upon us and make us think we can survive alone, alone in patches, alone in groups, alone in races, even alone in genders.” Tue March 8, 2011, 4:34 am: Right now I am stemming: stemming- The act of preparing words in a document specifically for enhanced searching, ”stemming” determines word boundaries in a query or document. For example, â¬Srun⬕ will match with â¬Srunning,⬕ â¬Sruns,⬕ and â¬Sran.⬕ The purpose of stemming is to increase the relevancy of search results as well as the speed of search results. Wed March 2, 2011, 8:37 am: how hard is visual studio 2010. need to program a business register in silverlight 202

- HELP Wed March 2, 2011, 6:55 am: Love the new buzz word ”Coloured”. Its getting people talking. Thanks: * Kuli Roberts * Jimmy Manyi * Trevor Manuels * and my man Trevor Noah Tue March 1, 2011, 9:07 am: There are already more mobile phone subscribers in Africa than in Canada and the US combined, proving that even those on the breadline have spending power. Tue March 1, 2011, 7:32 am: For a person to behave ethically I mean they should know the difference between their rights, and knowing what is the right thing to do. Tue March 1, 2011, 7:07 am: Spammers are now on FB too: Subject: Congratulations Milton FROM: THE DESK OF THE MANAGEMENT OFFICE FACEBOOK ANNIVERSARY PROMOTION REFL2/209318/09 BATCH:18/103/HME. Tue March 1, 2011, 6:05 am: I am a polyglot. Ek is veeltallig. Ich bin ein Polyglot. Je suis un polyglotte. æÆ æܯé¬aæ"“æ"°ç§œ-C í 訬ça 人㬠Mon February 28, 2011, 3:03 am: In the office loving what I do. Just got kick the fb habit for a day or two if I can do that, I might consider stopping smoking.... Fri February 25, 2011, 7:47 am: Uninstalling Monopolies in Namibia Telecom â–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ– Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ“-˃¢Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æ : done NBC â–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ“-˃¢Æâ–Æâ–Æâ–Æ : done MTC â–Æâ–Æâ–Æâ– â– â â– â– â– â– â“-ââ– â– â– â– â– : in progress MTC will be back II - they will have to fight to keep their monopoly. Pity they cannot just give better service Thu February 24, 2011, 2:55 am: Snow beautiful snow..... S $ & #t - nearly fall on my backside Wed February 23, 2011, 4:34 am: Facebook Zero was launched in about 45 countries in the Global South with the help of strategic partnerships with 50 carriers allowing users to access Facebook Zero at no data costs. Tue February 22, 2011, 10:02 am: getting out of the office. If I was in WHK I would personally bang some heads together. If I hear one more excuse from a bank on why they cannot help Namibians.... Mon February 21, 2011, 7:05 am: * Americans with African forefathers call themselves Afro-Americans. * Asians with European forefathers call themselves Euro-Asians. I have some European ancestors mixed with African and am born in Africa, so therefore I am a Euro-African ( Europeans with African forefathers should call themselves Afro-Europeans. ;-) Mon February 21, 2011, 2:51 am: ALOTBSOL - Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life Mon February 21, 2011, 2:19 am: Singing: I’m an African, I’m a EuroAfrican in Düsseldorf. (thanks Sting) Fri February 18, 2011, 8:25 am: movies downloaded. beer bought and stored. j &b and pizza tonite. off for the weekend peeps Fri February 18, 2011, 7:43 am: just got paid -in Euro. Thanking the powers that be I have no girlfriend Fri February 18, 2011, 4:45 am: Just read a column: Africa needs spiritual leadership. Does this columnist agree to Islamic leadership in a country? He probably means christian spiritual leadership. But still it bothers me: If our columnists are not clear in thinking, where are we as a nation? Thu February 17, 2011, 3:40 am: This morning I feel that someone is not taking Consumer Rights seriously. Can you believe the Law Reform Commission sent out the wrong document for discussion? If they cannot get that right...... Thu February 17, 2011, 2:22 am: â¬SDefining myself, as opposed to being defined by others, is one of the most difficult challenges I face.⬕ ⬓ Carol Moseley Braun Wed February 16, 2011, 10:00 am: Just got called a WOG! It means Wise Old Guy. Still feels insulting though. Cheers peeps, till 2morrow Wed February 16, 2011, 9:10 am: Who am I? I am: a) a social entrepreneur that has been struggling to start a credit register in SADC for 12 years; b) lecturer in IT at Polytechnic of Namibia; c) Founder of the Namibia Consumer Protection Group; d) Author of ”Future Namibia”, e) Social commentator and probably most important f) father of five Wed February 16, 2011, 3:06 am: Valentine is far enough away for us singles, so: ”There is no surprise more magical than the surprise of being loved. It is God’s finger on man’s shoulder.” Tue February 15, 2011, 10:26 am: Off I go home. Downloaded Vampire Diaries Season2 -thats what I am doing tonite 203

Tue February 15, 2011, 3:10 am: NB! â¬SKnowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.⬕ Tue February 15, 2011, 2:31 am: â¬SAny man who can drive safely while kissing a pretty girl is simply not giving the kiss the attention it deserves.⬕ Guess who - don’t google it! Mon February 14, 2011, 9:22 am: In Peru, cost information associated with financial services has to be published daily in newspapers. When this information was first published, interest rates dropped by as much as 15 percent in six months. Jeepers, what are we doing in Namibia? Mon February 14, 2011, 3:27 am: To all on Valentine: ”The way to love anything is to realize that it might be lost.” - G.K Chesterton Fri February 11, 2011, 7:45 am: Weekend time. Off to Hariksee (a lake near Mongengladbach) for a Hunting Association party and then some serious drinking. Spending the weekend at a Lodge house of a friend.Luckily he has a saun for that hangover I hope to have Thu February 10, 2011, 10:30 am: â¬SSweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds⬕ however, â¬SIn the next century it will be the early mechanical bird which gets the first plastic worm out of the artificial grass.⬕ Thu February 10, 2011, 7:27 am: I made a new story ”Living my dream” with myHistro! You can check it out here: http://beta.myhistro.com/show-story/1024 Thu February 10, 2011, 6:58 am: I just signed up in myHistro! You can check it out here: http://beta.myhistro.com Wed February 9, 2011, 10:06 am: freedom, yeah! Got my notebook connectedto the net (real fast out here). Seems though Namibia has leapfrogged most EU countries with software. Most of my data is in MS 2007 and now have to export back into 2003. Anways, who cares. I am living my dreams..... FREEDOM Tue February 8, 2011, 10:25 am: to all those who love me, remember me fondly till we meet again. to all those who hate me, remember me fondly till we meet again. To all others thanks for fondling.... Mon February 7, 2011, 8:34 am: One of my ex-students sent me a comment and must share my reply with you: The best part was while I was working on my dreams, I was able to inspire others. The weekend I was counting how many students I have been able to teach the past five years. It was incredible: Mon February 7, 2011, 3:08 am: Thinking what a wonderful day until I heard a daughter cry, ”....but daddy you owe me”. No parent owes their children, they do it because they love them. Perhaps I should spent more time teaching them this important lesson: ”No-one in life owes you anything. Don‘t go around saying the world owes you a living; the world owes you nothing; it was here first.” Mon February 7, 2011, 2:22 am: ”Being broke is a temporary situation. Being poor is a state of mind.” I am broke staying in a house of over a million euros right on the Rhine river in Düsseldorf. Really understanding this statement now Tue February 1, 2011, 8:05 am: The two thousand member Baptist church was filled to overflowing capacity one Sunday morning. The preacher was ready to start the sermon when two men, dressed in long black coats and black hats entered thru the rear of the church. Tue February 1, 2011, 3:18 am: Packing my clothes getting ready to leave. Will have to take dirty clothes because they wont get dry..... Fri January 28, 2011, 11:28 am: Last friday in whk. Weather is already like in germany. Just the beer is better @ home Thu January 27, 2011, 8:38 am: Just read an interesting comment: To most Christians, the Bible is like a software licence. Nobody actually reads it. They just scroll to the bottom and click ”I agree”. Now before you jump on me for quoting this - think where is your copy of the Bible? Thu January 27, 2011, 8:32 am: ”There was this man who muttered a few words in the church and found himself married. A year later he muttered something in his sleep and found himself divorced.” Thu January 27, 2011, 4:25 am: Just got told my visa is approved. Riding on sunshine..... Wed January 26, 2011, 11:38 am: Thanks 4 all the fish. News is good.... Sun January 23, 2011, 6:18 am: Wishing i had my own jimmy cricket.... Fri January 21, 2011, 5:58 am: Another gorgeous Friday on the farm. My last till I return in April. . Oh 204

well, just hope my visa gets done soon..... Wed January 19, 2011, 6:13 am: FB Friends. Urgently looking for a 1 or 2 room flat for my two daughters in Windhoek. Price range +/- N $ 2,000. Please inbox me if you can help. Tue January 18, 2011, 1:03 pm: FB Friends. Urgently looking for a 1 or 2 room flat for my two daughters in Windhoek. Price range +/- N $ 2,000. Please inbox me if you can help. Mon January 17, 2011, 9:44 am: URYY4M - You Are Too Wise For Me Mon January 17, 2011, 8:45 am: I am working together with LEAD Namibia on a conference scheduled for 13-15 July 2011 in Windhoek to assess the decentralisation and local economic development of Namibia. Would love to give a proposal on our LED methodlogy (inlcuding government services directories) if you any one is interested. Mon January 17, 2011, 2:47 am: â¬SYou don’t have to be educated to be a president.⬕ Julius Malema on education Mon January 17, 2011, 1:58 am: SEWAG - Scientifically Engineered Wild Ass Guess Mon January 17, 2011, 1:57 am: â¬SMoney grows on the tree of persistence⬕ - old Japanese probverb. ”Money grows on the tree of nepotism” - new Namibian proverb Thu January 13, 2011, 2:41 am: why do some people not do their jobs. Why do they want to get paid but do not provide the required servie? Wed January 12, 2011, 2:21 pm: FUBAR - F***ed Up Beyond All Recognition Tue January 11, 2011, 9:00 am: A man placed some flowers on the grave of his dearly departed mother and started back toward his car when his attention was diverted to another man kneeling at a grave. The man seemed to be praying with profound intensity and kept repeating, â¬SWhy did you have to die? Why did you have to die?⬕ Fri January 7, 2011, 4:23 am: STaying on a farm for three days - not yet been in the swimming pool. Gotta fix this now - and a lager going with Thu January 6, 2011, 2:11 am: To all my FB friends: Thanks for the best wishes on my Birthday. It was great to know so many of you were thinking of me. Fri December 17, 2010, 8:50 am: So often times it happens that we live our lives in chains And we never even know we have the key. Eagles Wed December 15, 2010, 6:55 am: Irish Blessing - to you and yours May the road rise to meet you, May the wind be always at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face, The rains fall soft upon your fields. And until we meet again, May God hold you in the palm of his hand. Thu December 9, 2010, 12:07 am: British Archaeologists dug to a depth of 10 feet last year, they found traces of copper wire that was 200 years old, the conclusion.... their ancestors had a telephone network more than 150 years ago. Wed December 8, 2010, 8:32 am: they recently did a study at Polytechnic of Namibia where they hooked up a test subject to various gadgets and then asked him to count to ten using his complete brain function and it went as expected: one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten Wed December 8, 2010, 8:19 am: IRONY AT ITâ¬"S BEST 90 people get the Swine Flu and everybody wants to wear a mask. A million people have AIDS and no one wants to wear a condom. Wed December 8, 2010, 2:26 am: Just been told the Czech Republic is included in my intinerary for the next few months. ”whoaah” Mon December 6, 2010, 7:53 am: All that we are is the result of what we have thought. If a man speaks or acts with an evil thought, pain follows him. If a man speaks or acts with a pure thought, happiness follows him, like a shadow that never leaves him. Mon December 6, 2010, 5:28 am: ”Metaphors are dangerous. Love begins with a metaphor. Which is to say, love begins at the point when a woman enters her first word into our poetic memory.” Mon December 6, 2010, 12:38 am: bit bucket - The fictitious place in cyberspace where missing documents or files are said to end up. Fri December 3, 2010, 8:42 am: Off for the weekend. Broke but lots of promise.... Fri December 3, 2010, 7:20 am: It’s the small things in day to day life that get us through. The small comforts 205

that we take for granted, but our world would fall apart without. Hearing your favourite song on the radio on the way to work. An ”I love you” from someone we care about. Fri December 3, 2010, 3:33 am: ”If you love what you do, then it is no longer work. The money you earn is secondary when you love your work.” Fri December 3, 2010, 12:41 am: ”Live well, Learn plenty, Laugh often, Love much.” Thu December 2, 2010, 2:38 am: Just must laugh today: Gatiep sit gesuip langs Maraai se graf en tjank. Lekker dronk verdrietig: ”Meraai as jy net terugkom hou ek op drink!” ’n Mol is besig om ’n hopie op te stoot. Gatiep spring die hopie plat met albei voete: ”Jirre Meraai, kan jy nie ’n joke vattie!?” Thu December 2, 2010, 1:42 am: A little boy was waiting for his mother to come out of the grocery store. As he waited, he was approached by a man who asked, ”Son, can you tell me where the Post Office is?” The little boy replied, ”Sure! Just go straight down this street acoupla blocks and turn to your right.” Tue November 30, 2010, 9:04 am: magic lantern - Code name for the FBI’s plan to send encryption-key and password-sniffing spyware disguised as email attachments to a suspect’s computer. As seen in Wired from MSNBC: ”Magic lantern installs so-called keylogging software on a suspect’s machine that is capable of capturing keystrokes typed on a computer.” Tue November 30, 2010, 12:41 am: Cancellation of Miss Palm Beach 2010 Mon November 29, 2010, 12:44 am: BSBD &NE - Book Smart, Brain Dead & No Experience Thu November 25, 2010, 5:47 am: ”If I am what I have and if I lose what I have who then am I? ” Wed November 24, 2010, 1:43 am: Who is Milan Kundera? He said ”The basis of shame is not some personal mistake of ours, but the ignominy, the humiliation we feel that we must be what we are without any choice in the matter, and that this humiliation is seen by everyone.⬕ Tue November 23, 2010, 8:57 am: In all my efforts to learn to read, my mother shared fully my ambition and sympathized with me and aided me in every way she could. If I have done anything in life worth attention, I feel sure that I inherited the disposition from my mother.- Booker T. Washington Tue November 16, 2010, 6:01 am: What would I prefer? a) being rich b) having friends c) fulfilling my dreams Thu November 11, 2010, 12:18 am: A great resource for telemarketing in Namibia Tue November 9, 2010, 2:52 am: Off for the day. Won a couple of grand at the casino last night - time to spoil myself. BTW: Normal people believe that ”If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Engineers believe that ”If it ain’t broke, it doesn’t have enough features yet” Tue November 9, 2010, 2:42 am: n Boer maak ’n plan, maar ’n ”Coloured” maak MAGIC An old man lived alone in Cape Town. He wanted to spade his potato garden, but it was very hard work. His only son, Clemence, who used to help him, was in Polsmoor Prison. Fri November 5, 2010, 1:05 am: ”I predict future happiness for Namibians if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.” (misquoting Thomas Jefferson) Thu November 4, 2010, 7:48 am: Just had a lot of fun deleting a whole group under this new fb adding regime. Got a troll and really had people mad. Sorry to those of my friends who got baited. next time we will have a closed group. ;-) Thu November 4, 2010, 6:55 am: Am looking for an expert on Namibian languages to meet with Google Representative - seriously Thu November 4, 2010, 5:37 am: Damn the heat - looking forward to cooler climes in Germany ;-) Wed November 3, 2010, 4:04 am: Today I have realised there are times when you must use swear words. They occur when using a Microsoft product! Wed November 3, 2010, 2:37 am: Stay away from Windows Live if you have Gmail Wed November 3, 2010, 2:05 am: Microsoft sucks Tue November 2, 2010, 2:51 am: â¬SThe farther backward you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.⬕ Mon November 1, 2010, 6:54 am: New FB group policy. You put your friends on first (instead of inviting) and then they must leave the group. Silly policy - sure they will have to change it. Mon November 1, 2010, 1:02 am: 060/081 Nation, or any other for that matter - we will continue to pressure 206

GRN to allow us the users to own our own numbers. Viva Number Portability. Fri October 29, 2010, 12:11 pm: damn. looking for at least a room to rent in Windhoek to store my furniture for a short while. damn these landlords in WHK that abuse us renters. sms me on 081629755 if you can help? Fri October 29, 2010, 1:28 am: even when life gets me down - lost my great flat, lost a big contract, the woman who is like a mother passed away suddenly on Tuesday - I still go on and enjoy whatever hand life gives me Thu October 28, 2010, 9:31 am: A man with a gun went into a bank and demanded their money. Once he was given the money, he turned to a customer and asked, ”Did you see me rob this bank?”The man replied, ”Yes sir, I did.”The robber then shot him in the temple, killing him instantly. Thu October 28, 2010, 9:07 am: Just read my post of August 20, 2009 at 2:36 pm - amazing the total information FB keeps on you. If you want you can download all the information and look through it - from your first post. Thu October 28, 2010, 7:00 am: I was barely sitting down when I heard a voice from the other stall saying: ”Hi, how are you?” I’m not the type to start a conversation in the men’s restroom but I don’t know what got into me, so I answered, somewhat embarrassed, ”Doin’ just fine!” Thu October 28, 2010, 1:31 am: â¬SBecause of deep love, one is courageous. Because of frugality, one is generous. Because of not daring to be ahead of the world, one becomes the leader of the world.⬕ Wed October 27, 2010, 1:04 am: Today I am an oyster making pearls. ”What can be more foolish than to think that all this rare fabric of heaven and earth could come by chance, when all the skill of art is not able to make an oyster! ” Tue October 26, 2010, 7:36 am: Looking through my FB friends I am tempted to say: ”By associating with wise people you will become wise yourself.” Mon October 25, 2010, 7:46 am: Is it only me - FB not working - feeling lonely - and without my games Mon October 25, 2010, 6:22 am: In a study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, British researchers found that people who drank moderately ⬓ 1 to 2 units of alcohol a day ⬓ before the age of 60, suffered less cognitive decline after the age of 60 than others who drank heavily or not at all. This is not a suggestion of course to begin drinking heavily every day. But it does appear that moderate consumption of alcohol can benefit your ... Mon October 25, 2010, 4:27 am: Seek the lofty by reading, hearing and seeing great work at some moment every day. Fri October 22, 2010, 10:39 am: off for the weekend, getting paid only on Monday ;-( Fri October 22, 2010, 2:14 am: Doublethink means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one’s mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them Wed October 20, 2010, 10:01 am: sitting on the farm after a plane ride. phew time for a lager and sunset. ;-) Tue October 19, 2010, 8:24 am: 25 windows open on my desktop. WTF - I am being productive or just looking busy? Tue October 19, 2010, 5:45 am: ”when you see something that needs to be done but is not being done, recognise it: It is an opportunity for work!” - Milton Louw 2008 Fri October 15, 2010, 1:39 am: - gloabl handwashing day - feel like Pontius Pilate. or is it better to play the fiddle while Rome is burning. Fri October 15, 2010, 1:27 am: Only one man in a thousand is a leader of men – the other 999 follow women. Fri October 15, 2010, 1:05 am: My daughter, Ziana, is the Junior Mayor of the Swakopmund Junior Town Council. Does that mean I must call her, ”Your Worship”? Thu October 14, 2010, 1:35 am: â¬SA leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves.⬕ Mon October 11, 2010, 1:27 am: Today is going to be a great day, enjoy! Tue September 28, 2010, 12:55 am: â¬SMoney is only a human invention. I get paid for my work, it’s a system of trade, but it’s not my purpose and reason for living.⬕ Fri September 24, 2010, 7:36 am: â¬SKeep away from those who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you believe that you too can become great.⬕ 207

Fri September 24, 2010, 7:09 am: â¬SIf ever there is tomorrow when we’re not together.. there is something you must always remember. you are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think. but the most important thing is, even if we’re apart.. i’ll always be with you.⬕ - winnie the ...... Thu September 23, 2010, 9:46 am: â¬SBe patient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves. Do not now seek the answers, which cannot be given you because you would not be able to live them. And the point is to live everything. Live the questions⬕ Thu September 23, 2010, 4:06 am: You don’t need pain killers for another man’s headache Tue September 21, 2010, 3:04 am: Happiness is a perfume you cannot pour on others without getting a few drops on yourself. Mon September 20, 2010, 9:34 am: TTTHTFAL- Talk To The Hand The Face Ain’t Listening Mon September 20, 2010, 5:15 am: They say we‘re young and we don‘t know Won‘t find out until we grow Well I don‘t know baby that‘s true ’Cause you got me and baby I got you (Chorus) Babe, I got you babe, I got you, Babe. They say our love won‘t pay the rent Before it‘s earned our money‘s always spent I guess that‘s so, we don‘t have a lot But at least I‘m sure of all the things we got..................................... Mon September 20, 2010, 2:20 am: ”You have within you a god-given vibrational meter that tells you what is good for you and what is not good for you. That vibrational meter is your emotions. If something feels good, then it is good for you. If something does not feel good, then it isn’t.” Mon September 20, 2010, 1:46 am: Really thinking of switching from fb and only using Windows Live. Love this ”add as a favourite button”. AND its not being blocked by the normal corporate and government nonsense! Mon September 20, 2010, 1:21 am: ”You have to grow from the inside out. None can teach you, none can make you spiritual. There is no other teacher but your own soul.” Mon September 20, 2010, 1:12 am: yetties - A term for ”young, entrepreneurial, tech-based twenty-somethings” or ”young, entrepreneurial technocrats.” They represent the modern version of yuppies, ”young, urban professionals.” Mon September 20, 2010, 1:03 am: I love Mondays - a whole week to fill and its all up to me Fri September 17, 2010, 5:41 am: â¬SA dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.⬕ Wed September 15, 2010, 1:49 am: ”We need to build millions of little moments of caring on an individual level. Indeed, as talk of a politics of meaning becomes more widespread, many people will feel it easier to publicly acknowledge their own spiritual and ethical aspirations and will allow themselves to give more space to their highest vision in their personal interactions with others. Tue September 14, 2010, 1:10 am: USING COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE IN 2010 - report at http://competeinc.zendesk.com/attachments/token/swb8juquxmp6bdl/?nam e=5-Steps-to-MarketingSuccess-With-Competitive-Intelligence.pdf Tue September 14, 2010, 1:06 am: Life used to be lonely and dreary Then you came into it; It was fun.Then it Ended. Now itâ¬"s lonely and dreamy again â¬ÜCause Iâ¬"m without you living on my dreams losing touch of reality Mon September 13, 2010, 4:56 am: SWALBCAKWS - Sealed With A Lick Because A Kiss Won’t Stick Mon September 13, 2010, 4:49 am: I am a web hippie! Fri September 10, 2010, 7:19 am: Starting the weekend..... Fri September 10, 2010, 5:15 am: woke up with a hangover. never felt better in my life ;-) Thu September 9, 2010, 1:08 am: What a beautiful morning. ”Joy can be real only if people look upon their life as a service, and have a definite object in life outside themselves and their personal happiness.” - Tolstoy Mon September 6, 2010, 1:48 am: I got Dorito Syndrome: Feelings of emptiness and dissatisfaction triggered by addictive substances that lack nutritional content. ”I just spent six hours surfing the Web, and now I’ve got a bad case of Dorito Syndrome.” Fri September 3, 2010, 9:55 am: if you can get a few friends and colleagues together, (maximum of 12) I can offer a whole day course on Online Social Media at a total cost of N $ 3500 including meals and courseware. Normally such a course will cost around N $ 950 per person ;-). Willing also to do for an organisation that 208

wants to provide their employees, or sell such a course to others. Fri September 3, 2010, 8:45 am: Now its not only south african goods, but chinese too. The problem very few of us want to go the industrial route? perhaps its too hard Fri September 3, 2010, 7:12 am: Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny. Fri September 3, 2010, 4:51 am: Things that make me go mmmmm.. Why is ’bra’ singular and ’panties’ plural? Fri September 3, 2010, 2:33 am: a top of the range Mercedes Benz as the â¬Stools of the trade⬕ of a Minister. - Dr Mamphele Ramphele Wed September 1, 2010, 3:14 am: If I find the f* &ˆ &k face that uses the number 0812401010 I will put it where the sun don’t shine Tue August 31, 2010, 10:35 am: I no longer believe in what I thought was a fundamental part of my being. Namely the independence of the judiciary. When a person’s life warrants only a fine, then the Judiciary should be brought to book. I no longer believe in the supreme law of my country - the one I was wiling to go to jail for. Tue August 31, 2010, 9:51 am: I no longer believe in what I thought was a fundamental part of my being. Namely the independence of the judiciary. When a person’s life warrants only a fine, then the Judiciary should be brought to book. Tue August 31, 2010, 2:30 am: â¬SMay you - Work like you don’t need the money, love like you’ve never been hurt, dance like no-one is watching, screw like it’s being filmed, and drink like a true Irishman⬕ Mon August 30, 2010, 7:05 am: Web dead: Slang for the act of erasing your online identity or ”digital doppelganger,” it refers to taking certain actions in order to remove your personal data or ”digital footprint” from the Internet. For example, ”Ever since he applied for that government job, he removed his profiles from Facebook and MySpace. Apparently he’s going Web dead.” Fri August 27, 2010, 6:59 am: People of little understanding are most apt to be angry when their sense is called into question. Fri August 27, 2010, 3:35 am: ”If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.” Thoreau, Henry David Wed August 25, 2010, 8:14 am: Look at a babyâ¬"s toothless smile; Listen to its laugh; Then tell me ”Love does not exist!” Tue August 24, 2010, 4:28 am: â¬SNobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.⬕ Tue August 24, 2010, 2:43 am: â¬SNothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.⬕ Mon August 23, 2010, 6:03 am: Get paid for what you do well, Neither under or over ⬓ charge Earn fairly, pay slightly better Enjoy the fruits of your labour Yet bury the seeds. ”Milton Louw - 2000” Fri August 20, 2010, 6:35 am: Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting a tomato in a fruit salad. Fri August 20, 2010, 2:28 am: Starting Day 2 of social media workshop. Damn, people are paying to learn Facebook and blogging Thu August 19, 2010, 8:21 am: me getting training - not doing training. och it is hard after lunch to keep my eyes open Thu August 19, 2010, 5:09 am: when can we run a competition for the Namibian Blogger of the Year? Thu August 19, 2010, 2:53 am: Sitting in a workshop on ”marketing with online social media”.mmmmm Wed August 18, 2010, 9:49 am: What do I want out of life? I want to be successful, to overcome the toughest of challenges to prove to those who doubt me that yes-I can do it, to be a good person, and a better friend. Wed August 18, 2010, 3:50 am: Sweet dreams are made of this Wed August 18, 2010, 2:59 am: Lets liven this place up. WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS! I’ve paid my dues Time after time I’ve done my sentence But committed no crime And bad mistakes I’ve made a few I’ve had 209

my share of sand kicked in my face But I’ve come through Wed August 18, 2010, 2:21 am: Listening to Dave Koz. Ciggy between the lips, cup of Java in the hand. What more can I ask for? Tue August 17, 2010, 2:13 am: Each morning when I open my eyes I say to myself: I, not events, have the power to make me happy or unhappy today. I can choose which it shall be. Yesterday is dead, tomorrow hasn’t arrived yet. I have just one day, today, and I’m going to be happy in it. Sat August 14, 2010, 9:07 am: is there any young blogger out there that wants to join me in mass mingling on 20th August @NICE - 18h00? Thu August 12, 2010, 10:06 am: Really great article on Innovation by Dr. John Steytler of Bank Windhoek. http://www.bankwindhoek.com.na/files/MM 203.pdf Thu August 12, 2010, 8:17 am: Just confirmed my order for a fool-proof heart. Hope this one is immune to my tinkering Wed August 11, 2010, 7:49 am: â¬SHave you ever been in love? Horrible isn’t it? It makes you so vulnerable. It opens your chest and it opens up your heart and it means that someone can get inside you and mess you up. You build up all these defenses, you build up a whole suit of armor, so that nothing can hurt you, then one stupid person, no different from any other stupid person, wanders into your stupid life... Thu August 5, 2010, 10:43 am: We come to love not by finding a perfect person, but by learning to see an imperfect person perfectly. I love me! Wed August 4, 2010, 2:14 am: â¬SRevenge is always the weak pleasure of a little and narrow mind⬕ today I shall take revenge on myself.... Thu July 29, 2010, 10:32 am: Transformation is only valid if it is carried out with the people, not for them. Liberation is like a childbirth, and a painful one. The person who emerges is a new person: no longer either oppressor or oppressed, but a person in the process of achieving freedom. It is only the oppressed who, by freeing themselves, can free their oppressors. - Paulo Freire Thu July 29, 2010, 8:25 am: mmmmm ”If you don’t like something change it; if you can’t change it, change the way you think about it.” Thu July 29, 2010, 2:00 am: â¬SRevenge is an act of passion; vengeance of justice. Injuries are revenged; crimes are avenged.⬕ Fri July 23, 2010, 2:27 am: Have you ever wondered which hurts the most: saying something and wishing you had not, or saying nothing, and wishing you had? Thu July 22, 2010, 8:06 am: can nobody get it? You start with the other person as in ”Peter and I”. NOT ”me and Peter”. Damn, is this worth correcting people about every day? Thu July 22, 2010, 2:22 am: Today I will be increasing my circle of influence by understanding the perceptions of others Wed July 21, 2010, 11:20 am: looked for inspiration today and found it... in the last place I would expect? Wed July 21, 2010, 2:10 am: is looking for inspiration or love. will probably spend lost of time on it too. Mon July 19, 2010, 4:40 am: Today I shall first seek to understand others, and then to be understood. Should make for a good day in class Thu July 15, 2010, 10:59 am: sitting writing code for websites - the little pleasures in life - and getting paid... Thu July 15, 2010, 2:05 am: Working a 52 hour week and loving it. & the money is not bad either Wed July 14, 2010, 10:54 am: Harold Pukewitz Graduate School of Business officially launched on his 95th Birthday. Congrats to ”Uncle Harold” and Polytech for bringing this to Namibia Tue July 13, 2010, 3:00 am: Age is only a number, a cipher for the records. A man can’t retire his experience. He must use it. Experience achieves more with less energy and time. Mon July 12, 2010, 10:41 am: This picture of me shall not be on for long. Its for the curious who want to see me shorn? Mon July 12, 2010, 2:38 am: Today I dare to be a fool, and that is the first step in the direction of wisdom. Mon July 12, 2010, 2:22 am: who left the door open in windhoek? damn, its cold - and i shaved all my hair off this weekend. bad timing? Fri July 9, 2010, 2:17 am: Life is one big road with lots of signs. So when you riding through the ruts, don’t 210

complicate your mind. Flee from hate, mischief and jealousy. Don’t bury your thoughts, put your vision to reality. Wake Up and Live! ” - my friend Bob..... Thu July 8, 2010, 11:16 am: got mugged last night. stupid thieves found no cash on me. inconvenienced because they also stole my flats keys and cellullar. well have to do without communications for a while ;-( Thu July 8, 2010, 5:41 am: Today I shall do no harm. I shall not tell you I love you! Wed July 7, 2010, 4:43 am: I want to be President of Namibia! Tue July 6, 2010, 5:00 am: My todays are always good. Mostly its knowing that my past will not influence how I feel today that counts for me. Tue June 29, 2010, 11:30 am: â¬SThose sweetly smiling angels with pensive looks, innocent faces, and cash-boxes for hearts⬕ Fri June 25, 2010, 4:58 am: â¬SLife is not a journey to the grave with intentions of arriving safely in a pretty well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out and loudly proclaiming ... WOW! What a ride!⬕ Fri June 25, 2010, 2:01 am: Today is mine - a day to share what i have with those around me Thu June 24, 2010, 10:10 am: Great to be alive. Taking time to smell the roses Thu June 24, 2010, 4:15 am: This morning I fell like talking in tobgues. Liebe ist wie eine Violine. Die Musik kann stoppen aber die Schnüre bleiben für immer. Missing my smurfie ;-( Wed June 23, 2010, 4:32 am: â¬SWhen the solution is simple, God is answering.⬕ Tue June 22, 2010, 11:12 am: â¬SAlcohol is like love. The first kiss is magic, the second is intimate, the third is routine. After that you take the girl’s clothes off.⬕ Mon June 21, 2010, 11:28 am: Some people say I live in a dream world and they face reality? Whoa, I’m turning one into the other! Wed June 16, 2010, 10:58 am: I apologise for lying to you. I promise I won’t deceive you again except in matters of this sort. Wed June 16, 2010, 2:07 am: The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched - they must be felt with the heart. Fri June 11, 2010, 2:14 am: â¬SThe desire of the man is for the woman, but the desire of the woman is for the desire of the man.⬕ DUHH Thu June 10, 2010, 2:27 am: Consumers union calls for general disclosure of data leaks - The Dutch consumers union has called for a general requirement for companies and organisations to disclose personal data leaks. The Dutch government has been considering such a requirement for telecom companies, but the union would like to see the government immediately implement the obligation for all companies. Thu June 10, 2010, 2:18 am: â¬SA dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.⬕ Wed June 9, 2010, 1:54 am: ”A wise and frugal government, which shall leave men free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned this is the sum of good government. ” That’s what I want! Tue June 8, 2010, 10:16 am: Forget love, I would rather fall in beer... Tue June 8, 2010, 7:52 am: everything I desire has led me on this path. Now to find a rest stop. Then back to work me go Mon June 7, 2010, 10:24 am: ... is feeling a little lonely. A room fulll of people writing tests and I am lonely? Mon June 7, 2010, 5:47 am: this a nother gr8 day Thu June 3, 2010, 7:07 am: ”Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.” Thu June 3, 2010, 2:26 am: Welcome to the real-time.” The present, as in right now. Not the past, not the future, not even one minute from now, it means this actual moment. Commonly used in the industry to refer to something that is not cached.” Enjoy your non-cached moments today Tue June 1, 2010, 10:51 am: each morning I pray: Now I live only for this day, I have no other! Tue June 1, 2010, 2:28 am: .... being in demand is not all its made out to be. Time management must kick in - procrastination must become a thing of the past 211

Mon May 31, 2010, 11:31 am: work is too much - hope the pay is too? Mon May 31, 2010, 8:02 am: got my second wind. Things are looking rosy. Mon May 31, 2010, 2:17 am: ”Money has never made man happy, nor will it, there is nothing in its nature to produce happiness. The more of it one has the more one wants.” Thu May 27, 2010, 4:39 am: Just started a new class. I am blessed to love my job Wed May 26, 2010, 11:01 am: What a wonderful day. Every day just gets better and better. Wed May 26, 2010, 6:36 am: off to do a lunchtime insert on NBC TV. enjoying my day Wed May 26, 2010, 5:17 am: Had a great breakfast meeting. Got the juices flowing. Started a fb group ”Black Economic Empowerment is needed in Namibia”. All on my day off.... Mon May 24, 2010, 4:13 am: ”The first step in the acquisition of wisdom is silence, the second listening, the third memory, the fourth practice, the fifth teaching others.” Mon May 24, 2010, 2:09 am: Good morning. No need to go work - but still I did. Love my job! Fri May 21, 2010, 2:39 am: ”The man of virtue makes the difficulty to be overcome his first business, and success only a subsequent consideration.” Thu May 20, 2010, 10:52 am: I have yet to hear a man ask for advice on how to combine marriage and a career. Thu May 20, 2010, 2:11 am: Each day is what you make of it. If you find yourself with nothing to do, visit a language site and learn Chinese? Wed May 19, 2010, 2:15 am: You are what your deep, driving desire is. As your deep, driving desire is, so is your will. As your will is, so is your deed. As your deed is, so is your destiny. Tue May 18, 2010, 2:28 am: With the past, I have nothing to do; nor with the future. I live now. - Emerson Mon May 17, 2010, 9:23 am: ”Sanity may be madness but the maddest of all is to see life as it is and not as it should be.” still tilting at windmills Don Quixote Mon May 17, 2010, 8:04 am: Had a perfect long weekend. Who says exes cannot be friends? Mon May 17, 2010, 5:24 am: doing project with government employees. I love my job! Tue May 11, 2010, 2:10 am: thanks to all my friends for the words of encouragement, both before and after Talk of the Nation. It was a great show. Mon May 10, 2010, 10:49 am: ”Make the lie big, make it simple, keep saying it, and eventually they will believe it” Mon May 10, 2010, 8:13 am: ”The worst lies are the lies we tell ourselves. We live in denial of what we do, even what we think. We do this because we’re afraid. We fear we will not find love, and when we find it we fear we’ll lose it. We fear that if we do not have love we will be unhappy.” Mon May 10, 2010, 8:05 am: Gonna be on ”Talk of the nationa” tonight at 21H00. Talking about competition and consumers Fri May 7, 2010, 6:58 am: Thank god for looking after my daughter. Got bumped by a car running a red light. Thankfully she is only bruised Thu May 6, 2010, 2:09 am: What a wonderful morning. Weather is great, job is exciting, and my children love me ;-) Mon May 3, 2010, 7:29 am: What is it with ex-wife? The minute you get your life together - she tries to drop you down the toilet. God give me patience and strength to fight this fight on behalf of all fathers. Sun May 2, 2010, 5:34 am: Making a new start. Forgetting, and forgiving those who may have forgotten they hurt me. Hey, why should I carry this burden if they don’t? Mon April 26, 2010, 8:14 am: ”It is idle to dread what you cannot avoid.” - Publius Syrus Fri April 23, 2010, 11:44 am: feeling lonely. picking up a bottle of jameson then watching movies under the covers Fri April 23, 2010, 5:17 am: There is only one person who could ever make you happy, and that person is you. Tue April 20, 2010, 1:32 pm: just made 10,000 for a days work for the first time. That whiskey is going to taste good!! Mon April 19, 2010, 1:22 pm: Okay - this is a good fight. Why do I feel I’m alone out here. Me against the world. LOL - know you fb friends are there too... 212

Fri April 16, 2010, 10:05 am: ”If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.” Thoreau, Henry David { { { {Enjoy your weekend } } } } Fri April 16, 2010, 9:54 am: ,!!!! (=) talk to the hand Fri April 16, 2010, 9:47 am: walking on sunshine... And don’t it feel good Fri April 16, 2010, 3:22 am: I not to support leaderless street actions. Any action must call for an expected reaction - otherwise we are pissing in the dark. It is easy for a person living in a developed country to suggest what we must do in street action - I would only condone such action if the leader was present at such action. Fri April 16, 2010, 3:06 am: Today is D-Day. I will know if I get the grant soon! Thu April 15, 2010, 2:17 am: Today I will listen to gossip. My horoscope says there might be some truth in it. Wed April 14, 2010, 11:24 am: Form now on my motto: We spend too much time telling others about our suffering, rather than rejoicing on how we overcame it. Tue April 13, 2010, 11:15 am: Remember when we were young and couldn’t wait to grow old so we could do whatever we wanted, whenever we wanted - without having to explain to anyone? How’s that working out for you? Tue April 13, 2010, 7:54 am: yeah. what a day. Milton 5: Devil 0 Mon April 12, 2010, 6:40 am: whats this with the 35 % hike. A week after submissions some of still shouting. We need to keep the momentum if we have a hope of stopping it. Fri April 9, 2010, 11:17 am: I love life. Thank God for friends, health and family. Off for the weekend. Fri April 9, 2010, 10:28 am: feeling powerful and surrounded by friends - while all alone marking papers ;-) Fri April 9, 2010, 8:52 am: Showing my class what fb is Thu April 8, 2010, 10:50 am: its hard to keep your spirits up when its seems the Devil has an off day and he just spent it on you Thu April 8, 2010, 3:29 am: FB is back on at the Poly. They listened (or read my note on how to circumvent ;-) Thu April 8, 2010, 2:12 am: I am what I am, I am my own special creation.... Wed April 7, 2010, 2:25 am: Dont get me wrong, I did not want to do no harm, but you force me to do things to get around your stupid blocking of fb. (See my notes if you want too!) Tue April 6, 2010, 11:16 am: wtf. Now even Polytech is shutting off Facebook. and Plaxo, and linkedIn. Damn, if they knew how much they benfit from some of the stuff we do here. Can someone please quantify the value of these networks? Tue April 6, 2010, 4:29 am: What a wonderful feeling. I have dreamed big, and now it is time to reap the fruits. Thu April 1, 2010, 1:03 am: Just found out the nbc is becoming commercial - gr8 April’s fool joke... Tue March 30, 2010, 1:17 am: ”They do not love that do not show their love. The course of true love never did run smooth. Love is a familiar. Love is a devil. There is no evil angel but Love.” Mon March 29, 2010, 9:51 am: Can hardly sleep. All that we have been working for the past ten years comes to life this week. Mon March 29, 2010, 12:56 am: â¬SDreams are illustrations... from the book your soul is writing about you.⬕ Fri March 26, 2010, 9:38 am: another day in paradise - off for a beer and a smoke Thu March 25, 2010, 1:34 am: Do what you can, with what you have, where you are! I am living the dreams... Wed March 24, 2010, 6:56 am: If you treat me like a child, I will act like a child...if you treat a man like a man...ahhh, who am I kidding.. Tue March 23, 2010, 1:07 am: what a wonderful feeling,... Fri March 19, 2010, 7:22 am: sitting here in a silent class. its wonderful to watch other people work.. Fri March 19, 2010, 1:08 am: Absurdum est ut alios regat, qui seipsum regere nescit. Thu March 18, 2010, 10:03 am: The mind of the superior man is conversant with righteousness; the mind of the mean man is conversant with gain. Thu March 18, 2010, 9:11 am: It has yet to be proven that intelligence has any survival value. 213

Wed March 17, 2010, 10:21 am: What a wonderfull life! Off to watch season 2 of weeds ;-) Wed March 17, 2010, 1:02 am: Great things amuse those with great minds Mon March 15, 2010, 10:31 am: Off to watch a movie at home. End of Consumer Day 2010. Mon March 15, 2010, 10:30 am: I need some one to give Excel and Outlook training for about 7 people. > Excel 2007 Intermediate for 17/18 March 2010 > Outlook- except on Internet for 19 March 2010 Please drop me a line urgently Mon March 15, 2010, 1:38 am: Having a great day. Started with a radio interview on NBC pushing for consumer rights. Now off to a free breakfast paid for by Government. Never realised non-profit work was this good? Fri March 12, 2010, 10:34 am: off i go home - time for a tafel and a ciggie Fri March 12, 2010, 12:58 am: Leadership: The art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it. -((( Consumer Day includes a Breakfast and Lunch on Monday ;-))) Thu March 11, 2010, 8:40 am: time for dragon-slaying mood - get behind me satan Wed March 10, 2010, 11:08 am: good night - hope to c u all at the Consumer Day on the 15th? Free lunch included Tue March 9, 2010, 2:36 am: I’m not sure what I need, but I have what I want. Mon March 8, 2010, 12:18 am: Good morning all. Sun is shining, little bit chilly, but my heart is bursting with joy and and happiness. Gr8 to be alive! Sun March 7, 2010, 10:12 am: busy- things are going well. working at a big corporation on this sunday, giving classes every day this week at polytech. gr8 paycheck looking better. Fri March 5, 2010, 9:05 am: pretexting: In short, ”pretexting” means impersonating someone else. Pretexting is the act of creating and using an invented scenario (the pretext) to persuade a targeted victim to release information. While it is typically done over the telephone, data brokers also obtain confidential information using computers. Wed March 3, 2010, 12:44 am: ”Greed is a fat demon with a small mouth and whatever you feed it is never enough.” - Janwillem van de Wetering Tue March 2, 2010, 9:02 am: out of here.... Tue March 2, 2010, 3:57 am: negotiating consumer day proceedings with government. going well! Tue March 2, 2010, 12:26 am: Love the rain. Thanking the Big Guy for everything he has given me. Mon March 1, 2010, 2:04 am: No one can confidently say that he will still be living tomorrow. Mon March 1, 2010, 1:11 am: Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, it seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come Mon March 1, 2010, 12:27 am: got to work. enough said. Fri February 26, 2010, 8:23 am: looking forward to a bottle of whiskey and a good book - enjoy your weekend. Fri February 26, 2010, 12:25 am: YRYOCC - You’re Running on Your Own Cookoo Clock - cukoo, cukoo Thu February 25, 2010, 8:46 am: Your imagination is your preview of life’s coming attractions. - Einstein Thu February 25, 2010, 5:14 am: Many ideas grow better when transplanted into another mind, than in the one where they sprung up. THUS lets share peeps Thu February 25, 2010, 12:32 am: time for an English breakfast. Feel like the king of my castle. Wed February 24, 2010, 5:46 am: What I have to give, let me give with a smile. Once again today I am blessed without asking. Wed February 24, 2010, 12:58 am: In the film ”Invention of Lying” they mention Namibia as the place to go where no-one will know you. mmm... Tue February 23, 2010, 12:53 am: I yearn for the impossible - and when I succeed - I am more than mediocre Mon February 22, 2010, 11:52 pm: Life can only get better. From where I am, everything looks up ;-) Mon February 22, 2010, 3:51 am: feeling absolutely wonderful today! Its who I know, not what Thu February 18, 2010, 3:57 am: Once you agree upon the price you must pay for success, it allows you to ignore the pain, the hungry stomach and the temporary failures. Thu February 18, 2010, 1:51 am: What’s complicated? I think divorce with benefits is gr8 214

Tue February 16, 2010, 8:42 am: Yipee - they agree I’m right. Pity it took ten years for them to understand. Still wonder if it was me that could not explain properly - mmmm Tue February 16, 2010, 5:05 am: â¬SEvery great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.⬕ - Harriet Tubman. I know this to be true. After ten years of dreaming, I am seeing my dream come true. Mon February 15, 2010, 9:03 am: if you want your life back, go to Settings, click Account Settings, click ”deactivate” then click Deactivate Account. Its fun and really works ..LOL. Mon February 15, 2010, 7:32 am: Money’s too tight to mention... Mon February 15, 2010, 1:10 am: Heaven please send to all mankind, Understanding and peace of mind. But, if it’s not asking too much Please send me someone to love. Show all the world how to get along, Peace will enter when hate is gone. But, if it’s not asking too much,Please send me someone to love. - Sade Mon February 15, 2010, 12:29 am: Of all the bars in all the world why did she choose this one? Wed February 10, 2010, 8:27 am: Listening to a double cd from Kenny G. Wow this man has spent a lot of time in my life! Thanks for the music Wed February 10, 2010, 12:12 am: The past ten years have been very lean. Now its the turn of the fat years... Tue February 9, 2010, 12:34 am: to a gr8 day. Got the new Sade (Soldier of Love) and loads of work to go through. Thanks Peter;-) Mon February 8, 2010, 9:21 am: I cherish the day, I won’t go astray, I won’t be afraid, You won’t catch me running, You’re ruling the way that I move, You take my air - vintage Sade - aaaaaah Mon February 8, 2010, 6:51 am: If, out of all the moments in my whole life, I could keep one, to cherish all the days of my life, I would choose the moment I met you. Mon February 8, 2010, 1:03 am: I love Mondays. May you all enjoy the day. I know I will. Fri February 5, 2010, 8:53 am: planning on buying a six-pack - finishing reading my book - and writing a long (hand-written) love letter. Ag bliss.... Fri February 5, 2010, 8:09 am: ”The first step in the acquisition of wisdom is silence, the second listening, the third memory, the fourth practice, the fifth teaching others.” Fri February 5, 2010, 6:28 am: let’s leave Zuma alone - but one last one from a friend Charles: ——–> BREAKING NEWS: Security company Viro; men’s outfitters Armani and plastic bag company Jiffy have come up with a novel solution to our President’s ”problem” and which draws on each company’s strengths. They’ll be installing a new technology into all Zuma’s pants, it’s called ZIP-LOCK!! Thu February 4, 2010, 8:26 am: Any man can love a million women, but only a real man can love one woman in a million ways? Thu February 4, 2010, 4:29 am: ”Now I’ve had the time of my life, No I never felt like this before, Yes I swear it’s the truth, and I owe it all to you..... dirty dancing rocks! Thu February 4, 2010, 12:00 am: When I’m alone in my room sometimes I stare at the walland in the back of my mind I hear my conscience callTelling me I need a girl who’s as sweet as a dovefor the first time in my life, I see I need love Wed February 3, 2010, 7:30 am: ”Work spares us from three evils: boredom, vice, and need.” Wed February 3, 2010, 12:30 am: looking forward to a gr8 day. Let me not follow the clamor of the world, but walk calmly in my path. Tue February 2, 2010, 1:00 am: Looking forward to a gr8 day... Mon February 1, 2010, 9:16 am: done with Monday. crossed out, klaar Sun January 31, 2010, 11:58 pm: looking forward to a gr8 week. Feb is here. Fri January 29, 2010, 8:53 am: ”All round is haste, confusion, noise. For power and wealth men stretch the day, From dawn till dusk. But quietly I go my way. For glitter, show, to taunt the crowd, Desire-tossed in wild dismay, Men sell their souls. But quietly I go my way. The green of all the fields is mine; The stars, the night, the wind at play, A peaceful heart, while quietlyI go my way.” - Thanks Max Ehrmann Fri January 29, 2010, 1:01 am: Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy? Caught in a landslide No escape from reality Open your eyes Look up to the skies and see I’m just a poor boy (Poor boy) I need no sympathy Because I’m easy come, easy go Little high, little low Any way the wind blows Doesn’t really matter to 215

meeeee Thu January 28, 2010, 11:56 pm: I’m a POTATO - Person Over Thirty Acting Twenty On Thu January 28, 2010, 9:15 am: We are the champions my friend, And we’ll keep on fighting till the end, We are the champions, We are the champions, No time for losers’cause we are the champions of the (world) - See it keeps playing not only radio but on FB too. Probably showing my age but what the hell, QUEEN rocks. Thu January 28, 2010, 4:25 am: Still singing the song. - I’ve taken my bows, And my curtain calls, You brought me fame and fortune and everything that goes with it, I thank you all, But it’s been no bed of roses, No pleasure cruise, I consider it a challenge before the whole human race, And I ain’t gonna lose” Thu January 28, 2010, 12:19 am: looking forward to a great day. ”I’ve paid my dues, Time after time, I’ve done my sentence, But committed no crime, And bad mistakes, I’ve made a few, I’ve had my share of sand kicked in my face, But I’ve come through!” Wed January 27, 2010, 8:59 am: Gonna go home and have a tafel. Maybe even have a nite out. deserve it Wed January 27, 2010, 6:58 am: I love my job! How many jobs out there will pay you N $ 2,000 for five hours work? Wed January 27, 2010, 1:07 am: Looking forward to slaying some dragons today. Where is my horse Sancho? Tue January 26, 2010, 7:41 am: The Inner Voice of Intuition (God’s voice), talks to us from morning till noon, even when we do not listen to it. Tue January 26, 2010, 1:43 am: There is a time for everything. A time to sow and NOW is my time to reap. Mon January 25, 2010, 9:13 am: Phew - need more time to get my work done this Monday. Anyway, why get worried about what you can do next week... Mon January 25, 2010, 2:29 am: The most certain test by which we judge whether a country is really free is the amount of security enjoyed by minorities.- John Dalberg, LordActon Mon January 25, 2010, 12:17 am: Morning has broken, like the first morning - ready to take on the world. May all your energy spent be renewable Fri January 22, 2010, 9:04 am: Have a gr8 weekend. No fb - only real life and real beer this weekend. Fri January 22, 2010, 5:44 am: Could U beThe Most Beautiful Girl in the World - It’s plain 2 see - U’re the reason that God made a girl - Oh yes U are — was ist mit mir? Fri January 22, 2010, 2:32 am: The question for each man to settle is not what he would do if he had means, time, influence and educational advantages; the question is what he will do with the things he has. The moment a young man ceases to dream or to bemoan his lack of opportunities and resolutely looks his conditions in the face, and resolves to change them, he lays the corner-stone of a solid and honorable success. - Hamilton Wright Mabie Thu January 21, 2010, 9:37 am: the rain is gr8. pity i have no raincoat. gotta do like in the old days - use a shopping bag LOL Thu January 21, 2010, 1:43 am: gee crime is really on the rise. Woke up at 4 o’clock to see a thief shining a light through my open window with an implement to grab things through the burglar bars. From fright i shouted at him. Luckily he had no gun and ran away. Eish, what’s our country coming too? Wed January 20, 2010, 7:18 am: HUH? To write well, express yourself like common people, but think like a wise man. Or, think as wise men do, but speak as the common people do. Wed January 20, 2010, 4:55 am: I have finished built my castles in the sky. Now I am busy with the foundations ;-) Tue January 19, 2010, 7:11 am: Thanks Cuana. Read it all again.: Love is patient; love is kind; love is not envious or boastful or arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice in wrongdoing, but rejoices in the truth. It bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Tue January 19, 2010, 12:19 am: Today I make the day mine. Got a call from a lawyer, they need my help? Gr8 Mon January 18, 2010, 9:10 am: Going home, reading a good book under the covers with a pot of milo.... Mon January 18, 2010, 1:23 am: Looking forward to a great day - When I get ready to talk to people, I spend two thirds of the time thinking what they want to hear and one third thinking about what I want to say. 216

Thu January 14, 2010, 8:54 am: ooooh. Chris Rock really does it in his documentary on hair. Do the guys out there even understand this issue? Thu January 14, 2010, 4:07 am: there are four kinds of knowing. Knowing you know, knowing you know not, not knowing you know and not knowing you know not Thu January 14, 2010, 2:08 am: singing again.... Life’s not worth a damn ’til you can say, ’Hey world, I am what I am!’ Thu January 14, 2010, 12:09 am: lifted my eyes up to the mountains and was inspired Wed January 13, 2010, 9:12 am: What can I say. You win some, you lose some. Today I won some! Wed January 13, 2010, 5:04 am: WOW. I’m the Man! aced that one.... Wed January 13, 2010, 1:11 am: Today I am taking life by the horns, throwing it over my shoulder and making it mine! Tue January 12, 2010, 9:26 am: Life is getting better and better. Hope the luck is being shared! Tue January 12, 2010, 12:11 am: Courage is the discovery that you may not win, and trying when you know you can lose. Mon January 11, 2010, 12:13 am: wonderful to be at work. now to make me some moolah Tue December 22, 2009, 11:08 am: ”The joy is that we can take back our bodies, reclaim our health, and restore ourselves to balance. We can take power over what and how we eat. We can rejuvenate and recharge ourselves, bringing healing to the wounds we carry inside us, and bringing to fuller life the wonderful person that each of us can be.” Thu December 17, 2009, 5:37 am: I am here on earth to help others; what on earth the others are here for I don’t know. Thu December 17, 2009, 4:42 am: @ex-wife: u divorced me - i left you the house, you wouldn’t even let me see the kids. u made a pcket from the house, then spent it. now you want money for what??? Thu December 17, 2009, 12:09 am: been invited to spend a week on a guestfarm - must have done something good in my previous life. Wed December 16, 2009, 12:23 am: feeling great this morning - drowned my sorrows - now need a lifesaver ahhhhh coffee is good Tue December 15, 2009, 8:38 am: what is it with some woman? you don’t want me but you want to make my life hell. Enough is enough. No more mister nice guy Tue December 15, 2009, 6:38 am: Time is perfect. Everybody is too busy winding down to notice me preparing for the new year. Tue December 15, 2009, 12:36 am: Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realise we cannot eat money. - whats with the global warming conference? don’t they get it? Mon December 14, 2009, 1:32 am: looking forward to a brand new day. bring it on... Wed December 9, 2009, 1:50 am: Lottery: A tax on people who are bad at math. Wed December 9, 2009, 12:23 am: Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday. Tue December 8, 2009, 6:42 am: ”Call it a clan, call it a network, call it a tribe, call it a family. Whatever you call it, whoever you are, you need one.” Fri December 4, 2009, 8:05 am: feeling down. missing people i don’t know Wed December 2, 2009, 9:47 am: Life is only a outer layer, for reality is only realised by the insane. Wed December 2, 2009, 7:30 am: Life and Jah are one in the same. Jah is the gift of existence. I am in some way eternal, I will never be duplicated. The sigularity of every man and woman is Jah’s gift. What we struggle to make of it is our sole gift to Jah. The process of what that struggle becomes, in time, the Truth. Wed December 2, 2009, 1:19 am: To me, there is no greater act of courage than being the one who kisses first. Wed December 2, 2009, 12:42 am: Life is interesting - if you make mistakes. Thats how we learn. Tue December 1, 2009, 9:07 am: working lekker - now off to home I go. Tue December 1, 2009, 6:52 am: perhaps we should make a national search for the Namibian equivalent of ”irish paddy” or ”koos van der merwe”. This way we will be able to laugh at ourselves too? Tue December 1, 2009, 12:12 am: ”Love is born with the pleasure of looking at each other, it is fed with the 217

necessity of seeing each other, it is concluded with the impossibility of separation.” Mon November 30, 2009, 4:20 am: On cloud nine. Just thought up a new concept and know it will work. Love the inspiration i get from all my FB buddies. Thanks Mon November 30, 2009, 12:43 am: If you don’t know me by now, you will NEVER, NEVER, know me...... oooooh. Gr8 morning. happy to be living in a democracy Fri November 27, 2009, 8:28 am: â¬SIf I make a fool of myself, who cares? I’m not frightened by anyone’s perception of me.⬕ Fri November 27, 2009, 7:35 am: Thank you for the rain... Thu November 26, 2009, 9:09 am: Never leave for tomorrow what can be done next week Thu November 26, 2009, 1:23 am: Don’t ask (it’s forbidden to know) what final fate the gods have and what end the gods will give me or you... love where Carpe Diem comes from - Seize the day and place no trust in tomorrow. Wed November 25, 2009, 5:39 am: feeling rather wise today - had a woman in my arms last nite and sorta hoping wisdom rubs off Mon November 23, 2009, 12:37 am: setting up an economic database of namibia. really enjoying my job. Need to find more clients for my data centre Fri November 20, 2009, 5:30 am: I luv my life. I might not always like where i am, but love where i’m going! Fri November 20, 2009, 12:11 am: The fear of death is the most unjustified of all fears, for there’s no risk of accident for someone who’s dead. - Einstein Thu November 19, 2009, 8:47 am: what a gr8 day this was. â¬SKeep your dreams alive. Understand to achieve anything requires faith and belief in yourself, vision, hard work, determination, and dedication. Remember all things are possible for those who believe.⬕ Thu November 19, 2009, 12:08 am: Yeah, looking forward to today. And if someone should make me angry hey today they can get away with it... Tue November 17, 2009, 12:34 am: FB is a contact sport. Just like any sport, you need to practice and play regularly. Fri November 13, 2009, 12:40 am: The ideal goal of consumer protection groups is to push consumers to question the morality of a purchased product’s origins. Fri November 13, 2009, 12:01 am: What a wonderful morning. Sun is shining, and I cannot wait to start working! Tue November 10, 2009, 5:53 am: Jusr walked passed some freshly cut grass. Pleasant memories of my youth come floating back. Thu November 5, 2009, 5:50 am: Let us create a petition for the observations of National Consumers Day in Namibia. I suggest we hold this on 15 March every year. See more at Namibia Consumer Protecttion Group: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=166649789666 Wed November 4, 2009, 3:07 am: FACEBOOK EXPERIMENT: If you are reading this, whether we do or don’t speak often, post a comment of the first memory you have of you and me that pops in your head, when you’ve finished post this paragraph on your own status. You’ll be surprised what people remember about you... Mon October 26, 2009, 6:27 am: one more week before I join Legalshield. YEAH. Wed October 21, 2009, 9:18 am: Culture is the habit of being pleased with the best and knowing why. Tue October 20, 2009, 9:47 am: What is it about beauty and brains. Which would I prfer to have in the person in my life? Fri October 16, 2009, 3:01 am: Going to the farm for the weekend. Simply love the guest farm thing, lazing in the sun, safari drive and then Tafel. Thu October 15, 2009, 7:56 am: Meeting the staff at Legalshield in an hour. Looking forward to the next challenge in my life. Thu October 15, 2009, 5:30 am: If you can give your son or daughter only one gift, let it be enthusiasm. Tue October 13, 2009, 9:39 am: Your words are truth, and you have promised these good things to me, your servant. And now, may it please you to bless me and my family so that our dynasty may continue forever 218

before you. For when you grant a blessing to your servant, O Sovereign LORD, it is an eternal blessing! Mon October 12, 2009, 2:41 am: Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You. - Dr. Seuss Fri October 9, 2009, 4:13 am: Glad I have so much work to do! A big challenge is always inspiring. Thu October 8, 2009, 5:38 am: â¬SIt is good to have money and the things that money can buy, but it’s good too, to check up once in a while and make sure you haven’t lost the things money can’t buy.⬕ - George Lorimer Thu October 8, 2009, 1:28 am: My wish for today: show my appreciation to my friends and family! Wed October 7, 2009, 6:36 am: starting up my playlist with some Earl Klugh and then on to UB40... Wed October 7, 2009, 3:04 am: Having a gr8 day. Basking in the love of friends Tue October 6, 2009, 8:56 am: should I do what I love or go for a job with twice the money? Wed September 30, 2009, 5:20 am: Want to go to the farm. A biology student from Germany is going to be spending two weeks there. Wish I could go with her ;-) Wed September 30, 2009, 4:20 am: Sitting in a class learning MS project. Gr8 to have FB in the background. Tue September 29, 2009, 3:52 am: Don’t cry for a woman who’s left you, the next one may fall for your smile. Tue September 29, 2009, 3:34 am: a smile just made my day. Hope mine will make yours lighter too. Mon September 28, 2009, 1:50 am: I really need a DWPKOTL - (Deep Wet Passionate Kiss On The Lips). Love this lingo, learn new acronyms everyday. Tue September 22, 2009, 9:15 am: @bianca / nou nou op kantoor Fri September 18, 2009, 3:43 am: Ricardo Mensah - thanks for the 3g - should be working though ;-) Fri September 18, 2009, 3:42 am: ”For you and I are past our dancing days” . Romeo and Juliet ( Quote Act I, Scene V). LOVE Shakespeare! Thu September 17, 2009, 10:14 am: We are one nation. Will we ever be one continent, one peoples? Integration with our neighbours will be harder than accepting western cultures Wed September 16, 2009, 2:01 am: What would I change in my past if I could? Nothing! What would I change about today - lots. Rather contradictory I admit - after all my past brought me here. I think most of us (me too) do not appreciate today enough. Then when we look back we only remember the good bits. Tue September 15, 2009, 9:50 am: Who dares call me a BHOF? I might be old but I am definitely not bald ;-) Mon September 14, 2009, 3:21 am: Got my Master MCAS and my Certified Trainer dosc this morning. What a great Monday morning - after all ïf you love your job - you never need to work again”. Sat September 12, 2009, 4:04 am: teaching on a saturday . What a wonderful way to spend my day. Fri September 11, 2009, 9:19 am: A friend who is far away is sometimes much nearer than one who is at hand. Is not the mountain far more awe-inspiring and more clearly visible to one passing through the valley than to those who inhabit the mountain? - Kahlil Gibran Fri September 11, 2009, 4:43 am: The attitude to education which is presently geared to becoming an industrial country, must be changed to a system where knowing where the information is available is more important than having the information in your head. Thu September 10, 2009, 6:20 am: â¬SIf you’re respectful by habit, constantly honouring the worthy, four things increase: long life, beauty, happiness, strength.⬕-Buddha Tue September 8, 2009, 10:30 am: need my blankie - my yellow one.. Tue September 8, 2009, 6:23 am: Finished my second MCAS (MS Certified Appliactin Specialist). Was real easy. mmmm wondering why more Namibians don’t learn this and get paid to teach it? Mon September 7, 2009, 8:07 am: All kids, when they go to school, are pretty good artists and dancers and singers and poets. All that gets buried, basically through being educated, or brainwashed. - William Wiley Mon September 7, 2009, 6:44 am: ”Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.⬕ - Goethe â¬SThinking is more interesting than knowing, but less interesting than looking⬕ - Goethe Fri September 4, 2009, 8:49 am: â¬SAll men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible.⬕ -Thomas Edward Lawrence (of Arabia) 219

Wed September 2, 2009, 6:38 am: Just became a MCAS (Microsoft Certified Application Specialist) Mon August 31, 2009, 11:04 am: Patrick Henry was a wise man.. Mon August 31, 2009, 10:57 am: I know of no way of judging the future but by the past, that is by the lamp of experience Fri August 28, 2009, 10:41 am: Still love my children - after all its not their fault they are just like the worse in me and the best of their monther;-) Fri August 28, 2009, 4:41 am: Great to be working. Enjoying the knowledge I get paid again.... Thu August 27, 2009, 2:30 am: Regardless of which party I belong to, or which one I vote for, that party must be one that makes a difference in my own life, as well as brings improvement for my country. Tue August 25, 2009, 4:53 am: Barack Obama’s Communications Director is in Namibia for a lecture on 27 August from 18H00 @ Polytechnic Auditorium Fri August 21, 2009, 6:47 am: When most around me have invested in property, I invested time in my friends. Now when I am in need, they offer to help - sometimes before I know I need help. Thu August 20, 2009, 12:59 pm: I FB because it allows me to see out of my box. My opinions have been formed by my upbringing and experiences, yet through this medium I interact without any regards to the social norms. Least of all the differences in age, culture or gender. Tue August 18, 2009, 9:01 am: â¬SProsperity is a way of living and thinking, and not just money or things. Poverty is a way of living and thinking, and not just a lack of money or things.⬕ - Eric Butterworth Tue August 18, 2009, 2:32 am: ⬦ Policemen should be appointed and promoted on the basis of education, ability, experience, expertise, performance, character, integrity and motivation. Mon August 17, 2009, 4:22 am: In Namibia, we only plastered over the problem of economic integration. The black majority is still not participating in the meaningful way promised by the politicians. Or for that matter, the way the previous English and Afrikaner political movements allowed their voters to prosper. Thu August 6, 2009, 2:55 am: need a spell check in fb Sun July 26, 2009, 10:01 am: Teaching young people to drive on the farm can be scary. need a dop. Sun July 26, 2009, 4:18 am: Jogging is worth it if breakfast was this good every morning. Especially enjoyed the goats cheese - a new Namibia delicacy Sat July 25, 2009, 3:37 am: Why is it, no matter which direction I jog, the wind is always coming from the front? Fri July 24, 2009, 8:08 am: Never thought I would ever say ”I have had enough biltong” Fri July 24, 2009, 3:04 am: Just jogged four kilometres - gotta stop smoking. Thu July 23, 2009, 12:55 pm: Time to get offline and enjoy braaing that oryx. Thu July 23, 2009, 8:40 am: Just found a place to build my weekend house. Over 1,000 hectares of peace and its all mine. Just 2 hours drive from Windhoek ;-) Thu July 23, 2009, 4:17 am: All good things come to them that wait - as long as they keep doing their bit! Tue July 21, 2009, 3:05 pm: Lekker to be on the farm again. Lots of wild animals - they know I don’t have a rifle.... Mon July 20, 2009, 10:35 am: Life is really great. Now where is that little bugger with the horns/hallo who always f #@ $ it up? Wed July 15, 2009, 9:18 am: Does not matter where I lay my head at night - only the quality of my dreams Wed July 8, 2009, 8:17 am: What made me tick when I was younger? I really need to get wound up again..... Fri July 3, 2009, 8:51 am: ”These days I lie awake asking where I went wrong. Then my inner voice answers, WE are going to need more than one night.”

Hermanus van Wyk: The Biblical Moses’ of the Rehoboth Baster Community - by Shampapi Shiremo (2011-05-27 14:59)
[1]New Era article 220

To many Namibians, the name Rehoboth sound too familiar because it is a well-known small town located about 90 Km south of Windhoek. However, a closer look at the history of Rehoboth and the Baster Community who have settled in that area since around 1870, one would find that Rehoboth is a biblical name meaning the promised land.’ Since the promised land’ is what the Israelis who were moving out of Egyptian captivity wandered in desert for many years in order to get there, it is therefore likely that the history of Namibia’s Rehoboth have a similar narrative with the biblical Israelis whom Moses led. However, unlike the biblical Moses who himself did not reach the promised land’, Hermanus van Wyk did reach his after leading his people from the Cape Colony bondage. In the 1983 publication entitled the History Makers’, by Lester Venter, the biography of Kaptein Hermanus van Wyk was presented. Related to the Griqua of the Historical Adam Kok of the Cape Colony, the Baster Community also had origin in South Africa where they were mistreated by Dutch farmers in the area. It was because of seeking freedom from the oppression of the Cape Colony, that the Ninety Baster families who looked to the bearded and patriarchal Hermanus van Wyk as their leader, in a Boer Trekkers style, decided to leave the Cape colony. Originally, Hermanus van Wyk lived at Amandelboom, near Williston, in the mid 19 century. Shortly before 1868, Hermanus van Wyk and his community lived at a place called De Tuin in the Northern Cape. In 1868, they decided to leave De Tuin and cross the Orange River, going via Pella mission station. A missionary, Heidmann, travelled with them. Lester Venter (1983) writes that it was at that time when the people started to call Van Wyk “Kaptein”. Two years later, they arrived at Berseba, where the trekking Baster families stayed for four months. Scouts were sent out and they saw the Rehoboth district, one of the most fertile areas of Namibia, which at the time was settled by the Swaartboois. Thus, in 1870, during a Treaty signed at Okahandja between Kamaharero, Jan Jonker, Hermanus van Wyk accompanied by two elders, Piet Beukes and Paul Isaacs told the Herero and Nama Chiefs that he came there to let them know that he was seeking a place of abode. Abraham Swaartbooi agreed to let the Baster community occupy Rehoboth for as long as the Swartboois did want it. An initial payment of eight Horses was made and the “rent” was fixed at one horse per year. The Baster Trekkers’ then moved from Berseba and arrived at Rehoboth in October 1870. Lester Venter (Ibid) writes that the Basters set about industriously, converting the region into a paradise they ordained to be theirs. They improved the flow of water from the river, built houses and repaired the church that had been there. A small group went to the Cape to buy a stock of Merino sheep. In 1872, the Baster community came up with a Constitution (aka Vaderlike Wette) in which Hermanus van Wyk was invested in the office of Kaptein. By 76, the approximately 800 people at Rehoboth owned some 20 000 sheep and between 2000 and 3000 cattle and horses. It was for this reason that Kaptein Hermanus van Wyk wanted a speedy conclusion of the sale of Rehoboth by the Swartbooi reasoning further that they wanted to improve the channelling of water by blasting. At this point Abraham Swartbooi was dragging his feet, saying that if it arose in future that he wanted to sell the land, he would give the Baster community the rights of first option at value set at £ 2750 to be paid in the form of 100 horses and five wagons. Kaptein Swartbooi’s reluctance to put his proposal in writing necessitated Hermanus van Wyk to appeal through the missionary Hugo Hahn to W.C Palgrave, the Special Commissioner of the Cape Government. In 1880, war broke out between the Nama and the Herero and the Baster community though hesitating to join the war, later on sided with Jan Jonker and Abraham Swartbooi in a Nama alliance against the Herero. This decision was only taken after the Herero attacked and killed a Baster traveller called McNab and other six Basters. However, two years later and, in a turn of events, Jan Jonker and Abraham Swartbooi turned and attacked their allies, the Baster Community at Rehoboth, carrying off 500 cattle and 2000 small livestock. The Basters, under Hermanus van Wyk fended off their enemy but suffered heavy losses. In the fight Swartbooi 221

was wounded and later died. For the next two years, until 1884, Hermanus van Wyk made efforts to mediate between the Nama and the Herero, but with little success. During that time, the Swartboois reneged on their late leader, Kaptein Abraham Swartbooi of giving the right of first option to the Baster in the event of selling Rehoboth. They sold it to a then well-known Cape coloured man namely, Willy Jordan, who wanted to settle the Dorsland Trekkers’ there. Before Jordan could put his plan into action, the Germans appeared on the scene, and they recognised the Basters as the rightful inhabitants and owners of Rehoboth and concluded a Protection treaty with them. One would therefore understand that it was mainly for that reason that Hermanus van Wyk had sided with the Germans in the subsequent years, as the latter had helped the former to keep Rehoboth as his and his people’s place of abode. Thus, the widely speculated notion that Hermanus van Wyk collaborated with the Germans even during the Herero-Nama against German colonialism of 1904-1908 needs to be placed in the right historical context. Lester Venter (ibid) concludes that little is recorded of the last years of Hermanus van Wyk. He died in Rehoboth in 1905, an aged and revered man, the founding father of Rehoboth.
1. http://www.newera.com.na/article.php?articleid=38914&title=Hermanus%20van%20Wyk: %20%20The%20%E2%80%98Biblical%20Moses%E2%80%99%20of%20the%20%20Rehoboth%20Baster%20Community

3.5

June

Creating a common memory for Namibians (2011-06-05 12:36)
It is quite common to hear politicians admonoshing the white communities for not participating in natinal events. I am not a history buff, but have recently been talking about my student politics days and placed a few pohotos from this period. It got me thinking about the participation of young people (white, coloured or black) and the following struck me in an article, ”..But maybe memory is what young people need to be taught before they can be taught actual history.” So, I have started a small project to ensure that our common memory becomes available to our youth through the Wikipedia website. This site covers almost all areas of knowledge, but I found very little written about Namibia. While doing this I found that there were no templates on the languages or cultural identities of many of our peopls. I have started the [1]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coloured People in Namibia and hope to assist in developing similar sites about our common memories. At the end of the project,I hope to create an SMS novella about certain historical events and peoplein Namibia. If you have the timeand the inclination, feel free to assist.
1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coloured_People_in_Namibia

”Everyone is Free” (to use sun screen) (2011-06-05 12:37)
Graduation Speech (Written by Chicago newspaper columnist, Mary Schmich – recently recorded with music by Baz Luhrmann) Ladies and gentlemen of the class of ’97: Wear sunscreen. 222

If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it. The long-term benefits of sunscreen have been proved by scientists, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience. I will dispense this advice now. Enjoy the power and beauty of your youth. Oh, never mind. You will not understand the power and beauty of your youth until they’ve faded. But trust me, in 20 years, you’ll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can’t grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked. You are not as fat as you imagine. Don’t worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum. The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 4 p.m. on some idle Tuesday. Do one thing every day that scares you. Sing. Don’t be reckless with other people’s hearts. Don’t put up with people who are reckless with yours. Floss. Don’t waste your time on jealousy. Sometimes you’re ahead, sometimes you’re behind. The race is long and, in the end, it’s only with yourself. Remember compliments you receive. Forget the insults. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how. Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements. Stretch. Don’t feel guilty if you don’t know what you want to do with your life. The most interesting people I know didn’t know at 22 what they wanted to do with their lives. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds I know still don’t. Get plenty of calcium. Be kind to your knees. You’ll miss them when they’re gone. Maybe you’ll marry, maybe you won’t. Maybe you’ll have children, maybe you won’t. Maybe you’ll divorce at 40, maybe you’ll dance the funky chicken on your 75th wedding anniversary. Whatever you do, don’t congratulate yourself too much, or berate yourself either. Your choices are half chance. So are everybody else’s. Enjoy your body. Use it every way you can. Don’t be afraid of it or of what other people think of it. It’s the greatest instrument you’ll ever own. Dance, even if you have nowhere to do it but your living room. Read the directions, even if you don’t follow them. Do not read beauty magazines. They will only make you feel ugly. Get to know your parents. You never know when they’ll be gone for good. Be nice to your siblings. They’re your best link to your past and the people most likely to stick with you in the future. Understand that friends come and go, but with a precious few you should hold on. Work hard to bridge the gaps in geography and lifestyle, because the older you get, the more you need the people who knew you when you were young. Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard. Live in Northern California once, but leave before it makes you soft. Travel. Accept certain inalienable truths: Prices will rise. Politicians will philander. You, too, will get old. And when you do, you’ll fantasize that when you were young prices were reasonable, politicians were noble and children respected their elders. Respect your elders. Don’t expect anyone else to support you. Maybe you have a trust fund. Maybe you’ll have a wealthy spouse. But you never know when either one might run out. Don’t mess too much with your hair or by the time you’re 40 it will look 85. Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it. Advice is a form of nostalgia. Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it’s worth. But trust me on the sunscreen.

Network for quality, not quantity (2011-06-05 12:38)
It may be not what you know but who you know that matters, but having 976 Facebook friends does not necessarily mean you are well connected, says Harvard Business Review. The secret of successful networks has never been their size. If you were to take the advice of some self-help books on networking, you would amass as many Facebook friends and LinkedIn connections as possible. But research shows that bigger networks are not necessarily better. In fact, large networks can hurt your performance by putting too many collaborative demands on you. 223

The people who network successfully tend to have more ties to people who are not very connected themselves. People with connections to the less-connected are more likely to hear about ideas that haven’t gotten exposure elsewhere, and are able to piece together unique opportunities. Don’t treat networking like a popularity contest. Find ways to connect with more than the usual suspects by reaching out to those who aren’t surrounded by others. * The Management Tip of the Day offers quick, practical management tips and ideas from Harvard Business Review and HBR.org (http:\\[1]www.hbr.org). Today’s management tip was adapted from The Most Valuable People in Your Network’ by Rob Cross. – Nampa-Reuters
1. http://www.hbr.org/

Constitution of SWAPO PARTY (2011-06-05 12:39)
Adopted by the First Congress of SWAPO PARTY in an Independent Namibia, December 6 – 12, 1991 and amended by SWAPO PARTY EXTRA ORDINARY CONGRESS, 27 – 28 August 1998 Windhoek, Republic of Namibia CHAPTER I ARTICLE I THE NAME The name of the party is the SWAPO PARTY, hereinafter to be referred to as SWAPO PARTY. The National Headquarters of the Party shall be situated in the Capital City of the Republic of Namibia. ARTICLE II Definition SWAPO PARTY is a mass based political Party born and selected in the crucible of a popular and heroic struggle for national independence. It is founded on the principles of democracy, solidarity, freedom, social justice and progress. ARTICLE III A. PREAMBLE (1) Whereas the Namibian people have emerged victorious from the struggle against colonialism; (2) Whereas Namibia has taken its rightful place among the free nations of the world as a sovereign state; (3) Whereas the establishment of a democratic political system in the country has brought the role of political parties from the back of the burner to primacy of place in our nation’s political life; (4) Whereas a political party is an important agency in a modern society for the articulation society’s aspirations, developmental goals, objectives, and political communication for the training of future political leaders; (5) Whereas the process of democratization of the Namibian society and elimination from it of the pernicious of the apartheid past; (6) Whereas the Namibian people have a strong desire to strengthen the unity of the nation and the independence of the country through common consensus of democratic values and patriotism; (7) Whereas the mobilization of the productive energies of the masses of the Namibian people is the critical factor in the reconstruction of our society; and 224

(8) Whereas the exploitation of one person by another, individual or as a class, including gender inequality, is unacceptable in an independent and democratic Namibia; B. Now, therefore, SWAPO PARTY declares its aims and objectives as follows: (1) to unite the people of Namibia, irrespective of race, religion, sex, or ethnic origin into a democratic, vibrant and peace-loving nation; (2) to defend and protect Namibia’s hard-won freedom and independence; (3) to foster a sense of common purpose and collective destiny among the Namibian people; (4) to combat retrogressive tendencies of tribalism, ethnicity, nepotism, racism, sexism, chauvinism, regionalism, personality cult, etc.; (5) to instill in the Namibian people a spirit of patriotism and to develop in them the consciousness that they are masters of the own destiny; (6) to educate the people to uphold, with honour and pride, Namibia’s emblems which constitute the symbols of the country’s sovereignty, the constitution, the national flag, the national anthem, the coat of arms, etc.; (7) to promote the development of the culture of the Namibian people through the reconstruction of the nation’s system of education, the encouragement of cultural exchanges with other nations as well as incentives to Namibians who show potential for technological and artistic creativity; (8) to ensure that Namibia works, on the one hand, in close cooperation with other African states, to advance the cause of African unity and, with all the other states to promote world peace and security, on the other; (9) to fight under development, poverty, illiteracy and disease; (10) to promote accelerated economic development and to create a balance and interlinkages between the primary and the secondary sectors of our economy in order to promote self-reliance and the upliftment of the standard of living of the vast majority of the Namibian people; (11) to invest by way of acquiring shares or otherwise in any viable business, venture or enterprise; and (12) to establish companies, close corporations and any other business organization, either wholly owned by the PARTY or the PARTY in partnership with either organizations or institutions, with the view to generating funds necessary to ensure the smooth function and operations of the PARTY. CHAPTER II ARCICLE IV Membership There shall be two categories of SWAPO PARTY membership: (a) individual membership; and (b) affiliate membership. A. Individual Membership (1) Membership of SWAPO Party shall be open to every Namibian citizen who accepts the aims and objective of SWAPO Party as set-out in Article III above and who, in addition is of the age 18 years and above and who is not a member of any other Political Party. (2) A person wishing to become a member of SWAPO Party shall make his or her application and submit it to the Secretary of the appropriate Branch of the Party. He or she must be recommended by two members of the party who 225

must have known him or her a minimum period of two (2) years. (3) Upon admission to membership, a member shall pay and admission fee to the Party and a receipt thereof shall be given. The amount of the admission fee shall be determined from time by the Central Committee of SWAPO Party. In addition, he or she shall pay an annual membership fee that will also be determined from time by the Central Committee. (4) Membership in SWAPO Party may be lost through: (a) resignation, or (b) expulsion under Article VI (13) and VII (10) 5. In the event of either resignation or expulsion, no refund of admission or membership fees shall be made. B. Affiliate membership (1) Affiliate Membership of SWAPO Party shall be open to any bona fide sociocultural organization (e.g., Trade Unions, student union or professional organization) which accepts the aims and objectives of SWAPO Party as set in Article III of this constitution. (2) Any organization wishing to become an affiliate member of SWAPO Party shall in writing, enclosing a resolution of its organization to that effect, as well as a copy of its constitution to the Secretary-General of SWAPO Party. (3) The Secretary-Genera of SWAPO Party shall place the application before the political bureau of SWAPO Party which shall whether or not to grant membership. (4) Upon admission to membership, the organization shall pay a specified admission fee. In addition such organization shall pay a specified annual membership fee to be determined from time to time by the Political Bureau of SWAPO Party. (5) An affiliate organization may be called upon by SWAPO Party to make such financial contribution towards the funds of the Party as may be agreed upon between SWAPO Party and that organization. (6) Affiliate membership may be lost through; (a) withdrawal by the organization or (b) expulsion from SWAPO Party under Article VI (13) and VII (10) (7) No affiliate organization may withdraw from SWAPO Party unless it has given notice to that effect six month prior to such withdrawal. (8) No refund of admission or membership fees shall be made upon withdrawal or expulsion. C. Rights and Obligations (1) A member of SWAPO Party has a right: (a) to demand the fulfillment of what is established in this constitution, as well as the implementation of resolutions, decisions, directives and agreements of the Party. (b) To participate in Congress and meetings of SWAPO Party organs, wings and affiliated organization to which he or she belongs and to freely discuss in them the policy and activities of the Party. (c) To put forward proposals and defend his or her opinions before a decision is reached on the matter under discussion. 226

(d) To vote at meetings on decisions to be taken in relation to matter discussed; (e) To elect and be elected to positions of authority in the subject to restrictions set out in this Constitution. (f) To state matters and address questions, petitions and proposals to the appropriate organs; (g) To receive concrete and timely answers to his or her proposals; and (h) To express in such meetings his or her opinions freely and without fear or favour and to contribute to discussions and participate in the adoption of the decisions of those organs. (2) A member of SWAPO Party has the following obligations: (a) to act dedication and commitment in the interests of the Party and the national interest of Namibians; (b) to be of exemplary conduct and to act in a spirit of comradeship towards other members of the Party; (c) to respect, take care of and protect the property of the Party; (d) to attend meetings of the Party called by the organs he or she belongs to, as well as any other meetings he or she may be summoned by the Party to attend; (e) to observe and comply with decisions, resolutions and directives of the majority, even though he or she have voted against them or held a diverging opinion during the discussions; (f) to contribute to the strengthening of the organic unity of the Party and the political consciousness of its rank and file; (g) to be ever vigilant against infiltration of the ranks of the Party by persons not worth the honour of SWAPO Party membership; (h) to oppose factionalism and defend the party; (i) to strive constantly to explain the aims and objectives, policies and the political direction as of the party to the masses; (j) to promote and exercise criticism without fear and self-criticism with a view to overcoming any defects, errors or deviations in the Party; (k) to be sincere and honest; and (l) to promote the Party’s secrets. CHAPTER III PARTY STRUCTURE ARTICLE V The Organs THE CONGRESS (1) There shall be a Congress of SWAPO Party. (2) The Congress shall be the supreme organ of the Party. (3) The Congress of SWAPO Party shall be composed of: (a) all members of the Central Committee; (b) then delegates elected from each of the Regional Executive Committee by the Regional Conferences. (c) Three delegates elected from each district executive 227

committee by the District Conferences. (d) Fifteen delegates from SWAPO Party Youth League and SWAPO Party Elder’s Council who have been duly elected by their respective Congresses; (e) Twenty delegates from SWAPO Party Women’s Council who have been elected by their respective congresses; (f) Fifteen delegates from each of the affiliate organizations; and (g) With the exception of an extra-ordinary congress, thirty specially invited personalities who must have outstanding contribution to the work and development of SWAPO Party but are non office-bearing members of the Party. This category shall have the right to participate fully in the deliberation of the congress but will not have the right to vote. Provides that in the event of an extra-ordinary Congress of the SWAPO Party where the holding of such congresses and conferences may not be feasible due to financial constraints or urgency of the subject-matter to be discussed, SWAPO Party Wings, regions and districts shall be entitled to adopt a different formula from which is prescribed in this Article of selecting delegates to the extra-ordinary congress; provided further such formula has been agreed with the Secretary General. (4) the Congress shall have the power to set policy of the party, review and asses the overall activities and development of the Party. (5) The Congress shall have the power to confirm, amend, repudiate or revoke any decision made by any organ of the Party. (6) The Congress shall evaluate the work of the Central Committee, consider, adopt or reject reports including financial reports and recommendation, thereof. (7) The Congress shall determine the programmatic orientation of the Party. (8) The Congress shall have the power to adopt and amend the Constitution of the Party; a two-third majority of the votes shall be required for such purpose. Proposed amendments to the Constitution shall be forwarded to the central Committee not later than three (3) months prior to the holding of the congress. (9) The Congress shall elect the Central Committee, the President, Vice-President, Secretary General and Deputy Secretary General of the Party. (10) The Congress of the party shall be held after every five years. (11) The Congress shall be called by the Central Committee not later than three months prior to the holding of such Congress. (12) The Central Committee may on its own initiative, or at the request of at east two-thirds majority of all regional executive Committees, convene an extra-ordinary congress of the Party. (13) The agenda of an congress shall be proposed by the initiators of such a Congress. (14) The Extra-ordinary Congress shall be held not later than two months after the proposal for its convocation has been made. (15) The quorum of the Congress shall be a simple majority or more than half of the voting delegates. (16) The Congress will elect its officials and frame rules for its proceedings. 228

ARTICLE VI The Central Committee (1) There shall be a Central Committee of SWAPO Party. (2) The Central Committee shall be the highest organ of authority between two congresses and its Chairperson shall be the President of the Party. (3) The Central Committee shall consist of 70 members, including the President, Vice-president, the Secretary general and deputy Secretary General who shall be elected directly by the congress, six (6) to be appointed by the president, three (3) elected secretaries for the wings and thirteen elected regional Coordinators. (4) A minimum of ten (10) years of continuous membership in SWAPO Party shall be required for a member to be eligible for membership of the Central Committee. (5) The Central Committee shall discuss, adopt, review, amend or annul its own resolutions, decisions and recommendations and/or those of the Political Bureau. (6) The Central Committee shall convene the congress of SWAPO Party. (7) The Central Committee shall meet annually or as often as it shall be requested by the Political Bureau. (8) All members of the Central Committee shall be compulsory required to attend all meetings of the central Committee, except those who may be on specific and urgent missions or duties of the party or its government. (9) A member of the Central Committee who fails to be present at three consecutive meetings without valid reasons shall cease to be a member of the Central Committee. (10) The Central Committee shall elect from amongst its members, the Political Bureau and all national officers, other than the president, the Vice-President, Secretary General and deputy Secretary General. (11) The Central Committee shall consider current of the policy and practice of SWAPO Party, adjust its political view, respond timely to new problems and determine concrete political stands towards solutions to such problems. (12) The Central Committee shall determine the most appropriate ways and means of promoting the political education and development of the cadres of the Party. (13) With the exception of the President, the Vice President, the Secretary General, the deputy Secretary General, the Central committee shall have the power to expel by two-third majority an affiliate organization for serious misconduct or violation of the Constitution. (14) The Central Committee shall ensure that the account-books, accounts, registers or statements which are kept or prepared in connection with the collection, receipt, custody, banking, payment or issue of money, securities, equipment and stores are audited by professional external auditors who shall be appointed by the Political Bureau. (15) The Central Committee shall set a cut off date for the party’s financial year in order to ensure the examination of revenues, disbursement of funds and use of other property of the party by external auditors. (16) The Central Committee shall approve the Annual budget of the Party’ (17) The Central Committee shall have the power to establish as many subcommittees as may required. (18) The Central Committee shall be accountable to the Congress 229

(19) The quorum of the Central Committee shall be a simple majority of its members. (20) No Party member shall be eligible for election or appointment as a members of the Central Committee unless such a member meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. ARTICLE VII The Political Bureau (1) There shall be a Political bureau of the Central Committee of SWAPO Party. (2) The Political Bureau shall be responsible for policy formulation in the period between Central Committee. (3) The Political bureau shall be the steering committee of the central Committee, directing the political and programmatic agenda of the Party. (4) The composition of the Political bureau shall be 21 members, including the President of the party who will be its Chairperson, the Vice –President, the Secretary General and the Deputy secretary General.(5) The Political Bureau shall be responsible for putting into practice all decisions, resolutions and directives of the Congress and the Central Committee. (6) The Political Bureau shall be responsible to and render account periodically to the Central Committee on its own work, on that of the Secretariat as well as on that of the regional Executive Committees. (7) The Political Bureau shall appoint a Secretariat which shall assist it in executing the day to day work of the Party. (8) The Political Bureau shall supervise and control the use and maintenance of SWAPO Party funds and books of accounts at the Headquarters, the regional, the district and the branch levels of the Party. (9) The Political Bureau shall appoint an external auditor to audit the Party’s financial records and accounts. (10) With the exception of the president, the Vice-President, the Secretary General and the Deputy Secretary general, the Political bureau shall by two-third majority of its members have authority to expel any member of the Party or suspend any affiliate organinsation for serious misconduct or violation of the Constitution and respect of an affiliate organization refer to the Central Committee for final decision. (11) The Political Bureau shall have the power to call extra-ordinary meeting of the Central Committee as well as of the Regional Conferences. (12) The Political Bureau shall appoint officials to undertake party missions on the recommendation of the Secretariat. (13) The Political Bureau shall have the power to appoint acting regional officials in case of unresolved disputes in the Regional Executive Committee pending the holding of elections. (14) The Political bureau shall meet at least once a month and as often as it may be requested by the Secretariat or by a Regional Executive Committee. (15) A member of the Political Bureau shall have the right to propose the holding of an emergency meeting or the Political Bureau. (16) The Political Bureau shall have the power to appoint Deputies to National officers whose duties and functions are defined under Article IX. (17) The Political Bureau shall appoint directors of all Party Companies. (18) The Political Bureau shall receive and approve the audited accounts of Party companies not later than six months after close of financial year. 230

(19) All members of the Political Bureau shall be compulsory required to attend all meetings of the Political Bureau meetings, except those who may be on specified and urgent missions or duties for the Party. (20) Any member of the political Bureau who absents himself from three consecutive meetings without valid reasons shall immediately cease to be a member of the Political Bureau. (21) The quorum of the Political bureau shall be a simple majority of its members. No Party member shall be eligible for election to the political bureau unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. ARTICLE VIII NATIONAL OFFICERS Besides the President, the vice-President, the Secretary General, and the Deputy Secretary General, there shall be the following National Officers who shall be elected by the Central committee from amongst its members: (1) Secretary for External relations; (2) Secretary for Defence and Security; (3) Secretary for Economic Affairs (4) Secretary for Finance; (5) Secretary for Information and Mobilization (6) Secretary for Labour (7) Secretary for Education, Culture and Sport; (8) Secretary for Legal Affairs (9) Secretary for Heath and Social Services; (10) Secretary for Transport; (11) Secretary for Environmental Affairs; (12) Secretary for SWAPO Party Youth League (13) Secretary for SWAPO Party Women’s Council; (14) Secretary for SWAPO Party Elders Council. ARTICLE IX Duties and functions of the National Officers (A) THE PRESIDENT (1) The President of the SWAPO Party shall be the leader and the Chief Executive Officer of the party. (2) He or She shall be the Chairperson of the Central Committee, the Political Bureau and the Congress. (3) He or She shall conduct his or her duties and functions in consultation with the Political Bureau and the Secretary General. (4) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (5) He or She shall be elected the congress by secret ballot for a five-year term of office. (6) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (7) He or She may be removed from office by resolution of the Congress, supported by at least two-third majority of the delegates. 231

(8) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the political bureau unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (B) VICE-PRESIDENT (1) The Vice-President shall be the principal assistant to the President in the discharge of this or her duties and function in the Party. (2) He or She shall exercise al such functions as may be delegated to him or her by the President. (3) He or She shall exercise the same powers and carry out all the duties and functions of the President in the absence of the President. (4) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (5) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot by Congress for a five-year term of office. (6) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (7) He or She may be removed from office by Congress, supported by at least two-third majority of the delegates. (8) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the political bureau unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (C) SECRETARY-GENERAL (1) The Secretary General shall be responsible for the external co-ordination and streamlining of the political administrative activities of the Party. (2) He or She shall be secretary to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (3) He or She shall supervise the business of the Congress, the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. And shall ensure implementation of decisions of these organs. (4) He or She shall regularly visit regional offices and be in constant Correspondence with all the Regional Executive officers so as to acquaint himself or herself with the problems facing such offices. (5) He or She shall maintain regularly a register of the party’s membership. (6) He or She shall be responsible for sending out invitations, by letter or other approved methods, to the Congress, the Central Committee and the Political Bureau. (7) He or She shall keep records, minutes and correspondences of meetings and decisions of the national and regional organs as well as Wings and Affiliate Organisations. (8) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (9) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot by Congress for a five-year term of office. (10) He or She shall be eligible for re-elections. (11) He or she may be suspended from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at east two-third majority of the members. (12) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Deputy SecretaryGeneral of SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution (D) DEPUTY SECRETARY GENERAL (1) The Deputy Secretary-General shall be the principle assistant to the Secretary General. (2) He or She shall exercise al such function as may be delegated to him or her by the Secretary General. 232

(3) He or She shall exercise the same powers and carry out al the duties and functions of the Secretary General in the absence of the Secretary General. (4) He or She shall be accountable to the central Committee and its Political Bureau. (5) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot by the Congress for a five-year term of office. (6) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (7) He or she may be suspended from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at east two-third majority of the members. (8) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Deputy SecretaryGeneral of SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (E) SECRETARY FOR EXTERNAL RELATIONS (1) The Secretary for External relations shall be the spokesperson of the Party on foreign affairs and responsible for promoting friendship, co-operations and active solidarity with other progressive and democratic parties and movements throughout the world. (2) He or she shall be responsible for foreign contacts of the Party. (3) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for a five-year term of office by the central Committee from amongst its members. (4) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (5) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the members. (6) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (7) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for External affairs for SWAPO PARTY unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (F) SECRETARY FOR DEFENCE AND SECURITY (1) The Secretary for Defence and security shall be the party’s spokesperson on defence and security matters. (2) He or she shall be accountable to the central Committee and its political Bureau. (3) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Central Committee form amongst its members. (4) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (5) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the members. (6) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for Defence and Security for SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (G) SECRETARY FOR FINANCE 1) The Secretary for Finance shall be the Party’s spokesperson on finance matters. 2) He or She shall keep and maintain books of accounts, vouchers, financial documents and reports of the Party, and submit them to external auditing. 3) He or She shall prepare and present to the Political Bureau and the Central Committee, at the end of each financial year, up-to-date accounts of income and expenditure of the Party. 233

4) He or She shall have the power to check SWAPO Party banking accounts and books of accounts in the regional and district offices, and report the findings thereof to the Political Bureau. 5) He or She shall be responsible for making payments on behalf of SWAPO Party, and for keeping copies of all receipts thereof. 6) He or She shall prepare all cheques and payment vouchers. 7) He or She shall study possibilities and make proposals about the appropriate ways and means of raising funds for the Party. 8) He or she shall be co-signatory to al cheques at the National Headquarters. 9) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. 10) He or She shall receive from al departments at the end of every financial year, their departmental expenditures of the previous year and their budgets for the ensuing year. 11) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Central Committee form amongst its members. 12) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. 13) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the members. 14) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for Finance of SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (H) SECRETARY FOR INFORMATION AND MOBILIZATION (1) The Secretary for Information and Mobilization shall be the party’s spokesperson on media and communication matters, and shall be responsible for gathering, analyzing, publishing and disseminating information on the socio-economic and political conditions in Namibia. (2) He or She shall be responsible for composing, editing and issuing SWAPO Party press releases and publications and for arranging press conferences as may be directed by the Central Committee, the Political bureau, or the President of SWAPO Party. (3) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (4) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Central Committee form amongst its members. (5) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (6) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the members. (7) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for Information and Mobilization for SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (I) THE SECRETARY FOR EDUCATION, CULTURE AND SPORT (1) The Secretary for Education, culture and sport shall be the party’s spokesperson on education, training and culture. (2) He or She shall be responsible for the promotion of the country’s advancement in scientific knowledge, technical know-how and artistic creativity. (3) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (4) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Central Committee from amongst its members 234

(5) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (6) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the member. (7) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for education, Culture and Sport of SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (J) SECRETARY FOR TRANSPORT (1) The Secretary for Transport shall be the Party’s spokesperson on transport matters.(2) He or She shall be responsible for proper use and maintenance of the vehicles of the Party. (3) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (4) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Central Committee form amongst its members. (5) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (6) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the member (7) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for Transport of SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (K) SECRETARY FOR LEGAL AFFAIRS (1) The Secretary for Legal affairs shall be the party’s spokesperson on legal matters. (2) He or She shall study the country’s laws and propose timely repeals or amendments to the laws and regulations, regulations, especially those that were used as instruments of oppression and expression and exploitation in Namibia. (3) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (4) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Central Committee form amongst its members. (5) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (6) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the member (7) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (L) SECRETARY FOR ECONOMIC AFFAIRS (1) The Secretary for Economic Affairs shall be the spokesperson of the party on economic matters. (2) He or She shall study the potentialities and possibilities for an all-round and balance economic development of Namibia and make recommendations thereon to the Political Bureau. (3) He or She shall be responsible for the establishment and development for Party enterprises. (4) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau.(5) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Central Committee form amongst its members. (6) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (7) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the member 235

(8) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the political bureau unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (M) SECRETARY FOR LABOUR (1) The Secretary for Labour shall be the spokesperson of the Party on labour matters. (2) He or She shall study at all times the opinions, concerns and requirements and problems of the workers and make proposals as to the measure to be adopted to improve the situation of the workers and labour relations in the country. (3) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (4) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Central Committee form amongst its members. (5) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (6) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the member (7) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for Labour for SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (N) SECRETARY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS (1) The Secretary for Environmental Affairs shall be the spokesperson on Environmental matters. (2) He or She shall responsible for analyzing and monitoring the operation of factors affecting the environmental and to propose timely measures to be taken in order to protect the environment. (3) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (4) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Central Committee form amongst its members. (5) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (6) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the member. (7) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for Environmental Affairs for SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (O) SECRETARY FOR SWAPO PARTY YOUTH LEAGUE (1) The Secretary for SWAPO Party Youth League shall be the party’s spokesperson on youth matters. (2) He or She shall not be more than 45 years of age. (3) He or she shall guide the activities of the SWAPO Party Youth League on the basis of the directives of the Political Bureau. (4) He or She shall promote and coordinate contacts and solidarity between SWAPO Party youth league and other friendly youth organizations thought-out the world. (5) He or She shall preside over SWAPO Party Youth League Congress and meetings. (6) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (7) He or she shall be elected by secret ballot for a five-year term of office by the Congress of SWAPO Party Youth League which shall take place prior to the congress of SWAPO Party. (8) He or She shall be endorsed by the Congress of SWAPO Party. 236

(9) He or she shall be eligible for re-election. (10) He or She may be suspended from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the member. (11) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for SWAPO Party Youth League unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (P) SECRETARY FOR SWAPO PARTY WOMEN’S COUNCIL (1) The Secretary for SWAPO Party Women’s Council shall be the Party’s spokesperson on Women affairs. (2) She shall be responsible for the articulation of SWAPO Party’s policies and the Political Programme among the Namibian Women. (3) She shall supervise the activities of the SWAPO Party Women’s Council. (4) She shall give guidance in formulation and execution of plans and programmes and design the specific interest of Namibian women. (5) She shall preside over SWAPO Party Women’s Council Congress and meetings. (6) She shall promote cooperation and solidarity with other progressive national and international women’s organizations. (7) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (8) She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Congress of SWAPO Party Women’s Council which shall take place prior to the Congress of SWAPO Party (9) She shall be endorsed by the Congress of SWAPO Party. (10) He or she shall be eligible for re-election.(11) She may be suspended from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the member. (12) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for SWAPO Party Women’s Council unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. (Q) SECRETARY FOR SWAPO PARTY ELDERS COUNCIL (1) He or she shall be the party’s spokesperson on the issues affecting Namibia’s senior citizens and veterans of Namibia’s struggle for national liberation. (2) He or She shall be responsible for the explanation of SWAPO Party’s policies and the Political Programme amongst Namibia’s elders. (3) He or She shall encourage elders to play as active role in running of the party by availing to the party their experienced guidance and tried and tested wisdom. (4) He or She shall supervise the activities and preside over SWAPO Party Elders Council’s Congress. (5) He or She shall be accountable to the Central Committee and its Political Bureau. (6) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Congress of SWAPO Party Elders Council which shall take place prior to the Congress of SWAPO Party. (7) He or she shall be eligible for re-election. (8) She may be suspended from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the member. (9) No Party member shall be eligible for election to the Secretary for SWAPO Party Elders Council unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of this Constitution. 237

ARTICLE X Secretariat (1) There shall be a Secretariat of SWAPO Party. (2) The Secretariat shall be appointed by the Political Bureau. (3) The Secretariat shall be compose of the Secretary General, the Deputy Secretary General and Head’s of Departments. (4) The Secretariat shall assist the political Bureau in the implementation of the decisions, resolutions and directives of the Central committee and Political Bureau. (5) The Secretariat shall be responsible for the coordinated functioning of the technical and administrative bodies of the Party. (6) The Secretariat may establish such number of committees as it may deem necessary, including a Finance Committee to administer the finances of the Party accordance with the relevant financial regulation and acceptable accounting procedure. (7) The Secretariat shall have the power to call for emergency meetings of the Political bureau. (8) The quorum of the Secretariat shall be a simple majority of its members. CHAPTER FOUR ARTICLE XI Regional Organs (1) The shall be the following organs of SWAPO Party at the regional level: (a) Regional Conference; and (b) ]Regional executive Committee (A) REGIONAL CONFERENCE (2) There shall be a regional Conference for each Administrative Region (3) The composition of the Regional Conference shall be as follows: (a) members of the Regional Executive Committee; (b) four delegates from each of the district in the Region; and (c) four delegates from each of the Party Wings and affiliated organization. (4) The Regional Conference shall be the highest organ in the Region. (5) It shall be competent to discuss and decide on matters of regional concern and may make recommendation thereon to the Political Bureau through the Secretariat. (6) The Regional Conference shall elect the regional executive Committee. (7) The Regional Conference shall elect the Regional Coordinator. (8) It shall consider and adopt reports submitted to it by the regional executive Committee on the activities of the Party within the Region. (9) The Regional Conference shall be convened by the regional Executive Committee once every five year and shall, subject to the proviso contain in Article V (3) of this Constitution, do so immediately prior to the Congress of the Party. 238

(10) An Extraordinary regional conference may be called on the initiative of either the Political bureau, by two third of members of the Regional Executive Committee or the District executive committee or at the request of both. (11) The quorum of the Regional Executive Committee shall be simple majority of the delegates entitled to attend and vote. (12) It shall elect ten delegates from the regional executive Committee members to the Congress of the Party. (B) REGIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE (1) There shall be a Regional executive Committee for each Administrative region. (2) The regional Executive Committee shall be compose of : (a) The Regional Coordinator (b) The Regional Treasurer (c) The Regional information an Mobilization Officer, (d) All District coordinators in the Region; (e) All district information and Mobilization Officers in the Region; (f) One delegate from each of the party wings and affiliate organization. (3) The regional Executive committee shall be responsible of the implementation in the regional, of the decision, resolutions and directive of the Congress, the Central Committee, the Political Bureau and the Regional Conference. (4) The Regional Executive committee shall be accountable to the regional Conference and the political bureau. (5) The Regional executive Committee shall be responsible for the political and mobilization of the masses for broad participation in the activities of the Party. (6) The Regional Executive Committee shall have the power to suspend any member of the party, in the region, for serious misconduct or violation of the constitution. And refer the matter to the Political Bureau for ratification. (7) The Regional Executive committee may appoint such sub-committees as may be necessary for the better implementation of the policies and programmes of the party in the Region. (8) The Regional Executive Committee shall meet at least one in three month and as often as may be requested by a majority of the District Executive Committee. (9) The quorum of its meetings shall be a simple majority of the members entitled to attended and vote. ARTICLE XII Duties and Functions of the Regional Officers (A) REGIONAL COORDINATOR (1) The Regional Coordinator shall take overall charge of the Activities of the Party in the Region. (2) He or She shall be the party’s chief administration officer and party leaderat the regional level. (3) He or she shall preside over the regional conference and the Regional Executive Committee. (4) He or She shall be co-signatory to al cheques issued by the regional headquarters. (5) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for a five year term of office by the regional Conference, supported by at least two-third majority of the delegates. 239

(6) He or She shall be accountable to the Regional executive committee. (7) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (8) He or she shall be suspended by the regional executive committee by resolution, supported by a at least two-third majority of its member. (9) He or She shall endorse as a member of the Central Committee by the Congress of SWAPO Party. (10) He or She shall be removed from office by resolution of the Regional conference, supported by at least two-third majority of the delegates. (11) No party members shall be eligible for election as a regional coordinator of SWAPO Party unless he or she meets the requirements of Article VI (4) of its Constitution. (B) REGIONAL TREASURER (1) The Regional Treasurer shall receive and bank, within 7 days of receipt, all the monies belonging to the party at the Regional level. (2) He or She shall be responsible for making payments on behalf of SWAPO Party and keeping accounts, vouchers, receipts and copies of financial statements and reports, as well as stock-cards. (3) He or She shall study possibilities and make proposals concerning the raising of funds. (4) He or she shall be co-signatory to al cheques at the Regional Headquarters (5) He or She shall be accountable to the Regional Executive Committee. (6) He or She shall be elected by secret ballot for five-year term of office by the Regional Conference from amongst its members. (7) He or She shall be eligible for re-election. (8) He or She shall be suspended by the Regional Executive Committee by resolution supported by at least two-third majority of its members (9) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the delegates C. REGIONAL INFORMATION AND MOBILIZATION OFFICER (1) The Regional Information and Mobilization Officer shall be responsible for gathering, analyzing, publishing and disseminating information on the social, economic and political realities in the Region. (2) He or She shall propagate, explain and defend the policies and the Political programme of SWAPO Party (3) He or She shall study responsible for the preparation and distribution of SWAPO Party information and publicity materials in the Region. (4) He or she shall be accountable to the Regional Executive Committee (5) He or She shall be eligible for re-election.(6) He or She shall be suspended by the Regional Executive Committee by resolution supported by at least two-third majority of its members (7) He or she may be removed from office by resolution of the Central Committee supported by at least two-third majority of the delegates ARTICLE XIII District Organs There shall be the following organs of SWAPO Party at the district level: 240

(a) District conference; and (b) District Executive Committee (A) DISTRICT CONFERENCE (1) There shall be an annual District Conference. Its Composition shall be as follows: (a) All members of the District Executive Committee; (b) Four delegates elected by each Branch in the District; and (c) One delegate fro each of the Party Wings and affiliate organizations. (2) The annual District Conference shall be the highest organ authority in the District and shall, subject to the provision contained in Article V (3) of this Constitution, meet annually or as often as the need arises. (3) An Extraordinary conference may be called at the instance of either the Secretary General, by two-third majority of the District Executive Committee, the Branch Executive Committee or at the request of both. (4) The Annual district Conference shall be competent to discuss matters of district interest and may make recommendations thereon to the regional Executive Committee and the Regional Conference. (5) It shall consider and adopt reports on the activities of the Party within the district. (6) It shall elect four delegates to the regional conference. (7) It shall elect the District officers on the pattern of the regional Officers. (8) It shall elect the district Executive Committee from amongst its delegates. (9) It shall elect three delegates from the District Executive Committee members to the Congress of the Party. (10) The quorum of the District Conference shall be a simple majority of the delegates entitled to attend and vote. (B) DISTRICT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE (1) There shall be a District executive committee for each District. It composition shall be as follows: (a) The District Coordinator; (b) The District Treasurer; (c) The District Information and Mobilization officer; (d) All Branch Coordinators; (e) All Branch Secretaries; (f) One representative from each of the Party Wings and affiliate organizations; and (g) All elected members of the regional Council as ex-officio: members. (2) The duties and functions of the District executive Officers will correspond to those of their respective counterparts in the regional executive Committee, with the exemption that their term of office shall be three years. (3) The District Executive Committee shall recommend to the regional Executive Committee the suspension of District officials and individual members of the party, for serious misconduct or violation of the Party Constitution. (4) The District Executive Committee shall be accountable to the District Conference. (5) The quorum of its meetings shall be a simple majority of its members entitled to attend and vote. 241

ARTICLE XIV Branch Organs (1) There shall be the following organs of SWAP Party at the Branch level: (a) Branch Conference; and (b) Branch Executive Committee (A) BRANCH CONFERENCE (1) There shall be a Branch conference of SWAPO Party. Its composition shall be as follows: (a) All members of the Branch Executive Committee; (b) Four delegates from each of the sections in the Branch; and (c) One delegate from each of the party wings and affiliate organization. (2) The Branch Conference shall be the highest organ of authority at the branch eve and shall meet annually. (3) An Extraordinary Branch Conference may be called at the instance of either the secretary –general, by two-third majority of the Branch executive committee, members of the sections in the branch or at the request of both. (4) It shall by secret ballot, elect the Branch Executive Committee. (5) It shall be competent to discuss such matters of local interest as it may deem fit and make recommendation thereon to the District executive committee and to the District Conference. (6) It shall by secret ballot select four delegates to the District Conference. (B) BRANCH EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE (1) There shall be a Branch Executive Committee of SWAPO Party for each branch in each Administrative District (2) The composition as well as the functions of its members shall correspond to those of the District executive Committee, except that al Section Secretaries shall be members of the Branch executive Committee, that a monthly enrolment of membership shall be compiled and forwarded to the District executive Committee every month, and that the term of office of the Branch executive Committee members shall be two years. (3) It shall organize SWAPO party members and recruit new ones, (4) It shall raise funds for the party by collecting membership fees; (5) It shall generally supervise and coordinate the activities of the party within the Branch and shall report thereon to the branch Conference; (6) It may appoint such sub-committees as may be necessary for the better carrying out of the functions and activities of the party in the Branch. (7) The Branch executive Committee shall recommend to the District Executive Committee the suspension of section officials and individual member of the party for serious misconduct or violation of the Constitution. (8) It shall meet once every month or as may be necessary. (9) It shall be accountable to the Branch Conference. (10) The quorum of its meeting shall be simple majority of its members entitled to attend and vote. (11) The quorum of its meetings shall be a simple majority of its members entitled to attend and vote. ARTICLE XV 242

SECTION (1) There shall be a Section of SWAPO Party which shall be the basic organ of the Party; (2) The Section shall be established in residential areas. (3) Between (15) and fifty (50) members of the Party shall be required to constitute a Section. (4) Each Section shall elect for a one year term of office a Secretary who will take overall charge of the affairs of the party in the Section. (5) The Section shall be accountable to the Branch executive Committee in the area under which it falls. (6) The Section shall educate members of the party in the knowledge of SWAPO Party Constitution, the Political Programme, resolutions, directives and decisions. (7) It shall discuss and analyses all the documents, resolutions, reports, and decisions of the Party. CHAPTER V ARTICLE XVI Wings of the Party There shall be the following wings of SWAPO Party: (A) SWAPO PARTY YOUTH LEAGUE (SPYL) (1) There shall be a SWAPO Party Youth League (SPY) (2) Subject to Article IX 92) of this Constitution, membership of SWAPO Party Youth League shall be open to all Namibian youths who accept the aims and objectives of SWAPO Party and whose age is between 18 and 35 year. (3) Minors who wish to identify themselves with the aims and objectives, as well as the activities of SWAPO Party, can join through the pioneer wing of SWAPO Party Youth League. (4) Membership of SWAPO Party Youth League shall thus consist of two groups; namely youth between the ages of 18 and 35, and pioneers between the ages of 6 and 17. (5) SWAPO Party Youth League shall adopt its own Constitution governing its activities and administration, provided that such Constitution or amendment shall require the approval of the Congress of the party before becoming operative. (B) SWAPO PARTY WOMEN’S COUNCI (SPWC) (1) There shall be a SWAPO Party Women’s Council (SPWC); (2) Membership of SWAPO Party Women’s Council shall be open to every woman who is of the age of 18 years and above; (3) SWAPO PARTY Women’s Council shall adopt its own Constitution governing activities and administer that such constitution or amendment shall require the approval of the party before becoming operative. SWAPO PARTY Flag, Emblem, official Anthem and Motto (A) SWAPO PARTY FLAG The official flag of SWAPO Party consists of three colour in horizontal position.The upper colour shall be blue, the middle coulour shall be red and the lower shall be green. The blue coulour shall represent the minerals and the wealth of Namibia as well as her long Atlantic coast which is rich of both minerals and other resources. 243

The red colour shall represent the precious blood of the Namibian people that have been shed in the struggle against colonialism, the struggle for nationhood, in general, and the victorious anti-colonial revolution in Africa. The green colour shall represent the people, the land, the agricultural potentials and the vegetation of the country. (B) THE EMBLEM The emblem of SWAPO Party is a young man with a raised fist symbolizing the youthfulness and energy of our nation surging forward to social progress. (C) MOTTO The motto of SWAPO Party is Solidarity, Freedom and Justice. (D) OFFICIAL ANTHEM The Official Anthem of SWAPO PARTY IS “Alert Namibia”

The Racial Gap in the Namibian Healthcare System (2011-06-05 12:40)
Authors: Audrey Eisemann, Laura Overton and Tamara Siburg Week 13 While Apartheid ended 21 years ago, as has been portrayed in many of these blog posts, the effects of Apartheid continue to be prevalent in Namibian society today. Those in Namibia who are black and coloured in general have fewer privileges and more obstacles than white Namibians. These privileges are highly due to the advantages gained by white Namibians through having generations of wealth in their families that many black and coloured Namibians do not have. While this is not true for 100 % of the cases, it is true for enough to be an indicator of significant disadvantage. This issue is no different when it comes to healthcare system. Those who are more wealthy have the privilege to have access to medical aid which enables them to utilize the private hospitals, while those with less privilege and who cannot afford medical aid must rely on under-funded, under-staffed, state hospitals. Since lack of wealth is one of the obstacles that many black and coloured people have to overcome in Namibia, many are forced to rely upon government run hospitals, and do not have access to the more technologically advanced and thorough healthcare at private hospitals. This past week we visited a private hospital, Roman Catholic Hospital, and a government hospital, Katutura State Hospital. The differences in treatment due to funding and staff were blaringly obvious from the infrastructure, the equipment and the queues. Roman Catholic Hospital is a privately-owned hospital nestled in the center of Windhoek. Their brochure states: “Our mission is to provide a Christian based quality nursing care service. We endeavor to provide compassionate health care for those suffering from illness and to help them find psychological and spiritual stability and peace” (Roman Catholic Hospital).They have a full staff of nurses and doctors with nurses there twenty four hours a day, and at least one doctor who is on duty at all times in the casualty department. Like in private hospitals in the United States, patients can be turned away. If patients do not have adequate medical aid, which is our version of health insurance, they will not be treated at the hospital. To be admitted to the Roman Catholic Hospital, a deposit covering the estimated cost of the procedure, service or operation is required. Throughout the semester we have learned about the inequality among races within Namibia that is left over from Apartheid. We have been taught that Namibia has the highest rate of inequality in 244

the world. By charging such a high admission to be admitted to a private hospital, the segregation between different races within Namibia is perpetuated. Katutura State Hospital is a state-run hospital. The government provides it with all of its funds. While at the hospital we noticed how impersonal the feeling of being in there was compared to the private Roman Catholic Hospital or even to state owned hospitals back home in the United States. One of the sisters that were showing us around at the Roman Catholic Hospital even told us that the state hospital is set up more like a business then a caring family. Due to socioeconomic inequalities, the lower class can only afford to go to the Katutura State Hospital. The most expensive price that on anything the hospital offers to its patients is 30 Namibian dollars. Staying overnight 1 night or even 3 weeks will both only cost a person 30 Namibian dollars. But if a patient needs to be in the hospital for a (photo: Outside of Katutura State Hospital) few days that means the more money they lose for missing work. When we asked why the hospital was so under staffed because they did not have the funds to pay the doctors and nurses a salary comparable to that of the private hospital. It is good for the patients without a lot of money needing care to come to the hospital because cheap prices, yet if the hospital can’t keep the doctors and nurses then one would have to ask what quality of care do the patients receive at the state hospital and how time efficient for the patient would it be.

When interacting on Facebook (2011-06-05 12:42)
Here are the most important things to keep in mind when interacting on Facebook: • Choose your friends wisely because it is considered rude to delete someone as a friend. If you’re unsure, it’s more acceptable to not accept the initial invitation. • Poke carefully because this interactive features means different things to different people. It depends on what your relationship is with the person originally. It can be used as a business tool to build rapport with colleagues and clients, but it is more famous for having a sexual connotation. • Respect people’s privacy, especially if you are a parent and your teenager is on Fcebook. Instead of asking to be your teenager’s friend using Facebook (which could be perceived as an invasion of privacy), instead tell them you set up an account and let them decide whether to become your Facebook friend. • Be aware of what you post because a message posted on the ”wall” section at the bottom of a profile page can be read by anyone. A general rule is that if it’s not appropriate for someone’s boss to read, then don’t post it. (FYI: If someone posts something questionable on YOUR wall, you can delete it.) • Be sure and upload a photo of yourself as this really helps people to connect a face with a name. Also, it’s much more appealing to look at a photo than the default blue question mark used for those who don’t post a picture. • Take advantage of the high degree of control over what people see. For example, you can adjust your privacy settings if you want to limit who can and cannot see certain photos. • Don’t overdo friend requests. Even though Facebook makes it easy to upload your contacts (and automatically issue friend requests to a whole address list) it’s not meant to be misused. • Another no-no is flooding your network with status updates. Each new update you post appears on your friends’ news feeds so it’s best to show a little restraint (as in no more than two updates per day). 245

• Finally, don’t be creepy in the sense that even if you share similar music interests with a nice 20-year-old, it doesn’t mean she wants to be your friend. The best rule of thumb is to not make friend requests of strangers (especially ones who are significantly younger than you). Even if you know them, it’s a better idea to wait and let young people take the lead.

Namibian Citizens’ Emergency Flood Relief Campaign (2011-06-05 12:45)
Dear compatriots and friends Namibia Cares was formally launched on the 14th of April 2011 by a number of caring Namibian citizens to assist the victims of the unprecedented floods in our country. We are writing to let you know how you can join the growing movement of human solidarity with the tens of thousands of affected residents of Namibia. We believe that every person in Namibia cares, and, if given the chance, would want to help in his or own way. Today, more than 13,000 persons remain in relocation centres, more than 200 schools remain closed, and more than one hundred lives have been lost due to the floods. It is expected that the relocation centres will continue to operate at least until the end of June in some areas and until the end of August in others. When the flood waters subside and the relocated persons are able to return to their homes, they will face the prospect of clearing debris, rebuilding their homes, replanting their crops and replacing lost personal property. We therefore appeal to you to donate, as you see fit: " In-kind contributions of clothes, bedding, canned food, cooking and eating utensils, dish, laundry and body soaps, writing pads, pencils and crayons, toys, shovels, rakes, refuse bags or any other useful items; or " A cash donation to one of the accounts listed below. (A law firm, Dr. Weder, Kauta and Hoveka, is receiving the funds to assure proper control). You may bring your in-kind donations to our office at Khomas Regional Council headquarters or you may phone our office for collection or more information. We also invite you to join our efforts. You can " place collection boxes at your place of work or school; " ask your church or organisation to appeal to its members for contributions. (We can supply collection boxes or stickers for your own boxes) " send this letter to your email contacts or to your friends on Facebook. You are welcome to attend our weekly Monday meetings at 5pm at the Khomas Regional Council Office or to phone the office for more details. We need many more volunteers, and your humble contribution will be very much appreciated. Kind regards, Helmut K Angula (National Coordinator) Deputy Coordinators: Tangeni Angula - Paul Smit - Vicki Erenstein ya Toivo Patrons: Hon. Libertine Amathila Hon. Ben Amathila, Hon. Johan De Waal, Hon. Samuel Nuuyoma Trust Accounts Name: Dr. Weder, Kauta and Hoveka, Inc. 246

Ref: Namibia Cares Bank Windhoek 1026 643 801 Branch code 48-19-72-00 First National Bank Acc. No 6201 677 2578 Branch code: 281 072 [1]http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002249128294
1. http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002249128294

Job Interview Question (2011-06-05 12:46)
You are driving along in your car on a wild, stormy night. You pass by a bus stop, and you see three people waiting for the bus: 1. An old lady who looks as if she is about to die. 2. An old friend who once saved your life. 3. The perfect man (or) woman you have been dreaming about. Which one would you choose to offer a ride to, knowing that there could only be one passenger in your car? Think before you continue reading. This is a moral/ethical dilemma that was once actually used as part of a job application. You could pick up the old lady, because she is going to die, and thus you should save her first; or you could take the old friend because he once saved your life, and this would be the perfect chance to pay him back. However, you may never be able to find your perfect dream lover again. The candidate who was hired (out of 200 applicants) had no trouble coming up with his answer. He simply answered: ”I would give the car keys to my old friend, and let him take the lady to the hospital. I would stay behind and wait for the bus with the woman of my dreams.” Never forget to ”Think Outside of the Box.”

Internet Friends - Author unknown (2011-06-05 12:47)
(Dedicated to Jaqueline) Although you are a friend of mine And letters we exchange I would not know you on the street And doesn’t that seem strange? You hold a place within my life 247

Unusual and unique We share ideals and special dreams And still we do not speak I picture what I think you are Perhaps you picture me? An intriguing game for both of us For someone we cannot see. So for this friendship we possess We owe this mail a debt Perhaps the charm lies in the fact That we have never met.

Namibian Facebook Fan Pages - 18H30 on May 30 2011 (2011-06-05 12:49)
1. NAMIBIA 15 254 2. MTC Namibia 7 444 3. INamibia 4 063 4. [1]www.exposenewspaper.com 3 558 5. My Namibia 3 200 6. Namibian Sun 2 294 7. Republikein 2 146 8. SPCA Windhoek, NAMIBIA 1 982 9. Travelstart Namibia 1 648 10. Hilton Windhoek 1 404 11. Pneumatix Namibia 942 12. Namibia Wildlife Resorts& 883 13. Polytechnic of Namibia 416 14. Vespa Namibia 305 15. Namibia Breweries Ltd 267 16. Black Economic& 253 17. NBIC Namibia 247 18. Herbalife Namibia 225 248

19. consumer news namibia 221 20. Milton Louw - Namibian& 60 21. National Youth Council& 52 22. Linux Namibia 50 23. Namibia Information and& 41 24. Institute of Management& 40 If you want to add your page, please drop me a mail.
1. http://www.exposenewspaper.com/

In a tight spot of debt (2011-06-05 12:51)
Many years ago in a small Indian village,a farmer had the misfortune of owing a large sum of money to a village moneylender. The moneylender, who was old and ugly, fancied the farmer’s beautiful daughter. So he proposed a bargain. He said he would forgo the farmer’s debt if he could marry his daughter. Both the farmer and his daughter were horrified by the proposal. So the cunning money-lender suggested that they let providence decide the matter. He told them that he would put a black pebble and a white pebble into an empty money bag. Then the girl would have to pick one pebble from the bag. 1. If she picked the black pebble, she would become his wife and her father’s debt would be forgiven. 2. If she picked the white pebble she need not marry him and her father’s debt would still be forgiven. 3. But if she refused to pick a pebble, her father would be thrown into jail. They were standing on a pebble strewn path in the farmer’s field. As they talked, the moneylender bent over to pick up two pebbles. As he picked them up, the sharp-eyed girl noticed that he had picked up two black pebbles and put them into the bag.He then asked the girl to pick a pebble from the bag. Now, imagine that you were standing in the field. What would you have done if you were the girl? If you had to advise her, what would you have told her? Careful analysis would produce three possibilities: 1. The girl should refuse to take a pebble. 2. The girl should show that there were two black pebbles in the bag and expose the money-lender as a cheat. 3. The girl should pick a black pebble and sacrifice herself in order to save her father from his debt and imprisonment. 249

What would you recommend to the girl to do? Well, here is what she did& The girl put her hand into the moneybag and drew out a pebble. Without looking at it, she fumbled and let it fall onto the pebble-strewn path where it immediately became lost among all the other pebbles. “Oh, how clumsy of me,” she said. “But never mind, if you look into the bag for the one that is left, you will be able to tell which pebble I picked.” Since the remaining pebble is black, it must be assumed that she had picked the white one. And since the money-lender dared not admit his dishonesty, the girl changed what seemed an impossible situation into an extremely advantageous one! Conclusion of the Story Most complex problems do have a solution. It is only that we don’t attempt to think. When the mind is alert, sharp and calm while facing any problem, there definitely would crop a good solution to it whereas if the mind is too agitated, depressed and fidgety, the brain loses its ability of positive “thinking” and everything seems blank and bleak with no solution that the mind forces a person to take drastic and negative measures like commit suicide or a crime as an immediate solution. If we can understand the problem, the answer will come out of it because the answer is not separate from the problem! Also, the important thing about a problem is not its solution, but the strength we gain in finding the solution! Next time you face a problem, consciously make an attempt to think more clearly, cleverly and calmly&and you will surely find the best solution for it.

(2011-06-05 12:51)
Many years ago in a small Indian village,a farmer had the misfortune of owing a large sum of money to a village moneylender. The moneylender, who was old and ugly, fancied the farmer’s beautiful daughter. So he proposed a bargain. He said he would forgo the farmer’s debt if he could marry his daughter. Both the farmer and his daughter were horrified by the proposal. So the cunning money-lender suggested that they let providence decide the matter. He told them that he would put a black pebble and a white pebble into an empty money bag. Then the girl would have to pick one pebble from the bag. 1. If she picked the black pebble, she would become his wife and her father’s debt would be forgiven. 2. If she picked the white pebble she need not marry him and her father’s debt would still be forgiven. 3. But if she refused to pick a pebble, her father would be thrown into jail. They were standing on a pebble strewn path in the farmer’s field. As they talked, the moneylender bent over to pick up two pebbles. As he picked them up, the sharp-eyed girl noticed that he had picked up two black pebbles and put them into the bag.He then asked the girl to pick a pebble from the bag. 250

Now, imagine that you were standing in the field. What would you have done if you were the girl? If you had to advise her, what would you have told her? Careful analysis would produce three possibilities: 1. The girl should refuse to take a pebble. 2. The girl should show that there were two black pebbles in the bag and expose the money-lender as a cheat. 3. The girl should pick a black pebble and sacrifice herself in order to save her father from his debt and imprisonment. What would you recommend to the girl to do? Well, here is what she did& The girl put her hand into the moneybag and drew out a pebble. Without looking at it, she fumbled and let it fall onto the pebble-strewn path where it immediately became lost among all the other pebbles. “Oh, how clumsy of me,” she said. “But never mind, if you look into the bag for the one that is left, you will be able to tell which pebble I picked.” Since the remaining pebble is black, it must be assumed that she had picked the white one. And since the money-lender dared not admit his dishonesty, the girl changed what seemed an impossible situation into an extremely advantageous one! Conclusion of the Story Most complex problems do have a solution. It is only that we don’t attempt to think. When the mind is alert, sharp and calm while facing any problem, there definitely would crop a good solution to it whereas if the mind is too agitated, depressed and fidgety, the brain loses its ability of positive “thinking” and everything seems blank and bleak with no solution that the mind forces a person to take drastic and negative measures like commit suicide or a crime as an immediate solution. If we can understand the problem, the answer will come out of it because the answer is not separate from the problem! Also, the important thing about a problem is not its solution, but the strength we gain in finding the solution! Next time you face a problem, consciously make an attempt to think more clearly, cleverly and calmly&and you will surely find the best solution for it.

Namibian Facebook Fan Pages - 16H30 on June 4 2011 (2011-06-05 13:23)
1. The Dogg 26 560 2. NAMIBIA 15 341 3. MTC Namibia 7 474 4. Namibia is the most& 7 326 251

5. Stop Animal Hunting& 5 784 6. INamibia 4 187 7. [1]www.exposenewspaper.com 3 566 8. My Namibia 3 201 9. namibia-travel.it 2 431 10. Namibian Sun 2 304 11. We are Namibia! 2 287 12. Lady May 2 263 13. [2]www.swapoparty.org 2 165 14. Republikein 2 147 15. SPCA Windhoek, NAMIBIA 1 986 16. Travelstart Namibia 1 652 17. Hilton Windhoek 1 605 18. Namibia - Where to Stay 986 19. Pneumatix Namibia 943 20. Namibia Wildlife Resorts& 901 21. Namibia Annual Music& 761 22. Namibia Geographical& 705 23. KTM Namibia 683 24. Voices of Namibia 668 25. Update Namibia NBC 549 26. Polytechnic of Namibia 416 27. Travelyard: Camping in& 408 28. Goethe-Zentrum/NaDS& 404 29. Conservancy Safaris& 360 30. Vespa Namibia 305 31. Namibia Breweries Ltd 267 32. Ultimate Safaris Namibia 266 33. Namibia On Foot 259 34. Black Economic& 253 35. NBIC Namibia 247 252

36. Herbalife Namibia 225 37. consumer news namibia 221 38. Rally for Democracy and& 143 39. Namibia National Youth& 138 40. Dr Tjitunga Elijah& 120 41. Telecom Namibia 66 42. Milton Louw - Namibian& 60 43. National Youth Council& 52 44. Linux Namibia 50 45. Namibia Information and& 41 46. Institute of Management& 40
1. http://www.exposenewspaper.com/ 2. http://www.swapoparty.org/

We Remember: Before, Now, and Later (2011-06-05 13:23)
The past: “Those who control the past, control the future.” (George Orwell, 1984) How do representations of the past affect our understanding of it? How are historical representations incorporated into collective memory? To what degree are ideas of national identity embedded in collective memory, and what role do museums and social online media play in the creation of this collective memory? Too many times, leaders and nations have dwelled in the past, which has handicapped the immense potential of the present, instead of using knowledge of the past advantageously towards the future. In conclusion, history has proved that it cannot disappear. Wars can never disappear. Poverty can never disappear. Sickness can never disappear. Corruption can never disappear. Yet our connected history has produced success, happiness, growth, and prosperity. History has shown contrasts, andNamibia, the country we are so fortunate to live in, advocates the diversity of every individual. In the words of Shakespeare, “What is past is prologue.” Indeed, the future of mankind will build upon what it has already established. As time progresses, the common public memory of the past will continue to fuse and intertwine all nations’ destinies together based on what each individual accomplishes now, in the present. Paraphrased: [1]http://www.greatquestions.com/winners/en/Microso ft %20Word %20- %20AnnaBetkaessay.pdf Now is the time to look at what is our common memory - and include all sides of the wars as part and parcel of one nation. And learn to use our differences to map a path for the future.
1. http://www.greatquestions.com/winners/en/Microsoft%20Word%20-%20AnnaBetkaessay.pdf

253

Some encouragement in the workplace (2011-06-05 13:24)
DON’T LOOK TO BECOME A PERSON OF SUCCESS, LOOK INSTEAD TO BECOME A PERSON OF VALUE! There was a farmer who collected horses; he only needed one more breed to complete his collection. One day, he found out that his neighbour had the particular horse breed he needed. So, he constantly bothered his neighbour until he sold it to him. A month later, the horse became ill and he called the veterinarian, who said: - Well, your horse has a virus. He must take this medicine for three days.. I’ll come back on the 3rd day and if he’s not better, we’re going to have to put him down. Nearby, the pig listened closely to their conversation. The next day, they gave him the medicine and left. The pig approached the horse and said: - Be strong, my friend. Get up or else they’re going to put you to sleep! On the second day, they gave him the medicine and left. The pig came back and said: - Come on buddy, get up or else you’re going to die! Come on, I’ll help you get up. Let’s go! One, two, three... On the third day, they came to give him the medicine and the vet said: - Unfortunately, we’re going to have to put him down tomorrow. Otherwise, the virus might spread and infect the other horses. After they left, the pig approached the horse and said: - Listen pal, it’s now or never! Get up, come on! Have courage! Come on! Get up! Get up! That’s it, slowly! Great! Come on, one, two, three... Good, good. Now faster, come on.... Fantastic! Run, run more! Yes! Yay! Yes! You did it, you’re a champion!!! All of a sudden, the owner came back, saw the horse running in the field and began shouting: - It’s a miracle! My horse is cured. This deserves a party. Let’s kill the pig! Points for reflection: this often happens in the workplace. Nobody truly knows which employee actually deserves the merit of success, or who’s actually contributing the necessary support to make things happen. LEARNING TO LIVE WITHOUT RECOGNITION IS A SKILL! If anyone ever tells you that your work is unprofessional, remember: amateurs built the Ark and professionals built the Titanic. DON’T LOOK TO BECOME A PERSON OF SUCCESS, LOOK INSTEAD TO BECOME A PERSON OF VALUE! (Thanks to my sister Arlene for passing along)

Swearing at the Namibia Music Awards 2011 (2011-06-05 16:36)
The profane language by a certain artist, formerly known as Lady May (she is no lady), has sparked a lot of debate on the various Internet forums such as Twitter and Facebook. I am sure it is also a topic in many people’s houses during this weeekend, and will be amply covered by our newspapers during the week. My first reaction when she made the comment (I do watch NBC), was to laugh. The artist obviously did not have any idea what the meaning of the words were, or the insult she was trying to convey. After all, did she really mean, to refer to the audience as people who participates in sexual intercourse with their mother? 254

Then I did a double take. How do I explain to a child in the audience (at home) what she meant by this? Must I tell the child the truth that this artist believes we are engaged in sexual acts, or should I just answer, ”she’s swearing, and does not mean it”? Thats when I got angry. Why should I be forced to make excuses for someone else? This artists is dependent on us as consumers to buy her music. Thus her behaviour is unacceptable. As a consumer, I believe its my money and I will use it where I am treated as king. So no Lady May, no business that swears at me will get my money.

Think out of the Box (2011-06-22 17:01)
You are driving along in your car on a wild, stormy night. You pass by a bus stop, and you see three people waiting for the bus: 1. An old lady who looks as if she is about to die. 2. An old friend who once saved your life. 3. The perfect man (or) woman you have been dreaming about. Which one would you choose to offer a ride to, knowing that there could only be one passenger in your car? Think before you continue reading. This is a moral/ethical dilemma that was once actually used as part of a job application. You could pick up the old lady, because she is going to die, and thus you should save her first; or you could take the old friend because he once saved your life, and this would be the perfect chance to pay him back. However, you may never be able to find your perfect dream lover again. The candidate who was hired (out of 200 applicants) had no trouble coming up with his answer. He simply answered: ”I would give the car keys to my old friend, and let him take the lady to the hospital. I would stay behind and wait for the bus with the woman of my dreams.” Never forget to ”Think Outside of the Box.”

Email friend (2011-06-22 17:06)
(Dedicated to Jaqueline) Although you are a friend of mine And letters we exchange I would not know you on the street And doesn’t that seem strange? You hold a place within my life Unusual and unique We share ideals and special dreams And still we do not speak I picture what I think you are 255

Perhaps you picture me? An intriguing game for both of us For someone we cannot see. So for this friendship we possess We owe this mail a debt Perhaps the charm lies in the fact That we have never met.

3.6

August

Why did I write, ”Future Namibia”? (2011-08-23 15:57)
Namibians have a lot to be proud of. It is one of the most spectacular countries in terms of scenery and wildlife. In addition, it has enormous mineral wealth. The most important ingredient of this country however, is its people. Namibians have emerged from decades of colonialism and apartheid rule to become one of the most integrated societies in the world. Regardless of social, economic or political background, Namibians are proud of their country. As a child of Independence, having raised the flag of Namibia over Windhoek the morning of 21 March 1990, I am grateful for those who went before me to ensure the quality of life we can all enjoy. I have been trained in investment promotion, or in plain words, marketing of Namibia to outsiders. This has had its share of success and failure, but more importantly given me the chance to study the people, the landscape, the business sectors, history and so much more. This book is the result of my experiences and study of the best system for making this country even better for us, and our generations to come. While preparing the book I was looking for a basis on which to write. The best structure, I believe, has been to write this book as a “Business Plan for Namibia”. Accordingly, I looked at: · Management (Government, Legislature and Executive) · External and Internal Environments (PEST analysis) · Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) · Marketing planning(through segmentation and targeting) to find the best value proposition · Forecasting In all these, I looked for the best result achieved in other countries such as China, Germany, France, Netherlands, Japan, USA, etc and adapted it to our specific situation. Throughout this book I also looked at how to integrate technology into our systems and daily lives. I have struggled to find a term for this and the best I could find was “Progress through Technology”, or in German, “Vorsprung Durch Technik” . I prefer to use the German expression because in German the word “Technik” not only means technology, but also thetechnique of studying and mastering the skills of something. My conclusion is that in Namibia, discrimination is not based only on race, culture, gender, or geographical location, but more importantly in access to services (and technology). 256

Just as in any business plan, this book is not set in stone. It is a work in progress that will develop and change to reflect the changes in our society. I hope that you the reader, will not only read, but become a participant in creating this vision of “Future Namibia”. Future Namibia Mission Statement “Develop the tools and systems to assist the management of Namibia (government, civil society and private sector) in providing access to services and technologies to allow maximum quality of life to all who live here.” Milton Louw 14 August 2011

3.7

December

Idealism (2011-12-28 15:44)
Idealism! Throughout history, some men had sought the ideal, and most had called it freedom. Only fools expected absolute freedom, but wise men dreamed up many systems of relative freedom, including democracy. They had tried that in America, as the last fling of the dream. It had been a good attempt, too. The men who drew the Constitution had been pretty practical dreamers. They came to their task after a bitter war and a worse period of wild chaos, and they had learned where idealism stopped and idiocy began. They set up a republic with all the elements of democracy that they considered safe. It had worked well enough to make America the number one power of the world. But the men who followed the framers of the new plan were a different sort, without the knowledge of practical limits. The privileges their ancestors had earned in blood and care became automatic rights. Practical men tried to explain that there were no such rights that each generation had to pay for its rights with responsibility. That kind of talk didn’t get far. People wanted to hear about rights, not about duties. They took the phrase that all men were created equal and left out the implied kicker that equality was in the sight of God and before the law. They wanted an equality with the greatest men without giving up their drive toward mediocrity, and they meant to have it. In a way, they got it. They got the vote extended to everyone. The man on subsidy or public dole could vote to demand more. The man who read of nothing beyond sex crimes could vote on the great political issues of the world. No ability was needed for his vote. In fact, he was assured that voting alone was enough to make him a fine and noble citizen. He loved that, if he bothered to vote at all that year. He became a great man by listing his unthought, hungry desire for someone to take care of him without responsibility. So he went out and voted for the man who promised him most, or who looked most like what his limited dreams felt to be a father image or son image or hero image. He never bothered later to see how the men he’d elected had handled the jobs he had given them. Someone had to look, of course, and someone did. Organized special interests stepped in where the mob had failed. Lobbies grew up. There had always been pressure groups, but now they developed into a third arm of the government. Bagde of Infamy - Lester del Rey

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258

Chapter 4

2012
4.1 January

Future Namibia - On Sale Now (2012-01-03 16:08)
”Future Namibia” is a book written by Milton Louw covering various PEST (Political, economic, social and technological) issues facing Namibia. About the author Milton Louw is a Namibian born socio-political entrepreneur. He has traveled extensively promoting Namibia as an investment destination. His publications, email newsletters and more recently his blogs are read by entrepreneurs from all sizes of businesses. His research on managing a country as a business using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) tools has been received by a wide audience of business, academics and other social entrepreneurs. Future Namibia Mission Statement ”Develop the tools and systems to assist the management of Namibia (government, civil society and private sector) in providing access to services and technologies to allow maximum quality of life to all who live here.” Click for the versions you wish to purchase:

• [1]Paperback version: • [2]Kindle Version: • [3]Ipad:
1. https://www.createspace.com/3677343 2. http://www.amazon.com/Future-Namibia-ebook/dp/B006FORWHE 3. http://itunes.apple.com/de/book/future-namibia/id483350891?mt=11&ls=1

The Dogg making racial jokes on Facebook (2012-01-05 22:47)
Facebook and social online media is today becoming a method of sharing our ideas with friends and relatives from all around the world, and all around our country too. It allows us to share our ideas, photos and private comments with each other and we know that our friends often think in the same wey that we do - that is after all why we are friends. Many of us do not think that our comments or posts should be considered public, or 259

often consider that people we might not know can read our posts and judge us accoring to these comments. Last night, 5 January 2012, I was rather saddened to read a post by one of our leading artists who has over 29,000 people following him on Facebook. The Dogg posted the following at around 20h00 on his fan page: [1]”A MULE IS A CROSS BREED OF A DONKEY AND A HORSE.....SO A BLACK PERSON AND A WHITE PERSON OFFSPRING IS ALSO A MULE SINCE IS CROSS BREED?....HAHAHAHAHAH” This is obviously a racial slur and can lead to a charge of racism. What was worse, was that as it was posted by the star many of his fans felt they too could comment and make even more outrageous comments making fun of other people whose parents were from different cultures or mixed races. It was particularly sad that these fans (many of them still youth and possibly born frees) did not realise their comments were racist and to be strongly condemned - even possibly having a criminal charges laid against them (and The Dogg). I wish to urge our artists, and our fellow Namibians, to be careful of the things they write on facebook or any other social media. Not only are your comments racist and hurtful, but can, and should, lead to criminal charges of racism. I hope that our people who make use of these tools think twice before making such comments, or even participating in such activities.

[2] Martin Morocky (born 31 March 1983), known by his stage name as The Dogg is a [3]Namibian multiaward winning [4]musician, [5]producer and [6]actor. He’s one of the most outstanding artists in Namibia and is considered one of the pioneers of [7]Namibia’s kwaito [8]genre.
1. http://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=10150470986827804&id=108470177803) 2. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vV7M_g8dIZc/TwYMMuD_ncI/AAAAAAAAAEY/GzurRPReevc/s1600/dogg+mule+story.jpg 3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Namibians 4. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musician 5. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Record_producer 6. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actor 7. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kwaito 8. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genre

260

Milton Louw - Future Namibia :
(2012-01-06 16:03)

Autorenportrait BoD - Books on Demand

[1]Milton Louw - Future Namibia : Autorenportrait BoD - Books on Demand: “Why did I write this book?” “In this book I hope to objectively evaluate Namibia’s economic problems in terms of Namibia’s realities. ... Namibia’s economic problems have both proximate and ultimate causes, too. The solution must eliminate its proximate causes which are multiple and complex. They include: a hugely expanding rural population that is moving to the urban areas; illiteracy – especially in regards Information Technology; lack of adequate schooling and medical care facilities; and their constantly escalating states of poverty. ...”
1. http://www.bod.de/index.php?id=296&objk_id=636881#.Twb-9ka69gA.blogger

Black Consciousness Revisited (2012-01-13 10:20)
by Benedick M Louw A QUOTE in Spanish by the revered Cuban patriot, poet and writer Jose Marti (1853-1895) states “La unica manera de ser libre es ser cultos”. When translated into English it means “the only way to be free is to be cultivators”. Contrary to hasty interpretation thereof, this statement, which by now is a social belief in Cuba, means that in order to be free one needs to produce food to feed yourself or work hard to be able to pursue your happiness whatever trajectory you choose to undertake. In other words it defines absolute independence characterised by a complete psychological, physical but most of all economic liberation from the oppressors. Underlining the word absolute’ gets one’s attention more in the sense that it calls for complete and total independence vis-à-vis dominance from the oppressor, which in Cuba’s case was principally from Spain. Now it has resonance for the West, particularly the United States of America. It’s obvious today that we in Namibia are continuously being led and misled by the former architects of apartheid, particularly the small percentage that owns, dictates and monopolises the economy, sowing divisions or disunity inconspicuously amongst the majority of blacks. This is because it would be unthinkable to repossess the country politically hence the cunning manner of pulling the bargaining ropes with the state and economically sabotaging the majority of the people, namely blacks. In simple terms, 21 years after independence the majority of blacks clearly do not hold absolute power, being economic ownership, leaving the status quo of apartheid architects still unchanged and unchallenged. It would be foolish or naïve to suggest that a few black elitists do not gain from this fundamentally manipulative neo-colonial manoeuvre. In his book The Dialectics of Ideological Resistance to White Supremacy, author Robert Fatton dissects the pertinent issues of Class, Blackness and Economics in a very eloquent approach. At the Black Renaissance Convention organised in 1974, Foszia Fisher and Harold Nxasana presented a paper entitled “The Labour Situation in South Africa” which expressed the point of the radical wing of Black Consciousness on the class nature of the blacks. They argued that white supremacy was not simply the result of military conquest; it also depended on co-opting a black minority into the structure and superstructure of the white system. This co-option permitted the systematic exploitation of black labour without the permanent use of force. In this sense, some blacks became auxiliaries of the white system and also participated in the exploitation of fellow blacks. Namibia is a prime example in respect of this rather abyssmal chain of events as evident today. The ongoing tender tussle of the Neckartal dam is a case in point, which bears all the distinguished hallmarks of black elites at work. These elites lack the logic, insight, and courage that would have made them leaders of the black revolution. They are blinded by their material egoism and they hardly dare to conceive the idea of black liberation, for this idea was the very negation of their existential condition. Furthermore, since their only social base of 261

power – outside white support – resided in the intensification of tribalism, they actively contribute to the fragmentation of black resistance. In Namibia nothing is more likely to cause more argument and debate than the land issue’. Land has become synonymous with this situation where less than 10 percent of the people control nearly half the land, while a further 65 percent of the population lives off 41 percent of the total area. The fact that the former 10 percent are white and largely derived from European settlers, adds racial and political dimensions to the issue.” (Society and Governance – Namibia’s Land Issue) Kazenambo Kazenambo, alias KK, Minister of Youth and Sport’s recent rhetoric regarding white arrogance sent shockwaves throughout the corridors of white owned businesses and straight into the living rooms of most, whether it be in urban areas or in the luxury of their farm establishments or industries. These overdue sentiments silently enjoyed praise and still echo in the minds of black youth nation-wide, not to mention youth leaders, the majority still crippled by the manacles of apartheid and the continued experience of being oppressed and economically disadvantaged. It is the elitist class that is sowing seeds of confusion and division amongst our people. It is the elitist class, created by the very oppressor which has joined hands with the oppressor in suppressing the legitimate aspirations of the masses of the people and they collect crumbs from the master’s table for this dirty work. To draw parallels to this fact is the undisputed partnership between white capitalists and some few BEE elites discreetly establishing empires, whereas the latter in the name of BEE affirmative policies and with capital funds of their former slave masters through unscrupulous and dubious means seek what is known as tenderpreneurship. This act of self-enrichment of a few to the disadvantage of the masses is fundamentally unconstitutional, morally backward and ought to be shamed where and when it shows its face. Such a severe condemnation of the tribal elites was an example of part of an incisive criticism of the whole policy of separate development, which in turn led to radical criticisms of the whole capitalist system. The linkages between tribal elites, separate development, and capitalist exploitation were identified in Black Consciousness literature and thoroughly condemned: “Let blacks take full notice of the fact that the Transkei and other homelands are there not for our benefit but to maintain the chains that bind us into perpetual servitude by keeping us divided and involving us in useless and meaningless political exercises so as to keep our eyes away from the pot from which the racial poison is being brewed. They are there to ensure that the blacks never attain what they aspire for - their liberation. They are there to maintain the capitalist system of this country by keeping (the black man) starving and ignorant so that he can continue being a tool in the white man’s farm, mine or industry for the production of wealth for the exclusive benefit of the white imperialist.” Despite liberal claims to the contrary, foreign capital did not contribute to the overall development of black Namibia; instead it enriched the white population and propped up a new black class of pseudo-capitalists. It’s obvious today that despite the success stories of numerous well drafted policies and well intended regulations, we have dismally failed regarding the effective implementation of these fundamental policies, which putting it candidly, are collecting dust and serve as mere white elephants, archived in the deep office corners of legislators, remaining idle until Kingdom comes. In the words of Nkwame Nkrumah: “In the era of neocolonialism, under-development is still attributed, not to exploitation but to inferiority, and racial undertones remain closely interwoven with the class struggle”. Benedick M Louw Karas Region

Cry The Beloved Country (2012-01-13 10:41)
[1]From the Namibian newspaper 13 January 2012 262

PEOPLE no longer become ashamed or show sympathy in this country, it seems. They only get angry and aggressive when caught out or when dubious deals are questioned. Some are so brazen they tell critics to leave them in peace in order to make their money. “It’s not my fault you don’t want to be in business,” is one refrain. “You are just jealous,” is the more common one. The details of the incidents exposed by the media are ignored as even the masses buy into the defence that journalists and other critics are simply envious because young blacks are becoming empowered’ and getting rich in the process. Two such incidents provided this newspaper with ample fodder for hard news’ over the holiday season, a time generally viewed as a soft news’ period. Seemingly the officials in the Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry and the Ministry of Works and Transport regard the reporting and questioning of two tenders as either an irritant or unnecessary and unjustifiable. Both contracts were discussed and decided just before Christmas, a time when the country literally shuts down for more than a month. And they were regarded as too urgent’ to wait for proper procedure. The agriculture ministry’s Permanent Secretary Andrew Ndishishi pushed through a decision to award a dam construction project to an Italian company called Impregilo at a cost of N $2,8 billion – a good N $800 million more than the lowest bid from a Chinese company also considered suitably qualified. The Minister of Works and Transport, Erkki Nghimtina, is also said to have insisted that only one company be considered in a N $150 million emergency contract to repair a decrepit railway line. Despite the Tender Board telling the works ministry to find at least two competitors, it came as no surprise that the ministry claims it could find no one else open for business’ except the company it had hand-picked. The government officials find nothing wrong with the fact that they or their friends own those companies which get government tenders, as is the case with the Permanent Secretary in the Office of the President, Dr Ndeutala Angolo, whose Schoemans Office Systems supplied State House equipment. It is probably unfair to people like Angolo to mention names because the incestuous government-business relationships have become so commonplace that it is understandable if apparent do-gooders like President Hifikepunye Pohamba and Prime Minister Nahas Angula begin to despair. It already appears that the general population have resigned themselves to aspects which in many societies would be frowned upon as dubious deals and corrupt systems. In fact, the situation is so bad there are many Namibians who wish former President Sam Nujoma was back in power, because, they argue, at least under him corruption was well managed’ or at least restricted to a few. This is despite the fact that Nujoma’s mere presence remains the cause of the paralysis that has gripped those he left in charge of the ruling party and the government. Cry beloved Namibia, cry.
1. http://www.namibian.com.na/index.php?id=28&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=92166&no_cache=1

Urbanomics: A Public Credit Registry for India? (2012-01-17 17:12)
[1]Urbanomics: A Public Credit Registry for India? One of the fundamental challenges with any credit market is the asymmetry in information between borrowers and lenders. This generates markets failures arising from adverse selection (of borrowers) and moral hazard (among borrowers). Inadequate information about credit risks posed by borrowers was a significant contributor to the sub-prime mortgage crisis in the US. Blinded by the spectacular rise in property prices and perverse institutional incentives, coupled with absence of adequate information about borrowers, mortgage lenders threw caution to the wind and indulged in a lending spree. Closer home, one of the major complaints against micro-finance institutions (MFIs) is the widespread trend of multiple borrowings by poor people. Though unaware of the credit histories of their borrowers, MFI lenders were carried away by the belief in their ability to recover loans and gave loans without proper due diligence. 263

The result was poor people saddled with multiple loans from different MFIs, with atleast some of them being merely used to reschedule or repay older loans. In this context, a credit history register assumes great importance. Credit reporting systems (CRS) are a widely accepted means to capture current and historical lending and payment information on individual borrowers. Such CRS’s enable lenders to accurately assess credit risks and monitor the riskiness of their loan portfolios. The CRS databases are also used by regulators to more effectively monitor and supervise banks and ensure financial stability. In this respect, CRS’s form the backbone of a healthy credit market. At a time when banks do not hold monopoly of credit, and are even being eclipsed by other players, it is important that such credit registries cover the transactions of these institutions. The MFIs are just but one of these large number of lending institutions that dot the credit marketplace. Finally, CRS’s will enable effective implementation of the recommendations of the International Regulatory Framework for Banks (Basel III). The Credit Information Bureau (India) Ltd (CIBIL), owned by a consortium of banks and financial institutions, is the first and leading credit registry in India. It collects and disseminates the applicant’s complete credit record that may be spread over different institutions. It provides information about the credit history of commercial and consumer borrowers to only its members. However, its membership and access is strictly on payment basis. In many respects, such CRS is a classic public good. The social benefit of maintaining a CRS out-weighs its private benefit and cost. Further, fragmented credit bureaus defeat the very purpose of establishing them. A single universal credit registry will generate network effects and attract more institutions. Only governments have the incentives to maintain such registries. An appropriately structured Public Credit Registry (PCR) can be invaluable in the assessment of credit risks and will enhance banking and financial market supervision. There are many countries with PCRs, run by their central banks or banking regulators. The troubles faced by the MFIs is a clear indication about the need to have in place a Public Credit Registry of India, where all financial institutions register and share information about their borrowers. The Aadhar number provides an excellent anchor around which credit histories can be located and traced.
1. http://gulzar05.blogspot.com/2011/02/public-credit-registry-for-india.html

Namibië moet digitaal verspring (2012-01-17 17:20)
[1]http://www.republikein.com.na/die-mark/namibi-moet-digitaal-v erspring.94007.php 25.09.2009 Namibië moet digitaal verspring [2] NAMIBIË kort blykbaar ’n dringende ingryping in die inligting- en kommunikasietegnologie (IKT) sektor om die steeds groeiende gaping tussen globale tegnologiese vordering en nasionale ontwikkeling te oorbrug. Volgens mnr. Milton Louw, skrywer van Smile my Beloved Land, sal sy IKT-aksiegroep bewusmaking in Namibië hoog op die nasionale agenda plaas. Mnr. Louw het onlangs die IKT aksiegroep gestig om Namibiërs aan te spoor om so gou moontlik deel van die digitale rewolusie te word. Die aksiegroep wil die Regering as vennoot betrek om op elke vlak bewusmaking te beklemtoon en om die regeringsmandaat te verkry om die publiek oor IKT in te lig. Die IKT-aksiegroep wil graag ’n sentrale register in Namibië begin, plaaslike webtuistes help skep en onderhou en mense aanmoedig om by webtuistes soos[3]www.namlish.com, wat ’n digitale gemeenskap Namibiërs bymekaarbring, aan te sluit en landgenote aan te spoor om ’n digitale nasionale identiteit te skep. 264

Mnr. Louw noem dat volslae IKT-infrastruktuur dit moontlik maak om ’n moderne inligtingsamelewing en kennisekonomie te kan aandryf, wat blyk die tendens is wat presterende lande volg. Hy noem dat Facebook, in terme van lede, reeds die wêreld se vyfde grootste “land” sou wees. Hy vermeld ook hoe die akteur Ashton Kutcher vir CNN in ’n weddenskap geklop het dat hy ’n miljoen kontakte op Twitter kon kry. Hy noem dat veral in lande soos Namibië, Nigerië en Suid-Afrika ’n reusesprong in selfoon-tegnologie plaasgevind het, wat ’n hele ander mark vir IKT-bewusmaking open. ’n Onlangse studie toon dat 80 % van die Namibiese bevolking ’n selfoon het, maar net 3.7 % gebruik ’n rekenaar met internettoegang. “Armoede is dus nie net ’n konsep wat met geld en basiese infrastruktuur verduidelik kan word nie, maar ook deur ’n gebrek aan kennis oor en toegang tot relevante inligtingen kommunikasietegnologie,” sê mnr. Louw. Hein Scholtz
1. http://www.republikein.com.na/die-mark/namibi-moet-digitaal-verspring.94007.php 2. file://localhost/mnt/ext/blogbooker/tmp/w5ykt629/w5ykt629-body.tex.lynx.html 3. http://www.namlish.com/

Nuwe bedeling vir ’dot com dot na’ (2012-01-17 17:28)
[1]http://www.republikein.com.na/die-mark/nuwe-bedeling-vir-dot-com-do t-na.24968.php Nuwe bedeling vir ’dot com dot na’ 1.10.2007 [2] DEELNEMERS aan ’n onlangse beraad oor die administrasie van Namibië se domeinnaam op die web, ”dot na”, het hulself bankvas geskaar agter die noodsaak vir ’n stelsel wat hierdie nasionale bate op ’n veel doeltreffender wyse sal bestuur. Klagtes oor ’n ”diktatoriale, diskriminerende en disfunksionele” status quo - waaroor koppe al vir jare baie hard stamp - het die Alliansie vir Inligtings- en Kommunikasietegnologie (ICTA) genoop om rolspelers bymekaar te roep om ’n padkaart vir ingrypende verandering op te stel. Volgens mnr. Milton Louw van ICTA sal die eenparige steun wat by hierdie slypskool vir vernuwing gemonster is, die weg baan vir ’n formele aansoek van regeringskant aan die internasionale Internetkorporasie vir Toegedeelde Name en Nommers (ICANN) dat die registrateurskap vir ”.na” uit die hande van dr. Eberhard Lisse geneem word. Lede van die alliansie dink dit is hoog tyd om die sterk persoonlike angel uit ’n rompslompstryd te trek wat volgens mnr. Louw veroorsaak dat meer as 70 persent van nuwe webwerwe wat vandag in Namibië geregistreer word, net die ”dot com”-naam eerder as Namibië se eie, unieke webkode dra. Hy het dr. Lisse se bewering dat hy nie genooi is om sy saak te stel nie verwerp. Volgens mnr. Louw het mnr. Sackey Shanghala, die persoonlike raadgewer van die Minister van Justisie en Prokureur-generaal, me. Pendukeni Iivula-Ithana, wat aan die stuur van die finalisering van die land se lank verwagte nuwe wet oor inligting en kommunikasie staan, verseker dat die administrasie van Namibië se domeinnaam vervat sal word in hierdie konsepwet, wat volgens plan nog in die huidige sitting van die parlement ter tafel gelê sal word. Die voorstel is dat die nuwe kommunikasie-owerheid (NCA), wat deur hierdie wet in die lewe geroep sal word, ’n onafhanklike liggaam sal stig wat die administrasie, registrasie en regulering van ”dot na” sal hanteer tot ’n wet op elektroniese transaksies ingestel is. Die plan is dat die publiek lede uit die IKT-bedryf, regslui, akademici en burgerlikes sal nomineer om op hierdie raad te dien. Die beter diens waarop almal in die proses aandring, kan egter nog jare neem om ’n werklikheid te word. Terwyl ’n mens volgens mnr. Louw met ’n kredietkaart op die internet binne vyf minute vir sowat N $90 ’n 265

nuwe webwerf kan registreer as die kliënt tevrede is met net ’n ”dot com”, wag aansoekers weke om ’n ”dot na”-naam te kry. Dít kos N $565. Volgens ICANN se reëls word die eerste persoon wat ’n werf met ’n land se toegedeelde kode registreer, outomaties die registrateur. Dr. Lisse het in 1990 op hierdie manier beheer oor die bestuur van ”dot na” gekry, wat tans deur die onderneming Ondis en die Namibian Network Information Centre (NA-NiC) op Swakopmund behartig word. So ’n registrateur kan die prosedure vir die registrasie van nuwe werwe vasstel en aansoeke goed- of afkeur. Ontevredenes meen heeltemal te veel mag het in die proses in ’n enkele internetman se hande beland. [3]Dani Booysen
1. http://www.republikein.com.na/die-mark/nuwe-bedeling-vir-dot-com-dot-na.24968.php 2. file://localhost/mnt/ext/blogbooker/tmp/w5ykt629/w5ykt629-body.tex.lynx.html 3. mailto:dani@republikein.com.na

Tyd loop uit vir inspraak in kommunikasiewet (2012-01-17 17:29)
[1]http://www.republikein.com.na/politiek-en-nasionale/tyd-loopuit-vir-inspraak-in-kommunikasiewet.56567.php 6.07.2007 Tyd loop uit vir inspraak in kommunikasiewet [2] ROLSPELERS in die telekommunikasiebedryf en ander belangstellendes het nog net tot Dinsdag om insette te lewer oor voorgestelde wysigings aan die land se langverwagte nuwe kommunikasiewet. Die Namibiese Kommunikasiekommissie (NCC) sal slegs tot 10 Julie bykomende kommentaar ontvang oor ’n konsepwet wat die grondslag vir die volledige liberalisering van die telkommark sal lê. ’n Nasionale slypskool sal vanaf 25 tot 27 Julie plaasvind om finaal vorm aan ’n wet te gee wat deur ’n ewekansige geleentheid vir vrye en gesonde mededinging uiteindelik vir Jan Alleman onder meer die beste moontlike diens en pryse moet verseker. Die wet sal die NCC ook vervang met ’n veel gevaarliker waghond, die Namibiese Kommunikasieowerheid (NCA). Die Kabinet het in Maart vanjaar midde ’n hete geveg tussen Telecom, MTC en Cell One oor of die staatsvoorsiener die mobiele foonmark met sy nuwe produk Switch kon betree, hierdie wetgewing wat al agt jaar in aantog is, op die sneltrajek geskuif. Behalwe dat Telecom opdrag gegee is om Switch-kliënte se opvangs intussen tot die dorp waar hulle woon te beperk, is bevel gegee dat die nuwe kommunikasiewet reeds vandeesmaand in die Nasionale Vergadering moet dien. Hierdie tydvenster is reeds gemis. Ná finalisering sal die wet ook eers weer voor die Kabinet moet dien. Die Inligtings- en Kommunikasietegnologie-alliansie (ICTA) is ’n forum wie se lede by laat vandeesmaand se finale indaba oor die kommunikasiewet hul stemme na verwagting baie dik kan maak. Volgens mnr. Milton Louw wat die Alliansie bestuur, is daar die volgende twee maande nog twee baie belangrike byeenkomste. Op 2 en 3 Augustus sal IKT-beleid in die visier inskuif, terwyl ’n konferensie op 13 September halsstarrige probleme met die administrasie van Namibië se domeinnaam op die internet (.na) gaan takel. As deel van die nasionale besit is dit volgens mnr. Louw noodsaaklik dat die land se internetkode in nasionale belang bestuur moet word. Die ICTA wie se nuusbrief ’n omsendsyfer van byna 1 400 het, het volgens mnr. Louw nuwe lewe gekry ná ’n lang sluimerperiode en verwag om hul individue ledetal, wat verlede jaar op 10 gestaan het, tot in die omgewing van 80 te vermeerder. ’n Totaal van 54 sakeondernemings was verlede jaar deel van hierdie belange266

en drukgroep. Enigiemand met navrae oor die werk van dié Alliansie is welkom om mnr. Louw by 081 304 3282 te skakel, of hom by milton@iit.com.na te vonkpos. Hul webwerf is www. ictalliance.org.na. Voorleggings oor die huidige konsepkommunikasiewet, beskikbaar by die NCC (061 222 666), moet in elektroniese en gedrukte formaat wees (vyf afskrifte van elke voorstel is nodig) en dit moet die Kommissie op die laatste teen 10 Julie bereik. Hul kantore is by Robert Mugaberylaan 56. Die NCC sal na verwagting eersdaags die konsultante aanwys wat aan die spits van die finalisering van die wet sal staan. [3]Dani Booysen
1. http://www.republikein.com.na/politiek-en-nasionale/tyd-loop-uit-vir-inspraak-in-kommunikasiewet.56567.php 2. file://localhost/mnt/ext/blogbooker/tmp/w5ykt629/w5ykt629-body.tex.lynx.html 3. mailto:dani@republikein.com.na

Roux-che Locke: teachers who were part of my life’s journey: thank you (2012-01-18 11:41)
[1]Roux-che Locke [2](Facebook status - 18 January 2012) This is gonna be quite a lengthy piece, so - you are under no obligation to view my status...Anyway,I went to register my Gr. 5 son at his school this week when ”Mother-Nature” called... a little boy directs me to the nearest girls’-restroom, and it is here that I am greeted by those smaaaaaaaalllllll miniature toilet-pots - first thought: would my ”African-booty” fit on this? But now Mother-Nature is really calling, and I dont’ have much of a choice! So, I sit down - as in reaaaaaalllly sit down, in fact, it felt more like I was doing a failed sit-up attempt - knees almost touching my chin: that’s how low!! Anyway, I am immediately taken back to almost 30 yrs ago when I started my first school day: Sub A, M.H Greeff Prim: 2 netjies gekamde-bees-gelekte laaaaaaaaaannng vlegseltjies net soos ma dit kon doen, ”dressed-2-kill” in my blou skool-rokkie wat so byna onder die knie stop en 2 stokkies-beentjies wat net-net uitsteek (ogh, how I hated this look!!), en my bruin ”suitcasey” lekker ge-stock met ma se ”bederf” vir die dag...my teacher, Mrs. Strauss (the most beautiful and elegant teacher, and today ”aunty Maureen” to me...) Dis hier waar ek my eerste tree na die res van my ”shaping-en-moulding” gee, waar ek my karakter ontdek en verder create...Maar wat ek eintlik wil se is dat dit hier is - op hierdie miniature-toiletjie (en neeeeeee, dit was nie so lank wat ek gesit het nie...lol!) dat ek besef watter noble job dit is om onderwyser te wees... So, to aaaaaaaaallllll my teachers who were part of my life’s journey: thank you for your valued contribution to who and what I am today. And to my child(ren)’s teachers and those-to-be: thank you for the contribution and impact you will make in his (their) life! En nou is dit tyd om op te staan van hierdie klein miniatuur potjie, want my bene en booty kan dit nie meer hou nie!!
1. http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1443141818 2. http://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=3110349604699&id=1443141818&notif_t=feed_comment_reply

Andreas Guibeb - Experimenting with education in Namibia (2012-01-19 11:36)
[1]Andreas Guibeb The poor outcome of the matric results of the past year takes me back down memory lane when I had the good fortune to serve as assistant teacher (hulp onderwyser) for a Grade9 class at Ella Du Plessis for a brief period. I soon realized the huge gap in performances between the top and lowest performing students, especially 267

those who commuted daily from Katatura to attend school in Khomasdal in the hope of a better future. I refused to accept that some kids were stupid whilst others were clever. My challenge was to proof that theory by narrowing that gap. But how...? Not prejudiced by the dogma of formal teacher training I experimented a lot and tested the tolerance limits of the school principal by abolishing the system of giving individual test marks and replacing it with a test mark for each student equal to the class average test mark for the subject. So every pupil in the class had either a good or horrible test mark for each subject. My point was that the success of everyone in the class was and should be our collective concern. We will only achieve that objective if we all start sharing good studying and learning strategies with everyone and increase the class average by helping the poor performers to up their contribution to the average class performances. I said let’s all fake it till we make it and achieve the highest possible average class result, which means that everybody is doing well individually. I therefore paired pupils to do homework and prepare for tests and taking particular care to pair top performers with under performers. I did this intuitively and without any knowledge of ”positive deviancy theory” developed years later by Harvard Professor Jerry and Monique Sternin. With hindsight it reasures me that there was sense to the experiments of the scientist gone mad in the Ella du Plessis School laboratory. This initiative was however very disturbing (understatement) to the school principal, school administration, the top performers and their parents in the class. The underlying spirit of: ”We are in this together and we win when everyone wins” that I was trying to share, militated against the acquired wisdom pervasive in all aspects of our life of: ”Each one for him/herself and God help us all”. So I convened a meeting of parents, the school principle, students and myself where I explained that if the top performers and poor performers studied together both will win. When both win everyone wins. The top performers would gain lifelong friends and the poor performers gained a window into the thinking and study methods of top performers. The poor performers would gain self-esteem they lacked before when they see improved results. Once successful, they will dislike failure forever. I am greatful to the school principal, parents and pupils for having allowed me to continue that risky experiment, but the rest is history as they say. Though I spend only a few months with the class all of them passed matric and gained access to university long after I left the school. The empowering lesson. If allowed, challenged and supported by all stakeholders the learners themselves will come up with more resourcefull and efficient solutions to the most chalenging situations. Because they come up with the solution themselves, it sets them on a lifelong course of success. I am gratefull to the star pupils of my class at Ella du Plessis who took the exercise to heart and help under performers acquire better study habits and thus raised the test average for all. As Shakespeare says,”when the tide rises all boats are lifted”. No top performer became worse because of helping others but all under performers became star pupils and realized their full potential. This is literally and figuratively true in all fields of life as today proven by the ”positive deviancy theory”.
1. http://www.facebook.com/360wellnessguy

Management coaching: There’s method in the madness | Africa Report (2012-01-28 10:58)
[1]Management coaching: There’s method in the madness | Africa Report It’s time to tackle the dreaded M word –management. With management coaching, this has never been easier. By Craig Falck for Africa Report Managers are not born& They are trained. And mentored. And coached. Management coaching is a new technique that’s gaining popularity around the world because it gives employees the skills they need when they enter higher management positions. After all, these programs are popular for a reason& 268

Being a manager is more than just delegating and having a “manager” sign on your business card, desk or office door. It’s about being able to handle the company, to mould and develop your team and department, and lead the team to victory. And that’s where management coaches come in. Like any coach in a sport, they will instil certain principles and knowledge in their leader and coach them to be the best that they can be. There are so many things that managers need to know these days and so many tools that they have at their disposal – there’s nothing that they can’t do in the workplace. Unless, of course, they haven’t had the proper training and coaching. Management coaching is all about identifying your inner manager traits and learning how to use them. We’re talking communication skills that allow you to better communicate your needs and wants in the office; decision making that puts the power in your hands to quickly decide what needs to be done and what can be ignored; concentration that allows you to focus on your goal and make sure that you get there no matter what obstacles stand in your way; drive and determination that you can pass onto others to encourage them to meet their objectives; insight, discretion and understanding that will give you the tools to cope with the office dynamics and personal issues that arise, and a number of other character traits that make for a good manager and leader. The thing is, as popular as manager coaching is, there are still those that scoff at the idea and call it “foolish” and “mad”. However, these names come from two kinds of people: those who think they know it all, and those who know nothing. You cannot simply slam a form of education or knowledge sharing because you don’t agree with it or because it’s not to your liking. Knowledge is power, and any form of education should be appreciated and exploited. The more you know, the better equipped you will be to handle what your workplace throws at you. Huddle up, team& it’s time to coach your management skills and turn you from also-ran-boss to game winner in the blink of an eye.
1. http://www.africareport.com/business-education/2012/01/27/management-coaching-there%E2%80% 99s-method-in-the-madness/

Children’s

books

available

electronically

-when

can

we

give

them

e-readers?

(2012-01-30 11:06)

See: [1]Project Gutenberg Children’s collection ”African publishers lag in shift to electronic books Electronic readers are transforming the way people enjoy their books. However, there is very little African published content on the online stores. For a reader looking for a Kenyan book or literature published in Africa, one has to get the ink-and-paper version as few publishers have moved online.” There are programs in place to provide one-laptop-per-child and the latest is getting e-readers to children. One of these is an organisation called Worldreader.org. What is the possibility of Namibia recognising this as a future trend and start planning for it. I recently completed together with an international team, a study for the University of Washington on ”Libraries, Telecenters and Cybercafés: A Comparison of Different Types of Public Access Venues”. It is sad that we neglecting our children’s access - I just look at the example of our public library in Windhoek. [2]Worldreader aims to put a library of books in the hands of families worldwide, using e-reader technology. Literacy depends on access to written material. E-readers can deliver written material anywhere, quickly and easily. But there is little known about the effect these devices have in classroom settings or in developing countries. Worldreader.org completed several classroom trials using e-readers to explore the use of digital content in the developing world. 269

Our working hypotheses are that:

• E-readers will increase access to books due to lower distribution costs and immediate visibility of millions of books available online. • This will result in a larger number and greater variety of books read, and increased excitement and exchange of ideas around these books. • The result will be a higher value placed on reading within the classroom, family, and community. • The results will be specific and measurable, and will, in the long term, increase literacy and opportunity for those involved.
1. http://www.childrensbooksonline.org/ 2. http://www.worldreader.org/

Dr Seuss - my best friend (2012-01-31 12:03)
[1]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player embedded &v=ahv 1IS7SiE This morning I was inspired by a friend’s post on the last Dr. Seuss book, Burning Man. Dr Seuss was one of those sets of books that I can still return to time and time again, and find new pearls of wisdom. The first time I read one of his books it was at the Von Welligh Library in Johannesburg. This was 1976, I had just lost my mother and my father seemed to have abandoned us children. My grandparents had taken us in and were trying their best to give us a better life. This included moving to Darragh House, the flats belonging to the Anglican Church, in Hillbrow, Johannesburg, South Africa. This was one of the few ”grey areas” in Johannesburg where light skinned coloureds could hope to start a life as ”whites”. Thus at the age of six, I was stuck in a small flat, not able to make friends with the neighbours, and missin my parents. That’s when I discovered ”The Cat in the Hat”. In Dr Seuss I had a new friend who still whispers in my ear: ”Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.” (Thanks Dave Duarte ;-) The whole book can be watched at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player embedded &v=ahv 1IS7SiE
1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ahv_1IS7SiE

A quote on attitude (2012-01-31 12:04)
”The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company... a church... a home. The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. We cannot change our past... we cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way. We cannot change 270

the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play on the one string we have, and that is our attitude... I am convinced that life is 10 % what happens to me and 90 % how I react to it. And so it is with you... we are in charge of our attitudes.”

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! (2012-01-31 13:25)
by Dr. Seuss Congratulations! Today is your day. You’re off to Great Places! You’re off and away! You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the guy who’ll decide where to go. You’ll look up and down streets. Look ’em over with care. About some you will say, ”I don’t choose to go there.” With your head full of brains and your shoes full of feet, you’re too smart to go down any not-so-good street. And you may not find any you’ll want to go down. In that case, of course, you’ll head straight out of town. It’s opener there in the wide open air. Out there things can happen and frequently do to people as brainy and footsy as you. And then things start to happen, don’t worry. Don’t stew. Just go right along. You’ll start happening too. OH! THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! You’ll be on y our way up! You’ll be seeing great sights! You’ll join the high fliers who soar to high heights. You won’t lag behind, because you’ll have the speed. You’ll pass the whole gang and you’ll soon take the lead. Wherever you fly, you’ll be best of the best. Wherever you go, you will top all the rest. Except when you don’t. Because, sometimes, you won’t. I’m sorry to say so 271

but, sadly, it’s true that Bang-ups and Hang-ups can happen to you. You can get all hung up in a prickle-ly perch. And your gang will fly on. You’ll be left in a Lurch. You’ll come down from the Lurch with an unpleasant bump. And the chances are, then, that you’ll be in a Slump. And when you’re in a Slump, you’re not in for much fun. Un-slumping yourself is not easily done. You will come to a place where the streets are not marked. Some windows are lighted. But mostly they’re darked. A place you could sprain both your elbow and chin! Do you dare to stay out? Do you dare to go in? How much can you lose? How much can you win? And IF you go in, should you turn left or right... or right-and-three-quarters? Or, maybe, not quite? Or go around back and sneak in from behind? Simple it’s not, I’m afraid you will find, for a mind-maker-upper to make up his mind. You can get so confused that you’ll start in to race down long wiggled roads at a break-necking pace and grind on for miles cross weirdish wild space, headed, I fear, toward a most useless place. The Waiting Place... ...for people just waiting. Waiting for a train to go or a bus to come, or a plane to go or the mail to come, or the rain to go or the phone to ring, or the snow to snow or the waiting around for a Yes or No or waiting for their hair to grow. Everyone is just waiting. Waiting for the fish to bite or waiting for the wind to fly a kite or waiting around for Friday night or waiting, perhaps, for their Uncle Jake or a pot to boil, or a Better Break or a string of pearls, or a pair of pants or a wig with curls, or Another Chance. Everyone is just waiting. NO! That’s not for you! 272

Somehow you’ll escape all that waiting and staying You’ll find the bright places where Boom Bands are playing. With banner flip-flapping, once more you’ll ride high! Ready for anything under the sky. Ready because you’re that kind of a guy! Oh, the places you’ll go! There is fun to be done! There are points to be scored. There are games to be won. And the magical things you can do with that ball will make you the winning-est winner of all. Fame! You’ll be as famous as famous can be, with the whole wide world watching you win on TV. Except when they don’t Because, sometimes they won’t. I’m afraid that some times you’ll play lonely games too. Games you can’t win ’cause you’ll play against you. All Alone! Whether you like it or not, Alone will be something you’ll be quite a lot. And when you’re alone, there’s a very good chance you’ll meet things that scare you right out of your pants. There are some, down the road between hither and yon, that can scare you so much you won’t want to go on. But on you will go though the weather be foul. On you will go though your enemies prowl. On you will go though the Hakken-Kraks howl. Onward up many a frightening creek, though your arms may get sore and your sneakers may leak. On and on you will hike, And I know you’ll hike far and face up to your problems whatever they are. You’ll get mixed up, of course, as you already know. You’ll get mixed up with many strange birds as you go. So be sure when you step. Step with care and great tact and remember that Life’s a Great Balancing Act. 273

Just never foget to be dexterous and deft. And never mix up your right foot with your left. And will you succeed? Yes! You will, indeed! (98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed.) KID, YOU’LL MOVE MOUNTAINS! So... be your name Buxbaum or Bixby or Bray or Mordecai Ali Van Allen O’Shea, You’re off the Great Places! Today is your day! Your mountain is waiting. So...get on your way!

Financial education counselling: counsellor’s handbook (2012-01-31 16:04)
The Financial education counselling: counsellor’s handbook is a resource for consumer advocates looking to provide free financial education. The handbook provides practical advice in a way that non-experts can understand and convey. The Counsellor’s Handbook is divided into a number of topic sections, including savings, budgeting, and debt management. It also contains take-home activities that can be given to consumers, as well as activity ideas for counselling sessions.

[1] [2]http://www.consumersinternational.org/media/897062/ci %20financial %20education %20counselling %20handbook %20final.pdf
1. http://www.consumersinternational.org/umbraco/imageGen.ashx?image=/media/402150/finance(by-talkephotography, -creativecommonslicence)_bigbox.gif&format=jpg&compression=100&constrain=true&width=193&height=82 2. http://www.consumersinternational.org/media/897062/ci%20financial%20education%20counselling%20handbook% 20final.pdf

Namibian Blog list 2012 (2012-01-31 16:14)
A list of Namibian bloggers which I hope to expand with your help.

• [1]Back to basics • [2]Change your life 274

• [3]Creating Wealth • [4]Daves Boring Blog • [5]Dune Sieben (German) • [6]End forced Sterilisation • [7]Frantic Naturalist • [8]Girl Uncovered • [9]I present Roxanne • [10]Making a better Namibia • [11]Mikeymum • [12]Namibian DJ|s • [13]Namibia Facts • [14]Namibia Welcome • [15]One Stoned Crow • [16]The Joys Of My Splintered Life In SMALLTOWN • [17]Vakwetu Style • [18]Vieranas Safaris • [19]the new Der/die/das Namibia/er auf Deutsch • [20]Sinisterstuf Thanks
1. http://back2basicswithmaletsky.blogspot.com/ 2. http://v-changeyourlife.blogspot.com/ 3. http://theodorestanley1.blogspot.com/ 4. http://davesboringblog.wordpress.com/ 5. http://dunesieben.wordpress.com/ 6. http://endforcedsterilisation.wordpress.com/ 7. http://frantic-naturalist.blogspot.com/ 8. http://enigma.iblog.co.za/ 9. http://www.myspace.com/marvinsanzila/blog 10. http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/ 11. http://mikeymun.wordpress.com/ 12. http://www.namdjs.com/ 13. http://www.namibia-facts.de/blog/ 14. http://groups.google.com/group/namibia-welcome 15. http://onestonedcrow.blogspot.com/ 16. http://splinteredlife.blogspot.com/ 17. http://www.vakwetu.blogspot.com/ 18. http://namibiahuntsafaris.blogspot.com/ 19. http://www.i-namibia.de/ 20. http://blog.sinisterstuf.org/

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4.2

February

Why use words like black market? (2012-02-01 09:15)
Black and white in language was not used to refer to the colour of people’s skin. ”....there were no “white” people in Europe before 1492. With the transatlantic slave trade, first Indian, then African, Europeans increasingly saw “white” as a race and race as an important human characteristic.” Before this period, black referred to things that could be done under cover of darkness. Sorry friends, there is nothing racial about black market, etc.

To my old slave master (2012-02-01 22:52)
Dayton, Ohio, August 7, 1865 To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance. I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy, the folks call her Mrs. Anderson, and the children Milly, Jane, and Grundy go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, ”Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again. As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams’s Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every 276

Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire. In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve and die, if it come to that than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits. Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me. From your old servant, Jourdon Anderson.

In the summer of 1865, a former slave by the name of Jourdan Anderson sent a letter to his former master. And 147 years later, the document reads as richly as it must have back then. The roughly 800-word letter, which has resurfaced via various blogs, websites, Twitter and Facebook, is a response to a missive from Colonel P.H. Anderson, Jourdan’s former master back in Big Spring, Tennessee. Apparently, Col. Anderson had written Jourdan asking him to come on back to the big house to work. In a tone that could be described either as ”impressively measured” or ”the deadest of deadpan comedy,” the former slave, in the most genteel manner, basically tells the old slave master to kiss his rear end. He laments his being shot at by Col. Anderson when he fled slavery, the mistreatment of his children and that there ”was never pay-day for the Negroes any more than for the horses and cows.” To take a look at what appears to be a scan of the original letter, which appeared in an August 22, 1865 edition of the New York Daily Tribune, click below: [1]http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7035/6790780585 466117fe88 o.jpg From: [2]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/01/in-recently-discover 1247288.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000009
1. http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7035/6790780585_466117fe88_o.jpg 2. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/01/in-recently-discovered-le_n_1247288.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000009

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I am a socio-political entrepreneur (2012-02-03 14:08)

I often consider myself a socio-political entrepreneur. To me this means that while I chase a business objective, i also need align certain political / legal frameworks to enable me to reach my longer term goals. Perhaps they just express it a little to harshly for my ego. Architects of the Future: The Socio-Political Entrepreneurship Style of 5GW PurpleSlog. ”Architects of the Future: The Socio-Political Entrepreneurship Style of 5GW.” PurpleSlog. August 27, 2007. [1]http://purpleslog.wordpress.com/2007/08/27/architects-of-the277

future-the-socio-political-entrepanuership-style-of-5gw/ (accessed January 14, 2011). In the second blog post of a series of blog posts exploring potential archetypes, or styles, of 5GW, PurpleSlog suggests a “Socio-Political Entrepreneurship” style of 5GW. Unlike the first archetype explored in the series (“The Puppet Master”), the Socio-Political Entrepreneurs will operate in the open to effect large-scale changes but their exact motives and ultimate goals will be hidden from view; that is, The S-P-E 5GWer acts out in the open (not in secret), but their true aims or expected/hoped-for consequences are closely held (secret) and/or at longer timespans than most folks consider or notice (there’s the secrecy), or the effects are so broad/horizontal that the ramifications are overlooked by most.

The Socio-Political Entrepreneur will operate across many domains, with and/or upon a wide variety of other actors, through visible means, but his apparent goals will be seen as the normal goals of entrepreneurship of one sort or another while his real motivations and goals remain hidden. PurpleSlog gives a short list of examples, although these are given as metaphors and not necessarily as examples of real Socio-Political Entrepreneur 5GW effectors:

• Super-empowered money actors (think Gates, Buffet, Soros) • Super-empowered media access actors (think Gore, Michael Moore, Kos) • Super-empowered idea/meme generating actors Furthermore, many apparatuses such as NGOs or even Dan Abbott’s “[2]Military-Industrial-Sysadmin Complex (MISC)” or other force structures or public organizations could conceivably operate as SocioPolitical Entrepreneur 5GW organizations. [3]Architects of the Future: The Socio-Political Entrepreneurship Style of 5GW - 5GW Theory Timeline
1. http://purpleslog.wordpress.com/2007/08/27/ architects-of-the-future-the-socio-political-entrepanuership-style-of-5gw/ 2. http://www.dreaming5gw.com/2007/07/the_militaryindustrial_complex.php 3. http://timeline.dreaming5gw.com/2011/01/architects_of_the_future_the_s.php

Culture, racism and tribalism (2012-02-06 10:01)
My rambling thoughst about race, tribalism and the recent tribal based comments by KK and others Namibia and Integration Most of the Namibian peoples have come to this area leaving behind war or oppression of some sort or the other. They chose this inhospitable place to settle and live peacefully, not only with one another, but also with the natural environment they found themselves in. During periods of oppression they have not had a choice but to react to ensure their continued peace and stability. After Independence, it was only natural that Namibians should choose to have one of the best constitutions in the world that ensures this peace and continued peaceful co-existence with one another. The policy of reconciliation was as natural for its people as breathing and eating. 278

Today, Namibia is a model that few other countries can emulate. Worldwide, countries struggle with problems of integration. These differences take the form of religion, language, customs or race. In Namibia these differences are recognised, but do not form the basis of either government policy decisions or social interaction. As Namibians we have a lot to offer the world, and more specifically our neighbours in Southern Africa. We are an “Institute of Integration” where peoples from other parts of the world can come to learn what we know – we have a dependency on our fellow human beings and the natural environment in which we stay. Differences in Namibia We have thrown the baby out with the bathwater. This is the only explanation of the total lack of information based on cultural affiliations in our census in Namibia. Unfortunately, this attitude of “let’s pretend it is not there” does not make it so. Even in South Africa, where the Apartheid system was the most formalised, they have recognised the need to keep the information and knowledge of all cultural groups as part of the “rainbow nation”. Discrimination because of race colour or culture is a thing of the past and is replaced by recognition and acceptance of our differences. We have also outlawed discrimination on the basis of gender, yet still need this categorisation to measure the needed changes that must take place in our country for gender equality. In the same way it is important to note that when a previously marginalised group, such as the San people, have qualified teachers from within their own tribe and culture (Republikein – 14 April 2009). The lack of recognition of certain groups can have detrimental effects on our country. Look at what has happened to some of our pre-Independence orphans who returned from East Germany. More recently we have seen the SWAPO veterans and orphans also wishing to be recognised as a distinct group with specific needs. In the near future we will see a new group forming of AIDS orphans who have grown up differently with specific disadvantages that need to be addressed to allow them to fully pluck the fruits of our freedom. What culture shall all these groups inherit? There is a national culture Namibia. Thus we can refer to our language as Namlish with its peculiarities and pronunciations. We are known by our friends and foes on the sport fields as the Brave warriors and the Biltongboere. In business we refer to the marketing process. It starts with an analysis of the present and then moves to develop a strategy. In marketing it is recognised that to provide the best product for the customer you need to segment the market. Tools such as the Living Standards Measurement are used to focus our marketing efforts. A typical LSM would include age, gender, race or cultural group and income. (Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) household surveys have become an important tool in measuring and understanding poverty in developing countries.) The people of Namibia are the customer. To serve our people better we must recognise our difference not only in gender or language but also in race. The census in Namibia must measure the race and culture embraced by each resident in future. The tertiary education institutes in Namibia must then participate in research focussing on cultural, racial, gender, urban-rural economic and livelihood inequalities in Namibia. This ongoing research must continue to ask what the relationship is between the growth and spatial distribution of the public and private economic sectors. It must also encompass the formal and informal economy, the nature of poverty, the characteristics of poor areas, and socio-economic empowerment.

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Written Interview with Andreas Thomas - Windhoek Observer - 7 Feb 2012
(2012-02-08 00:15)

Good afternoon Mr Louw It seems that a new political stance has emerged were tribal sentiments and ethnicity is now at play in local politics. Tribal outburst allegedly made during the interview by Youth Minister Kazenambo against Oshiwambo speaking people and the subsequent reactions toward the comments paint a picture of a society deeply rooted tribalism in our society. I would like to assist me answer some of pertinent questions regarding tribalism and tribal loyalties in Namibia especially in the wake of the upcoming Swapo Party congress and impact it might have on the country. 1. Do you think the problem of tribalism has seeped into the ruling party Swapo Party and how bad do you think that is? Tribalism and associated decision making because of ethnic relationships had been a product of the Apartheid South African ruling system. This we have to accept. However, we as a nation have committed ourselves to another standard, whereby through reconciliation and the adoption of our constitution, we do not base decision-making on culture or tribal affiliation. Having said that though, we must realise that politicians present things in certain ways to get themselves elected. Look at our opposition parties and all have an ethnic (though some say locality) representation. Swapo, being the party representing the largest protion of the population, would obvisouly thus also constitute the largest section of Oshiwambo speaking people. From a representative viewpoint, thus also many of the leaders of SWAPO would also be of this cultural group. However, tribalism is not the problem. I believe the problem is rather nepotism - (patronage or favoritism shown on the basis of extended family relationships) and cronyism (partiality to long-standing friends, especially by appointing them to positions of authority, regardless of their qualifications). If however, the person seeing this act nepotism is only seeing it in tribal terms, as they themselves are not part of that specific tribe. So no, tribalism is not the problem, nepotism and cronyism are.

2. Government adopted the policy of National Recompilation mainly to achieve reconciliation between blacks and white Namibians. Since independence, it has increasingly become evident that there is a tension between the various ethnic groups in Namibia. Should reconciliation between black Namibians therefore not had been the first priority after independence and is there not a need even now to start a process of reconciliation between various ethnic groups? Please allow me to explain a little - Reconciliation can be used in terms of either

• conflict resolution or • ethnic relations Thus Namibian reconciliation as Independence was conflict resolution between two ideological opposing sides. The one side, wanting Namibia to be a part of South Africa as a fifth province, and the other side wanting independence from South Africa. Thus conflict resolution reconciliation has been effective. What we are seeing is that there is a need for ethnic resolution reconciliation. So no, it could not have been a first priority. But it is still a step we need to take as a nation. We need to create a common memory - a history lesson we all feel comfortable with which explains where we all come 280

from, why we came here, and what our shared future vision is. I would like to see our leaders rather promoting our differences, and what we can learn from each other, than what has been reportedly said my the Minister. I believe this quote explains what I mean, ”..But maybe memory is what young people need to be taught before they can be taught actual history.”

3. Minister Kazenambo feel that he is being victimised because of the calls he made for the next country President (Swapo) to be non-Oshiwambo. But how would you suggest Minister Kazenambo should have handled this matter during the interview? I cannot say how the Minister should or should not handle any matter. However, if any reporter should ask me how i feel as a coloured person, I would immediately state that I believe in in integration. By this I refer to the lump sum off all of us as citizens of a specific country. It is the pride we have when singing the national anthem, our support to the members of our national sporting codes, or identifying with a Namibian that has done well on the world stage. The best way to illustrate this is: ”Before Independence I was Coloured, now I’m Namibian”. 4. Having a current situation of politics based on the premise of “now it is the turn of other tribes to take over”. What do you think the impact this will be on politics in the country and society in general? Do you expect tribal loyalty take centre stage at the congress? First, if it is ”the turn of others” to take over - it should be the turn of a Namibian woman to be President. Or do we as a nation, or political party, or as families, not yet believe woman are as good (or even) better as leaders? I wish to state that there is more gender-based discrimination among Namibian men than what there is tribal-based discrimination. The issues of leading Swapo, or Namibia will always be what is best for us as a nation. Each and everyone must vote according to their conscience. We deserve the leaders we choose. Nevertheless, we must face the reality that whoever is elected to be in command of SWAPO after Comrade Pohamba will be the next President of Namibia. So yes, it will have an impact on our society if the person chosen is not the best candidate, but rather the ”best oshiwambo” candidate. During the last congress when Hidipo Hamutenya, Nahas Angula and Hifikepunye Pohamba stood as candidates, it is clear that the Swapo members chose the person who in the long run has been the best choice for us as a arty, and Namibia as a nation Will tribal loyalty take centre stage - yes in the form of cronyism. All political parties in the world are based on give and take within the voting process - who is my friend, who will do something for me. However, terming it tribalism is just another way to hide from the fact that in Namibia too many of us still do not believe we are ”One Namibia, One Nation”. We are a tribe, the Namibian tribe.

Politicsweb - How to write about race - Top stories (2012-02-08 12:12)
[1]Politicsweb - How to write about race - Top stories An eight step guide to commenting on South Africa’s favourite obsession Introduction South Africans love race. One might even say we are obsessed with it. We cannot get enough. You cannot open a newspaper, read a blog, listen to radio discussion or watch a current affairs show that doesn’t have 281

yet another someone or other telling us what an enormous problem race is, how under appreciated the scale of the crisis is and how desperately we need to move past it. Anyone who doesn’t want to talk about race or considers themselves non-racial is accused either of effectively being racist themselves or living in some kind of dangerous denial. And it is everywhere. I mean everywhere. There is not a thing that is not interpreted through a racial lens or, indeed, argued itself not the product of some kind of racial malfunction.
1. http: //www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page72308?oid=278994&sn=Marketingweb+detail&pid=90389

The need for open debate - Villager 14/08/11 (2012-02-08 18:14)
Open and critical debate is not always welcome in our country. In the days of apartheid-colonialism, expressing views openly (especially political ones) often led to persecution, even detention and death. With independence, such repressive practices came to an end as a liberal constitution was adopted that enshrined basic human and political rights. However, a living democracy requires more than a few democratic rights on paper and the occasional holding of elections. A living democracy requires the appreciation for robust debates as well as policies to guarantee that the basic economic needs of all citizens are met. Despite the many praises for Namibia’s peace and stability since independence, I would argue that we are still falling short in some aspects of our democracy. Namibia is among countries with the highest levels of income inequality in the world and virtually all spheres of life are still characterised by inequalities on the basis of colour, gender and class. A large part of our population is thus engaged with a daily struggle for basic survival and the fact that 500 000 Namibians are living in shacks as reported recently by this paper, exemplifies this point. I will analyse the levels of inequality and what can be done to change them in a future column. Today I will focus on another aspect, namely our lack of appreciation for open and robust debate. This was not always the case. At the time of independence, Namibia was bustling with activism and debate. The Namibia National Students Organisation (NANSO) and the trade unions under the umbrella of the National Union of Namibian Workers (NUNW) were spearheading debate and action as they had done during the final years of the liberation struggle. However, after the elections of 1989 and the achievements of independence in 1990, things began to change gradually. Having elected “our own” Government and believing that the “fruits of independence” would become visible soon, mass organisations lost their vibrancy or were deliberately dismantled. This was not unique to Namibia but has happened in many other African countries after independence. With weakening community-based organisations and an increasingly dominant role of Government, the process of decision-making became increasingly hierarchical. The typical western form of representative Government became rooted and replaced more direct and participatory forms of democracy. The large community meetings that had taken place in Katutura in the late 1980s are now only a historical memory and even the consultative community meetings that some Government Ministers undertook shortly after independence have become rarities. Instead, decisions are taken in the higher echelons of power and then communicated to the base. Accompanying this increasingly hierarchical political culture was mistrust towards critical ideas and debate. Instead of seeing them as the lifeblood of democratic organisations, critical views were seen with suspicion and the first question that was usually asked was: “What is their agenda?” 282

Loyalty to an organisation was increasingly equated with blindly following the decisions taken by the leadership and in the end. Nobody was willing to raise critical questions for fear of being labelled a “trouble-maker” or “hibernator” etc. This political culture of suspicion against open debate has taken hold of most organisations in Namibia. Ironically, even those organisations that criticise hierarchical and autocratic practices of others often fall into the same pattern when dealing with critical voices in their own ranks. As a result, public debates in Namibia have become very guarded. Only a few people are still willing to raise challenges openly for fear of offending the powers that be. Instead, many express their views only privately and are even scared of sending readers’ letters in their own name. This trend is very worrying and needs to be countered before it becomes an all-embracing norm. History provides many examples how dictatorships and social standstill emerge when debates are dying. It was thus refreshing to see how Minister Kazenambo at a recent public debate of the Unam Sociology Students Association pointed out that it was important for the youth to raise their voices when they see things go wrong. How else can we improve if we are not willing to debate with a view of finding new solutions? Raising critical issues, exploring new ways of doing things and alluding to shortcomings and failures is a lifeline for any living democracy. Instead of just defending past decisions and actions, we must learn to appreciate criticism as it is the only way to avoid the death of ideas and socio-economic stagnation. Defending past policies and practices simply to please the powers that be will not contribute towards finding solutions for the many challenges we face today. Let us speak from the heart, let us share our ideas and let us have robust debates as part of our everyday lives. Fear and silence must be broken as they undermine the very democracy we fought for. After all, we are supposed to be the land of the brave!

Herbert Jauch is a labour researcher and educator in Windhoek.

Namibian Rights. What about Namibian responsibilities? (2012-02-12 17:45)
Last week we celebrated Constitution Day - 9th Februray. I thought about this great document we have in Namibia, but have to keep asking myself, ”Great that we have Namibian Rights. What about Namibian responsibilities?” Since Independence, Namibians have been guaranteed their rights through our Constitution. These rights are are known by all, but how many of us realise the burden of responsibilities these same rights put on us? In this opinion piece I look at the rights in our constitution, and compare them to the responsibility expected of each of us to ensure these rights for us all. And what is it to be a good citizen? • You must always remember that the other person has rights while being aware of your own • Think and do as you want, but know that your rights end where another’s begin • Create things which are useful to yourself and others • “It is to produce wealth by labour and only by labour, and to spend less than you have produced that your children may not be dependent on the state for support when you are no more. “ 283

• protect and defend the lives of others • not put other people’s lives at risk through my actions. This includes carrying of dangerous weapons, by acting recklessly and not disobeying our rules and laws. This is especially relevant to the responsibility we have as road users. It is your responsibility to ensure the vehicle and driver are in a fit condition to endanger the lives of others. • look after my own body by exercising, eating correctly, not smoking or abusing alcohol, not taking drugs or doing irresponsible things that may result in me becoming infected with communicable diseases such as HIV and AIDS • be polite to those who provide me with a service • enquire about the working conditions of the workers who provide me with services • pay adequately the people who work for me in my garden, around my house and within the office • treat every person equally and fairly • not discriminate unfairly against anyone on the basis of gender, race, colour, ethnic origin, religion, religion or status in society • respect the property of others • respect the letters, emails or conversations of people and avoid sharing this with others • recognise that love means long-term commitment, and the responsibility to establish strong and loving families • honour and respect my parents, and to help them, • be kind and loyal to my family, to my brothers and sisters, my grandparents and all my relatives • to see, and treat, every child as my own • listen to, and respect the opinion of a child • provide an example of how to treat others • provide monetary support for my children to achieve their goals 284

Article 6 - Protection of Life The protection of life places on me the responsibility to: Article 7 - Protection of Liberty The protection of liberty places on me the responsibility to: " not hurt, bully or scare people, or take measures to stop others who are hurting, bullying or scaring people " find solutions for problems in a peaceful manner, that is without resorting to violence Article 8 - Respect for Human Dignity The right to human dignity places on me the responsibility to: " treat every human being with respect and dignity " be caring, kind-hearted and understanding with everyone, by greeting them warmly and speaking to them politely Article 9 - Slavery and Forced Labour The right to safe and fairly paid employment places on me the responsibility to: Article 10- Equality and Freedom from Discrimination The right to equality and freedom from discrimination places on me the responsibility to: Article 13 - Privacy This right to privacy by each citizen expects me to: Article 14 – Family The right to family expects me to: Article 15 - Children’s Rights The responsibility of respecting children’s rights means: I believe that we can still do more to teach ourselves, and our children, about responsibilities. Feel free to email me at[1]miltonlouw@gmail.com with your comments
1. mailto:miltonlouw@gmail.com

THE WATERS OF ERONGO (2012-02-13 01:04)
North-East of Swakopmund, and somewhere where the line that runs the copper ore down from Otari has a station called Omaruru, there stands a mass of huge table-topped mountains. At the time of which I write they were known as the Erongos, so named after a famous chief of the Gainin Bushmen, who had made something of a stand there against the invading Damaras that eventually ”ate up” both him and his tribe. Even in that land, where most mountains are table-topped, and where the flat plateau above and the plain beneath represent geological epochs that are divided by aeons of years, these Erongo Mountains are remarkable; for they have never been climbed. From their base thick vegetation can be seen crowning the inaccessible summit, and in several places water flows in gushing cataracts down the steep cliffs that frown upon the plain on every side. This mountain had always had a great fascination for me; and once or twice, in the old days, before the railway came, and when we used to water our transport animals at these same streams, I attempted to climb its steep sides, full of curiosity to see what the top might be like. 285

But I never got within a thousand feet of it, for the crowning bastions are almost sheer, and would need a better cragsman than myself to negotiate. Isolated, and rising straight from the plain to a height of about 3,000 feet, it formed a prominent landmark for those few traders or prospectors who, in the old days, returned from their trips to the north to Walfisch Bay by this route; and I was glad indeed to see its huge bulk towering up one day more years ago than I care to remember when trekking in from a long expedition in the Kaokoveld for it meant that my long journey was nearly finished. With my wagon I had as cook and roust-about an old Englishman named Jim Blake, who had ran away from his ship at Walfisch Bay many years before, and who had traversed the country in all directions, since then, as few men had. In spite of the many years he had spent there, and the fact that he spoke many of the native dialects well, his Cockney accent was as pronounced as ever it could have been when he first shipped at Limehouse; and he had, apparently, a wholesale contempt for everything, and everybody, but himself. As his employer, he tolerated me, and as he was invaluable in many ways, I tolerated him in return, but he had one habit that always annoyed me immensely. In season and out of season he would say: ”Yer don’t know heverythink if yer thinks yer does!”; and I could never break him of it. Well, the evening that I speak of, we outspanned under the cliffs ofErongo, and the oxen drank deep. We had had a very successful trip, and I felt at peace with all mankind, as I sat smoking, and watching the setting sun turn the tall rocks from gold to crimson, and thence through a whole gamut of purples, violets and mauves to the cold grey of twilight. ”Pritty, ’aint it?” said a voice at my elbow. It was old Blake. His mahogany face shone with the effects of the first soap and water he had been able to use for weeks, for we had been very short of water; and even his arms showed the tattoo-marks that were usually hidden by the grime inseparable to life in the desert. ”Yes,” I answered, ”it’s beautiful, the most beautiful mountain I know in Africa. I wonder what’s on top? I’ve had a go at climbing it myself several times but, of course, it can’t be done. The Bushmen couldn’t, Erongo himself only had his werf half-way up when he fought the Damaras. No one has ever climbed it!” ”You don’t know heverythink if yer thinks yer does,” sniffed old Jim; ”you’re wrong. I’ve bin up it meself!” ”Rubbish, Jim!” I said; ”don’t talk rot. How far have you been up, anyway? As far as the bottom of the big fall, I suppose?” ”To the top and all over it,” said old Jim. ”Oh, I knows yer don’t believe. But it’s gospel. You don’t know heverythink!” ”No, that’s true, Jim,” said I meekly, for I wanted his yarn. ”I know you sailormen can climb better than I ever shall but how did you do it? Ropes? Ladders? . . . How?” ”No,” he answered slowly, turning his quid in his cheek, and spitting with great precision at a blue-headed lizard that had emerged from a crack in the rock and sat eyeing us. ”Got yer!” he went on as the small reptile retired in considerable discomfiture. ”No, neether ladders nor ropes. If yer reely wants ter know, I were carried up!” ”Oh, you can chuckle, but so it were! Twenty year or more agone I came here fust. There was four of us white men; me as cook, two prospectors, and the perfesser. ”He was a queer bloke, that perfesser, clever, too, but bless yer he didn’t know heverythink! I’d bin with him a long time, and he used ter tell me more’n he tole the other fellers . . . a clever sort of chap . . . but he didn’t know heverythink. And he ’ad one great pecooliarity: he was everlastingly afeard of getting old! He must ha’ bin well over fifty, but he used ter get himself up outrageous young: and when I docked his shavingwater he cussed most wonderful! 286

”’Cleanliness, and stric’ observance of rules of life that is the only way ter keep young, Blake,’ he would say ter me. ”Well, in them days, bein’ young, I didn’t see much in what he said, and if I got a wash once a month I was werry well satisfied; and arter a while this ’ere washing business of his got on my nerves. ’Cause, as yer know, when water’s been used fer a bath, yer can’t werry well use it fer anything but washing up, or biling pertaters, or sich like, and he was the wastefullest man I ever had to cook for. Well, we comes up here on our way to the Koaka Velt on some kind of scientific trip er other I dunno, and it didn’t matter as long as I was paid and the two prospectors they brings in gold, and tin, and copper, and all sorts of muck, and the perfesser was busy ’blow-piping’ and ’classifying’ and what not, and every day he gets more ’centrick. Then he gets sick only a bit of fever, but it laid him out bad for a time: and he couldn’t shave, and he couldn’t bath, and that hurt him wuss’n the fever. We was here, then; jist in this same camp. And when he got well enough to talk again I took him his cawfee one morning, and sees him a-looking at himself in a little glass: and he looked fair frightened! He’d got a week’s bristles on, and they was grey, o’ course he weren’t no chicken, anyway! And he says to me pitiful like ’Blake, I surely don’t look as old as all that?’ ”’You’ve bin ill, perfesser,’ I says, ’and it don’t make a man look younger. You’ll be all right when you’ve had a bath there’s plenty o’ water now.’ ”Well, I could see ’e weren’t satisfied, because he gives a bit of a groan, and looks at hisself in the glass agin. But a day or two arterwards he was well enough to get up, and when he sees Erongo for the fust time, with the water a-pouring down that big fall, he brightens up at once. ”’Just the very place the very place. Who knows but it may be true? Never to be old! . . . Never to be old!’ I hears him a-saying, over and over again; but nat’rally, I on’y thought he was a bit off his napper, same as half these ’ere perfessers is, wot think they know heverythink! Anyhow, as soon as ever he was able, oft he goes and bathes in the stream, farther up, a goodish way from the camp, and a power o’ good it seemed to do him, for he comes back a-looking ten years younger. Next day he sends the two prospectors out fer a long trip and then he calls me. ”’Jim,’ says he, ”ow do you think I look?’ ”’Look?’ I says for I was fair mazed at the look of him, ’why ten years younger than ever I seed yer!’ ”’Just so,’ says ’e. . . . ’It’s true then!’ ”’Wot’s true,’ I says. ”’The water of life,’ says he; ’I have searched for it fer years!’ ”’Take some quinine,’ says I, ’and back yer goes to bed,’ for I’d seen fever patients that way afore. ”’You don’t know heverythink, Blake,’ he says he ’ad a nasty way o’ using that there expression; ’it isn’t fever it’s joy. For if the stream below has such an effect, wot will the source be like?’ ”Well, it wasn’t much good taking notice of what he said, but anyhow, next day ’e’d gone! ”The boys said he’d gone upstream towards the big fall, and arter a while I follered him. As you know, that there waterfall takes a lot of reaching, but I gets there at last, and there he was a-sitting in the stream. Lord, I ’ardly knew ’im, he looked so young and vigorous, and full o’ life. He wanted me to bathe, but I’d had a wash on’y a day or two before, and I wouldn’t. But, my word, he seemed to keep getting younger; and as fer strength, why on our way back he jumped over rocks like a klipbok I never seen the like! Next mornin’ he’d gone agin, and this time he stays away fer two days, and I gets scared. The prospectors was away, and there was on’y me and the boys and I couldn’t get ’em to go far up Erongo, for they said it was full of devils. P’raps they was right them there boys knows a lot though they don’t know heverythink! Third day I gets up early and goes right up the side o’ the stream, till I gets to the waterfall, but no sign did I find. And I sits there a-pondering, till all of a sudden I ’ears a voice a- calling ’Jim!’ 287

”I turns round, and there ’e was at least I s’posed it was him! He hadn’t a stitch o’ clothes on, and his skin shone like a babby’s. Look young? Why the only thing I knew about ’im was his voice! And he came a-bounding over the rocks as if he was made of injy-rubber. And his face was all a-shinin’ it made me think o’ pictures o’ hangels to see him. ”’Jim! Jim!’ he sings out; half a-laughing and ’alf sobbing, ’it’s true! it’s true! look at me I’m young agin! I’m immortal!’ ”’You’re naked,’ I says, ’and you ought to know better at your time o’ life and in this ’ere ’ot sun too!’ ”He laughs like a madman. ”’Ye old fool,’ he says (nice it was, and on’y yesterday he’d bin a lot older than me!). ’Don’t you see it’s true? I’ve been to the top, man, and bathed in the source there, and I’m immortal!’ ”’You’re barmy,’ I says, though I was a bit scared, for never have I seen such a difference! ”’Come with me to the top and bathe,’ says he, ’and see fer yerself!’ ”’Who’s to take me?’ I says. ’I ain’t a bird!’ ”’I will!’ he shouts; and before you could ’a’ said ’Jack Robinson,’ he grabs ’old of me in a clove hitch! ”I was strong and a bit useful in them days, but I was like a babby in the arms of a giant, and he tucked me under one arm and ’eld me like a parcel. And then well! I know yer don’t believe it, but yer don’t know he very think. He jist went up the side of that there cliff like a klip-springer, catching on to little points of rock, and a-springing from place to place, as if I didn’t weigh more’n a feather; with me under his arm a-hollering blue murder, and a-lookin’ down sick and dizzy, and a-praying for him not to let me fall! Right up that there cliff as you can see from here we went, and almost afore I knew what had happened, I was on top. There was thick grass, and bush, and flowers, and tall trees and fruit I’d never seen afore, and butterflies everywhere, and he sat me down jist close to the brink, and there I sat a-gasping. And then he laughed and what a laugh it was jist like a trumpet ringing out, and he says again: ’Come and bathe, man, and be immortal, like me!’ ”And then he hustles me off into the wood, flustered and frightened, and a wondering when I should get down to terra-cotta agin. That there mountain ain’t flat on top, its cup-shaped, and it’s only the rim you can see from here; and there’s trees and water everywhere, and birds a- singing, and flowers a-blooming and butterflies a-flitting, and if there’d o’ny bin a nice little pub up there, like wot I knows of there at ’ome in Lime’ouse, it would ’a’ bin Parrydise and I’d ’a’ stayed. We sees no animals and no snakes, and we goes along the banks of the stream, and at last we conies to a deep pool that bubbled and fizzed up like soda water, all over. ”’The Source!’ he says; ’the Source!’ an’ you could ha’ ’eard ’is voice a mile off; ’the Water of Life! I bathed here this morning look at me! Come, bathe, old fool, and be young, and a companion fer me, and we’ll stay here fer ever!’ ”’Course, I knew he must be barmy though ’ow he got me up that cliff certainly is a mystery! Any’ow, I thought I’d better ’umour ’im a bit. So I starts to undress; and then I pauses. ”’Any beer here?’ I asks. ”’Beer, what do you want vile beer for, when there’s necktie fit fer the gords to drink?’ says ’e. ”’Baccy?’ I asks agin knowin’ he ’ated it. ”’Phaw,’ he says, ’your filthy smoke what need is there of it?’ ”’Wimmen!’ I says, thinkin’ that would be a clincher fer him. ”’Yes,’ he shouts; ’beautiful nymphs, spirits as immortal as myself!’ ”’I don’t see ’em!’ says I. 288

”’They are in the water,’ says he; ’beautiful water nymphs and wood nymphs lurks there among the trees! Bathe, fool, and your eyes will be opened!’ ”That settled it. I’d got an argyment fer ’im now. ”’Not me,’ I says, putting my shirt on agin. ’No beer; no baccy; no wimmen but a lot o’ shameless huzzies a-hiding and a-waiting to watch a feller bathe! Not me. I go back besides, I ’ad a bath on’y a few days ago.’ ”Well, ’e was that wild I thought ’e’d chuck me in, but I ’umored and coaxed ’im for I had to get ’im to take me down again; and at last ’e did. How he did it I don’t know, for when he took me up, like a kid, I shut me eyes, and never opened ’em agin till he put me down at the foot of the waterfall. ”’Good-bye, fool,’ he said; ’some day you’ll be sorry!’ ”Well, we never seen ’im agin, and when I told the prospectors wot I’d seen, they told me to put more water in my grog. And at last the whole outfit went back and reported the perfesser lost or dead. ”But I knows better: he’s up there yet! Look! see that smoke on the top? Well, who’s a-goin’ to make a fire on Erongo if it ain’t ’im? You don’t know heverythink, if yer thinks yer does.” Excerpt from ”A Rip Van Winkle Of The Kalahari Seven Tales of South-West Africa” Author: Frederick Cornell

4.3

March

Implementing ICT policy for the benefit of Africans (2012-03-17 11:53)
In this blog I am addressing the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) in the application for the position of African ICT Policy Advocacy Coordinator. The issues to be addressed are: a) why do you think ICT policy is in critical need of attention in Africa; b) what do you think are the most important areas to intervene in the near future?; and, c) how do you see the relationship between human rights and the internet? ICT Policy First, I wish to address our understanding of ICT and how we can integrate it into our governance systems and also our daily lives. I have struggled to find a term for this and the best I could find was “Progress through Technology”, or in German, “Vorsprung Durch Technik” . I prefer to use the German expression because in German the word “Technik” not only means technology, but also thetechnique of studying and mastering the skills of something. Thus my belief that African countries need to relook at their ICT Policy and include the mastering of ICT tools as part of their focus. These tools include the 1. social media revolution of sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, etc. 2. Mobile telephony (not only smartphones but also older technologies such as USSD) 3. touch screen and tablets in getting information to their constituents. 289

It is my opinion is that discrimination in the world in 2012 and beyond, is not based only on race, culture, gender, or geographical location, but more importantly in access to services and technology. African leaders must address this through ICT policies that are forward looking, and easily adaptable to changes in technology. Looking forward Africa can use the latest technology to the benefit of all its residents. The attitude to education which is presently geared to becoming an industrial country, must be changed to a system where knowing where the information is available is more important than having the information in your head. This means moving from our present agricultural society to a knowledge-base society within the next decade. This leapfrogging into a knowledge-based society can be assisted by creating an ICT Action Group (IAG) reporting directly to the President or even Parliament. I propose such an IAG should consist of four staff members, of which two should be young people under the age of twenty-five. (The (male and female) staff member should each have software programming skills and should also participate in gaming leagues such as Warcraft. In addition, they should have a minimum competency in the number of words they can SMS per minute on their cellular phone.) The objectives of the IAG: " Advise the President and Cabinet on ICT. " Ensure ICT capability of all members of the Cabinet and their staff. " Create a Government Ministerial scorecard on Information and Communication Technologies. This includes a baseline survey of computer equipment and civil servant skills, as well as monitoring the information availability over government websites. " Oversee the creation of a central register with data on residents and businesses. " Ability to declare certain areas to be under-serviced and secure funds to roll-out infrastructure " Identify international trends such as Facebook and Chat with the view of encouraging local sites that are able to provide the same service. This will encourage innovation and access to information. " Promote local content development to enhance the National Identity. " Host free internet websites for any resident of of their country ICT and Human rights Human rights are to be understood as something we are entitled to because we are a human being. With the advent of the Internet and more and more powerful ICT tools, some of the citizens of the world are being left behind. While the information on the Web might be available to anyone, availability of infrastructure to access the Internet in lacking in many developing countries. two issues are thus defined in ICT policy, access to the information, and being given the education to use ICT. Thus, just as the provision of water or housing, access to information and communication technologies must be provided by the government to its residents – in the same manner they provide libraries in the communities. As for teaching ICT usage, in the Declaration of Human Rights, Article 26 it states: (1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit. (2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace 290

In earlier times we referred to the three R’s being reading, writing and arithmetic. Today, using the computer as a e-reader, blog writer, movie uploader or collaborative social movement, has become just as important to learn at the primary education level. Our ICT policies should strive to& “Develop the tools and systems to assist the management of our countries (government, civil society and private sector) in providing access to services and technologies to allow maximum quality of life to all who live there.”

4.4

April

WHEN I ASK YOU TO LISTEN (2012-04-22 17:47)
When I ask you to listen to me and you start giving advice and you have not done what I asked. When I ask you to listen to me and you begin to tell me why I shouldn’t feel that way, you are trampling on my feelings. When I ask you to listen to me and you feel you have to do something to solve my problem you have failed me, strange as that may seem. Listen! All I asked, was that you listen not talk or do - just hear me. Advice is cheap; ten cents will get you both Dear Abby and Billy Graham in the same newspaper, and I can do for myself; I’m not helpless. When you do something for me that I can and need to do for myself, you contribute to my fear and weakness. But, when you accept as a simple fact that I do feel what I feel, no matter how irrational, then I can quit trying to convince you and can get about the business of understanding what’s behind this irrational feeling. And when that’s clear, the answers are obvious and I don’t need advice. Irrational feelings make sense when we understand what’s behind them. Perhaps that’s why prayer works, sometimes, for some people because God is mute and he doesn’t give advice or try to fix things. He “just listens and lets you work it out for yourself.” So please listen and just hear me. And if you want to talk, wait a minute for your turn; And I’ll listen to you. Anonymous: “Listen” was found in David Bailey and Sharon Dreyer’s book, Care of the mentally ill (1977)

Legalise Prostitution in Namibia (2012-04-23 18:56)
I know some prostitutes personally. There is no shame in knowing that they have sex for money. After all, if one of my friends is looking for a prostitute’s services, I will gladly help him get a lady for the evening, whether it is in the casino or on the street. Yet I am never ashamed of my friend or his behaviour. Sometimes referred to as the oldest profession in the world, it is also probably the most controversial. The moment I bring up the subject in “decent” conversation it either brings laughter (among the men) or derision (from the ladies). So, I know I am going to get a lot of difficulties for touching this subject: There are two types of prostitution. " The first is for the basic need of survival. The money received is used for the food and shelter. This is a problem of poverty. " The second, is a little bit more complicated. The money has become the central reason. The money is no longer just for the basic needs, but has become a means to fulfil other pleasures such as gambling, drinking, and drugs. 291

So here goes. I propose we legalise prostitution and have registered places of business with medical schemes and pensions in place for the sex worker industry. AND BEFORE YOU SHOUTFor a period of two years I lived in Ausspannplatz close to the police headquarters. This area was previously the place travellers would stop and leave their wagons before entering Windhoek. (“Aus spann” means to let the cattle free to graze.) There is a small park and two traffic circles in the area. This is the downtown of the city. As in most cities and towns around the world, the downtown has become a night life area filled with bars and casinos. Of course, where there is money and alcohol, there are also prostitutes and drugs. When my forefathers (the Plaatjies family) came to Windhoek, they had a business in the area – opposite where the Ministry of Transport and Works is today. Not surprisingly, I found some of the people still remember my family in the area. But it is the night life that was the most interesting. The area starts to come alive with the “night people starting around 16H00. The first “ladies” start appearing as their customers pass by before heading to their respective homes. Alcohol is being bought for the night ahead as it is cheaper from the bottle store than at the bar. The men in the area are either “boyfriends”, (who share the income with their girlfriends), drug peddlers – mostly marijuana, or petty thieves. I have spent many an interesting evening with the people of the area and have never felt threatened by anyone. However, life and death are ever present. This can be through knife fights, being shot by the robbery victim or police, or while asleep on the railway lines. During this period I met a young lady who was living in the area and we became more than just friends. I later moved to another part of Windhoek and she moved with me. However, this part of town and the people in the area were too part of her life. We later broke up and she returned to spending her day and nights in Ausspannplatz. Unfortunately, she became sick and as it was untreated it led to pneumonia. She passed away three days after being admitted to the hospital. Elmarie Motswana was only 24 years old. Her story began when she was 13 years old. Her mother and stepfather worked as labourers on a commercial farm close to Mariental. She became pregnant and had a baby boy at this age. Barely literate and with no hope, she moved to Windhoek to get another chance at schooling. Within a few months the lights of the city had bedazzled her and she went missing from her family’s house. She created a new history for herself and over the next ten years she became Elmarie Motswana. She had played soccer at school and had gone with the school team to Brazil. Her mother was a rich lady from Katutura, but she hardly went home because her stepfather did not like her. And so it went on with each passing year and less and less of the true Elmarie stayed behind. Only after her passing, was I able to piece together some of her past.

Toekoms Namibië (2012-04-24 11:52)
[1]http://toekomsnamibie.blogspot.com/ Toekoms Namibië is ’n samewerkings projek van Milton Louw en Moira Delie om die boek, ”Future Namibia” te verwerk in Afrikaans. Die boek handel oor die nodigheid van ’n regering en besgheidslui wat die mense van die land eerste stel om te verseker almal bly in ’n land van vrede en oorvloed.
1. http://toekomsnamibie.blogspot.com/

292

Some good news for Namibian consumers (2012-04-26 15:12)
In these troubling times and comparisons of costs in other countries, it is a little bit of comfort to realise that as Namibian consumers we have had some success. The following is taken from the ”Africa Prepaid Mobile Price Index 2012: South Africa” study by Research ICT Africa (http://www.researchictafrica.net/home.php) ”Not long ago, South Africa and Namibia shared the same mobile termination rates and had similar end-user prices. Today, Namibia enjoys amongst the cheapest mobile prepaid prices in Africa, as a result of the slashing of its termination rates close to cost, which pressured the incumbents towards cost-based pricing, thereby increasing demand and remaining highly profitable. South African prepaid mobile prices are three times more expensive than in Namibia. The most dramatic shift in prices was that of Namibia – the result of aggressive price reductions by the dominant operator MTC following systematic interconnection rate reductions towards cost-based termination rates. In June 2011, MTC launched a NAD 0,38 campaign for calls across networks with 100 free SMSs a day, subject to recharging of at least NAD 5. In Namibia, mobile termination rates were cut from NAD 1,06 to NAD 0,30 (ZAR 0,30) in less than two years.” From the Namibia Consumer Protection Group (NCPG), I must add, a lot of this was thanks to Dr Christoph Stork in cooperation with the Ministry of Information, Communication and Technology. Kind regards Milton Louw Executive Director NCPG

4.5

May

Namibian Bloggers - May 2012 (2012-05-01 11:20)
A list of Namibian bloggers which I hope to expand with your help. Change your life - http://v-changeyourlife.blogspot.com/ Creating Wealth - http://theodorestanley1.blogspot.com/ Daves Boring Blog - http://davesboringblog.wordpress.com/ Dune Sieben (German) - http://dunesieben.wordpress.com/ End forced Sterilisation - http://endforcedsterilisation.wordpress.com/ Frantic Naturalist - http://frantic-naturalist.blogspot.com/ Girl Uncovered - http://enigma.iblog.co.za/ I present Roxanne - http://www.myspace.com/marvinsanzila/blog Lottering News - http://lotteringnews.blogspot.com/ Making a better Namibia - http://milton-louw.blogspot.com Namibian DJ|s - http://www.namdjs.com/ Namibia Facts - http://www.namibia-facts.de/blog/ Namibia Welcome - http://groups.google.com/group/namibia-welcome?pli=1 One Stoned Crow - http://onestonedcrow.blogspot.com/ The Joys Of My Splintered Life In SMALLTOWN - http://splinteredlife.blogspot.com/ Vakwetu Style - http://www.vakwetu.blogspot.com/ Vieranas Safaris - http://namibiahuntsafaris.blogspot.com/ the new Der/die/das Namibia/er auf Deutsch - http://www.i-namibia.de/ 293

Sinisterstuf - http://blog.sinisterstuf.org/

What is faith to me? (2012-05-05 12:15)
There is more to my happiness and ability to perceive my life in positive terms. It is a mental attitude that I have spent time and energy on achieveing. (Perhaps I should also add money, even though it was not my money.) Since a very young age I have been prodded and poked to make sure that I was okay. This was especially noticable to me after my mother passed away when I was five years old. I was fortunate that after she had her accident while playing table-tennis, she still had enough time the next day to talk to be in the ambukance before she was moved to a hospital with better facilities. My mother had always taught me that ”God’s will be done” and that accepting His way would always lead me where I need to be. That day in the ambulance, she once again reminded me to ”heed God’s will” and ”accept what you are given in life”. Jeremiah 29 vs 11: For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Through the years I faced many trials and tribulations (most of them self-inflicted) but this bible verse stayed with me throughout my life. That is faith! This blog was written on Tuesday, 7 February 2012 at 09:55 - See [1]http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note id=10151235632190324 Three weeks later, while crossing the road at 13h30 in the afternoon, my knee dislocated and I fell in the road and lost five teeth too. BUT I still have faith - I made new friends in hospital - and had time to spend with family and friends - which I normally do not......
1. http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=10151235632190324

What happened at Sam Khubis - the day of the covenant of the Rehoboth Baster people of Namibia? (2012-05-08 17:41)
Sam Khubis Commemorated - 8 May 1915 02.02. South African (SA) Prime Minister Louis Botha arrives in Swakopmund and takes over command of SA’s 43 000 soldiers (on 11.02.). 15.04. The Basters rise against the Germans as a result of a secret meeting between Botha and Baster Captain Cornelius van Wyk on 01.04. The Basters are specifically dissatisfied that the ”Baster Corps” is used to guard SA prisoners of war in Otjiwarongo. In Schlip, Pieter Mouton collects all available able-bodied Basters to proceed to Sam-Khubis. On the way they kill inter alia the German policemen Rudolf Rogge and Richard Ewald Ernst Putzier on Büllspoort. The Germans, on their way to Sam-Khubis, attack the Basters at Heuras, Uitdraai and Kabirab. Among the Basters fighting the Germans are Samuel and Johannes Beukes. 08.05. The battle of Sam-Khubis is fought between the Germans and Basters. The Baster community still commemorates the battle every year. The German troops travel by railway to Bergland station (12.05.). On 13.05. they move from Hohewarte to the Waterberg. 294

[1]Article below taken from RehobothBasters.Org: Every year on the 8th of May, the battle of Sam Khubis is remembered. This historical battle took place on 8 May 1915, when the German colonial army attacked the Baster people who had fled to their last stronghold of Sam Khubis. The fear of total annihilation by a better equipped German army created a strong sense of common destiny. The battle turned into a miraculous survival, which is celebrated every year to remind the Baster people of the threats faced, which can be overcome together. In 1885, the Kaptein of the Rehoboth Basters signed a Treaty of Protection and Friendship with the German government. This international treaty arranged the rights and duties of the Rehoboth polity vis-à-vis the German colonial power. This treaty continued to be operational until 1914 when World War One changed the political landscape. The Basters refused to take up arms against South African troops that were threatening to invade German controlled South West Africa. They also refused to guard captured South African soldiers and did not agree to patrol outside the territory of Rehoboth. The escalation of events started on 13 April 1915 when the German authorities demanded from the Baster Council that the armed Baster troops would go to Otjiwarango to guard Prisoners Of War. If these demands were not to be met, all weapons in possession of the Rehoboth Basters had to be handed in to the German army. The Germans gave the Baster Council a three day deadline. However, the following day the Germans secretly disarmed’ Baster soldiers in Sandputs. Several of the Baster soldiers tried to escape in which one was killed and another one escaped to tell the Baster Council of the events. In the mean time the Germans were also disarming’ the Basters in Rehoboth. In the following days, several armed skirmishes occurred leaving a number of Baster and German soldiers dead. These events lead to the cancellation of the 1885 Treaty by the German authorities who declared it null and void as of 22 April 1915. Consequently, the Germans sent many soldiers to Rehoboth, while in the mean time Baster families were fleeing to the Sam Khubis area, which was considered a militarily defendable position. In the early morning of 8 May 1915, the Germans attacked the Baster stronghold of Sam Khubis, where a large part of the population had found refuge. The fighting lasted until the evening. The Basters feared that the superior weapons of the German army would mean a total defeat and possible annihilation the next day. However, the Germans withdrew from the fight the next day, leaving a relieved and hopeful Baster people behind. The German withdrawal was caused by the South African army that was on the march and conquered the territory of South West Africa, including Rehoboth, to mark a new chapter in the struggle for self-determination of Rehoboth and the Baster people.
1. http://www.rehobothbasters.org/casedetails.php?id=244

Consumer Protection Group advocates for laws to protect buyers (2012-05-12 15:19)
[1]Original Story in the Namibian Newspaper By: ROB PARKER - Namibian Newspaper This week The Namibian Consumer spoke to Milton Louw, founder of the Namibia Consumer Protection Group (NCPG) about the activities of his organisation and the biggest issues affecting Namibian consumers today. You are the founding member of the Namibia Consumer Protection Group? what does this group do? What are your powers?

The NCPG is a lobby group started in 2009 to provide an information channel to consumer about their rights in Namibia. It focuses on illegal and unethical behaviour by Namibian companies. 295

The Consumer Charter we promote states all consumers have: The right to basic goods and services which guarantee survival. The right to be protected against the marketing of goods or the provision of services that are hazardous to health and life. The right to be protected against dishonest or misleading advertising or labelling. The right to choose products and services at competitive prices with an assurance of satisfactory quality. The right to express consumer interests in the making and execution of government policy. The right to be compensated for misrepresentation, shoddy goods or unsatisfactory services. The right to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to be an informed consumer. The right to live and work in an environment which is neither threatening nor dangerous and which permits a life of dignity and well-being. It is a volunteer organisation and uses our facebook group to encourage membership. We currently have around 380 members who actively participate. In one of our most successful campaigns regarding the proposed electricity rate increase in 2010, we had over 5 000 electronic signatures to our petition – this can be seen as the non-participating membership. Our database includes information on both groups and allows us to send communications to the complete group of over 5 000. This Facebook page is also our primary method of information dissemination. In addition, we post articles on our personal blogs as well as regular media updates on issues we believe consumers should know. I am a volunteer also, and act as the executive director. We have no acknowledged legal status in the terms of the law. South Africa, last year, introduced a comprehensive Consumer Protection Act (CPA), Why do we not have a similar Act in Namibia?

This has been proposed in Namibia and the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI) is the line Ministry. For the past four or five years the various ministries including Justice, have been working at putting a law in place. What stage is the Namibian consumer protection Act at? Is it stalled at this stage? What will get it back on track?

Last year they called for tenders to provide the ministry with help in drafting the law. The last time we inquired from MTI was in March 2012 and we have not received feedback on the present status as yet. The Namibian Competition Commission has also been assisting with research into the issue and we hope to soon have feedback on this issue. What is the role of the public in advocating for legislation to protect consumers?

At present, the public can only complain or make its voice heard via the media. We have no recourse to the law and hope this will be addressed in legislation. I would hope that more journalists in the print and television media would highlight the needs for legislation through showing areas where such protection is lacking. If this issue is not pushed harder, the business community will not voluntary provide the protection required. What are some of the areas where a lack of consumer protection affects Namibians the most? 296

The financial services sector is one of the areas we believe needs to work together with NCPG to ensure consumers are fully aware of the implications of the contracts they sign with these service providers. In addition, the housing market in Namibia needs to be better regulated. The problem is not only with a law that needs to be put in place, but also because the estate agents are paralysing the working of the Estate Agents Board - another of the government regulators under the MTI. Which laws currently protect Namibians from unscrupulous vendors?

There are certain sectors where laws should protect consumers such as is health, medicines, etc but there is no encompassing legislation that will give consumers protection, but also provide the necessary inspectors for the MTI to carry out their work.
1. http://www.namibian.com.na/index.php?id=28&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=96850&no_cache=1

Am I Afropolitan? - ”a rose by any other name” (2012-05-20 12:19)
I define myself as being the person I see in the mirror. My friends define me as what they see now, my community define me as what I have achieved. However, how does the world, who does not know me, define me? If they cannot define me, they find it difficult to interact with an unknown. We might hide behind the pretense of not seeing differences, but that would be lying to ourselves. So, rather than disagree with you on what you call me, I embrace all those labels! For each label, I am able to attach myself to another group to find similarities rather than differences. Call me AFROPOLITAN Recently I came across an article about being Afropolitan. This word means:

• An African from the continent of dual nationality • An African born in the Diaspora • An African who identifies with their African and European heritage and mixed culture. • An African free from local, provincial, or national ideas, prejudices, or attachments; at home all over the world. Let’s examine if I fit into these meanings, and who of you are also in that box? Africans with dual nationality I was born in South West Africa. At Independence, I received Namibian nationality. That is the passport I carry and I am proud to be a Brave Warrior. Nonetheless, South Africa recognises me as having a right to citizenship, even though I have not exercised that right. So, I have dual nationality. Who else in Namibia has dual nationality? Aaaaaah, my Namibian born friends who also have German or British passports, you too are Afropolitan. 297

any other Namibians with dual nationality - including everyone born before Independence - and living in a cosmopolitan area Born in the Diaspora Not me. But all my exile friends born in the rest of the world - ”Welcome, Karibu, Onde Kutambulako!” Identifies with the Mixed Culture I call myself a ”Cool Coloured Chap” - you may too. I recognise, and appreciate both my African and European cultures. I can enjoy the music of the penny-whistle (african) and electric guitars (european) . In addition, I have made the effort to understand the history of the other cultures in my country. This is important. An AFROPOLITAN must make an effort to understand Africa, its similarities and its differences. Our strength in calling ourselves ”from Africa”, is our diversity. Without Prejudices OOPS. Will have to work on my -isms. I consider capitalism to be a system that does not work for the majority of its people. Jokes aside, I am comfortable in a church, temple, synagogue, ashram or any other place of worship. This is a start. Conclusion We are more the same than what we recognise. Now I have one more name that can help me see people who are just like me.

Let’s put Namibia on the forefront of technology (2012-05-30 16:25)
I am a social entrepreneur that has been developing a central register of data for Namibia since 1993. As a student of computer science and statistics I was interested in developing an economic modelling system to assist my country through the first years after Independence in 1990. At present, this personal data register includes over 1 million records, or over half the population. This comes from public information such as electoral rolls, land registers, etc. In 1999, I started a partnership with Creditreform Düsseldorf Frormann KG to develop a proposal for an integrated central register of personal and business data that would assist Government and the financial services industry provide better services to the people and businesses. The collection of data has continued over the 12 year period and we have met with various government officials to explain the benefits. However, the understanding of how to implement the technology has been lacking. The World Economic Forum (WEF), has started discussing [1]personal data as a new asset class and in its most recent report: ”[2]Rethinking Personal Data: Strengthening Trust” they suggest four main steps to be taken, namely:

1. Engage in a structured, robust dialogue to restore trust in the personal data ecosystem. The debate needs to focus on achieving consensus on some of the key tensions, including securing and protecting data, developing accountability systems, and agreeing on rules for the trusted and permissioned flow of data for different contexts. Central to this dialogue is the inclusion of individuals, who play an increasingly important role as both data subjects and as data creators. 298

2. Develop and agree on principles to encourage the trusted flow of personal data. The simple slogan of “think globally, act locally” can help frame these principles (i.e. shared principles can help all the actors aim towards the same outcomes, even if their approaches for how to get there differ). 3. Develop new models of governance for collective action. Regulators, organizations and individuals can play complementary roles in establishing accountability systems, enforcement mechanisms, rights and permissions. 4. Establish “living labs”. Given the complex social, commercial, technical and regulatory uncertainties and interdependencies, an environment which can provide stakeholders with the ability to test and learn in real time (and at scale) needs to be established. These labs can provide a safe context for more fully understanding the system dynamics and collectively identifying shared opportunities, risks and the means for effective collaboration. I would like to offer my databases and experiences in Namibia to a research organisation or team, to use in establishing a ”living lab” on a country-wide scale. Please fell free to contact me on any of the communication methods listed below. Mobile: +264 81 688 1368 Email: [3]miltonlouw@gmail.com Blog: [4]http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/ LinkedIn: [5]http://www.linkedin.com/in/miltonlouw
1. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CGAQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww3.weforum. org%2Fdocs%2FWEF_ITTC_PersonalDataNewAsset_Report_2011.pdf&ei=6ynGT--XAcyHhQfsxrW_BQ&usg= AFQjCNGQk7EmmdjUt-0-SQz4q0-4z_90tA&sig2=vhZ7hTLMMDasS2u5ZIgYiQ 2. http://www.weforum.org/reports/rethinking-personal-data-strengthening-trust 3. mailto:miltonlouw@gmail.com 4. http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/ 5. http://www.linkedin.com/in/miltonlouw

4.6

June

I am an pan African (2012-06-01 16:32)
Citizenship of a country is like being a member of a certain club. It allows you access to certain services, participation in social and economic programmes as well as the rewards.

4.7

July

I am a Citizen Informaticist (2012-07-20 14:29)
I have found an all encompassing title for my purpose in life. I am a citizen informaticist. This is the belief that the best way to improve the lives of citizens is to improve the flow of information. This includes: 299

* information about government services; and * information about the citizen and their specific needs My vision is that citizens throughout the world will share information to ensure ethical leadership. In this regard, I define ethics as being the code of values that guide a person’s choices and actions choices and actions that determine the purpose and the course of their life. The vision being clear, I can better understand my mission: “Develop the tools and systems to assist the management of countries (government, civil society and private sector) in providing access to services and technologies to allow maximum quality of life to all who live there.” Once the vision and mission are clear, I have to develop SMART objectives that ensure that vision is met. Looking back at the past ten years of my life, I realise that most of my actions (projects) have been guided by my choice to be a Country Informaticist. These include: the

1. [1]Future Namibia - a book identifying that discrimination is not based only on race, culture, gender, or geographical location, but more importantly in access to services (and technology). 2. [2]Milton Louw blogs - This blog has been used to share my ideas - and led to articles in newspapers and interviews on television to further share the ideas of an empowered citizenry. 3. [3]Government of Namibia Blog - A Directory of the Government of Namibia. That includes

• Contact details of Ministers through to Directors of each Ministry • Vision, Mission and Objectives • Strategic plans • Description of focus areas • Explanation of work processes • Recent press releases • Press articles about the Ministry

My next project is co-authoring a book ”THE ETHICAL WAY TO WIN ELECTIONS: The Essential Guide to Building a Successful Value-based Campaign”. Would you join me in being a citizen informaticist in your country?
1. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Future-Namibia/176158629122324 2. http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/ 3. http://government-of-namibia.blogspot.com/

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The argument for rent control in Namibia (2012-07-20 17:26)
The Namibian newspaper has requested that the Namibia Consumer Protection Group to express themselves on the escalating rental prices being charged in the country. The price increase in rentals of property have increased drastically and people cannot afford these prices as their salaries have not increased accordingly. What is Rent Control? Rent control refers to laws or regulations that set price controls on the renting of residential housing. It functions as a price ceiling. Rent control exists in approximately 40 countries around the world. Generally the laws dictate the frequency and degree of rent increases and are limited to less than the rate of inflation. Arguments for rent control First, on the economic front, such a law gives the tenant the ability to insist on certain improvements being done a minimum standard, without allowing the landlord to retaliate with higher rental fees. Secondly, the social dynamics of rent control, or to use the correct term, rent stabilisation, is an important one for consumer protection. Without rent stabilisation, landlords can demand any increase and tenants must either pay or move. These regulations provide some assurance that the consumer can maintain stability in their housing situation. Third, the moral argument is that housing is a human right that is more important than the property rights of the landlord. With this argument, the landlord’s income is restricted to a formula, for example no more than 20 % higher than the monthly installment on a bond for a house of this value. Arguments against rent control The main argument against is the putting a cap (highets price) on rent reduces the quantity and quality of housing available. Introducing rent control reduces the number of investors willing to purchase housing for the purpose of renting to receive an income. Thus rent control can lead to creation of less housing, raises prices and increases urban decay in certain areas of a town. If rent control should be introduced in Namibia, this will reduce the resale value of affected properties. Thus, banks and other mortgage holders would find the values they estimated to be higher than the true resale value if they need to foreclose. In addition, municipal valuations would have to be reduced in line with the value reductions. What is causing the problem? Rather than just accept Rent Control as the only solution, we need to look closer at the problem and find the causes of rental increases. In essence, a free market economy such as ours allows all interested would-be tenants equal opportunity to offer a rental amount for the space. In conditions of monetary inflation and housing shortages rents rise as landlords have tenants willing to meet their asking price. In other words, the landlords would reduce rents if no-one was willing to pay the rental fee. Conclusion Rent Control can be used as an interim measure to attempt to keep rental affordable, but this is not a solution that will solve the problem of the housing shortage in urban areas. Municipalities have to increase the number of erven available for building of lower income housing and the prices should stabalise once the supply and demand equation is more balanced. The costs of land-use regulation are also extremely unfair to the development low cost housing units and this is something that can be changed fairly quickly by local authorities. The increase of rent in Namibia has led to high-cost to income ratio. Thus the families affected by high or unaffordable rentals means they are now unable to afford non-housing necessities such as food and medicines. The Namibia Consumer Protection Group (NCPG) believes the answer to the problem of high cost to income ratio is to directly increase the income of low-income households. The Government should look at a policy programme that provides food stamps, health insurance, national pension plans, etc that make non-housing expenses more affordable. 301

Namibia needs to find sustainable solutions which improve health, safety and comfort for all its citizens, and more specifically reduce the costs incurred by low-income families for the use of water, energy and housing.

(2012-07-20 18:39)
The following was received from a member of the public I hereby wish to lodge a formal complaint against Reliance Motors cc for poor after sales service delivered to us. I also want to put forward a serious vote of no confidence in this dealer. Reliance Motors cc is not as trustworthy as their name implies, maybe their cars but definitely not their service. The truth is that they are very reluctant to deliver good after sales service. We had a mechanical breakdown with our car on the 3rd of November 2010 and took it to them on the 4th of November for repairs. The staff of Reliance Motors is simply not concerned about time, the inconvenience and humiliation we suffered throughout this ordeal. Client service is not a priority for them. They did not even have the decency to inform us once about their progress. We were the ones to phone and enquire on daily basis and even offer our help to speed up things, but to no avail. They simply have no sense of urgency to get the work done or simply do not care. We are commuting daily to work and need our car desperately and are tired of their excuses, unprofessional and incompetent behaviour. We write this letter out pure frustration, unhappiness and helplessness with our predicament. Is there any regulation body out there where one can report these arrogant car dealers?

Future Namibia - First edition (2012-07-23 16:56)
[1]Future Namibia IFRAME: [2]http://www.scribd.com/embeds/65499685/content?start page=1 &view mode=list &access key=key-gkztn2jeypkvzxpjv9s
1. http://www.scribd.com/doc/65499685/Future-Namibia 2. http://www.scribd.com/embeds/65499685/content?start_page=1&view_mode=list&access_key=key-gkztn2jeypkvzxpjv9s

Stealing copyrighted pictures in Africa (2012-07-24 11:51)
Eish, I might not be a music artist - but copying must be some form of flattery? The song below was created in remembrance of my comrades and I who were part of the internal struggle (and no my children, you cannot have demonstrations as the internal struggle kids!). Now, the artists Kuku Niihana, has taken my song and the copyrighted pictures of [1]John Arthur Liebenberg, and added video clips from Rhodesia army and Sam Nujoma and placed it on television. Nee man, our artists must learn to be original, or ask permission when stealing! IFRAME: [2]http://www.youtube.com/embed/JDw38eS8gn0
1. http://www.facebook.com/jaliebenberg 2. http://www.youtube.com/embed/JDw38eS8gn0

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Establishing a Namibian Savings and Credit Cooperative (2012-07-26 10:33)
Introduction The consistently increasing living cost has brought a big burden to Namibian as they never seem to earn enough to cover their daily needs. Many people tend to deal with this problem through the moneylenders such as banks and cash loans who charge them very high interest rates. By so doing their indebtedness is increased even more and the situation becomes more serious to them. However, this money problem can be reduced if they join together under the cooperative principles of self-help and mutual help. A cooperative is a business owned by its members for their mutual social economic and cultural benefit. There are two types of cooperatives namely, 1. consumer or service cooperative – owned and managed by the people who use its services; and 2. workers’ cooperative – owned and managed by people who work in the business. Namibia created an enabling environment for cooperatives through the Co-operatives Act 1996. In this Act, it defines various types of service cooperatives. These include Marketing & Supply cooperatives, Consumer cooperatives, Housing cooperatives and Savings & Credit cooperatives. The Act further stipulates that a service cooperative must also enter into at least 51 per cent of its transactions with its members. The Namibia Consumer Protection Group is proposing the establishment of the Namibian Savings and Credit Cooperative. The S &C Cooperative will act as a financial institution, and have the specific objectives to encourage savings and provide loan services. About Namibia Consumer Protection Group (NCPG) NCPG is a non-profit Namibian organisation that campaigns for customer rights. It focuses on illegal and unethical behaviour by Namibian companies. It also promotes the voluntary acceptance of the Namibian Consumer Charter by businesses and government entities. Objectives of the Namibian Savings & Credit Cooperative The Namibian S &C Cooperative shall: a) promote the economic and social interest of its members by providing effective services to its members according to sound business principles; b) have non-discriminatory voluntary membership; c) be democratic and controlled by its members; d) entitle every member to have one vote – regardless of the number of shares owned; e) provide services be primarily to members; f) limit the dividends so most profits are kept for the functioning of the cooperative; and g) provide ongoing membership education. Establishing a Cooperative Members must be • · at least 18 • · a citizen of Namibia, or ordinarily resident of Namibia 303

A primary savings and credit service cooperative shall be formed by at least a seven members. The cooperative shall be governed by its by-laws. These by-laws include information regarding the name, address, type of cooperative, objectives, nature of business and place of business and other information as stipulated by the Act. In addition the by-laws will include information on the liability of its members – in the case of the proposed Savings and Credit Cooperative the liability shall be limited. Upon establishment of a cooperative, a “Cooperative Formation Committee” (minimum seven members) shall be present at a meeting to elect a Chairperson, Secretary and Treasurer. The Formation Committee shall be responsible for convening meetings with prospective members, draft the by-laws, and submit the application for registration as a cooperative. Within one year, a Cooperative Founders meeting shall be convened where a register of members must be completed to be submitted with the application. Objectives of the Namibian Savings and Credit Cooperative The Namibia Consumer Protection Group is proposing the establishment of the Namibian Savings & Credit cooperative (S &C Cooperative). The primary purpose of the Cooperative is to reduce banks costs and use discounts, loyalty rewards or any other form of remuneration normally received by a banking institution for the lessening of members costs. The S &C Cooperative will be managed as a financial institution, and have the specific objectives to: 1. Encourage thrift among members. To encourage a saving habit, the cooperative currently offers two types of savings:a. Shares: All members are required to pay monthly shares at rates agreed by the members. b. Deposits: Both current and fixed deposits are generally offered to cooperative members. 2. Provide loan services to members. Members’ shares and deposits comprise significant part the loan funds made available to members with interest charged usually at rates lower than that of the prevailing market rates. The general three types of loans provided by this cooperative type are: a. Emergency loans: In crisis or emergency cases, a member may borrow up to half of his/her monthly income, depending on the cooperative financial status, without collateral. Repayment is normally made in two instalments. b. Ordinary loans: The cooperative can provide an ordinary loan, again, depending on its financial status. This can be between 4 to 15 times, of member monthly income. c. Special loans: When the cooperative extends its services to housing and investment purposes, a member may borrow the actual amount required for constructing or purchasing houses, land and other permanent investments Legislation and Regulation vis-à-vis Financial Services The Namibian Savings & Credit Cooperative is not a bank in the traditional sense of the word and as stated in the Cooperatives Act, “no provision of the Banks Act shall apply in relation to a cooperative”. The Banking Institutions Act, 1998, further states “This Act shall not shall not apply to & any co-operative society registered under the Co-operative Societies Act, 1996”. Practical Application It is proposed that the Cooperative shall work with a sponsor bank (preferably NamPost) and manage the accounts of its members as a virtual banking wallet. A technical management contract will be negotiated with a software development team to use a account management system via a cellular device. The software will be based on the technical USSD or similar standard. 304

The money in a members virtual wallet may be used for purchases at participating retail outlets. In addition, certain outlets will partner the Cooperative to provide cash disbursement at their business. Additional Services The Cooperative will also provide a personal data management system for its members. This will allow members to securely store a data about themselves and set permissions for others (government, legislative processes, private sector – for example potential employers, individuals, etc.) to access the information in a controlled way. Registration The Ministry responsible for cooperatives is the Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry. Registration is submitted to the Deputy Director of Co-operatives in the Directorate of Planning. Rights and Responsibilities In its essence, a cooperative belongs to its members. Effective and efficient management of the cooperative is ensured when members exercise their rights and responsibilities properly. The most important responsibility of the individual member is attendance at the annual general Meeting (AGM). The AGA gives him/her the opportunity to protect their membership rights, a fair sharing of benefits and monitor the management of the operations. It provides also a forum to determine general policies, elect committee members and assign tasks to further benefit all the members. Within the framework of cooperative principles, laws and regulations and procedures, members must discuss problems together, share ideas and exercise the right to vote on committees and meeting resolutions.

Please list me as the Father of your Child (2012-07-31 14:35)
I am the named as the father of a child on his birth certificate, but I am not the biological father. This was my choice. I offered my name to his mother. Let me tell you the story. In 2004, I met a young woman who had a child of 3 months old. Really cute (as most babies are) but the mother did not have a name for him. HUH? When i questioned her she told me that the Ministry of Home Affairs would not register the child without the name of the father. Unfortunately she did not know who the father was. This meant she had no birth certificate, and worse could not get a clinic card for her son. I went with her to the offices and offered to have them list me as the father. The GRN official told me that this was not possible unless i was the biological father or married to the woman. Now those of you who know me - know I don’t take no for an answer. I walked next door to the marriage regitration office and booked a marrigae appointment with the woman for the next week. With this marriage appointment I returned to the Birth Registration office. The GRN official was more than happy to now register ”my” son. Five minutes later, I called off my ”engagement” and cancelled the wedding appointment. [1] My son now has a birth certificate and will carry my surname.
1. http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/527106_10151023456724864_1447235059_n.jpg

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4.8

August

Showing my love for my neighbour (2012-08-16 14:40)
Paraphrased from Corinthians 13. The bible verse gifted to me by my Grandmother, Joyce Du Preez. I have been taught three things are necessary in life: faith, hope and showing my love for my neighbour and the most important is showing my love for my neighbour. Even though I can speak four languages and write computer programs, but do not show my love for my neighbour, I am like pirated music; And though I can see future trends, understand social media and have an international blog; Even though I have faith that I will become President of Namibia, and do not show love for my neighbour, I am nothing and have no social influence; Even though I am leaving my riches to feed the poor, and my body will be buried in heroes Acre, but do not show my love for my neighbour, it will not make me wealthy; Because when I show my love for my neighbour, - I lend my ears and give from my heart - I am not jealous or resent the good fortune of my neighbour - I am not arrogant or swollen with pride - I am not rude - I am not always seeking to receive my share or commission - I am not easily irritated - I do not think evil of my neighbour I get angered by injustice and wealth inequalities and promote ethics and morality I accept my own situation, believe, hope and endure all challenges The love I show for my neighbour will never stop, - even when my future predictions do not come true - even when new technologies are not understood - even when my skills become out of date At this moment, I only know a little and can only guess to the future - When I reach heaven, I will no longer need to guess When I was self-centred, I spoke about myself, understood only my own opinion, and thought only of my own well-being, now that I understand my part in society, I no longer think on those foolish, selfish things While I am on this earth, I can only see shadows, but there I shall see clearly; Now I am only aware of things fed to me through television and news, but only in heaven shall I fully appreciate the gifts God has given me. I have been taught three things are necessary in life: faith, hope and showing my love for my neighbour and the most important is showing my love for my neighbour.

306

I will put you in your place (2012-08-20 13:25)
Don’t ever mistake my silence for ignorance, my calmness for acceptance or my kindness for weakness Had an opportunity to realise again that some people take my kindness for weakness. Just because I am always taking life as fun, does not mean I do not have serious side. When I say NO, it means NO, even when I say it with a smile. I had to learn that people only say and do what I allow them to. I might not walk around looking angry all the time, but I will put you in your place when I feel disrespected - and I will do it with a smile.

Inheritance Tracing Agency (2012-08-20 13:36)
Inheritance Tracing Agency is a wholly owned Namibian Company, managed and operated by Namibians. Established in 2010, ITA specializes in finding beneficiaries and unknown heirs as well as the re-unification of assets, by providing pro-active search services to individuals, companies and the legal entities in Namibia According to the founder Andreas Hamutenya, The Company’s services promote consumer education and serves as a consumer protector. Clients can buy these financial products and services without hesitation knowing that they will actually benefit from such products in events of re-location or even death. Financial institutions are also benefiting in terms of administration costs reduction as these institutions won’t be dealing with the issue of making follow ups on where-about of untraceable clients. By seeking out sources of misplaced assets in situations where heirs can not be identified or located, the company boosts awareness, confidence and trust among the general public with regard to financial products and services, and hence creating, enhancing and developing the Namibian financial sector and the whole economy at large. ITA also helps Insurance companies trace clients who have stopped paying their premiums without any notifications. On successful trace, such clients are notified or reminded of their insurance policies and help bring them on board again. This will help insurance companies minimize lapses, and also increase revenue as more money will be flowing in from these traced clients. Taking proactive steps, demonstrates a commitment to corporate governance and social responsibility, reinforcing customer perceptions of financial institutions’ brands, says Andreas. In Namibian, it’s estimated that millions of Dollars in life insurance and other types of financial payouts goes unclaimed each year due to lost or unknown policies. Insurance companies may not even be aware of members’ deaths, and find it difficult to track down beneficiaries. In response to this problem of unclaimed benefits, the company has launched a registry database where members of the public can register the names of financial institutions that have their financial assets. The main aim of the database is to ensure that members’ efforts to secure their families’ futures don’t go to waste. This provides members and their beneficiaries’ peace of mind, ensuring that members’ financial legacies are not lost due to simple human error, passage of time, re locations, buyouts, natural disaster, or lack of communication. Your life insurance company, bank or pension fund administrator’s name will always be located somewhere for your designated beneficiaries to find it. The database will allow registering categories of accounts such as life insurance, safe deposit boxes, annuities, investment/bank accounts or even simply stating the lawyer holding onto their WILLS, or people appointed as their EXECUTORS/ESTATE ADMINISTRATORS, or just any inheritable assets on the database. Members’ 307

information will be protected with physical and digital safeguards similar to those employed by banks to secure online banking transactions. Member information is further secured by the fact that ITA does not ask for bank account numbers or insurance policy numbers, bank balances/values or types of investments or policies. With only a name of the clients’ financial institution, a thief cannot penetrate these two institutions without proper identification. In other words, any information to be gained by breaching ITA security measures would be useless for purposes of identity theft or other types of theft or fraud. Further information SMS ’info” to 95559 or email: [1]info@ita.com.na visit [2]www.ita.com.na Telephone (061) 225186.
1. mailto:info@ita.com.na 2. http://www.ita.com.na/

Can entrepreneurship be taught? (2012-08-20 13:45)
[1]Permission to reprint from Anthony Farr For decades, entrepreneurship has been viewed as something risky and mysterious that only a few lucky mavericks could master. This perception has been fuelled by a public reverence for successful individuals, who seem to have had no formal training to which their entrepreneurial success could be attributed. Some educational institutions have also shunned or quashed entrepreneurship as a non-discipline, something unteachable and incongruous with traditional discipline-based courses. Whilst the significance of entrepreneurship for a country’s economy is rarely disputed, the much-debated question is whether entrepreneurship is an elusive and exclusive “talent” that is inherent in some, or whether it can be taught and therefore extended to a wider segment of the population who will contribute to the growth of its economy. But I believe that entrepreneurship can be taught and that it is a process that begins with rethinking its definition. Redefining entrepreneurship “Our perception of entrepreneurship has to echo that of innovation and entrepreneurship” writes author, Peter Drucker, in his assertion that entrepreneurship is not magic; it’s not mysterious; and it has nothing to do with genes. “It is a discipline and like any discipline, it can be learned.” The first step is to realise that entrepreneurship is much more than starting a business. It is an innovation and opportunity driven attitude and mindset that is applicable across all areas of activity. It therefore cannot be oversimplified or categorised as a subject to be done. The application of this understanding is especially crucial when it comes to instilling an entrepreneurial ethos at school level. The role of educators Education, its methodologies and content, life orientation tasks, camps, projects, role models etc, should activate an awareness of opportunities and be holistic. They have to be built into every school activity and not planned as another subject on the curriculum. In this information age, schools should create endless opportunities for activating information through developing children’s ability to have insights which are then converted into permanent habits. The role of curriculum designers and teachers cannot be stressed enough: Curriculum designers should be paying attention to cultivating, encouraging, and activating the mindsets that are required as prerequisites for business start-up, whilst teachers should develop cross-cutting methodologies that are used in all subjects that then become the creative vehicles for developing entrepreneurial attitudes. This way, by the time pupils leave school they are prepared to participate entrepreneurially in anything they do. However, this is not an education that remains in the classroom. Parents would be well advised to look for opportunities to foster creativity and new projects with their children. The role of government According to Kristie Seawright, Executive director of the Global Economic Monitor, in order for entrepreneurship training to be productive in low-income countries, it needs to be complimented by beneficial government 308

policies, infrastructure, and other basic requirements. The first stage of instilling entrepreneurship as a culture is by rewarding it socially and financially by society. Whilst the social reward comes from each and everyone one of us celebrating and encouraging entrepreneurial individuals, the financial reward is primarily the government’s responsibility. In many ways government controls the balance of a country’s risk reward equation, which is a key component in incentivising entrepreneurial activity. A key first action that government must take is to de-stigmatise financial failure. Bankruptcy related laws need to be amended to ensure that one business failure does not mean the end of a person’s career, but rather becomes a learning opportunity for future entrepreneurial success. Yet there are two sides to this equation and government would be well advised to leverage the rewards on offer for entrepreneurial endeavour – a quick win would be by means of greater taxation concessions for start-up companies. It is crucial for a developing country such as ours to stimulate and embrace an entrepreneurial spirit to achieve the much-required economic transformation and a stronger presence in the global economy. There are no lucky individuals who magically acquire entrepreneurial success, just as there are no predictable traits that will give them a competitive entrepreneurial edge. There is no consistent profile of an entrepreneurial individual. Some are extroverted, others the opposite. The only common thread found across entrepreneurs is a deep desire for achievement and a discontent with the current status of a particular context. In much the same way that a consistent proportion of the population across different countries excels at mathematics, it is likely that a similar proportion of the population are entrepreneurs. It is believed that this proportion is approximately 20 %. In South Africa the actual level of entrepeneurship currently sits at 5 % which leaves us with a deficit of 15 %. We need to understand why this deficit exists and attempt to unleash the latent entrepreneurial activity that should exist within that 15 % . These individuals do not need to be taught entrepreneurship as much as opened up to the possibility and then to be encouraged to exercise their natural ability in this area. This does not exclude the remaining 80 % of the population group where the question of nurture vs nature and whether entrepreneurship can be taught becomes even more amplified. Not everyone can be an entrepreneur; however, it is imperative that the skills and attitudes of an entrepreneurial mindset are adopted more widely in response to the increased rate of change in society.
1. http://ventureburn.com/author/anthonyfarr/

4.9

September

Creating an Information Bank for Namibian consumers (2012-09-14 16:57)
My name is Milton Louw and I am a social entrepreneur that has been developing a central register of data for Namibia since 1993. As a student of computer science and statistics I was interested in developing an economic modeling system to assist my country through the first years after Independence in 1990. At present, this personal data register includes over 1 million records, or over half the population. This comes from public information such as electoral rolls, land registers, etc. and is freely available. In 1999, I started a partnership with Creditreform Düsseldorf Frormann KG to develop a proposal for an integrated central register of personal and business data that would assist Government and the financial services industry provide better services to the people and businesses. The collection of data has continued over the 12 year period and we have met with various government officials to explain the benefits. However, the understanding of how to implement the technology has been lacking. (The business register has been our 309

main focus and consists of over 11,000 businesses.) Since 2010, I have read with interest the work the World Economic Forum (WEF), has been doing in regards of personal data and its impact in the world today. The WEF, has started discussing personal data as a new asset class and in its most recent report: “Rethinking Personal Data: Strengthening Trust” they suggest four main steps to be taken, namely:

1. Engage in a structured, robust dialogue to restore trust in the personal data ecosystem. The debate needs to focus on achieving consensus on some of the key tensions, including securing and protecting data, developing accountability systems, and agreeing on rules for the trusted and permissioned flow of data for different contexts. Central to this dialogue is the inclusion of individuals, who play an increasingly important role as both data subjects and as data creators. 2. Develop and agree on principles to encourage the trusted flow of personal data. The simple slogan of “think globally, act locally” can help frame these principles (i.e. shared principles can help all the actors aim towards the same outcomes, even if their approaches for how to get there differ). 3. Develop new models of governance for collective action. Regulators, organizations and individuals can play complementary roles in establishing accountability systems, enforcement mechanisms, rights and permissions. 4. Establish “living labs”. Given the complex social, commercial, technical and regulatory uncertainties and interdependencies, an environment which can provide stakeholders with the ability to test and learn in real time (and at scale) needs to be established. These labs can provide a safe context for more fully understanding the system dynamics and collectively identifying shared opportunities, risks and the means for effective collaboration. I would like to offer my databases and experiences in Namibia to a research organisation or team, to use in establishing a “living lab” on a country-wide scale. http://milton-louw.blogspot.com/2012/05/lets-put-namibia-on-forefron t-of.html

4.10

October

Why is the consumer protection law taking so long to implement in Namibia?
(2012-10-04 14:55)

Namibians discuss the Competition Act The Namibia Competition Commission (NaCC) held a consumer awareness week in the capital from 24 to 27 September 2012. The week centred around two issues, namely the competitiveness of Namibia and the need for a consumer protection law. The participants included ministries, government institutions, non-government organisations, the media and members of the public. In the one-day workshop entitled consumer protection, an absolute necessity in Namibia, various aspects of a consumer protection law for Namibia were discussed. The conclusion of the workshop was that everyone agreed a law is necessary and everyone agrees with what should be included. So what has been the delay in tabling a bill to Parliament? The Ministry of Trade Industry’s Consumer Protection Division had to decide where Consumer Protection should be housed. In other words, should it stay in the Ministry, be a new Commission or be a division of 310

the NaCC. THAT’s Right! The only decision that needs to be made is by whom should the law be regulated. The Namibia Consumer Protection Group (NCPG) made it clear that this is not sufficient reason to delay the law and fully supports the proposal that the competition law should be a division of the Namibia Competition Commission (NaCC). For your information, the rest of the article covers what is consumer protection, and what are your rights as a consumer. What is consumer protection? Consumer protection consists of various laws and institutions that are designed to:

1. Ensure the rights of consumers 2. Ensure fair trade competition 3. Provide free flow of information in the marketplace These laws are designed to prevent businesses that are out to defraud consumers, or prevent businesses taking advantages over their competitors (to the disadvantage of consumers) and should also provide protection for those consumers that are disadvantaged or unable to take care of themselves. Consumer Protection Laws are thus a form of government regulation which aim to protect the rights of people who spend their money in buying goods and services. For example, the laws may require businesses to provide money-back guarantees or not allow false advertising. Consumer protection is very closely linked to the idea of ”consumer rights” (see the consumer charter later) and to the formation of consumer organisations which can help consumers make better choices or get help with consumer complaints. Consumer protection laws in some countries deal with a wide range of issues including credit repair, debt repair, product safety, service and sales contracts, bill collector regulation, pricing, utility turnoffs, consolidation, personal loans that may lead to bankruptcy. What are your consumer rights? The consumer organisations, Ministry of Trade and Industry, as well as all the government institutions agree on the following rights of Namibians consumers: • The right to basic goods and services which guarantee survival. This includes Food,Water, Electricity, Telephone and Internet access. • The right to be protected against the marketing of goods or the provision of services that are hazardous to health and life. • The right to be protected against dishonest or misleading advertising or labelling. • The right to choose products and services at competitive prices with an assurance of satisfactory quality. • The right to express consumer interests in the making and execution of government policy. • The right to be compensated for misrepresentation, shoddy goods or unsatisfactory services. • The right to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to be an informed consumer. • The right to live and work in an environment which is neither threatening nor dangerous and which permits a life of dignity and well-being.

311

My debt is more than double? (2012-10-18 14:46)
In Namibia, the Consumer Law can do a lot to prevent the endless circle of debt and poverty consumers get trapped in. Take for example the principle of in duplum. “In duplum” is a Latin phrase derived from the word in duplo which means ”in double”. The rule has its origin in the Roman Dutch law. It basically provides that interest stops running when unpaid interest equals the outstanding capital amount. It has always been considered illegal (and immoral) to charge interest which is more than the original amount owed, except in special circumstances but people such as banks, lawyers, debt collectors, etc get away with it because it is a common law rule. This means there is uncertainty when applying the rule, especially by the courts. Thus a creditor should not charge more than twice the original amount due - but lawyers charges, tracing fees, administrative costs, etc. can inflate the debt to almost any amount? This common law ”in duplum” rule has been codified by statute in South Africa, which now protects consumers against predatory interest rates on loans and further provides better clarity about when the rule applies and when not. Namibia needs legal protection for its consumers – the Consumer law is a necessity not a nicety!

4.11

November

Namibian Telephone Numbering Plan (2012-11-12 13:29)
Your telephone number belongs to you. This is a basic accepted principle by any consumer. After all, who would dial your number unless they wanted to speak to you? It should therefore mean that you can keep your number even if you change your provider from Leo to MTC or even from a mobile company like MTC to your home telephone. The idea that your number belongs to you is called number portability and the method of implementing this is through a National Telephone Numbering Plan. As a consumer, you have an attachment to your number. After all, you give out on your CV, to your friends and family and to creditors. If you change your telephone service provider, you will have to face the inconvenience of learning the new number, changing your documents and making sure everyone knows your new number. This inconvenience has a financial cost and could be important in forcing you to stay with your service provider, even if you are unhappy with the service, or can get a better deal from another provider. Being able to change your provider without changing your number gives you, as the consumer, the power and the right to choose the telephone service provider that makes you happy with it price, service and products. Since 2002, most countries around the world have opened their telecommunications markets to competition (that include a national numbering plan), which has accelerated the deployment of telecommunications services more quickly and cost-effectively than past monopolies have achieved. For example, the European Union (EU) Universal Service and Users’ Rights Directive (2002/22/EC), Article 30 effective since July 2003 imposes on all EU member states the following obligations: “Member states shall ensure that all subscribers of publicly available telephone services, including mobile services, who so request can retain their number(s) independently of the undertaking providing the service: " In the case of geographic numbers, at a specific location; and " In the case of non-geographic numbers, at any location.” 312

The Communications Regulatory Authority of Namibia (CRAN) is mandated to establishing a numbering plan and to require mobile number portability by 2013. According to a recent advertisement, CRAN s looking for sufficient information to justify the implementation of number portability taking into account consumer needs, ensuring fair competition in the market and economic feasibility. CRAN will have to establish a numbering policy that provides a legal, legislative, and regulatory basis for competition. Then CRAN ust decide on numbering and dialing schemes, services, technologies, and billing and tariff methods that support its chosen numbering policy. Lastly, it must also establish a fair, neutral office for numbering administration. From discussions with CRAN and industry representatives, it is obvious that certain telephone providers would prefer not to have a numbering plan implemented. The argument being put forward is that the plan has not worked well in some countries because of the costs involved, the implementing agency not being technically capable, etc. It is understandable that CRAN should look at the costs or other issues involved for the providers as they will put these costs on to us as the end user. However, the power granted to the consumer to change providers will force cheaper prices and a better service which is the ultimate reason for the establishment of regulatory authorities that need to “take into account consumer needs”. As consumers, we often do not have the regulations or protection we need because we lack an adequately funded organisation that will look after our needs and address issues such as the national numbering plan to ensure that government and its regulatory authorities such as CRAN Electricity Control Board, etc do “take into account consumer needs”. This needs to change.

We need Consumer Protection laws (2012-11-12 14:04)
Since Independence, Namibia’s lawmakers have been preparing laws to make all our citizens equal and to ensure that our rights are protected. They have scrapped discriminatory laws and created laws that give us access to equal opportunities. Thanks to these efforts by our parliament, all of us know exactly what our human rights are. As part of the efforts of creating equal opportunity for all, the government ministries and institutions have concentrated on bringing laws and regulations that assist in sharing the wealth of the business community amongst the black population. These laws have covered ownership of businesses in various sectors such as farming, mining and fishing as well as lifting of restrictions on certain business areas which excluded the majority of Namibians. One of the major partners in these efforts has been the chamber of commerce and industry. The NCCI was instrumental in getting one voice for business and has become a partner for development. In exchange, the government has helped the chamber by channeling grants and donor funds, and even gone so far as to purchase them a building in Windhoek for their operations. It is good that Namibia has become a country friendly to business, but what about the protection of the consumer? We hear about consumer protection but hardly do we ever hear exactly what that means to us as a person. The question you have to ask is, “Who do I need protection from?” According to Wikipedia - “Consumer protection law or consumer law is considered an area of law that regulates private law relationships between individual consumers and the businesses that sell those goods and services.” Unfortunately, Namibia’s lawmakers have failed to create the laws necessary to protect its consumers. This needs to change. A recent example of this is the decision by NAMFISA to “remove the Consumer Credit Chapter from the Financial Institutions and Markets Bill. The scope of the Consumer Credit Chapter was deemed too wide 313

and necessitates considerably more research in order to develop a comprehensive policy for consumer credit in Namibia.” The history of this law makes one realise that Namibian consumer is being ignored. History of the Consumer Credit Chapter In 2006, the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Economics, Natural Resources and Public Administration invited the public, banks and the private sector to discuss what can be done to make banking more affordable for the majority of Namibians. At the meetings, it was agreed by various presenters that we need legislation that will cover competition issues, but just as important would be the need to have consumer credit legislation. The Parliamentary Committee then tasked the Ministry of Finance and its institutions to prepare legislation in this regard. After 6 years of consultation, meetings, road shows and various legal drafts, NAMFISA has removed the legal provisions which would cover what types of credit agreements would be allowed, the registration of credit providers, rules for the listing in credit bureau and the registration of debt counsellors. More importantly, they will no longer include the following rights of the consumer: • Right to apply for credit • Protection against discrimination in respect of credit • Right to reasons for credit being refused • Right to information in plain and understandable language • Right to receive documents • Protection of consumer credit rights The laws we need The laws we need in Namibia have to cover the following issues: • Product liability - Businesses who make products must be held responsible for the injuries those products cause; • Unfair Business Practices – These should include looking at leasing of property and the increases in rental prices, the settlement of insurance claims and debt collection when there is a default; • Guarantees – Forcing sellers to provide a money-back guarantees to consumers if they wish to return a defective product • Consumer Credit – Regulation of credit bureau (such as ITC and Compuscan), assistance with debt counseling and repairing of credit reports, consolidation of loans and regulating of credit that can lead to bankruptcy • Small Claims Court - This is a court of law where ordinary people can handle their own cases. It is not necessary to have a lawyer (and their costs) as the forms are meant to be a kind of do-it-yourself where you fill in the blanks. The court has less formal and less complicated rules and procedures than the Magistrates Court • Privacy Protection –At present the Constitution guarantees only Physical Privacy. The storage of personal and business information (Informational Privacy) must have legislation that will prevent misuse of this information. In addition, the individual in Namibia must be able to access any, and all, information that is stored by the state (public institutions).

314

4.12

December

Namibian Telephone Numbering Plan (2012-12-03 10:44)
Your telephone number belongs to you. This is a basic accepted principle by any consumer. After all, who would dial your number unless they wanted to speak to you? It should therefore mean that you can keep your number even if you change your provider from Leo to MTC or even from a mobile company like MTC to your home telephone. The idea that your number belongs to you is called number portability and the method of implementing this is through a National Telephone Numbering Plan. As a consumer, you have an attachment to your number. After all, you give out on your CV, to your friends and family and to creditors. If you change your telephone service provider, you will have to face the inconvenience of learning the new number, changing your documents and making sure everyone knows your new number. This inconvenience has a financial cost and could be important in forcing you to stay with your service provider, even if you are unhappy with the service, or can get a better deal from another provider. Being able to change your provider without changing your number gives you, as the consumer, the power and the right to choose the telephone service provider that makes you happy with it price, service and products. Since 2002, most countries around the world have opened their telecommunications markets to competition (that include a national numbering plan), which has accelerated the deployment of telecommunications services more quickly and cost-effectively than past monopolies have achieved. For example, the European Union (EU) Universal Service and Users’ Rights Directive (2002/22/EC), Article 30 effective since July 2003 imposes on all EU member states the following obligations: “Member states shall ensure that all subscribers of publicly available telephone services, including mobile services, who so request can retain their number(s) independently of the undertaking providing the service: " In the case of geographic numbers, at a specific location; and " In the case of non-geographic numbers, at any location.” The Communications Regulatory Authority of Namibia (Cran) is mandated to establishing a numbering plan and to require mobile number portability by 2013. According to a recent advertisement, Cran is looking for sufficient information to justify the implementation of number portability taking into account consumer needs, ensuring fair competition in the market and economic feasibility. Cran will have to establish a numbering policy that provides a legal, legislative, and regulatory basis for competition. Then Cran must decide on numbering and dialing schemes, services, technologies, and billing and tariff methods that support its chosen numbering policy. Lastly, it must also establish a fair, neutral office for numbering administration. From discussions with Cran and industry representatives, it is obvious that certain telephone providers would prefer not to have a numbering plan implemented. The argument being put forward is that the plan has not worked well in some countries because of the costs involved, the implementing agency not being technically capable, etc. It is understandable that Cran should look at the costs or other issues involved for the providers as they will put these costs on to us as the end user. However, the power granted to the consumer to change providers will force cheaper prices and a better service which is the ultimate reason for the establishment of regulatory authorities that need to “take into account consumer needs”. As consumers, we often do not have the regulations or protection we need because we lack an adequately funded organisation that will look after our needs and address issues such as the national numbering plan to ensure that government and its regulatory authorities such as Cran, Electricity Control Board, etc do “take into account consumer needs”. This needs to change.

315

Growing trend of mobile phone spam in Namibia (2012-12-03 10:48)
A consumer recently sent a copy of an SMS that offered the consumer a chance to make money from filling in forms and directed them to a website. The email reads: “Earn Extra income. Get paid up to N $3 750 per form. No computer needed. Very profitable. Visit www.mynamcash.com to get started.” The short message was sent from the short service number 5001. Once a consumer uses the website link, (which sounded Namibian) they were redirected to a website in South Africa. In addition, the page created a pop-up window which offered a free computer programme download. This is a typical example of spam being used to get more of your personal details which the website owners can sell to other spammers and they use your network of contacts to further spread their message. Unfortunately there is no easy way to make money. These types of messages are mobile phone messaging spam that is aimed at getting you interested in something for nothing before making your money disappear. What is SPAM? SPAM stands for Salted Pork and Meat (or as we know it in Namibia – bully beef), and is now commonly used to refer to uninvited messages or advertising sent out in bulk. While the most widely recognised form of spam is e-mail spam, the term is applied to similar abuses in other media: instant messaging spam, Web search engine spam, spam in blogs, wiki spam, online classified ads spam, mobile phone messaging spam, Internet forum spam, junk fax transmissions, social networking spam, social spam, television advertising and file sharing network spam. The aim of the SPAM is to get you the consumer to react to the information message and then be drawn into making a purchase, giving your personal information or even becoming involved in an attempt to defraud you of your money. How do I stop SMS spam? The cellular providers in Namibia do not have a regulatory body as yet. In South Africa commercial SMS messaging is regulated by the industry organisation WASPA (Wireless Application Service Providers’ Association). Membership of WASPA was made mandatory in 2005 by the mobile operators and TV stations for any company doing value added services in South Africa. They also provide a list of approved SMS providers and allow consumers to complain via their website or telephonically. The Namibian cellphone companies allow businesses to send SMS messages to users using the short service number (for example 727 or 5001). Businesses using this service can determine how much they wish to charge if a consumer uses this number to send in a reply. The cellphone companies charge the costs of a normal SMS, and a further 50 percent of the costs being charged to the consumer. When a company wishes to rent a short service number they are informed that they should get permission from the consumer to send to their number, but no official procedure seems to be in place to manage consumer complaints. As a consumer it is your responsibility to protect your cell phone number by being careful who gets your number. One of the biggest sources of SMS spam is number gathering carried out by Internet sites offering “free” ring tone downloads. In order to simplify the download, users must provide their phones’ numbers. This information is then used to send frequent advertising messages to the phone. It must be noted that companies can collect your number to send you messages you might want to receive, for example your account payment reminders or promotional offers. You should check whether they keep your information private and do not share it with other businesses. Another consumer scam While investigating this issue, the cellphone companies wished to remind consumers to be careful when answering missed calls or CallMe requests from a number you do not recognise. Some consumers have been fooled into phoning back and the party answering has transferred their call or some other trick to keep them 316

on the line. When the consumer gets their account, they find this was a premium number and they have been charged a lot of money for this call back.

History of credit in Namibia (2012-12-03 10:51)
Credit is a word with various meanings. These include praise, recognition or acknowledgement and that is why the list of names at the end of a movie is called credits. It can also refer to reputation or character, but most often we use it to refer to a product or service that is provided now and paid for in the future. Most of us use credit to purchase a house, a car, clothes and sometimes even groceries. If we take on too much credit, we find it difficult to get out of the cycle of indebtedness. In Namibia, indebtedness has become one of our biggest problems and needs to be tackled sooner rather than later. In this week’s column, I investigate the history of credit in Namibia under German colonial rule and see if we can learn any lessons from the past. The credit system evolved in the early 1840s and started to destroy the economic structures of many Namibian communities. It is recorded in the history books that around this time Jonker Afrikaner incurred heavy debts with the trader Morris. It is speculated that Jonker’s raids on the Ovambanderu in 1846 was a direct response from Morris on him to pay his debts. By the late 1890s, the German Administration had realised the extent of the problem and the administration decreed that “no person could be sued for credit”. Pressure from the business community forced the administration to suspend the regulation on 22 February 1899. Increases in trading activity also brought problems for Samuel Maharero. The traders expected his help in collecting their debts and held him personally responsible if debts were not paid. These rising debts led to the “sale” of land, and traders such as Gustav Voigts, Fritz Wecke, Ludwig Conradt and John William Wallace of Okombahe were paid in this way. It is recorded that the missionaries Diehl and Viehe sharply attacked Samuel Maharero for “selling” the Okakango locale, north of Okahandja, to settle his debts. This made it necessary for the District Chief of Okahandja, Zürn to relieve the pressure on Samuel Maharero by declaring that “while Samuel himself still has unpaid debts, he could not accept responsibility for the debts of others”. This increase in trading activities on credit (and the method of debt collection) drew attention to the more serious problem of the “land issue”, which conflicts with the notion of a “settler colony”. By 1903, a Credit Commission appointed by the German Government to study the problem of credit and look into how indigenous people should settle their debts to the traders completes its recommendations. Theodor Leutwein, (the “Kaiserlicher Landeshauptmann” or Governor) issued a proclamation in July 1903 that enacted the long awaited credit regulations. The credit regulations outlawed the sale of “tribal” (communal) land to curb abuses. Recognising that the regulations would restrict their ability to collect debts, the traders used even harsher methods to collect outstanding debts before the regulations came into law. In early 1904, just before the Ovaherero uprising, Gustav Sonnenberg held discussions with Chief David Kambazembi on the growing indebtedness of the Ovaherero. The uprising had several causes including the loss of control and ownership of traditional land, moneylending by traders, increasing debts, cases of rape, the sale of alcohol, and threats to Samuel Maharero’s life. In history we can see that the business and financial practices under colonial rule led to the people of the country becoming disqualified from the economic opportunities of their own country. Our modern struggle for Independence will only be complete when the business and financial practices become a qualifying force to enable Namibians to participate in the economic opportunities of the Land of the Brave’.

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What is the information you need when taking a bank loan? (2012-12-03 10:55)
Before you take a loan (or other financial product) you have the right to receive all the necessary information that will allow you to make an informed financial decision. If you are taking a loan, you should know the answers to the following questions before agreeing to the loan.

• What is the size of the loan amount you are borrowing? • What is the loan term? This is how long it is going to take to repay the loan. • What is the interest rate? This is the percentage of the total loan amount charged for using the loan amount. It is normally charged on a monthly basis. • What are the fees on this loan? These are normally once-off payments or administrative costs such as a loan processing fee. • Do I have to take out insurance with this loan? If you take out loan insurance it will pay back your loan if something bad happens to you. This will protect your family and guarantee the bank gets its money back. • How much is the loan payment? This is the amount of money you have to pay at regular intervals to repay the loan. • What is the repayment schedule? This is the frequency with which you need to pay. Normally a bank loan is repaid on a monthly basis. • Do I need collateral? This is a guarantee in the form of assets such as property that the lender can take if you fail to pay the loan. • What happens if I pay late? If you do not repay on or before the dates agreed, the bank may charge a penalty. It can be that penalties in the form of a fee or increased interest charges are added to your payment for each day you are late. • What are the consequences of default? If you should stop repaying the loan completely, the bank will take your collateral and will register you with the credit bureau. Remember, the relationship with your bank is a life time one. The longer the bank knows you, (and the more your bank gets to trust you because you keep your commitments), the easier it becomes to get preferred rates and charges that will provide you with even cheaper credit.

A Consumer Christmas Wish List (2012-12-14 14:36)
During the Xmas period it is considered part of the festive season to give and receive presents. I remember as a young boy writing a letter to Father Xmas and asking for the gifts(s) I hoped to find under the tree. Many times I was disappointed and had to do with small gift and more often than not, practical things like socks or other clothing articles were part of my “presents”. For this Xmas season I have made a wish list of things I would like to see for the Namibian consumer. Friendly Customer Service 318

Many employees in government and private business are not aware of the saying, (or simply ignore it), “The customer is king”. While it is understandable that the salaries are never enough and personal problems are worrying you, please make an effort to greet your customer and provide the most helpful service you can. Not only will you make me happier, but it will also lead to me doing more business with your company – which will lead to more profit and hopefully better salaries. More affordable banking choices Banks provide an important service. If you as a consumer wish to grow, you need the credit provided by the bank. My wish is that banks work at innovative ways to make the services more affordable. Buying “Made in Namibia” Buying products made in Namibia or preferring to use services provided by local companies’ means more profits for local owners who will create more jobs and these consumers in turn buy more in an ever increasing cycle of growth. Buying local is not only good for you; it’s good for all of us. Understandable Pricing The prices on products in the shops are often difficult to compare. The same product is packed in different sizes and makes comparison difficult. I would like to see the shops provide the price of all products broken down into the price per kilogram, litre or some other unit that will allow me to make comparisons between products of different sizes. Consumer Law The Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Ministry of Justice, Namibian Financial Institutions Supervisory Authority (Namfisa) and the Namibian Competition Commission have made presentations on consumer protection frameworks during the past few years. I wish for a comprehensive legal draft on consumer protection to be tabled in Parliament (soon). Affordable Housing for all The demand for housing is not being met by the National Housing Enterprise (NHE) or the assistance programmes created by local authorities. Preventing foreigners from buying properties in urban areas is not going to greatly influence the prices or provide more erven for first time buyers. I wish for better town planning which will purposefully create mixed economy housing. By this I mean having lower income housing areas close to (and between) high income housing. For example affordable housing areas on the east side of Windhoek close to Klein Windhoek, Avis and Ludwigsdorp. This will not bring down the cost of housing in these areas, but will certainly bring down the cost of transport and other costs for the workers who have to work in these areas if they live closer. Away with January Blues Of all my wishes, this is the one where you have to be good consumer to get your gift. No matter what the temptation is, do not spend more than you can afford. Save some money and remember that after Xmas there are many bargains to be had for cheaper when consumers are no longer “in the spirit of buying”. If you can spend according to your budget you will have money left in January. Lastly, I wish for all consumers to remember some good advice given to me by my grandfather, “Never buy food, clothes or petrol on credit. Never use now and pay later. You will not appreciate what you bought if it is old when you have to pay for it.”

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Competitions of luck not so lucky (2012-12-14 14:46)
(Consumer Column - Namibian Newspaper - 6 December 2012) I would love to win a car for Xmas, or even just a shopping hamper. It’s that time of the year when each of us hopes and desires are higher than normal. We not only want more money for ourselves, but also that we can buy things for people we care about. Companies understand this of course and are busy doing everything to tempt us to think only of today, not the January we all know is around the corner. As a consumer we understand that our relationship with business is one of mutual benefit. Nevertheless, we also expect our government to create laws that will not leave us powerless when we want compensation when things go wrong, or at least laws that will prevent outright abuse of us as the people of the country. As a consumer advocate, and someone who cannot see injustice without at least writing about it, I am worried when the government does not do its job. Before Independence there were laws governing lotteries, raffle tickets and other games of luck. When it was decided that Namibia would legalise gambling this law had to be revised and updated. Unfortunately, the lawmakers concentrated on casinos and gambling houses and forgot about other games of skill. This has left a loophole which is being abused. To give an example: You and I can come together and decide to hold a raffle with a car as the prize. We will print tickets and even get a car to be shown at one of the car dealers. Our aim will be to sell tickets to raise N $ 400 000 and the car will be valued at N $ 200 000. Till thus far it sounds like something each of us have participated in the hope of winning. However, once we have collected the money I will ensure you (as my partner) will win the car. I will keep the money we collect and you win the car. This is a really good business idea for you and me, but what about the other people who all bought a ticket? I am sure they would not buy a ticket if they knew they would not win. Or what about selling scratch cards that promise you cash if you get a certain number of pictures that match? Would you buy a scratch card if you knew that not a single card that was printed actually has a winning combination? Or how about a competition that you enter by sending an SMS where the promoters promises that the first person to send an SMS is going to win? Surely they would not continue charging people who send in an SMS after the prize has been won? You as a consumer would think that you are protected against this kind of business venture, right? Wrong. I had the opportunity to discuss the new gambling bill that is being discussed around the country and found out that the present law does not cover this kind of business activity. If you participate in these games of luck (and sometimes the business even suggests it is a game of skill), you have no place to complain. The promoters might be acting unethically, but they are not acting illegally. The Ministry of Environment and Tourism is in the process of speaking to stakeholders and they need complete this as soon as possible and get this legislation to parliament to make sure that we as the citizens are protected. So next time you give your hard earned money in the hope you win something, think carefully about whether you actually know you stand a chance of winning in a fair manner.

Consumer Rights are Human Rights (2012-12-14 15:05)
The past week we celebrated the “Old Location Uprising” which coincides with Human Rights on 10 December. On Monday evening there was a discussion on NBC television that was discussing the topic and specifically what was referred to as second and third generation rights. It is important for people to understand these rights and the institutions that are responsible for protection their rights. Human rights are traditionally divided into two main groups, namely – 320

" civil and political rights, and " economic, social and cultural (ESC) rights (also referred to as second and third generation rights). In Namibia, since Independence, most people can freely exercise and enjoy the fundamental rights and freedoms recognised and protected in the Bill of Rights entrenched in the Constitution of the Republic of Namibia (Chapter3), most of which are civil and political rights. But how many people enjoy or even are aware of their Economic, Social and Consumer rights? ESC rights play an important role in people’s standard of living and should play a greater role in improving people’s opportunities in life. A literal interpretation of the Constitution would thus let us understand that some, but not all, consumer protection issues are considered rights. John Nakuta, in his paper, “The justiciability of social, economic and cultural rights in Namibia and the role of the nongovernmental organisations”, argues that ESC rights can be enforced both directly under the Namibian Constitution through Article 144 of the Constitution, which reads as follows: Unless otherwise provided for by this Constitution or Act of Parliament, the general rules of public international law and international agreements binding upon Namibia under this Constitution shall form part of the law of Namibia. The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) was ratified by the Namibian Parliament and came into force on 28 February 1995. These internationally recognised rights are: " The right to work; " the right to fair conditions of employment; " the right to form and join trade unions; " the right to social security; " the right to protection of the family; " the right to an adequate standard of living, including the right to food, clothing, and housing; " the right to health; " the right to education; and " the right to culture. This means that civil and political rights as well as ESC rights have to be treated in an equal manner, on the same footing, and with the same emphasis. The Namibian government as a party to the Covenant, is obliged to take steps to achieve the fulfilment of all the ESC rights recognised and protected under the Covenant. These steps include the adoption of legislation that allows for citizens to have these rights enforced. Office of the Ombudsman as Consumer protector One of the institutions created to protect the rights of people in Namibia is the Office of the Ombudsman. According to Wikipedia, an ombudsman is a person who acts as a trusted intermediary between either the state or an organization, and some internal or external constituency, while representing not only but mostly the broad scope of constituent interests. It comes from the Old Norse word umboðsmaðr, essentially meaning ”representative”. In modern language the ombudsman is an official appointed by the government or parliament with a significant degree of independence, who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints reported by individuals. In the case of Namibia, the Ombudsman is appointed by the President on the recommendation of the Judicial Service Commission and the function of the Ombudsman is defined under Chapter of the Constitution. In brief, the Ombudsman has the duty to investigate complaints against government institutions or employees; the protection of our living resources and violations of fundamental rights and freedoms. Of particular interest for the Namibian consumer is Article 91 (d) that states: “The Ombudsman functions shall include the following& the duty to investigate complaints concerning practices and actions by persons, enterprises and other private institutions where such complaints allege that violations of fundamental rights and freedoms under this Constitution have taken place.” 321

Already the Office of the Ombudsman investigates a variety of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights. These have included issues around unfair dismissal, remunerations and salaries, and pension funds. These are all issues of a socio-economic nature, indicating the important role the Ombudsman plays in protecting and enforcing socio-economic rights in Namibia. Any person in Namibia has the right to complain to the Office of the Ombudsman, including a problem in respects of consumer protection. I would like to encourage any consumer that has an issue of consumer protection to apply for them to investigate the issue. My hope is that with the support of the Ombudsman we will be able to speed the process of enacting a law on Consumer Protection.

Future Dreams (Submission to the Commonwealth Writers Short Story Prize 2012)
(2012-12-29 23:36)

“Love does not understand the concept of time.” said Simon as he took the drink I offered to him. The sun was gliding behind the mountains to the west while we looked northwards over the golf course. I had purchased a piece of land on a golf estate some thirty kilometres south of Windhoek, the capital of Namibia. After many years of saving I had just finished building the house of my dreams. This was the first time I had the time to have a drink and appreciate the sacrifices I had made in my life to get here. Tomorrow, my wife and daughter would move in, today was for me. Simon was an old friend of mine, and he often spent time telling me stories about the lives of the people around us. He is one of those people who often spends his time alone, but as he insists, he is never lonely. Perhaps, because he was often alone, his conversation normally started with a startling thought or quotation before telling his story. “Do you know the one bullet theory?” he enquired from me. Then continued without giving me time to respond, “The theory holds that you can fall in love and make love many times but there is only one bullet with your name on it. And if you are lucky enough to be shot with that bullet then the wound never heals.” We sat quietly thinking on these weighty words. I am sure Simon, like me, was remembering something from the past to fit into this theory. “I recently bumped into Martin where he was having a coffee with Catherine. I was quite surprised to see them together as I did not know they were still friends after all these years. You remember their story don’t you?” I have learnt long ago to let Simon tell his story in his own time which often meant listening rather than participating. So I just inclined my head lightly and frowned. This seemed to satisfy him that I was listening. “Martin was born in Windhoek but spent most of his time growing up with his grandparents in Johannesburg after his mother passed away. He would often come to visit his father in Windhoek, and one could see he was taking part in the local games of the children, but he was always separate. Catherine was born in Cape Town and she had moved to Windhoek and she was staying with her Aunt after her father passed away. It is peculiar how they both lost parents at a young age and maybe that’s why their souls found an echo in each. Anyway, the first time I saw them they must have been about six or seven and it was a wedding. In those days you invited everyone in your neighbourhood to the reception. Those were the days,” he sighed He fumbled with relighting his pipe and I could see he was reliving the days of his youth. Everything always seemed to have been better in those days’. Once his pipe was lit to his satisfaction he continued, “She was the little bridesmaid. Beautifully dressed in white and looking adorable. You know she is the most beautiful woman I have ever seen, and even back then she stood out from all the other children even though she was always surrounded by friends. Martin was there too, but he was the exact opposite. He looked uncomfortable in his suit and had drifted off to the bottom of the garden where he was staring out into space.” 322

“I had just started smoking and had sneaked off to the bottom of the garden myself and could see him, but was sure he could not see me. As I was lighting my cigarette, I saw Catherine approaching down the steps to where he was sitting.” “What are you doing here alone?” she asked him. “I was wishing a special wish,” he replied “And what was that?” “I was wishing the beautiful girl dressed in white would be my friend.” Obviously growing up in Johannesburg had rubbed off on him already and he was too sure of himself. “I watched them talking and could see the interest they had in each other but they were far too young and innocent to recognise Cupids arrow. Then someone called for us all to come together for a photograph and Catherine ran quickly back to where the bride and her entourage were waiting. I also made haste to re-join the group, but something made me look back to Martin. I saw him standing there looking towards the sunset and distinctly heard him say One Day I will marry her’. I thought it rather cute at the time but never had occasion to think of it again till some years later.” As a natural story-teller, you could easily pick up the non-verbal cues from Simon’s story. Not only the soft way he finished that last sentence, but also the rather significant look he gave our empty glasses was enough for me to go for a refill. As he took the glass from my hand he continued, “I had quite forgotten about Martin until I saw him some ten years later. I was teaching at the high school when he returned to Windhoek. It was quite a scandal as he had come in the middle of the school year and all the students were soon aware that he had been in jail as a juvenile. Something about a bank card robbery if I remember it right.” “There was nothing wrong with his intellect and as a teacher I had my work cut out for me. If Martin felt something was not clear to him, he would not think twice to stand up in class and ask me to repeat until he understood. Back then we still had caning as a punishment and he had his fair share. It was funny though, he often had a caning for being disruptive, but never for bad marks or breaking school rules.” By this time the sun had set and the coals were just right for the springbok chops I had been marinating since yesterday. In the meantime, Simon started with the potjiekos in a black cast iron pot which allowed us to simmer the bosvark rugstring (the spine of a bushpig). It was turning into a typical summer evening in Africa. The heat was gone, the whiskey was good, the meat was plentiful and the story was mellow. I refilled our glasses and we settled down around the fire. “It was heart-wrenching to watch Martin that year. He was shunned by almost all his classmates and most parents warned their children not to make friends with him. I used to see him walk around the neighbourhood all alone, but he always had a smile on his face as if he understood some joke we all had missed. The only time I saw him serious was when he was watching the other students and Catherine was amongst them. The first time I saw him standing on the edge of the rugby field I wondered about the look on his face till I saw he only had eyes for Catherine. That’s when I remembered the wedding of years gone by and his conviction on his face when he had said those words, One Day I will marry he”’. It was that same look he had on his face on the playground.” “The One Bullet,” I interrupted him. “That’s what you meant by the One Bullet Theory.” “Exactly,” Simon replied and went on with his story. “It was hard to watch him pine away on the edge of the crowd knowing he did not stand a chance. She was the most beautiful girl at the school, her foster parents were on the school board and he was a jailbird. It reminded me a bit of Romeo and Juliet and all those other doomed love stories.” Knowing Simon so well I knew the next part of the story would involve him as part of the outcome. Or perhaps it was just the whiskey that emboldened me. “So what did you do Simon?” I asked. “Well, you seem to know me too well by now. I had also had a doomed relationship in my younger days and thought it would be balancing the scales if I took a hand to assist him. It’s funny now that I think back about it – I was not the only teacher that seemed to wish to make the match happen. You see Martin and Catherine were in different classes but the same grade. It was their last year of school and it seemed 323

whenever a teacher sent a student from either of their classes to give a message to the teacher who was given class to the other, the two of them were always chosen as the messenger. At first it was hardly noticeable, but after a while it became obvious to me as the rest of the students in the class had come to notice it and tease the both of them about the other.” Simon took another long pull of his whiskey before continuing. “It’s funny. I have seen many students teased by their classmates but Martin’s reaction was very different. The more they teased him, the more he seemed to take it as a challenge. Rather than becoming embarrassed like most other teenagers, he seemed to take it as a badge of honour. Or maybe it was just the fact the other students were treating him as one of them.” He eyed the lamb chops that were almost done. “To cut a long story short, within one year of Martin being enrolled at the school he asked Catherine to be his girlfriend. You must imagine the surprise of the teachers and the students when she agreed. Till they became a couple, no girl was interested in Martin at all. He went from zero to hero and he deserved it, no, I should rather say they deserved each other. Together they started a school newspaper, brought together a drama group and won all the national competitions that year. At their Matric farewell I had a feeling déjà vu – I had seen them looking the same at that wedding of many years before – she in a white dress and him in a blue suit.” “Like all love stories it was doomed from the start. I had no small blame for the break-up,” he said and finished his drink. “Let us eat before those lamb chops become too dry.” This was the cue to sit down for dinner. We took our plates and piled it high with lamb chops, bush pig stew and “Baster poeding” – our local version of potato salad. After grace we ate our food in companionable silence. One thing you can say for us Namibians, we enjoy our food and do not waste time talking when there is something important to do. After dinner, I made us a cup of coffee and made myself ready to hear the rest of the story. Simon, like most Namibians believed a story must take time to its conclusion and would never finish it before dinner. After all, a good story is made much better after one has a full stomach. “Martin came to see me early the next year after the examinations results had been posted. He was greatly troubled as he had passed with flying colours and the Catherine had not made the grade. He wished to study further and had received a bursary while she would have to get a job as her foster parents had disowned her and she was on her own. He had come to me for advice and that was probably the wrong thing to do.” Simon got quiet for a while and then started filling his pipe. I knew the silence was him pretending to relive the moment again while the pipe filling was part of his excuse to get me involved in his story. “So what was troubling him?” I obliged. “He wished to become part of the student uprising that was agitating for Independence and he knew what the sacrifice might demand from him. For him it was straight forward, either he would stay involved with Catherine or participate in the struggle. He could not have both and nothing I said could change his mind.” At this point I had to interrupt. “What year was this? I vaguely remember the students boycotting classes and making things difficult for the South African apartheid regime. Was Martin not one of the leaders that were arrested?” “That’s right. It was 1988 and the internal struggle for Independence was reaching its zenith. The students were becoming more political aware and Martin and his friends were organising the students into specific actions to make the occupying regime take notice. They were boycotting classes and toi toiying (dancing in the streets as a sign of rebellion). But we are getting ahead of the story.” I sat back and allowed Simon to continue. “Where was I? Yes, Martin made his decision. He did not want to get old and blame Catherine for not being able to do what he though was his duty. His love for his country and the people was more important than his love for her. I don’t know how he broke up with her but it was hard on both of them.” He suddenly changed the topic, “Why don’t you bring that bottle of whiskey closer? I think I can do with a stronger coffee.” I fetched the bottle and put it down between us. Simon poured himself a shot of whiskey in his coffee and 324

offered me the bottle. I politely declined and waited for him to continue. “I had encouraged him in his studies of Marx and African liberationists and understood his need to participate. I should have tried harder to convince him to think of himself. The sad part was that within two years the situation had changed so drastically and the South African regime left Namibia to get Independence in 1990. Martin had done what he thought was necessary and was rewarded by being the student chosen to raise the new flag the morning of Independence, but at what personal cost?” “The choices we make can only be understood in hindsight. That’s how life is,” I answered even though I knew it was rhetorical question. It seemed Simon had not heard me as he continued, “I followed his career and read he got married a few years later and became the Namibian trade representative to Paris, France. Unfortunately he got divorced later and I had not seen or heard from him in over ten years. Apparently he had given up the capitalist life and became a recluse writer and general beach bum. Catherine meanwhile had fallen pregnant shortly after they break up and married the father. Her marriage was short lived, but her career really took off. She studied nights and became a lawyer.” I could hear the note of melancholy creeping into his voice. I wondered how many times he had thought of this story and wished he could have done things differently. Simon finished his coffee and slowly stood up to get a refill. He slowly sat down and as quiet for a long time. I did not like to see Simon like this and tried to get him out of his musing. “So you saw Catherine and Martin having coffee together?” “Yes,” he replied. “They had bumped into each other and decided to catch up on each other’s lives. I could see they were still uncomfortable being with each and left very quickly. Perhaps I also felt a little guilty at the decision Martin had made.” He chuckled rather cynically and shook his head as if to clear his head. I remembered his opening remarks and inquired, “What did you mean when you said Love does not understand the concept of time’ when you started the story?” Simon slowly topped his cup of coffee with a shot of whiskey before wistfully answering me, ”I looked back at them as left and I could see they were talking in the present about their past, but their souls were already sharing their future dreams.”

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Chapter 5

2013
5.1 January

Blowing my own horn (and Namibia’s) in Jan 2013 (2013-01-08 12:40)
[1]Neuss: Silvester-Lunch bei Neussern in Namibia

[2]
1. http://www.ngz-online.de/neuss/nachrichten/silvester-lunch-bei-neussern-in-namibia-1.3120880 2. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZBAQhH0_Qs8/UPEckLeM44I/AAAAAAAAAUI/t3ePcavLbHU/s1600/neuss+artcile.jpg

Transport plans long overdue for Namibia (2013-01-13 20:05)
It was recently reported in the newspaper that the City of Windhoek is modernising the urban transport plan. This is long overdue and I hope that it will be done as speedily as possible, and in consultation with consumers. In this article I wish to look at the broader concept of transport in the country, and propose 327

certain areas which local authorities, and transport institutions should look at when developing their plans to the benefit of consumers. Taxis Namibia has a predominantly public taxi system compared to a private (radio taxi) system. This means that in most towns a consumer can take a taxi with other customers and be dropped at any destination they request. The biggest problem in local taxis seems to be the lack of indications potential customers can give to indicate where they wish to go. A customer can stand anywhere and hope to get a taxi to take any point they wish. In fact, I often see customers standing on the wrong side of the road to the direction they wish to go in. This causes unnecessary problems with multiple stopping taxis and irate other road users. I would like to suggest the Namibia Bus and Taxi Association come up with a “finger guide” within towns to indicate where they wish to be dropped off. For example in Windhoek, a thumb raised means City Centre, a hand on the head would mean UNAM and a raised fist could mean Avis. In addition, I would like to suggest we as customers also take responsibility of where we wish to be picked up and dropped off. If we do not think carefully about the road hazard we create, the local authorities and law enforcement will be forced to write a fine for customers we indicate they wish to picked up or dropped at dangerous places On a personal point of notice: I notice that the residents of Park Foods in Khomasdal do not have a taxi rank within their area. A taxi rank is stationed at the entrance to the area (situated in front of a property owned by the Khomas Regional Council), but no further stops within their area. This should be expanded by NABTA. In terms of long haul taxis, NABTA must become a consumer oriented service organisation. The executive must be aware of the unruly behaviour exhibited by some taxi owners at their loading areas, as well as their “bag of tricks” used on unsuspecting customers. Public Bus Transport I would like to see a public transport bus company in Namibia that covers all the major towns and tourist destinations. There must be a middle ground between the public transport taxis and the scheduled shuttles that will provide affordable, safe transport for locals and tourists alike. (While I am dreaming, I would like to see a inner city train service in Windhoek. Imagine getting onto a train at UNAM, getting off at Bahnhof for a coffee or dentists appointment and then continuing on to a friend’s house in Avis?) But back to bus services. The city of Windhoek is becoming a busy place and many of the cars on the road are carrying only one or two people. The public bus service exists but has not updated from an Apartheid service which provides low cost transport to domestic workers and labourers travelling from the low cost townships to the CBD and high cost suburbs in the mornings and back again in the evenings. It needs to be modernised to provide affordable and reliable transport between all areas of the city. Most modern city authorities provide this through published time tables and even goes so far as to create dedicated bus lanes. Why not Windhoek? Once again on a personal note, I wonder why there is no bus service through Khomasdal. The bus stops are clearly marked on the streets throughout the township, but I have yet to see a municipal bus stop at any one of these bus stops. Wishful thinking 328

Lastly, I would also like to see a proposal for public train and air transport service that delivers commuters cheaply and safely between towns. Or will this only happen in 2030?

E-Governance needs to be prioritised (2013-01-13 20:08)
What is e-commerce? Electronic commerce, commonly known as e-commerce, is the buying and selling of product or service over electronic systems such as the Internet and other computer networks. Electronic commerce draws on such technologies as electronic funds transfer, supply chain management, Internet marketing, online transaction processing, electronic data interchange (EDI), inventory management systems, and automated data collection systems. For the consumer, e-commerce manes greater access to products, the ability to compare prices between products and services and save money on the cost of physically visiting the place of business. The topic of e-commerce and its impact on countries such as Namibia have been researched since the late 1990s and found that the greatest impact on whether a country (and its entrepreneurs and consumers) will benefit is largely dependent on the attitude of government and its legislature. In short the following are identified as the government policies which have a detrimental effect on the creation of e-commerce Namibia. They include: " The insistence of government to hold onto and protect the state owned telephone network and in actual fact not allowing competition as all three cellular providers are actually owned by one government owned Mother Company (Namibia Post and Telecom Holdings). This results in inferior and high communications costs making e-commerce activities unnecessarily costly and uncompetitive. " The lack of government strategy or support to develop world class enterprises. A poor business, even if connected to the web and e-commerce enabled, will not succeed in a competitive world. Companies in Namibia are generally ignorant of international opportunities, the needs of those markets and how to service them properly. To a large extent the Investment Centre and other government institutions focus on FDI (foreign direct investment) and not in assisting local enterprises expand to international markets. " The governments should be doing more to help enterprises identify international opportunities and take advantage of them. " Government insistence in maintaining ownership and management of logistics networks such as ports and airports resulting in inefficient, costly and unreliable services, which are incompatible with an e-commerce environment. " Bureaucratic export and import procedures result in lengthy customs clearance times which nullify the benefits of speed in transactions offered by e-commerce. This affects service levels and increases the cost of business operations. " Restrictions on imports and exports such as permits and licences, and the time taken to obtain these permits, place barriers in the way of fast efficient e-commerce activities. " Namibia has exchange controls that provide a barrier for transacting in a foreign currency on the Internet. " Lack of an e-commerce friendly legal framework to provide recourse for companies. Current laws do not accommodate electronic contracts and signatures. Our country does not have legislation that deals with e-commerce concerns including enforceability of the validity of electronic contracts, digital signatures. " Lack of progress in setting government institutions to accept declarations electronically. This forces e-commerce enabled companies to produce paper and undermines the concept of paperless trading. 329

To have e-commerce, a country needs rich computer infrastructure, a functioning telecommunications network, and cheap access to the Internet. Its citizens need to be reasonably computer literate, possess both a consumerist mentality and a modicum of trust between the players in the economy - and hold credit cards. E-Government is needed as well For the consumer, e-commerce should also extend to government services as well. This is known as egovernment and the Office of the Prime Minister has been responsible for establishing this as an integrated ministerial function at all levels, especially to our rural citizens. The type of services should include: · Receiving notifications of the readiness of documents such as birth certificates, passports etc. through SMS or email · Payment allowed through electronic financial transactions (EFT) – including payments in regional and local level such as school fees, water and electricity accounts If Namibia is to achieve goals such as Vision 2030, we must ensure consumers are part of this project and are the beneficiaries of political, economic, social and technological advances in the modern world.

Confusing pricing and its remedy (2013-01-13 20:10)
Recently I received letters from to consumer regarding their experiences with pricing of items. “I wished to buy some material and was looking at various options in the Chinese shops in the area. I noticed a sign for material that was normally marked for N $ 29.00 was on special at N 19.00. As the pattern as agreeable to me, I proceeded to buy around 10 metres. When I came to the till, the shopkeeper rang up the purchase at the price of N $ 29.00 rather than the advertised discount price. I immediately brought his attention to this fact and insisted he ring up the total at the advertised lower price. I was shocked when the shopkeeper started shouting at me, and even physically assaulted me while chasing me from the shop. During the scuffle, I received a push and landed quite hard on the sidewalk. I reported the incident to the Police but they were only interested in the physical assault and could do nothing about the pricing difference between what was advertised and what was being charged. I am a pensioner and would like to know, as a consumer, what rights do I have regarding this issue?” “While doing some shopping at one of the larger wholesalers in Windhoek I noticed a certain brand of mussels was showing a very good price on the labelling attached to the shelf. I double checked that the bar code of the product and the price label were the same and proceeded to take 6 cans of the mussels. I had lots of other shopping to do and filled the trolley by the time I had to pay. By chance I happened to look at the register while the shop assistant was scanning the cans of mussels and realised the price was almost double than that indicated on the shelf. I immediately objected and insisted she call a supervisor when she told me that it was a computer problem and she was not responsible. The supervisor was very helpful and went with me to examine the pricing on the shelf. When the pricing on the shelf was checked against the cans she realised that it was “an old price” still being displayed. Nevertheless, she assisted in checking through the mussels at the advertised price and had the price corrected on the price thereafter. How many times do this kind of thing happen because how can we remember the price on each product when we make our choices?” In the case of the consumer who is a pensioner, very little can be done about the difference between product pricing and what is being charged at the counter – at present. The proposed Consumer Protection Act would address what is in effect misleading advertising, but more importantly, the law will prescribe certain deterrents such as fines and even possibly imprisonment of sellers intentionally misleading the public. My 330

advice is to pursue the criminal charge of assault as too many of our business owners treat their customers without respect. In regards to the consumer purchasing mussels; they have found a business that really believes in a healthy consumer relationship. The business you mentioned has not only got a policy of refunding you if the product is overcharged, but they also have a very responsive customer helpline which you can contact – even while you are in the store and having a problem. That is the kind of business e should all support by spending our money there. After all, as a consumer the true power you have is in the colour of your money. Buy where you receive good service and deny your money to shopkeepers who treat you badly. I would like to take this opportunity to wish all the staff and readers of the Namibian for the opportunity given to me to write my small contribution to making this country a better, happier place for us all. May you and your loved ones have a blessed Christmas, and may we continue in 2013 in improving our personal lives with better consumer protection awareness.

A New Year’s Resolution for 2013 (2013-01-13 20:16)
At the start of every calendar year, we take the opportunity to look at the past year and decide which things we wish to change. We then call these promises we make to ourselves “resolutions” because we promise to stop doing a negative habit in the future. For 2013, I want you to not only think of your bad habits you want to change, but also add a new “good habit”. For the year ahead, promise yourself to “Mind Your Own Business”. On the one side, this advice means that you should not poke your nose into the affairs of others or to put it better, “If it is not your business, do not make it your burden”. The second meaning is for you to look after your money affairs wisely – as if YOU are your own business. It is this second meaning that I wish you to take to heart this year. Many of us are very hard working and conscientious towards our employee and make doubly sure that we look after the “boss’s money”. It is this same attitude we need to have towards our own money. Start with a simple exercise. Make up a table of four columns with the headings Month, Income, Spending and Saved. Now write down how much you earned every month of 2012, with the amounts you earned, spent and saved. If you are anything like me, you probably have very little in the last column. That is why we need to change our habits for the year ahead. We want to put some away for our holidays at the end of the year, and more importantly so we can have a January 2014 with some money in our pockets. If you have good financial discipline, you should be able to save around 10 % of your monthly salary and in this way be able to save the equivalent of at least a month’s salary by the end of the year. In other words you will be able to give yourself a thirteenth cheque. If you struggle to save and not touch the money that is left in your account, consider opening a unit trust account through a financial advisor. The benefits are that the money can be directly debited off your account every month, you can increase the amounts quite easily and it takes around 2 working days to get your money after you inform the institution you wish to sell your unit trusts. Keep in mind, though you are able to get this investment amount out easily, it is suggested you use unit trusts as a medium- to long-term investment strategy for the best results. With a small start (and less risk of failure because of small steps at a time), you can soon be seeing an improvement in your bank balance and in your mental health because of less worries. 331

Mind Your Business Online As the New Year started, the newspapers have been reporting an increase in cyber-crime. As we become more involved with online and mobile banking remember the following advice to ensure your personal business is protected: · Never reply to emails with personal information. No matter how good the email looks, no bank or financial service provider will use email to check your details. · Never click a link in an email to go to your banking web site. · Use a unique (and different) password on every site. · Use 2-factor authentication whenever possible. For example a pin code device in addition to your site password. · Be careful what you write online. You never know when a possible job interview can turn out bad because of what you wrote on Facebook or elsewhere. · Password protect your devices such as your cellular phone and computer. I wish all the readers of the Namibian a prosperous, healthy and wealthy 2013. May we all work together in making our country more consumer friendly for the benefit of its residents and all its visitors.

Innovation needed for home ownership (2013-01-18 12:38)
The Namibian - 16 Jan 2013 Home ownership is a problem in Namibia. According to estimates by the Minister of Regional, Local Government, Housing and Rural Development, Honourable Jerry Ekandjo in 2011 “..there is a backlog of about 300,000 houses and that 70 per cent of the population cannot access decent residential properties mainly due to issues of availability and affordability. This alarming situation calls for radical policy measures to restore the housing market.”

[1] As a consumer activist it is not sufficient that I only state the obvious problems facing Namibians, but that I also apply myself to proposing solutions to these identified economic, social and cultural (ESC) rights. Thus I 332

would like to share two ideas, the first to help reduce the household rental burden and the second to increase home ownership. Lastly, I suggest a policy of purposefully creating mixed income neighbourhoods. Subsidised rental housing In earlier days most large employers provided subsidised rental in houses and flats owned by the company. During the past twenty years most of these companies have reviewed their ownership of property and sold off their properties as “this was not their core business”. In this way, some of them have “increased” profits by selling the properties (TransNamib is a typical example), but at the same time decreased the salary value of their employees. In addition, in those years most municipalities were also providers of rental housing. The social responsibility of companies and municipalities must be encouraged. The fact is that employees with less worries, make happier employees. The asset owned in the property by the company is also a positive income for their balance sheet. The Government can also encourage subsidised renting by companies if they provide a tax exemption to these companies. Rent to buy I propose we develop 5,000 homes for lower income earners proportionally throughout the country. The National Housing Enterprise (or another appropriate body) should build quality houses valued at N $ 200,000 each and make this available to civil servants and other employees who already qualify for home loans, but cannot afford the present sky-high prices. Under the rent-to-buy scheme the local municipality must supply serviced land at cost price and allow the future home owner to pay off the land price over a five year period. If the land loan is fixed at 5 % interest over five years for a service plot valued N $ 50,000, the home owner would pay N $ 950.00 per month to the Municipality. The repayment on the NHE built house would amount to N $ 1320.00 over 20 years with a fixed interest rate of 5 %. Thus the home owner would be paying a monthly amount of N $ 2,200.00 for the first five years, and only N $ 1,320.00 per month over the last fifteen years. In most cases, the home owners would reinvest this additional monthly saving they are used to paying to improve their properties. Home ownership would increase not only the wealth of our people, but would also increase their participation in their communities, saving the authorities amounts otherwise used for policing etc. in areas where people are not proud home owners. Mixed Income Neighbourhoods Mixed income neighbourhoods by definition include different types of housing units such as flats, town houses and single family homes for people with a range of income levels. In other words various price ranges and housing preferences within one development. The town planners or even government can put guidelines in place for the number of type of each housing unit within a development to encourage integration of differing income levels within a community. Such guidelines will go a long way to eliminate neighbourhoods of concentrated poverty and combat residential segregation. If nothing else helps, perhaps we will see the implementation of what one of my friends proposed on Facebook: “Write a petition and sue government for violating or neglecting its citizens the basic right to shelter as provided for in the constitution.” Follow me on twitter: @miltonlouw [2]Printed in The Namibian on 17 Jan 2013
1. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-EU7f0lE-o1E/UPkt9IKKD6I/AAAAAAAAAUw/c_gra_kxD20/s1600/shack1.jpg 2. http://www.namibian.com.na/index.php?id=28&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=106144&no_cache=1

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Micro lending or loan sharks? (2013-01-26 17:23)
First printed in The Namibian - 24 Jan 2013 Micro lending is a fast-growing sector and the Namibia Financial Institutions Supervisory Authority (Namfisa) has invited the public to comment on the industry. Micro-lending refers to loans under N $50 000 which must be repaid over a maximum period of 60 months to the micro-lender, usually in instalments. According to Namfisa, micro-lenders are often unkindly referred to as loan sharks’, but they consider it to be unfair to say the micro-lenders are always in the wrong when it comes to misunderstandings with their customers. They further point out that “while it’s true that micro-lenders’ interest rates are higher than bank rates, this is because they provide funds over a shorter period, and at greater risk of bad debts’ if their customers fail to pay.” The industry has grown rapidly and there are now almost 400 registered micro-lenders across the country supplying close to N $2 billion. Around half of this is supplied via pay-day lenders who provide loans with a repayment period of up to 30 days. To understand the business model, let us first look at why interest is charged. In the beginning of banking, interest was used to offset the risk of providing the credit to the borrower. There are four risks (hazards):

• The costs incurred by the bank while providing the loan had to be repaid; • Inflation means the lender will be able to buy less for the money as time passes; • Scarcity – in other words once it is lent to a borrower at a specific rate, it cannot be used for another loan; • That the borrower cannot pay back the loan (Of these four, the only real difference the government can make is in reducing the risk of borrower’s inability to repay.) The Ministry of Finance has determined that the annual finance charge rate may not be greater than 1.6 times the average prime rate in respect of a credit transaction. The prime rate is presently 9.25 percent and thus the highest a micro-lender should be allowed to charge would be 14.8 percent per year or 1.24 percent per month. From my limited research this week, I have determined that the rates of micro-lenders are 19.50 percent for loans longer than six months or 30 percent for short term loans that last up to 30 days. There is some proposed self-regulation occurring with regards to clients with “over-indebtedness” – however this would mean sharing clients’ data across all micro-lenders. This would include sharing data on good clients - and this the micro-lenders are wary of. One possible answer is a national credit register where all credits of each person are recorded and thus ensuring no “predatory” marketing and less over-lending occurs. This would mean within your data there would be a “big brother” indicating when you have reached your debt level as determined by the legislation. I think you can see how this could mean less self-governance and a certain loss of self-determination and responsibility. At the same time, the organisation or corporate body that has the rights to hold your information must be well managed and regulated. The suggestion of a national credit register was submitted to the Parliamentary Committee on Economics, Natural Resources and Public Administration in 2006 and has been part of discussions held with Namfisa in the creation of the Financial Institutions and Markets (FIM) Bill but I am not sure what is the status of such legislation since the Consumer Credit Chapter has been removed from the FIM Bill in March 2012. My question to you, the reader, is: Do you want government to do something about the possible exploitation and would you accept the consequences of having a company keep all credit data about you and your family? Follow me on twitter: @miltonlouw [1]Printed in The Namibian on 26 Jan 2013 334

1. http://www.namibian.com.na/news/full-story/archive/2013/january/article/micro-lending-or-loan-sharks/

How much does it cost? (2013-01-31 10:49)
First printed in Consumer News Namibia magazine - Jan 2013 edition As I spend most of my year living on a guest farm, I very rarely have to buy anything other than my sins of cigarettes and alcohol. I have for some time been complaining about the prices of these items, but accept this as a burden I must bear for using them. This past week however, I had to make purchases for the farm shop. Great was my concern when I could not work out the unit prices. By this I mean the items were not marked per litre or per kilogramme but only showed a price for the item whether it was packed in 200g, 375 litre or even more ridiculously, per 180g. Now how must I compare the prices between products if they are all packed in different sizes? I believe, consumers can gain major benefits when unit prices are provided and are easy to notice, read and use. If a shop owner can show this together with an item’s selling price, it will increase price transparency and competition. But without pressure from consumers – retailers and governments rarely do anything to provide, or improve, unit pricing. This is why more consumer organisations and consumers themselves should campaign for grocery retailers to provide best practice grocery unit pricing – price per standard unit of measure (per kg/litre/each, etc.) – for pre-packaged food and other grocery items. The main benefit for the Namibian consumer is that unit prices allow us the opportunity to have value comparisons, including those between package sizes, brands, product types, package types, packaged/unpackaged products, and between special offers’ and regular prices. (I always joke and refer to these as Omo and Surf issues – in other words we are used to buying a certain product regardless of price, but these days we all need to be more price conscious). The unit prices of the same product and of similar and substitute products are often big. So we as consumers can use unit prices to get much better value for money and this can result in a very big saving and substantially reduce our total expenditure on groceries. For most consumers, especially the poor, and underpaid, food and grocery products account for a high proportion of total expenditure. Therefore, the benefits resulting from using unit price information can be significant for these and many other consumers. Unit pricing also saves the shopper from spending time calculating unit prices themselves and helps them to spot hidden price increases when, as is common, the amount in the package is reduced but the selling price is not. Personally, I was surprised when buying chocolate for a special friend to notice how much smaller the packaging is from when I last bought. At first I thought I was just remembering wrong from twenty years ago, but on closer examination I found chocolate bars are not only more expensive, but they are packed in smaller amounts as well. Previously, in this column and on national television, I have complained about the lack of consumer laws and this must also be addressed as an important issue within this context. However, I also believe consumer organisations such as Namibia Consumer Trust, Consumer Lobby or the Facebook interest and lobby groups such as the Namibia Consumer Protection Group can play an important role in persuading supermarkets to provide unit prices voluntarily. After all, even the retailer must understand their own cost price in this explosion in the number of package sizes used by manufacturers. (This retailing revolution has also occurred, or is occurring, in many other countries, especially developing countries where consumer laws are less than adequate.) 335

If we look around the world we can see some success. In Europe, pressure from consumer groups resulted in the compulsory provision of unit prices, initially only in several Scandinavian countries, and then in each of the 27 member nations of the European Union. In 2009, the provision of grocery unit pricing became compulsory in Australia after a long and hard-fought consumer campaign. I wonder is this will work in Namibia? [1](Column in the Namibian newspaper, 31 January 2013)
1. http://www.namibian.com.na/index.php?id=28&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=106643&no_cache=1

5.2

February

The myth of Namibia (2013-02-19 01:24)
She wants to satisfy the needs of all her children. She has granted the custodianship to our political, religious and civic leaders - and they will have to answer her when she asks ”What have you done with the talents I entrusted to you?

5.3

March

Understanding B2B, B2C and G2B (2013-03-07 11:22)
First printed in Consumer News Namibia magazine - Jan 2013 edition

[1]In today’s modern world we have so many new things and often they have long names. To make our language easier we use abbreviations like LOL (laughing out loud), especially when we write or sms. As a consumer it is important to understand the types of relations between suppliers and buyers and thus the terms we use such as Business-to-Business and Business-to-Consumer because we need to understand the regulations in each of these markets and how we are protected – or not. In the diagram, it shows that the end user of a product or service can either be a consumer, a business or government. (C, B or G). In the same way, the supplier of a product can either be a consumer, a business or government. (C, B or G). 336

[2] Thus if the supplier is a business (B) and the purchaser is a consumer (C) we refer to this type of transaction as B2C. If a person (C) sells their car in a private sale to another consumer (C) it is a C2C transaction. Thus we have the following abbreviations o Government to Government (G2G) – For example, transactions that take place between central government and the decentralised functions at local and regional level, or purchasing of electricity by government departments from town councils. o Government to Business (G2B) – Services provided by Government to the private sector, for example the rental of industrial buildings by the Offshore Development Company. o Government to Consumer (G2C) – The provision of education or registering births and deaths is an example of services provided by Government. Some of these service are stipulated as a right and should be provided free of charge, while others are provided on a cost recovery basis. o Business to Business (B2B) – These include all services and products supplied to the businesses as part of their production process or for own usage. For example supply of copy machines or factories supplying goods to retailers. o Business to Consumer (B2C) – The consumer is the end user of a product or service, for example a retail store. o Business to Government (B2G) – These refer to transactions where government is the end user of a product or service. Most of these are done on a contract through a tendering process. o Consumer to Consumer (C2C) – These normally refer to transactions of sale between consumers and can also include legally enforced financial transactions such as child maintenance o Consumer to Business (C2B) – This normally refers to where consumers are paid a fee or commission for promoting a product or service on behalf of a company. o Consumer to Government (C2G) – These are transactions where fees are paid via online payments for services such as licence fees or taxes In Namibia we have been discussing the electronic transactions legal framework, but, as in the case of the consumer protection laws, nothing has yet been tabled in Parliament. As we become part of the global village, and the accompanying international trade environment, it is important that we get the legal framework in place to protect us as consumers. 337

1. http://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=7754137909221642247 2. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xagr6OOn6GA/UThdhgpVdBI/AAAAAAAAAVE/mhLjWzIEtGY/s1600/b2b+pic.jpg

Implementing ICT policy for the benefit of Namibian consumer (2013-03-07 11:31)
First printed in Consumer News Namibia magazine - Jan 2013 edition As the world is changing with new technologies, Namibians are also finding these impacting on their lives. Twenty years ago there were less than 75,000 telephones and today we have more cellular phones than people. Thus it has become important to understand ICT policy and how it should be providing benefits to our citizens. First, I wish to address our understanding of ICT and how we can integrate it into our governance systems and also our daily lives. I have struggled to find a term for this and the best I could find was “Progress through Technology”, or in German, “Vorsprung Durch Technik”. I prefer to use the German expression because in German the word “Technik” not only means technology, but also the technique of studying and mastering the skills of something. Thus my belief that Namibia needs to relook at their ICT Policy and include the mastering of ICT tools as part of their focus. These tools include the following: • Social media revolution of sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, etc. • Mobile telephony (not only smartphones but also older technologies such as USSD) • Touch screen and tablets (in getting information to their constituents). It is my opinion is that discrimination in the world in 2012 and beyond, is not based only on race, culture, gender, or geographical location, but more importantly in access to services and technology. Our country’s leaders must address this through ICT policies that are forward looking, and easily adaptable to changes in technology. Looking forward ICT and Human rights Africa can use the latest technology to the benefit of all its residents. The attitude to education which is presently geared to becoming an industrial country, must be changed to a system where knowing where the information is available is more important than having the information in your head. This means moving from our present agricultural society to a knowledge-base society within the next decade. Human rights are to be understood as something we are entitled to because we are a human being. With the advent of the Internet and more and more powerful ICT tools, some of the citizens of the world are being left behind. While the information on the Web might be available to anyone, availability of infrastructure to access the Internet in lacking in many developing countries. Two issues are thus defined in ICT policy, [1] • · access to the information, and • · being given the education to use ICT. 338

Thus, just as the provision of water or housing, access to information and communication technologies must be provided by the government to its residents – in the same manner they provide libraries in the communities. As for teaching ICT usage, in the Declaration of Human Rights, Article 26 it states: [2] (1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit. (2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace. In earlier times we referred to the three R’s being reading, writing and arithmetic. Today, using the computer as a e-reader, blog writer, movie uploader or collaborative social movement, has become just as important to learn at the primary education level. The Namibian ICT policies should strive to& “Develop the tools and systems to assist the management of our countries (government, civil society and private sector) in providing access to services and technologies to allow maximum quality of life to all who live here.”
1. http://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=7754137909221642247 2. http://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=7754137909221642247

New Year’s Resolutions to help Namibian Consumers (2013-03-07 12:04)
First printed in Consumer News Namibia magazine - Jan 2013 edition At the beginning of every year it is common practice to make New Year’s resolutions. This is a commitment you make to one or more personal goals or objectives, or changing of a bad habit. When a person makes a New Year’s resolution they generally plan to do so for the whole of the year. It is generally accepted that these resolutions will make your life better if you follow them. Consumer News Magazine offers the following ten resolutions to help you avoid becoming the victim of scams, prevent identity theft and save money in 2013. 1. 1. Do your research. When making large purchases such as furniture, a car or a house, do some investigation on what various retailers and banks have to offer. It is also a good idea to get quotations from various businesses to be able to compare prices. When buying on credit you should shop around for the cheapest interest rate and beware of hidden costs such as insurance on furniture that you might already have covered under another policy. 2. Keep your computer and mobile phone safe. Many Namibians are now using online banking as well as the mobile banking offers and should thus take extra care of these items. It is also important to keep your pin codes and account details in a safe place and not together with your phone or computer. 3. Protect your identity. Tear up documents that might contain sensitive financial information and store all your personal documents such as Identity Document, Passport, Drivers Licence, etc. in a safe place. In addition, check your bank account regularly for payments you might not be aware of. 339

4. Get everything in writing. Make sure that when you get a service from a company they put their offer in writing. This will prevent misunderstandings, and protect you if something should go wrong in the transaction. 5. Don’t share everything on Facebook or Twitter (or other social media). A future employer or possible soul mate can see information you might prefer hidden. Do not post compromising photos, and check that others cannot tag you in photos either. Keep in mind too that the thieves can also use information about when you are on holiday to pay your house an unwelcome visit. 6. Never send money to someone you do not know. Many scams want you to send them money before you receive your prize or whatever they are offering and one sent, you will not be able to get it back very easily. 7. Beware of job offers that will let you make “easy money”. Unemployment in Namibia is high and crooks are now targeting the unemployed with job offers, work-at-home schemes or other business opportunities that promises big money for very little work and no experience required. If it is too good to be true, it probably is. 8. Use a savings account. When you leave money in your savings account, you get interest on this amount. This is not always the case with cheque and credit card accounts. 9. Budget, budget, budget. Every month you should prepare a budget to show your income, expected expenses and your savings. You must make an effort to follow this budget and you will be surprised how much you save when having a clear understanding of where your money is going. 10. Nothing is free (except Consumer News Magazine). Beware of cash back or other free offers that encourage you to buy. There is always a price to pay, and you normally find out only later. If you can stick to your resolutions you will be a much happier, wealthier consumer in 2013.

Housing in Namibia (2013-03-07 12:06)
First printed in Consumer News Namibia magazine - Jan 2013 edition All Namibians have the right to an adequate standard of living, including the right to food, clothing, and housing. It is the responsibility of the politicians to ensure the legal and policy framework is in place, while it is the duty of the civil servants and employees of State-Owned Enterprises (SOE) to implement these in practical terms. Unfortunately, this has not materialised in the form of housing for all. According to estimates, the Namibian housing shortage stands at over 300 000 units. Almost 280 000 of these houses are needed for the households earning N $ 5,000 a month or less. In 2011, the Minister of Regional, Local Government, Housing and Rural Development, Honourable Jerry Ekandjo stated at the 13th Annual Symposium of the Bank of Namibia, “I would like to emphasise that the limited access to housing in Namibia is of great concern to us all. It is worrying that there is a backlog of about 300,000 houses and that 70 per cent of the population cannot access decent residential properties mainly due to issues of availability and affordability. This alarming situation calls for radical policy measures to restore the housing market.” Existing Government Programmes National Housing Enterprise (NHE) The government created the NHE in 1993 with the objective of “.. financing of housing for inhabitants of Namibia and generally providing for the housing needs of such inhabitants”. In Vision 2030 it is expected that NHE should deliver 7 937 units though no deadline is given. This compares to figures supplied in the Institute of Public Policy Research (IPPR) housing report of 2011 that NHE has only been able to build an average of 253 houses per year since 2003. 340

Build Together The Build Together Programme involves: · low-income households with incomes that do not exceed N $1250.00 per month · low-income households in squatter areas · low-middle income households without credit access The programme was established to cover both rural and urban areas with a target of reaching an average of 1300 families per year. Targeted Intervention Programme for Employment and Economic Growth (Tipeeg) In addition to NHE and Build Together Programme, the government through Tipeeg, had as its aim to build 1 507 low-cost houses per year from 2011 until 2014. There are no results on how many of these units have been built to date. The aim of delivering housing to all Namibians is not being met and we need to hold the management of the National Housing Enterprise (NHE) and Build Together Programme accountable. New Developments Not all is gloom and doom though. In September 2012, NHE announced it will establish two new components, one to service land and the second to build the houses rather than issuing tenders to companies to build the houses. Further to this development, NHE and financial institution FNB Namibia, signed a partnership agreement in November 2012 to provide affordable homes and financing to support low-income earners to acquire housing. They will also assist customers in leveraging these assets to create wealth for themselves – or putting it plainly, using their homes for collateral to acquire credit. As consumers we have to continue to fight for the recognition of our rights and get the knowledge about where we can access these rights. At Independence, the political and social rights were guaranteed through the Constitution. The fight for recognition of our economic, social and cultural (ESC) rights must continue until each and every Namibian has an adequate standard of living – including the assistance to own their own house.

The downside of Credit (2013-03-07 12:15)
First printed in Consumer News Namibia magazine - Feb 2013 edition ”Credit buying is much like being drunk. The buzz happens immediately and gives you a lift.... The hangover comes the day after.” Joyce Brothers Many consumers struggle to repay their debts. I have heard percentages as high as 70 % of income is being used to repay debts. Many young people are ending up financing their lifestyle (which they cannot afford) through credit. Many consumers need help with restructuring their debts. The Namibian Financial Supervisory Authority (NAMFISA) is proposing a Financial Institutions Bill that will provide for debt counselling as part of the assistance to consumers. Before discussing the new debt counselling I would like to add that there are other factors at work besides the servicing of debt; they include income volatility, legalised gambling, bigger medical bills and a cultural shift that has de-stigmatised bankruptcy and bad debts. So what is the difference between the present administration order and the new debt counselling? 341

The idea behind Debt Counselling is to help clients reduce their overall debt with creditors in the most cost effective way. An Administration order can take a large part of your disposable income to offset the relatively high cost. Debt Counsellors are proposed by the Financial Institutions Bill in order to specifically deal with people in trouble with their finances. These debt counsellors will have the support of and have to be approved by the Government. An administration order is presently used with the view to resolve an individual’s over indebtedness. However this method can be very costly and with various limitations. Unlike under an administration order, 95 % of your monthly payment will go to your creditors under a debt counselling plan. A debt counselling plan will manage all your payments to creditors from a central distribution agency on a monthly basis on your behalf. Under administration, distribution by Lawyers is only done once every three months after all their costs have been deducted (In some cases it can take longer than a year before your creditors’ receive any form of payment). Remember, that once a debt counsellor has accepted your application, they will inform all your creditors that you have applied for debt counselling. You will not be able to access any further credit until your debts have been repaid. You will even have to cut up your credit and store cards such as Edgars, Markhams, etc. At present, there are no accredited debt counsellors in Namibia. This is a new occupation and training will have to take place to ensure the consumer gets the full benefit of this new law. [1]Training of Debt Counsellors The new Act could become law within the next two years. Once enacted, there will have to be a process of training Debt Counsellors to assist consumers. If we follow the proposed Bill (as it is copied from the Act in RSA) to become a debt counsellor, Namibians have to be over the age of 23 and have a minimum of two years experience in accounting, finance, legal, para-legal or credit fields. Aspiring debt counsellors will also have to have a clean credit record - have no debt-related judgments against them at the time of applying and not be under administration. A debt counselling course over five days covers general outcomes such as listening and communication skills, interviewing skills, as well as budgeting and personal financial management know-how. It also requires specific outcomes regarding the debt counselling process as stipulated in the proposed Bill - from filling in an application for counselling to obtaining a clearance certificate.
1. file://localhost/mnt/ext/blogbooker/tmp/w5ykt629/w5ykt629-body.tex.lynx.html

Money to be made in helping consumers (2013-03-07 12:17)
The Namibian 5 Feb 2013 Shortly before Namibia gained its Independence, I was arrested along with around thirty students for a “public gathering without a permit”. We were protesting the establishment of army bases near schools as this was endangering the safety of especially the female learners. Upon our arrest I laughed at one of the police officers and he told me, “Lag vir jou gat en bid vir jou siel” (Laugh at your ass and pray for your soul). Now you might be wondering what this has to do with consumer affairs. This past week I was enquiring about a consumer complaint regarding a second-hand car purchase. The company representative told me the car was sold “voetstoots” and the buyer should beware. I told the representative that soon we would have a law in place to prevent companies from this kind of business practice. He laughed in my face and told me I 342

will wait a long time before the consumers would take up their rights in this country. I then felt like telling him exactly what that old apartheid era police officer had told me. Unfortunately, the specific consumer has no recourse under the present law and is stuck with vehicle that is not roadworthy, and even worse, a lease agreement with the bank on this vehicle. However I could advise the consumer (and you the reader) when you purchase a second-hand vehicle you should first ask consumer assistance organisations like the Automobile Association (AA) for assistance. These organisations can assist you in getting a roadworthy test before you purchase your vehicle. The roadworthy test is basic - it involves checking that all major safety features of the vehicle are in working order. These features include the safety belts, brakes, steering, exhaust system, transmission, mirrors and the electrical system. The test also involves checking the vehicle’s documentation and serial numbers – this is to make certain you are not unwittingly purchasing a stolen car. I was rather disappointed when speaking to the AA that they no longer provide this service themselves, but would be able to provide a referral to a trusted partner in the consumer place of residence throughout the country. And this led me to my brainwave. How many business opportunities are there for companies who can help consumer when they purchase a product, especially like a house or a car. Already, I had identified an opportunity for a potential entrepreneur to provide roadworthiness test and enable them to link with the AA, but what other opportunities might arise. The idea I wish to share with you is a “house-worthiness” doctor. Many buyers (especially first-time buyers), are so impressed by the house and the fact they got approved for the loan, they do not enquire too deeply on the repairs and maintenance the house might require. As most buyers use their maximum amount they qualify for in payment, they are not able apply for a second mortgage to do these repairs to their property. Many buyers are also fooled into the thinking that the building compliance certificate is sufficient. It is not, The compliance certificate only applies to the building plan, municipal services and certain building codes, and not necessarily to checking the working condition of pipes or even (as I found out to my own detriment) the age of the electrical wiring in the house. A person with experience in the building industry (perhaps even a retired person) should consider developing such a training institute. We have many artisanal workers who are looking for employment; maybe we can do something about this by providing training in checking the worthiness of the house for the consumer in the country. By the way, I did have the last laugh on that police officer. We students were released and within six months we won the court case in Bloemfontein for wrongful arrest. And like all good stories go, this one ended happily – I used the money from the wrongful arrest to buy an engagement ring. But that’s another story.

Legal Insurance for Namibians (2013-03-07 12:19)
First printed in Consumer News Namibia magazine - Feb 2013 edition

The cost of taking legal action can be prohibitive. Could you afford to claim compensation if you were injured in an accident, unfairly dismissed from work or had a dispute with a business? A friend of mine has had legal insurance for the past three years and believed he was covered. About a month ago, he was accused of being involved in a theft syndicate at his work. He immediately called his legal insurance company, but was informed they do not cover criminal cases. He was taken for a polygraph test (is that even legal in Namibia?), and informed that he had failed the test. This led to him leaving the job that morning to go speak to his legal insurer. 343

An guess what the legal insurance company tells him? They inform him they do not cover the expenses for a labour case either. WHAT is it with insurance companies that do not want to pay claims? If you complain at NAMFISA they can do very little to help. If I am going to buy legal insurance I expect: Bail Assistance " Bail negotiations and applications on members’ behalf " Depositing of the bail amount/issuing of bail guarantee on behalf of arrested member In other words, I must know that if I a accused of a crime that I have instant legal assistance when I am arrested and the legal representative shall do everything in their power to have me released on bail. In addition, my legal insurance will cover a ceratin amount – for example bail up to N $10,000. Civil Law " Bank and insurance matters " Blacklisting " Building and construction matters " Contractual disputes " Debt collection " Letters of demand " Litigation " Personal injury claims, etc I I should find myself in a case where I am accused of wrong doing by an individual (civil meaning between two parties), I hope my insurance company will cover all the types of cases, as well as assist when I wish to take another person or company to court in a civil case. Criminal Law " Fraud, theft, robbery or assault " Arrests " Bail applications " Consumer issues " Driving under the influence " Reckless driving " Search warrants, etc. This area is where most legal insurance companies are doing proper cover. This is of course the area that scares most citizens. But, in all probability, this is the area which legal insurance companies know are used the least – but do wonders for advertising. Family Law " Ante-nuptial contracts " Custody disputes " Divorces 344

" Family violence matters " Interdicts " Maintenance disputes, etc. Being able to handle family affairs privately and confidentially is very important for every consumer. This area of law also calls for the ability to settle disputes within the family about legal matters. Labour Law " Dismissals " Disciplinary proceedings " Pension payout disputes " Restraint of trade agreements " Retrenchments " Unpaid wages " Working condition In the employment arena we are often caught out either not knowing our rights, or thinking that we actually do when we don’t. Our legal insurance should allow us to get quick assistance, especially in cases where we need advice before following any course of action that could be detrimental in the long run. Surely this is not too much to ask from your legal insurance company?

Show me the money (2013-03-07 12:20)
The Namibian 14 Feb 2013 Millions of dollars are laying unclaimed with banks, pension funds and insurance companies. I have been informed that these companies believe it is the responsibility of the deceased to have informed the relatives of the policy of other benefit that the relatives are to receive. In turn, they insist, it is the responsibility of the beneficiary to claim their monies. Nonsense, I say! The company has been entrusted with a duty which must be kept. In last week’s column I discussed the opportunities to be had by entrepreneurs in the assistance of customers. Many people are not aware of their rights and thus lose out on possible savings on products and services. An even further disturbing business practice is the non-payment of death benefits. After all, (a business might argue), the person has passed away and would not be aware if their loved ones had received the money they had worked so hard to put aside. Each and every person in Namibia has the right to find out if they have been left an inheritance, whether it is property, money or even a prized possession. Most of us presume that such matters will be taken care of after our deaths – but very few actually make sure there is enough information about our financial dealings so that our relatives or executors can make these divisions according to our wishes. A typical example came to light recently when a friend of mine had a death in the family. The deceased was a pensioner and had received their pension money less than a week before the passing. My friend was given the responsibility of managing the financial costs of the funeral and decided to use the account of the deceased to finalise matters. Now, unfortunately, one of the other relatives had access to the bank card and had withdrawn the last monies left from the pension – and even left a negative balance. Upon enquiry, my 345

friend was requested to provide a death certificate and proof of being the executor before he could access the particulars of when and where the money was withdrawn. The “missing” money was less than N $ 300.00 and my friend wondered if it really was worth the effort. Nonetheless, he provided the paperwork to the bank and was given the bank statement. And this is where we come to an interesting discovery. One of the bank employees asked my friend why he had not requested for the death benefit of the account to be paid out. The employee explained that all bank accounts carried life insurance - and they charged it as part of bank fees on the account. Upon enquiry it turns out that all accounts with the bank had an automatic death benefit of N $ 2,500.00. When I heard the story I was amazed, as I am not even sure if my bank provides the same service. Or whether I am paying for this service and am not aware of it? This brings another business opportunity to light. “Inheritance Tracing”. Not many of us have the financial knowledge, or even the time to check whether there is money not being paid out which rightfully belongs to us. Thus an inheritance tracing agent can assist consumers with checking with all financial institutions such as banks, insurance companies, etc as well as with the appropriate authorities (for example the Master of the High Court). In addition to tracing, there is also an opportunity to provide consumer education on matters pertaining to their last wishes. We might not like to think about our deaths, but we must do our utmost to ensure we do not bring more misery to our relatives through our passing. If you have a bank account, funeral policy, shares or other financial instruments, make sure they are all listed with a person who you can trust. This can either be a financial advisor (insurance broker, etc.) or speak to your bank about their services in case of your death.

Have some manners, please (2013-03-07 12:22)
The Namibian 21 Feb 2013 Last year I dislocated my knee while visiting in Windhoek. It happened while I was crossing the street on a Monday afternoon. This was an old sport injury from my days of ice-skating, rollerblading and probably further irritated by my recent bungee jumping. Thus it is something that I can only blame on my carefree younger days without heeding the safety advice of my elders. A friend was with me at the time and called the emergency number of the cellular network and we were quickly and efficiently helped to get in contact with the hospital services. Within half an hour the ambulance was there and I was transported to the Katutura State Hospital. Having heard so many scare stories about the cleanliness - and lack of service – I was rather worried about actually getting sick at the hospital. However, I must loudly declare my fears were largely unfounded. Of course the hygiene in the emergency room was rather scary – especially for those of us who never land in such situations – but the service was exceptional. I was helped within a reasonable period of time and was given very good service by the doctor on duty. The trip to the Windhoek Hospital for the X-rays was a little bit crowded, but nevertheless I received the necessary treatment and examination. The operation was the next day (as it was surgery day) and all went well. I stayed for two weeks and received good, healthy meals and pain medication almost every time I asked. The nurses were friendly and attentive and I never felt neglected though I stayed in a public ward that had extra beds in the corridor area. When I was discharged, I received an account of only N $ 30.00. Wow. Reasonable service, good price. I must add to the story that my step mother was a Staff Sister for many years at the hospital, and, on the last day of my stay, Andimba ya Toivo visited my hospital bed. This however was not known upon my arrival or during the initial part of my stay. 346

As a consumer we often complain about good service but rarely compliment the good service when we get it. From the time of the operation, the nurses made it a habit to stop at my bed and ask about my recovery. When I left and thanked them for the good service and for being patient with me – after all I am just as much a baby as any man when he is sick. The nurses then told me something that made me think. They said it was a pleasure to have a patient like me. They had been overwhelmed that from the first day I had greeted them every morning and every night and gotten to learn their names. In addition, I had assisted one or two of them with personal problems (housing applications) and even helped one of the Sisters with her homework. The nurses told me that when they found out my step-mother had been a nurse it had no additional effect in how they treated me. They had come to enjoy being told “please” when I wanted something and “thank you” every time they gave me something or even when they just made my bed. They also noticed how I had made friends with all my ward colleagues and shared my drinks and presents with those who were far from home. As one nurse told me, “It is a pleasure to help someone who appreciates what you do for them.” It is their work to help us, but do we really appreciate the long years of study and patience it takes to deal with all our impatience and the stress we take out on them because they are “beneath us”? All it takes is a little bit of good manners from each of us to make this a better place to live in. Next time someone gives you something, remember to say thank you. It is a habit that can only make your life better too. BTW – that is the story how I lost my front teeth while fallinand why I now look like a Cape Coloured. LOL.

Understanding Banking (2013-03-07 12:23)
First printed in Consumer News Namibia magazine - Feb 2013 edition Let me start by repeating the words of a friend who is a banker in Windhoek, “banking is the profession with one of the best marketing departments around. Imagine trying to convince the first customer that their money was safer with the bank than in their own hands, and best of all, which the customer would need to pay fees to deposit and withdraw their own money.” Even now during the financial crises throughout the world banks are still succeeding in motivating clients to give them their money. Today, most of us feel safe with our money in banks because “we are many and government will not let it fail”. The term “moral hazard” is used to explain why we take these risks. All over the world people often complain about banks. This ranges from bank fees, interest charged, to repossession of vehicles and homes. In Namibia this is no different. The late Hon. Reinhard (Kalla) Gertze, Member of Parliament, proposed an investigation into the financial institutions through public hearings of the Parliamentary Committee on Economics, Natural Resources and Public Administration. They held public hearings on bank charges and regulations in 2006 in Windhoek. One of the submissions outlined why interest is charged. Why is interest charged? In the beginning of banking, interest was used to offset the risk of providing the credit to the borrower. There are four risks (hazards): • The costs incurred by the bank while providing the loan had to be repaid; • Inflation means the lender will be able to buy less for the money as time passes; 347

• Scarcity – in other words once it is lent to a borrower at a specific rate, it cannot be used for another loan; • That the borrower cannot pay back the loan Of these four, the only real difference the government can make is in reducing the risk of borrower’s inability to repay. Being a client of a bank Banks and their branch network is a convenience. We can put our own money into an account, send money to someone else, and apply for a loan. As consumers, we realise th