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GENERAL PURPOSE

The goal of the ASA Advocacy program is to create a positive relationship between each elected legislative member and an ASA school administrator. This relationship will be established over a number of contacts spanning the legislator's full two year term. The hope is to build a positive belief by the legislator that the ASA administrator is a trusted and valuable resource for all issues relating to K-12 public education and the preparation of teachers and administrators. A personal connection is the most effective form of grassroots lobbying. As a public school administrator, you can be relied upon to provide factual background on both academic and operational programs and the potential impact on these programs that pending legislation may have. If the ASA administrator doesn't have the specific information requested, the administrator can put the legislator in contact with an administrator who can provide the information. The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to ASA members on how best to establish a positive relationship. Remember, this is only guidance. Your own judgment is the best guide. The strategies and resources suggested in this handbook are only suggestions. ASA is here to support your efforts. It's important to keep ASA abreast of your efforts. A quick e-mail or phone call conveying a recent meeting or contact with a legislator helps ASA assess the overall progress of our advocacy efforts.
GOAL: Increase the visibility and prestige of ASA by having members serve as a credible source of information to legislators.

Table of Contents

STRATEGIES
There is no one single way to develop a positive relationship. A lot depends on your own instincts. The following strategies are examples and are meant to give you ideas on how to approach a legislative member. While it may sound intimidating or less than significant, a five minute meeting or short conversation is all it may take to initiate a valuable relationship with a legislator. Face to face meetings in the district are more effective than form letters or e-mails. Though a phone call and/or a conversation with the legislators staff person can be helpful. When meeting with your legislator: Request an appointment Be concise and well organized Demonstrate a regard for his or her schedule Follow up with a thank you letter (also to staff who may have arranged the meeting) When making written contact: Dont send postcards or form letters. Dont send petitions. Well written letters are best. Be brief, one page, typed, without errors. Simplify your point, everything you say should be on point Offer to be of assistance or provide information When making phone calls: Usually reserved for talking on issue You may be speaking to a legislative assistant You dont need to show your expertise, you just need to show you care One or two basic facts is sufficient Dont expect a return call E-mail: Like a phone call, e-mail communication is for very brief input Its better to use e-mail of you have an established relationship with the legislator In some situations, it, and phone messages are simply tallied. Regardless of your method of communication there are principles upon which to base your interaction with an elected official. -Know who you're talking to Check out the profile in the 2011 Guide to the 50th Legislature (aka: The Green Book) of the member you're going to visit. Look at the profile in the Citizens Clean Election Voter Education Guide. Look at local news stories on the newly elected members. In other words do your homework on where this member is on budget issues, immigration, K-12 education and other issues. To what committees is the member assigned? Does the member have children in school? What is his/her educational background? Jobs? Hobbies? Try and find a connection with the member. The more you know about the member, the better relationship you can build.
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-Resources There are a number of resources which can be helpful to your efforts, at the top of the list is ASA. If you have a question or need information, your first call should be to the ASA offices. If ASA doesn't have it, we can direct you to the source for your answer. You should also look to the other education advocate groups for education based information. The Arizona School Boards Association (ASBA), the Arizona Association of School Business Officials (AASBO), the Arizona Education Association (AEA) and the Arizona Charter Schools Association all produce information on a regular basis relating to public education. The Legislature itself also has useful information through its agencies and staff. The joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC) has a wealth of budget and revenue information and can be accessed through the legislative website (azleg.gov). Each legislative committee has a professional staff that supports the committee membership. The staff is partisan, with the majority working for the chairman and the minority supporting the minority members on the committee. The staff can be found in the Green book provided to superintendent division members.

-Get the legislator on your turf Encourage the legislator to visit schools and participate in district events. Encourage their participation in community events that include schools or the school district. In implementing this strategy keep in mind that the Legislature is required to be in session from January until April/May (lately, until June or July) to fulfill the hundred day requirement. Each legislator has commitments during this timeframe. The best time to arrange legislative visits is the interim between regular sessions (summer/fall).

-Build a team - inside and out You are not the repository of all knowledge, nor do you have to be. If there is someone who is more knowledgeable on an issue, refer the legislator to them, even if that person may have different views from yours. Additionally, build a team within your district that represents different knowledge bases. Also, look within the community for potential team members, parents and persons in business who have been involved with the schools. Take a look at the possibility of teaming up with charter schools in your area. They are funded with general fund dollars and can provide a unique perspective.

-Open communications Maintain communications with the legislator throughout the year. This can include persons other than yourself. Establish routine contacts by including the legislator in mailings of newsletters and communications from the schools or district. Ensure the information you provide is accurate. Always get the facts right. If you dont know or arent sure, verify the fact before sharing it. Don't use ultimatums. Threats of dire consequences will not get you where you want to be and often are exaggerated. If there is an alternative, action or strategy, acknowledge it, even if you disagree with it. You and s/he will not share the same views on every issue. Remember, the goal is to establish a relationship so the legislator will seek your input in the future. On occasion, personal stories and specific information may be helpful in creating greater awareness of district or school operations. Several templates are provided to guide these efforts (see Appendix). This information can be left following an initial meeting or modified, as needed, to illustrate a specific circumstance.

S T R A T E G I E S
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ASA AND ADVOCACY


In the past, ASA used a number of approaches to establish its policy positions. Under various circumstances the Executive Board, the Legislative Committee, the regional representatives and the various divisions have each participated in the development of ASAs policy positions. The positions themselves have taken the form of specific oppositions to a proposal (vouchers), to White Papers that identify how ASA believes a major policy should be crafted (White paper of Flores lawsuit), to a general set of Principles that should be considered in resolving a policy issue (ASAs Public Policy Priorities). Key ideas or points of view reflected in these documents have been extrapolated to form a broad platform upon within ASAs initial position will be based. This platform does not address all possible areas of support or opposition, it is meant to be a guide. It is a given that public policy issues emanating from the Governors Office, the State Department of Education and especially the State Legislature can have a very short timeframe in which advocacy positions can be developed and disseminated. The process must be flexible enough to allow for a very quick turnaround. Additionally, because of the nature of how public policy is established, particularly in the Legislative process, advocacy positions must be coached in broad principles whenever possible to avoid having to establish a new position when the original policy proposal goes in a different direction. As a general rule, the Executive Board should take the lead in establishing ASAs policy position. ASAs credibility as an education association leader will be accomplished by the interaction of its members with other local and statewide leaders. Each ASA member bears the responsibility of advancing education in Arizona by communicating with their local community and its elected officials. While this document addresses interaction with members of the legislature, it is applicable to most other advocacy relationships. Building the relationship with a legislator and establishing a communications link is the goal to being seen as an education resource. While issues-based lobbying is important its effectiveness will be determined by the credibility and the trust developed with the legislators. If you lobby the legislator on a specific issue, you should first establish on whose behalf you are advocating: yourself or your district or ASA. As succinctly as possible, you should lay out your concerns, potential impact, and suggested solution to the issue (support/oppose or modify). Regardless of the legislators response, your conclusion should be appreciative of their time.

ARIZONA SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS, INC. LEGISLATIVE PLATFORM


Economics Public education is an important economic engine, both for the current and future economy of our state. In many communities the school system is the largest employer and as such its staff makes a significant contribution to the local economy. Education and the success of Arizonas students and the academic attainment of Arizonas citizens are indicators of the health and wellness of our state. To these ends, ASA will support: Actions to improve the quality of education provided to Arizonas students. Innovation in curriculum development and content delivery. Competitive salaries, benefits and working conditions for all school employees. Stakeholders efforts to work on finance reform. Efforts to address the structural deficit through comprehensive revenue reform. Actions to positively promote staff achievement.

Student Achievement Student achievement must be the number one priority behind every education initiative. Successful implementation of each initiative is vital in guaranteeing student success. Attention must be given to the capacity of the LEA to provide sufficient resources to ensure student success. Resources include time, personnel, training, instructional materials and funding. To these ends, ASA will support: Proposals to provide training and support to accompany all new mandates and initiatives. Resources to increase availability of reliable and timely data. Efforts to provide more instructional time and ensure the current instructional time is used effectively. Resources to replace instructional materials cut during since 2008. Collaboration with higher education institutions and the business community to support college and career readiness.

Local Control Arizonas public education system is founded on the principle that local schools, governed by representatives of the local community can determine how best to deliver an educational program that optimizes the potential for success for all students. To this end, ASA will support: Legislative actions that provide flexibility in managing district resources. Opportunities for multipurpose funding. Modifications in the funding formula that will address the unique needs of Arizonas diverse districts

SCHOOL DISTRICTS WITHIN LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS


Arizona is divided into 30 state legislative districts. These districts bare little relationship to school district, city or county boundaries. Each legislative district elects two State House of Representatives and one State Senator.
LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 19,29 13 4 29,30 7 2,3,4 3,9,11 4,13 14 8,16 4,13 14 1 4,13,19 1 24,26,27 1,6 14 5 14 7 7 14 5 LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 14 4,13 13,19 5 1,6 1 11,19,29 4,8 4,8,11 9 1,15,23 8 7 12,17,18 7 1 1,6 14 14 14 5 5 7 1

SCHOOL DISTRICT AGUA FRIA UNION HIGH SCHOOL AGUILA ELEMENTARY DISTRICT AJO UNIFIED DISTRICT ALHAMBRA ELEMENTARY DISTRICT ALPINE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT ALTAR VALLEY ELEMENTARY DIST AMPHITHEATER UNIFIED DISTRICT ANTELOPE UNION HIGH SCHOOL APACHE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT APACHE JUNCTION UNIFIED DIST ARLINGTON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT ASH CREEK ELEMENTARY DISTRICT ASH FORK JOINT UNIFIED DIST AVONDALE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT BAGDAD UNIFIED DISTRICT BALSZ ELEMENTARY DISTRICT BEAVER CREEK ELEMENTARY DIST BENSON UNIFIED DISTRICT BICENTENNIAL UNION HIGH SCHOOL BISBEE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT BLUE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT BLUE RIDGE UNIFIED DISTRICT BONITA ELEMENTARY DISTRICT BOUSE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT

SCHOOL DISTRICT BOWIE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT BUCKEYE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT BUCKEYE UNION HIGH SCHOOL DIST BULLHEAD CITY ELEMENTARY DIST CAMP VERDE UNIFIED DISTRICT CANYON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT CARTWRIGHT ELEMENTARY DISTRICT CASA GRANDE ELEMENTARY DIST CASA GRANDE UNION HIGH SCHOOL CATALINA FOOTHILLS UNIFIED CAVE CREEK UNIFIED DISTRICT CAVIT CEDAR UNIFIED DISTRICT CHANDLER UNIFIED DISTRICT CHINLE UNIFIED DISTRICT CHINO VALLEY UNIFIED DISTRICT CLARKDALE-JEROME ELEMENTARY CLIFTON UNIFIED DISTRICT COCHISE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT COCHISE TECHNOLOGY DISTRICT COLORADO CITY UNIFIED DISTRICT COLORADO RIVER UNION HIGH SCH CONCHO ELEMENTARY DISTRICT CONGRESS ELEMENTARY DISTRICT

SCHOOL DISTRICT CONTINENTAL ELEMENTARY DIST COOLIDGE UNIFIED DISTRICT COTTONWOOD-OAK CREEK ELEM CRANE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT CREIGHTON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT CROWN KING ELEMENTARY DISTRICT DEER VALLEY UNIFIED DISTRICT DOUBLE ADOBE ELEMENTARY DIST DOUGLAS UNIFIED DISTRICT DUNCAN UNIFIED DISTRICT DYSART UNIFIED DISTRICT EAST VALLEY INSTITUTE OF TECH ELFRIDA ELEMENTARY DISTRICT ELOY ELEMENTARY DISTRICT EMPIRE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT FLAGSTAFF UNIFIED DISTRICT FLORENCE UNIFIED DISTRICT FLOWING WELLS UNIFIED DISTRICT FOUNTAIN HILLS UNIFIED DIST FOWLER ELEMENTARY DISTRICT FREDONIA-MOCCASIN UNIFIED DIST FT HUACHUCA ACCOMMODATION FT THOMAS UNIFIED DISTRICT GADSDEN ELEMENTARY DISTRICT GANADO UNIFIED DISTRICT GILA BEND UNIFIED DISTRICT GILA INSTITUTE FOR TECHNOLOGY GILBERT UNIFIED DISTRICT GLENDALE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT GLENDALE UNION HIGH SCHOOL GLOBE UNIFIED DISTRICT GRAND CANYON UNIFIED DISTRICT HACKBERRY ELEMENTARY DISTRICT

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 2,3,14 8,12 1,6 4,13 24,28 1 1,15,20,22 14 14 14 13,21,22,29 26 14 8,11 14 6,7 8 3,9,22 23 19 5,7 14 7,14 4 7 4 14 12,16,17,25 20,29,30 20,24,28,29,30 8 6,7 5,7

SCHOOL DISTRICT HAYDEN/WINKELMAN UNIFIED DIST HEBER-OVERGAARD UNIFIED DIST HIGLEY UNIFIED DISTRICT HILLSIDE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT HOLBROOK UNIFIED DISTRICT HUMBOLDT UNIFIED DISTRICT HYDER ELEMENTARY DISTRICT INDIAN OASIS-BABOQUIVARI DIST ISAAC ELEMENTARY DISTRICT J O COMBS ELEMENTARY DISTRICT JOSEPH CITY UNIFIED DISTRICT KAYENTA UNIFIED DISTRICT KINGMAN UNIFIED DISTRICT KIRKLAND ELEMENTARY DISTRICT KLONDKE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT KYRENE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT LAKE HAVASU UNIFIED DISTRICT LAVEEN ELEMENTARY DISTRICT LIBERTY ELEMENTARY DISTRICT LITCHFIELD ELEMENTARY DISTRICT LITTLEFIELD ELEMENTARY DIST LITTLETON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT MADISON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT MAINE CONSOLIDATED ELEMENTARY MAMMOTH/SAN MANUEL UNIFIED MARANA UNIFIED DISTRICT MARICOPA UNIFIED DISTRICT MAYER UNIFIED DISTRICT MCNARY ELEMENTARY DISTRICT MCNEAL ELEMENTARY DISTRICT MESA UNIFIED DISTRICT MIAMI UNIFIED DISTRICT MINGUS UNION HIGH SCHOOL DIST MOBILE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 7,8 6 12 1 6,7 1 13 4 19,29,30 8,16 6,7 7 5,7 1 14 18,27 5 27 4,13,19 13,29 5 19 24,28 6 8 9,11 8,11 1 7 14 16,17,23,25,26 6,8 1,6 4

D I S T R I C T S W I T H I N L E G I S L A T I V E D I S T R I C T S

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SCHOOL DISTRICT

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 5 4,13 14 13 19,27 14 13,22 7 6 2 8,11 24 5 7 4,13 4 14 15,20,23,28 5 2 6 5,7 14 19,29 20,21,22,29 24,27,30 18,19,24,26,27,28,29,30 8,11 7,14 6 7 14 1 5 12,16

SCHOOL DISTRICT RAY UNIFIED DISTRICT REDINGTON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT RED MESA UNIFIED DISTRICT RED ROCK ELEMENTARY DISTRICT RIVERSIDE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT ROOSEVELT ELEMENTARY DISTRICT ROUND VALLEY UNIFIED DISTRICT RUCKER ELEMENTARY DISTRICT SACATON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT SADDLE MOUNTAIN UNIFIED DIST SAFFORD UNIFIED DISTRICT SAHUARITA UNIFIED DISTRICT

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 7,8 14 7 11 19 27 7 14 8 13 7,14 2,4,14 5 7,8 2 14 7 2 2 8,11 23,24,28 6 1 4,13 6,7 14 1 6 7,14 4 2 14 7 4, 11 2,3,4,9 8 10,14

MOHAVE VALLEY ELEMENTARY DIST MOHAWK VALLEY ELEMENTARY DIST MORENCI UNIFIED DISTRICT MORRISTOWN ELEMENTARY DIST MURPHY ELEMENTARY DISTRICT NACO ELEMENTARY DISTRICT NADABURG UNIFIED DISTRICT NAVAJO COUNTY/RAINBOW ACCOM NAVIT NOGALES UNIFIED DISTRICT ORACLE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT OSBORN ELEMENTARY DISTRICT OWENS ELEMENTARY DISTRICT PAGE UNIFIED DISTRICT PALO VERDE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT PALOMA ELEMENTARY DISTRICT PALOMINAS ELEMENTARY DISTRICT PARADISE VALLEY UNIFIED DIST PARKER UNIFIED DISTRICT PATAGONIA UNIFIED DISTRICT PAYSON UNIFIED DISTRICT PEACH SPRINGS UNIFIED DISTRICT PEARCE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT PENDERGAST ELEMENTARY DISTRICT PEORIA UNIFIED DISTRICT PHOENIX ELEMENTARY DISTRICT PHOENIX UNION HIGH SCHOOL DIST PICACHO ELEMENTARY DISTRICT PIMA UNIFIED DISTRICT PINE-STRAWBERRY ELEMENTARY PINON UNIFIED DISTRICT POMERENE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT PRESCOTT UNIFIED DISTRICT QUARTZSITE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT QUEEN CREEK UNIFIED DISTRICT

SALOME CONSOLIDATED ELEMENTARY SAN CARLOS UNIFIED DISTRICT SAN FERNANDO ELEMENTARY DIST SAN SIMON UNIFIED DISTRICT SANDERS UNIFIED DISTRICT SANTA CRUZ ELEMENTARY DISTRICT SANTA CRUZ VALLEY UNIFIED SANTA CRUZ VALLEY UNION HIGH SCOTTSDALE UNIFIED DISTRICT SEDONA-OAK CREEK JOINT UNIFIED SELIGMAN UNIFIED DISTRICT SENTINEL ELEMENTARY DISTRICT SHOW LOW UNIFIED DISTRICT SIERRA VISTA UNIFIED DISTRICT SKULL VALLEY ELEMENTARY DIST SNOWFLAKE UNIFIED DISTRICT SOLOMON ELEMENTARY DIST SOMERTON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT SONOITA ELEMENTARY DISTRICT ST DAVID UNIFIED DISTRICT ST JOHNS UNIFIED DISTRICT STANFIELD ELEMENTARY DISTRICT SUNNYSIDE UNIFIED DISTRICT SUPERIOR UNIFIED DISTRICT TANQUE VERDE UNIFIED DISTRICT

D I S T R I C T S W I T H I N L E G I S L A T I V E D I S T R I C T S

SCHOOL DISTRICT TEMPE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 18,24,25,26,27 18,24,25,26,27 14 19 19,29 8,11 14 6 5 7 2,3,4,9,10,11 19,27 2,10,14 5 14 7 1 20,24,28,30 13 5 7 1,13,22 14 6,7

SCHOOL DISTRICT WILSON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 6,7,27 7 6,7 1 6 5 4,13 4,13 4,13

TEMPE UNION HIGH SCHOOL DIST THATCHER UNIFIED DISTRICT TOLLESON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT TOLLESON UNION HIGH SCHOOL TOLTEC ELEMENTARY DISTRICT TOMBSTONE UNIFIED DISTRICT TONTO BASIN TOPOCK ELEMENTARY DISTRICT TUBA CITY UNIFIED DISTRICT TUCSON UNIFIED DISTRICT UNION ELEMENTARY DISTRICT VAIL UNIFIED DISTRICT VALENTINE ELEMENTARY DISTRICT VALLEY UNION HIGH SCHOOL/ELFRIDA VERNON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT WALNUT CREEK WASHINGTON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT WELLTON ELEMENTARY DISTRICT WENDEN ELEMENTARY DISTRICT WHITERIVER UNIFIED DISTRICT WICKENBURG UNIFIED DISTRICT WILLCOX UNIFIED DISTRICT WILLIAMS UNIFIED DISTRICT

WINDOW ROCK UNIFIED DISTRICT WINSLOW UNIFIED DISTRICT YARNELL ELEMENTARY DISTRICT YOUNG ELEMENTARY DISTRICT YUCCA ELEMENTARY DISTRICT YUMA COUNTY ACCOM YUMA ELEMENTARY DISTRICT YUMA UNION HIGH SCHOOL DIST

D I S T R I C T S W I T H I N L E G I S L A T I V E D I S T R I C T S

50th LEGISLATURE
Additional information and Senate and House Office information can be found at www.azleg.gov. RED - indicates member of Education committee ** indicates new member SENATE
DISTRICT 1
Steve Pierce(R) spierce@azleg.gov (602) 926-5584 Linda Lopez (D) llopez@azleg.gov (602) 926-4089 Olivia Cajero Bedford (D) ocajerobedford@azleg.gov (602) 926-5835 Lynne Pancrazi (D) lpancrazi@azleg.gov (602) 926-3004 Kelli Ward (R) ** kward@azleg.gov (602)926-4138 Chester Crandall (R) ccrandell@azleg.gov (602)926-5409 Jack Jackson Jr. (D) jjackson@azleg.gov (602)926-5862 Barbara McGuire(D) ** bmcguire@azleg.gov (602)926-5836 Steve Farley (D) sfarley@azleg.gov (602)926-3022 David Bradley (D) ** dbradley@azleg.gov (602)926-5262 Andy Tobin(R) atobin@azleg.gov (602) 926-5172 Andrea Dalessandro (D) ** adalessandro@azleg.gov (602) 926-5342 Sally Ann Gonzales (D) sgonzales@azleg.gov (602) 926-3278 Juan Carlos Escamilla (D) ** jescamilla@azleg.gov (602) 926-5872 Sonny Borelli(R) ** sborelli@azleg.gov (602)926-5051 Brenda Barton (R) bbarton@azleg.gov (602)926-4129 Albert Hale (D) ahale@azleg.gov (602)926-4323 Frank Pratt (R) fpratt@azleg.gov (602)926-5761 Ethan Orr (R) ** eorr@azleg.gov (602)926-3235 Stefanie Mach (D) ** smach@azleg.gov (602)926-3398

HOUSE
Karen Fann(R) kfann@azleg.gov (602) 926-5874 Rosanna Gabaldon(D) ** rgabaldon@azleg.gov (602) 926-3424 Macario Saldate (D) msaldate@azleg.gov (602) 926-4171 Lisa Otondo (D) ** lotondo@azleg.gov (602) 926-3002 Doris Goodale(R) dgoodale@azleg.gov (602)926-5408 BobThorpe(R) ** bthorpe@azleg.go v (602)926-5219 Jamescita Peshlakai ** jpeshlakai@azleg.gov (602)926-5160 Thomas T.J Shope(R) ** tshope@azleg.gov (602)926-3012 Victoria Steele (D) ** vsteele@azleg.gov (602)926-5683 Bruce Wheeler (D) bwheeler@azleg.gov (602)926-3300

DISTRICT 2

DISTRICT 3

DISTRICT 4

DISTRICT 5

DISTRICT 6

DISTRICT 7

DISTRICT 8

DISTRICT 9

DISTRICT 10

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51st LEGISLATURE cont.

SENATE
DISTRICT 11
Al Melvin (R) anelvin@azleg.gov (602)926-4326 Andy Biggs(R) abiggs@azleg.gov (602)926-4371 Don Shooter (R) dshooter@azleg.gov (602)926-4139 Gail Griffin (R) ggriffin@azleg.gov (602)926-5895 Nancy Barto (R) nbarto@azleg.gov (602)926-5766 Richard Crandall (R) rcrandall@azleg.gov (602)926-3020 Steve Yarbrough (R) syarbrough@azleg.gov (602)926-5863 John McComish (R) jmccomish@azleg.gov (602)926-5898 Anna Tovar (D) atovar@azleg.gov (602)926-3392 Kimberly Yee (R) kyee@azleg.gov (602)926-3024 Rick Murphy (R) rmurphy@azleg.gov (602)926-4444

HOUSE
Adam Kwasman (R) ** akwasman@azleg.gov (602)926-5839 Eddie Farnsworth (R) efarnsworth@azleg.gov (602)926-5735 Darin Mitchell (R) ** dmitchell@azleg.gov (602)926-5894 David Gowan (R) dgowan@azleg.gov (602)926-3312 John Allen (R) ** jallen@azleg.gov (602)926-4916 Douglas Coleman (R) ** dcoleman@azleg.gov (602)926-3160 Tom Forese (R) tforese@azleg.gov (602)926-5168 Jeff Dial (R) jdial@azleg.gov (602)926-5550 Mark Cardenas (D) ** mcardenas@azleg.gov (602)926-3014 Paul Boyer (R) ** pboyer@azleg.gov (602)926-4173 Rick Gray (R) rgray@azleg.gov (602)926-5993 Steve Smith (R) stsmith@azleg.gov (602)926-5685 Warren Peterson (R) ** wpeterson@azleg.gov (602)926-4136 Steve Montenegro (R) smontenegro@azleg.gov (602)926-5955 David Stevens (R) dstevens@azleg.gov (602)926-4321 Heather Carter (R) hcarter@azleg.gov (602)926-5503 Kelly Townsend (R) ** ktownsend@azleg.gov (602)926-4467 J.D. Mesnard (R) jmesnard@azleg.gov (602)926-4481 Bob Robson (R) brobson@azleg.gov (602)926-5549 Lupe Chavira Contreras (D) ** lcontreras@azleg.gov (602)926-5284 Carl Seel (R) cseel@azleg.gov (602)926-3018 Debbie Lesko (R) dlesko@azleg.gov (602)926-5413

DISTRICT 12

DISTRICT 13

DISTRICT 14

DISTRICT 15

DISTRICT 16

DISTRICT 17

DISTRICT 18

DISTRICT 19

DISTRICT 20

DISTRICT 21

51st LEGISLATURE

cont.

SENATE
DISTRICT 22
Judy Burges (R) jburges@azleg.gov (602)926-5861 Michele Reagan (R) mreagan@azleg.gov (602)926-5828 Katie Hobbs (D) khobbs@azleg.gov (602)926-5325 Bob Worsley (R) ** bworsley@azleg.gov (602)926-5760 Ed Ableser (D) eableser@azleg.gov (602)926-4118 Leah Landrum Taylor (D) llandrum@azleg.gov (602)926-3830 Adam Driggs (R) adriggs@azleg.gov (602)926-3016 Steve Gallardo (D) sgallardo@azleg.gov (602)926-5830 Robert Meza (D) rmeza@azleg.gov (602)926-3425

HOUSE
David Livingston (R) ** dlivingston@azleg.gov (602)926-4178 John Kavanagh (R) jkavanagh@azleg.gov (602)926-5170 Lela Alston (D) lalston@azleg.gov (602)926-5829 Justin Olson (R) jolson@azleg.gov (602)926-5288 Juan Mendez (D) ** jmendez@azleg.gov (602)926-4124 Ruben Gallego (D) rgallego@azleg.gov (602)926-3042 Eric Meyer (D) emeyer@azleg.gov (602)926-3037 Lydia Hernandez (D) ** lhernandez@azleg.gov (602)926-3376 Jonathan Larkin (D) ** jlarkin@azleg.gov (602)926-5058 Phil Lovas (R) plovas@azleg.gov (602)926-3297 Michelle Ugenti (R) mugenti@azleg.gov (602)926-4480 Chad Campbell (D) ccampbell@azleg.gov (602)926-3026 Justin Pierce (R) jpierce@azleg.gov (602)926-5495 Andrew Sherwood (D) ** asherwood@azleg.gov (602)926-3028 Catherine Miranda (D) cmiranda@azleg.gov (602)926-4893 Kate Brophy McGee (D) Kbrophymcgee@azleg.gov (602)926-4486 Martin Quezada D) mquezada@azleg.gov (602)926-5911 Debbie McCune-Davis (D) ddavis@azleg.gov (602)926-4485

DISTRICT 23

DISTRICT 24

DISTRICT 25

DISTRICT 26

DISTRICT 27

DISTRICT 28

DISTRICT 29

DISTRICT 30

E-mail addresses and legislative office information can be found at www.azleg.gov , then click on: ALIS. Under the picture of the Capitol dome click on: Email a Member.

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FIGURING OUT A.L.I.S.

FIGURING OUT A.L.I.S.

"HOW TO FIND A LEGISLATIVE BILL ON THE ARIZONA LEGISLATIVE WEB-SITE"

The following pages will help you use the Arizona Legislative Information System, known as A.L.I.S. This is a working website used by legislators and their staffs. It contains much information, some of which is less important to the casual reader.

Legislative Bill Numbering Bill Versions Calendars A.L.I.S. Home Page Bill Summary Bill Overview Overview of the Overview

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Legislative Bill Numbering

Every bill introduced into the Legislature is assigned a bill number that stays with the bill throughout the legislative process. In each legislative session, bills are numbered sequentially, in the Senate beginning with 1000, and in the House beginning with 2000. Thus, SB 1056, is the 56th bill introduced into the Senate, and HB2035, is the 35th bill introduced into the House. To find a bill on A.L.I.S. the chamber identifier and bill number must be entered without any spaces, i.e. HB2347 or SB1138.

Bill Version
As a bill moves through the Legislative process there are certain points along the way that the bill is updated to include amendments that have been adopted to the bill. On A.L.I.S., under Bill Versions, the following versions are likely to be displayed:

Introduced version This is what the bill looked like when it was first introduced into the legislative process.

House Engrossed version this is what the bill looks like after it has gone through the House amending process; all committees and the Committee of the Whole (COW) where every member of the body may provide amendments to the bill. The House Engrossed version incorporates all House Adopted amendments.

Senate Engrossed version this is what the bill looks like after it has gone through the Senate amending process, including all Senate committees and the Committee of the Whole (COW). The Senate Engrossed version incorporates all Senate Adopted amendments.

Conference Engrossed version If there are differences between the House Engrossed version and the Senate Engrossed version, a bill might be sent to a Conference Committee, made up of members from both chambers, to work out the differences. Whatever is worked out in the Conference Committee is embodied in the Conference Engrossed version.

On A.L.I.S., the version on the bottom of the list is the most current version of the bill.

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Calendars
Calendars are used as agendas for action that will take place on the floor before the entire body. Calendars are published daily and reflect the floor action that is scheduled to take place during the day. There are four calendars that are published that contain important information on bills and bill status: Caucus Calendar bills that are scheduled to be discussed in both the Majority and Minority Caucus prior to going to the floor. Caucus provides an opportunity for all members to discuss the merits of a bill. It also allows the leadership to gauge the level of support for a bill. While caucus is an informal meeting and no formal votes are taken on a bill, no bill can be scheduled for the floor until it has been cleared by caucus. COW Calendars (there can be multiple COW calendars) bills that have cleared caucus and are ready for Committee of the Whole. COW is where a bill is formally amended. The various committees recommend amendments, but the bill is not technically amended until the entire body approves the amendments in Committee of the Whole. COW is also the place where any member may offer an amendment to a bill. If an amendment is approved by a majority of the members present, the amendment is added to the bill. Once all the amendments have been voted on by the body, the bill receives preliminary approval by the body to Do Pass, as amended. Third Reading Calendar bills that have completed the process through COW and are ready for a final vote of the body. All approved amendments have been Engrossed (see above) into the bill and when it is called before the body, a formal vote on the bill is recorded. If the bill receives a majority vote (16 yeas in the Senate, and 31 yeas in the House) it moves on to the other chamber. Final Reading Calendar Finally, when a bill has completed its journey through the other chamber it must come back for a final vote in the original chamber, if the other chamber made any changes (likely), the bill will then show up on the Final Reading Calendar. This vote, like the Third Reading Calendar is a recorded vote.

Bill Overview
The Bill Overview on A.L.I.S. shows a summary of the bills progress through the process up to its current status. Track down to the bottom of the Overview and you will find where the bill is currently in the process. The hot links within the Overview provide additional details.

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A.L.I.S. HOME PAGE


The Arizona Legislative Information System (ALIS-azleg.gov) is the official website for the Arizona State Legislature. All official documents and activities of the state legislature are contained at this website. There are two ways to find a bill that is under consideration in the current legislative session:

If you know the bill number, you can enter it here [remember the format; HBxxxx, or SBxxxx]

If you don't know the bill number, but have a general idea what the bill is about, you can use the search engine to try to find the bill. Be warned! If you ask for "education bills" you will get a list of every bill that even remotely relates to education. Try to be a precise as possible, but be prepared to get a long list that will have to be narrowed down.

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BILL SUMMARY PAGE


Once you have entered the bill number and clicked on the little spyglass next to the bill number box, ALIS will take you to the "Bill Summary page". This page provides links to detailed information regarding the bill. All documents relating to the bill can be located from this page. Not all the information may be useful, but some of the links, starting with "Bill Overview" should be reviewed.

Bill Overview Provides a complete Legislative history of the bill. From bill introduction, through committee workups, to floor action right through the governor's action on the bill. By clicking on the "Bill Overview link, and scrolling down to the bottom of the overview, the last entry will indicate exactly where the bill is in the process. For more on the Bill Overview page, see the article "Overview of the Overview"

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BILL OVERVIEW PAGE


This page provides a roadmap of the bill's progress through the Legislative process. It provides info on committees, amendments and formal votes. The first stop on this page should be all the way to the bottom of the page. The last entry reflects the latest formal action on the bill. In the case of the example used on the left, this bill made it all the way to the Governor's desk and was signed into law.

This bill (SB1070) was sent to the Governor on April 19. The Governor signed the House Engrossed Version on April 23. In this case, the CHAPTERED VERSION: indicates the version of the bill that the Governor signed, and, under the BILL VERSIONS section on the Bill summary page, that's the version you need to look at if you want to know exactly what the Governor signed.

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BILL SUMMARY PAGE BILL VERSIONS


Going back to the BILL SUMMARY page, the third choice down on the left, is Bill Versions. By clicking on the link "Show Versions" the following drop-down menu will appear:

As a bill moves through the Legislative process there are certain points along the way that the bill is updated to include amendments that have been adopted to the bill. On A.L.I.S., under Bill Versions, the following versions are likely to be displayed:
Introduced version This is what the bill looked like when it was first introduced into the legislative process. House Engrossed version- this is what the bill looks like after it has gone through the House amending process; all committees and the Committee of the Whole (COW) where every legislator has an opportunity to amend the bill. The House Engrossed version incorporates all House Adopted amendments. Senate Engrossed version- this is what the bill looks like after it has gone through the Senate amending process; all Senate committees and the Committee of the Whole (COW). The Senate Engrossed version incorporates all Senate Adopted amendments. Conference Engrossed version- If there are differences between the House Engrossed version and the Senate Engrossed version, a bill might be sent to a Conference Committee, made up of members from both chambers, to work out the differences. Whatever is worked out in the Conference Committee is embodied in the Conference Engrossed version.

On A.L.I.S., the version on the bottom of the list is the most current version of the bill. If the bill is signed and becomes law, that version will be indicated by the notation: (Chaptered version). In deciding which format to use to view the bill, the two choices are HTML or PDF. The PDF version is displayed in the exact format as the bill in the Legislative process. The HTML version does not contain the line numbering or page format of the legislative version, but does highlight the new language and revisions to existing law. The HTML version is somewhat easier to read, but if the purpose of the review is to develop an amendment to the bill that addresses concerns, then the PDF version should be used, since amendments must identify the page and line number in the bill.
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OVERVIEW OF THE OVERVIEW


In General
The Bill Status Overview is a road map on where the bills been and what has happened along the way. It can answer questions like, How did that bill get out of committee? There is a recorded vote on every bill based on the committees final recommendation. The two most common committee recommendations are: DP (Do Pass in the form originally considered by the committee) and DPA (Do Pass Amended- reflecting that the committee has amended the original bill). On the Overview page a number of abbreviations are used as shortcuts, like DP and DPA. Click on any one of them and a list of all of the abbreviations is provided. The list does not provide any explanation, just what the characters stand for.

Amendments
While the Overview does provide a listing of amendments considered on the floor during COW, the details of the amendments are not available on the Overview page. Amendments, both approved and proposed, are available on the Bill Summary page.

First, Second and Third Read


The state Constitution requires that every bill that is introduced be read to the entire body at least three times. This provision was in the original Constitution in the days before copying machines and computers. It was a way to assure that the members were aware of what was in a proposed bill. Today, the requirement is met by a reader speed reading the number and title of each bill. First reading does however provide another purpose. After a bill is first read to the members, the President or Speaker assigns the bill to committees. Third reading also serves another purpose. After third reading a bill, which occurs after the bill has gone through Committee of the Whole, the body formally votes on the bill. The vote is recorded and if the bill passes it is sent to the other chamber for consideration.

Governors Action and Chapter Numbers


The last thing that will be recorded on a Bill Status Overview is the Governors action, assuming the bill makes it through the process and is sent to the Governor for consideration. The Overview will indicate whether or not the Governor signed the bill and the date. If the Governor signed the bill, the bill is assigned a chapter number. All legislation that becomes law is maintained as chapters and are subsequently identified as Chapter___, Laws of 20__. To see the chapters for the recently completed session, go to the ALIS homepage, and on the left hand side you will see Session Laws. A click on the button and a complete list of the chapters for the session is reveled.

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HOW TO READ A LEGISLATIVE BILL

The construction of a bill is subject to a vast number of rules and requirements that have been developed, since statehood. Some of the requirements are actually in the state Constitution. Most rules of construction have evolved over time through the office of the Legislative Council. The Legislative Council was established primarily as the bill drafting arm of the state legislature. Legislators send their bill ideas over to Legislative Council to be drafted into proper form and prepared for introduction. In fact, Legislative Council has published, and routinely updates the "Arizona Legislative Bill Drafting Manual" which is available on A.L.I.S. under the Legislative Council Button under picture of the Capitol Dome. A quick glance at the Bill Drafting Manual will reveal that there are a vast array of rules and arcane usage attached to the drafting of a bill. This Tutorial is not going to provide an exhaustive review of all the requirements that go into writing a bill. Instead, this Tutorial will attempt to provide a roadmap into how to read a bill. The first thing to consider is what version of the bill do you want to read? You have two choices: HTML or PDF. This tutorial will use the PDF version of the bill. The PDF version reflects the exact copy of the bill that the Legislature uses. The best way to do this, is to start at the front end and move through to the end. However, there may be some detours along the way. The target bill is HB2732, 3rd grade reading retention.

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HOW TO READ A BILL Rules to Play By


Legislative Bill Numbering (a quick review) Every bill introduced into the Legislature is assigned a bill number that stays with the bill throughout the legislative process. In each session, bills are numbered sequentially, in the Senate beginning with 1000, and in the House beginning with 2000. Thus, SB 1056, is the 56 th bill introduced into the Senate, and HB2035, is the 35th bill introduced into the House. To find a bill on A.L.I.S. the chamber identifier and bill number must be entered without any spaces, i.e. HB2347 or SB1138.

Statutory law and Session law Bills passed by the legislature are generally of two kinds; statutory law or session law. Statutory law is "permanent" law that has an indefinite duration, while session law has a temporary application and generally is used to provide guidance or establish an legal activity that is intended to be of short duration and not "permanent". All statutory law is codified using a sequential numbering system (much like an index) based on 49 Titles which are categories used to group laws by their subject matter. Thus, Arizona laws relating to children are in Title 8, education laws are in Title 15, and all laws relating to taxation are in Title 42, usually. However, one should not assume that ALL education laws will be found in Title 15, or that all laws relating to children are in Title 8.

Bill Format Every bill is constructed in the same way with very specific rules governing each element. The Legislative Council's Bill Drafting Manual, devotes over 150 pages to the details of bill drafting rules. There are a few rules that apply to every bill and are important in assisting with reading a bill. Every bill has a Title. Bills that amend or add statutory law within the various codified sections are placed in the bill numerically from lowest to highest. Thus a bill that amends sections in Title 3, 15 and 42 will be placed in the bill in that order. Next, all session laws are placed in a bill after any sections that relate to the codified Titles. Finally, any existing section of law that is going to be amended, either by adding a new subsection, deleting an existing subsection or adding to an existing subsection, the entire section must be included in the bill. It is this requirement, which is required by the Constitution (Art. 4, Pt.2, section 14), that makes some bills huge in the number of pages. Take a section like, 15-341, General powers and duties of local school boards. Over the years, so many powers have been added that this section now runs numerous pages, and, if you want to add a new power, the entire section must be included in the bill to add the new power.

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HOW TO READ A BILL Title Page


The title page is always the first page of the bill and contains key information regarding the bill. As the bill moves through the process, the content of the title page changes slightly in regard to the information provided. When the bill is first introduced into the legislative process, this is what the title page looks like:
On the Introduced title page, in the upper right hand corner (in red in the PDF version) is the Reference Title or Short Title. This is a very short description of the bill. The Short title disappears after the bill clears all committees. Also found on the introduced Title page is a listing of all the sponsors of the bill. The first name on the sponsors list is the "Prime Sponsor" and all the others are co-sponsors. Again, once the bill clears all committees, the sponsors list disappears.

Finally, on the Title page is the Constitutionally required (Art.4,Part 2,Section 13) Title which sets forth exactly what the bill does in terms of amending, repealing, appropriating, and all other special elements of the bill.

Once a bill has successfully gone through all committees, including committee of the whole (COW), all the amendments that have been successfully added to the bill are 'engrossed' into the bill prior to the body formally voting on the bill (3rd Reading). This is where the Title page changes:
First thing that's changed is the Short Title is gone and has been replaced with "House Engrossed". This means that this version has all the amendments incorporated into the bill. The bill is now read for a formal recorded vote by the entire membership. If a bill makes it all the way to the Governor, there will be at least three versions: Introduced, House Engrossed and Senate Engrossed. The other thing to note is that the Sponsors list is gone. You can only find the sponsors on the introduced bill.

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HOW TO READ A BILL


The very first thing in every bill is the 'enacting clause'. It's the same in every bill, and it says: Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Arizona: The enacting clause is required by the constitution (Article 4, Part 2, Section 24). It is the only part of a bill that can never be altered or changed. Even when a bill is completely rewritten by a 'strikeeverything amendment' the first line of that amendment will read, "Strike everything after the enacting clause." Next comes the first section of the bill, based on what the Title set forth on the Title page. The Title page says that section 15-701 is to be amended. So section 1 of the bill reads: Section 1. Section 15-701, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended to read: Each item identified in the Title must be set out in a separate section within the bill. If the Title identifies 7 different sections of law that are to be amended in the bill, then each one must be set out in a separate section in the bill. The Constitution requires that any existing law that is to be amended, must be set out in its entirety (Article 4, Part 2, Section 14). If the proposed section of law to be amended is one paragraph long, then that paragraph must be included in the bill along with any proposed new language. This means that if the bill intends to add an additional power for a local school board, the entire section 15-341. General powers and duties; immunity; delegation must be set forth all 42 current powers, to add power number 43. This is why some bills have so many pages. Most of it is current law. Thanks to the formatting in a PDF version of a bill, figuring out what's new is fairly simple. Current law is in lower case black. New law is upper case blue, and language that is being removed is in lower case red strikethrough.

From the above example there is new language on lines 28 through 30 ( all caps in blue), there is current law on lines 31 through 35 (lower case in black) and on line 34 the word 'insuring' is replaced by the word 'ENSURING'. If the bill under review is a large one with numerous pages, use the Title to identify what is being changed, then use the color code (black, red, blue) to scan the bill and identify where the changes occur. Current law is amended in this way. But there are different rules for temporary law.
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Session law, or temporary law, is always positioned after any changes to permanent law, in the back of the bill. The title will identify session law that is in a bill:

In the above case, the bill contains a conditional enactment. This is what it looks like in the bill:

Each session law that is proposed in a bill has its own section and title identifying the purpose of the proposed session law. Many session laws provide guidance as to how a proposed change to permanent law is to be implemented:

Session laws can take on a variety of forms and address a number of issues, but the most common types of session laws are: -Appropriations; identifying specific monies to be used to implement the purposes of the bill. -Establishing committees or task forces; used to identify membership, purpose and duration of temporary bodies with limited purpose. -Effective date and repeal; sets when the law becomes effective and sets a specific date for repeal of the law or parts of a law. -nonseverability and severability clauses; provides courts with guidance that if any portion of the law is found invalid, the entire law is invalid (nonseverability) or that if a portion of the law is found invalid, the remaining portions remain valid (severability). The courts are not bound by this - it is only legislative intent. -Legislative intent; Provided a guidance to courts regarding what the legislature intends the bill to do. It is used primarily for controversial bills or very complex bills. Again, the courts are not bound by intent clauses, they are only guidance. This is not an exhaustive list of potential session law subjects, but does reflect the most common session law types.
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HOW TO ADVOCATE ON A BILL


A.L.I.S. allows you to offer your opinion on any piece of legislation that is pending before a legislative committee. On the ALIS homepage there is a tab in the center of the page (under the picture of the domed ceiling), labeled "Request To Speak". By clicking this tab, the window below the tab changes:

Clicking on the blue highlighted "Make a Request To Speak" will take you to the login in page.
NOTE: YOU MUST SET UP AN ACCOUNT ON ALIS BEFORE YOU CAN USE THIS REMOTE REQUEST TO SPEAK PROGRAM. AN ACCOUNT CAN BE SET UP ONLY AT THE LEGISLATURE USING THE COMPUTER TERMINALS THAT ARE LOCATED DIRECTLY OUTSIDE OF THE COMMITTEE HEARING ROOMS ON THE FIRST FLOOR OF THE HOUSE AND THE SENATE. Once set up, your account will include your user name and password.

On the login page, you will be required to enter your user name and password.

Before you click the 'Login' button, be sure and select the appropriate chamber in which the bill is being heard, either the House or the Senate. After you login, you will be taken to the committee agenda page that lists all current committee agendas for the chamber you have chosen.
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There are two ways to find the bill you wish to address. If you know the bill number, you can enter it into the appropriate box and click 'Begin Search'. If you know the committee, you can select it from the list and click 'Begin Search'. Selecting the committee gives you all the bills on the agenda, so , if you wish to address more than one bill, this is the best way to address multiple bills. There is a third way to find the bill, using the 'key phrase' search, but the search engine is very problematic. If you get to this page and realize that the bill you are looking for is in the other chamber you can quickly go there by clicking the 'Change to House' button.

By clicking the "Begin Search" tab, you will be taken to the committee agenda you selected.

The agenda page displays all the bills that are on the agenda for the committee that was chosen on the prior page. If the agenda is accessed while the committee is actually meeting, some bills may be indicated 'COMPLETED'. This means that the bill has already been before the committee and is no longer available for public input. Find the bill that you wish to address, the bills are in numerical order. Click on the circle next to the bill number and then select the 'CHOOSE BILL' button under the bill selected.

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Once a bill has been selected, you are taken to the comment page.

There are four items that need to be filled out on this page. First, you must identify who you are representing. The default is 'SELF'., but if you're representing an organization, then you should identify it. Next, are you 'FOR', 'NEUTRAL', or 'AGAINST' Then, there is a space available to insert comments. It is not necessary to comment, but if you are not planning to speak, this is the only place to make your comments. Finally, you need to identify whether you wish to be heard in committee. A 'YES' or 'IF NECESSARY' assumes your presence at the committee hearing. When done, click 'Submit Information'

When you have finished your comments, there is a LOGOUT tab at the top of the page. Just above the LOGOUT, is a tab to return to ALIS homepage. If there is another bill on this particular agenda on which you wish to comment, then return to the ALIS home page and start the process over for the next bill for which you wish to comment.

FIGURING OUT A.L.I.S.


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'LEAVE-BEHIND INFORMATION'

THE FOLLOWING PAGES PROVIDE SUGGESTED INFORMATION FOR EACH SUPERINTENDENT TO DEVELOP FOR THEIR SCHOOL DISTRICT. THIS INFORMATION CAN BE GIVEN AT INITIAL MEETINGS OR SHARED AS NEEDED. THE PROFILE SHOULD CONTAIN INFORMATION OF INTEREST ON STUDENT POPULATIONS, INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF, SUPPORT STAFF AND FISCAL INFORMATION THAT PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF THE DISTRICT. THE PROFILE ALSO SHOULD INCLUDE CONTACT INFORMATION INCLUDING KEY STAFF CONTACT INFORMATION, DISTRICT AND SCHOOL WEBSITES, DISTRICT MAPS, AND COMMUNITY CONTACTS AFFILIATED WITH THE SCHOOL DISTRICT. THIS PROFILE IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR DISTRICT'S SUCCESSES AND CHALLENGES. THIS IS ALSO AN OPPORTUNITY TO PROFILE JUST HOW THE CURRENT ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT HAS IMPACTED YOUR DISTRICT'S OPERATIONS.

AS YOU TALK WITH LEGISLATORS, IT IS REQUESTED THAT ON OCCASION YOU MENTION YOUR INVOLVEMENT IN ASA. AN ASA HANDOUT IS PROVIDED.

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School/District Information
In this day and age of school district transparency and improved communication, the public wants and is entitled to the facts of how efficiently your schools and districts are operating. Provided for you are examples from which you share district information with your staff and community. In order to demonstrate how funding has impacted your district over the past five years, consider comparing data from previous years. It is helpful to emphasize school and district achievements even though there have been challenges. The following reports can be used for reference or comparisons when using data for your school districts: Arizona Auditor Generals Report http://www.auditorgen.state.az.us/PDF/Annual_Report.pdf National Center for Educational Statistics http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=372 Examples of State/District Fast Facts: http://fcps.schoolwires.com/15291076154630333/site/default.asp - Frederick County Public Schools - Maryland http://www.edina.k12.mn.us/district/fastfacts.html - Edina Public Schools Minnesota http://www.ncpublicschools.org/quickfacts/ - North Carolina Public Schools http://www.ccusd93.org/ - Cave Creek Unified School District Budget Guide Sources of Information: www.azgov.gov executive budget media presentation www.azauditor.gov reports school districts www.civicindex4education.org www.everyday-democracy.org www.givekidsgoodschools.org

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Suggested Presentations
How the State Budget Crisis will impact you and your school information for (staff and parents) key points upon which to add detail and local data: Arizona: is spending more than it collects in revenue Education is Arizonas largest budget item Education funding has experienced significant reductions Our district receives X% of its funding from the state If the state cuts education funding our district will experience additional cuts (identify those recently taken and likely to be taken, if appropriate) Budget misconceptions (cut fat, using bond and capital funds, expected 2% funding increase, administrative bloat, etc.)

Where do we spend our money? example .. $58 xxxxx .. $12 xxxxx .. $12 xxxxx etc. For every $100 we receive (use actual figures; expand, compare with previous point in time) Most money goes to people - Who do we employ (give # and positions) - Most money goes to salaries, and most of that goes to classroom teachers (how much) Costs over which we have little control - Gasoline, utilities, health insurance Directed revenue (cant be used for other things) - Food services, transportation, Federal funds

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WHO IS ARIZONA SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS?


The Arizona School Administrators ASA is a 501 ( c ) 3, non-profit organization whose members are K-20 school administrators, which includes district superintendents, and central office directors, administrators, and managers, as well as building level principals and personnel in the teacher training institutions. ASAs membership spans the entire state and its 226 school districts and the public and private colleges of education. Unlike other states with separate associations, ASA is the umbrella association for six divisions: Superintendents, Secondary, Middle Level, Elementary, Educational Services, and Higher Education. Each division elects its own board and the president of each division sits on ASAs Executive Board. In addition to participating in the two ASA conferences that are held annually for the general membership, each division holds workshops and training programs that are tailored to the needs of its members. Under the direction of the ASA Executive Board, the organization provides leadership training programs and workshops that promote and support excellence in educational leadership. The programs sponsored by ASA are geared at expanding the leadership abilities at the district and school site level with the over-arching goal of providing the highest quality academic experience to Arizonas students. In addition to training and workshops related to current Arizona and national issues, ASA provides support to superintendents and principals by serving as a voice for administrators to articulate their position on policy matters to the Department of Education, the State Board of Education, the Governors office and the State Legislature. ASA coordinates its advocacy position with other Arizona based education organizations, notably the Arizona School Boards Association, the Arizona Education Association, and the Small and Rural Schools Association. In addition to working with the other Arizona professional education based associations, ASA also is affiliated with other organizations that include advocacy for K-12 public education in their mission. In addition to these statewide groups, ASA maintains close ties with its national affiliates: the American Association of School Administrators, National Association of Secondary School Principals and the National Association of Elementary School Principals. For further information about the organization, visit the ASA website at www.azsa.org.
1910 W. WASHINGTON ST., PHOENIX, AZ 85009 602.252.0361 1.800.472.9753 FAX 602.252.8862 www.azsa.org

Arizona School Administrators 1910 W. Washington St., Phoenix, AZ 85009 Phone: (602) 252-0361/1-800-472-9753 FAX: (602) 252-8862 WEBSITE: www.azsa.org