Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.

oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

Article Pitching Tips for Freelance Writers // ‘Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin Hacks’
“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

Hi…
For a while, people have been asking me about how to pitch articles to a publication and land a commission for fun and profit. So, instead of repeating myself ad infinitum (I do enough of that already…), I wrote a little guide, which I have called Jack's Bitchin' Pitchin' Hacks. So, think of them as a series of ingredients to use in your pitching recipe. No pitch could possibly include them all (what kind of crazy recipe would that be?) but you can pick and mix from them to make said pitch more palatable to your commissioning editor (hah...) Think of it as your cribsheet / cheatsheet. The document contains hyperlinks, which look like this. Caveat: These are what have worked for me as a writer. I have worked in journalism, copywriting and technical writing (etc), whereas I have no experience with other/specialist areas such as grant writing or medical writing. Nobody's an expert in everything! :) So, as with everything, “Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense". Take what is usable from here and discard the rest. And as always, tweet me if I can be any help: @koukouvaya

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

The Fundamentals:

• Always mention that you are willing to revise the angle or
outline to suit the editor's needs (including the title) • State that the word-count can be flexible. Offer to meet/amend to word count requirements.

• THE SUPER HELPFUL FREELANCER

MINDSET: You are here to serve the editor and reach the
editorial goals. You are flexible. You are super open to feedback. You are a problem solver. You are meticulous. • You are shit hot because there are thousands of other people who are perhaps equally as good and who could be doing what you do. You will earn this commission and you will make the editor come back to you for more! • Phrasing: State why you 'feel' these ideas may be suitable (not that you 'know'). Politeness: Good. Assumptions: Usually not good. • Ask questions. The pitch is not you telling the editor 'what's what', it's a means of opening a dialogue to find out what the editor wants, which can be uncovered by questions. And then finding how you can fix it with your wordsmithing.
“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

• *** If this is a proposal to an editor you don't yet have a work
relationship with…Ask for the sale (the commission) at the end! This would make sure the editor knows this is a pitch, not a full article and not a press release. • Example: "I'd be happy to get started as soon as possible, could you let me know if this is a piece that you would be interested in commissioning, and if so, how we may begin?"

Structuring

• You can pitch ideas longform or shortform. Initially, shortform • • • • • •
is best... Shortform pitches can be developed into longform pitches with editorial interest. (see below for examples) Does the first sentence have a hook/summary? Even better, can you summarise it in one clear sentence? i.e.: Pitch for Alien film: "It's Jaws…in space!" Can you offer a sidebar to accompany your piece?

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

Shortform Example:
Title of piece (can be speculative) Angle and keywords you’ll address Target wordcount Piece ‘In a nutshell’ Example of one of the main points you’ll address (works especially great if it’s a list article) • Personal connection/experience/credibility, if any.

• • • • •

Longform Example:
• • • • • • • • • • • • •
Title of piece (can be speculative) Angle and keywords you’ll address Target wordcount Piece ‘In a nutshell’ Main Topic/Angle Secondary Angle(s) Is there an alternative/opposing viewpoint? Who could you speak to? How would the story be illustrated/photographed? Example of one of the main points you’ll address Personal connection/experience/credibility, if any. What can the reader learn/take away from the story? Any similar stories you can reference/link to?

Real Pitch Example: “Food Trends: The History of Coffee” [Which I wrote for Yahoo…] • How it is made and prepared • How it was discovered
“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

• How caffeine works on the body and why we enjoy it. How much • • • • • • •
is too much? Defining different types - espresso, cappuccino etc. Difference in coffee preparation and how this affects taste Interview with an expert e.g. coffee connoisseur! - Most expensive coffee? How to tell 'what's good' etc. Main types of coffee beans - e.g. Arabica Historical significance of coffee. How it is enjoyed across the world - regional variety in coffee preparation (e.g. Greeks love of frappe etc.) Personal note: I'm a coffee fanatic and could bring a lot to this one!

Adding Value / Ties

• Is there a celebrity tie in or statement from a celebrity's agent? • Any interviews with subject matter experts? • Any juicy quotes or soundbites you can include in selling the
pitch?
“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

• Ties: Any mention of the subject in scientific press/trade •
journals? (great for technical subjects) Are you familiar with competing industry publications, and will others ignore the query? - How will this publication get an edge on the competition by commissioning you? Tell them! Can you provide images? If your own, can you prove they are yours? If from another, can you prove you have the explicit right to use them? Tip: Always ask your source for image attribution and copyright information. Get it in writing that the source of the images is OK for you to use them. Another tip: If writing for web, don't forget to provide your images with file names that are relevant to the article, and short. E.g. 'stallone-the-expendables.jpg' Yet another tip: you can use the CC image search to find images, but be sure to double check the 'terms of use' for the selected image.

SEO: Do you have a keyword strategy? - I.e. is a specific

keyword combination trending, which you can address in your article (and especially in the article title!). You can use Google Trends to see what's happening. And you can address the keyword in your title. • If pitching for web, do you have an online/social media following (can you quote follower counts, etc.) or another means to drive traffic to the article?

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

Selling Yourself

• Can you provide a shortform bio with a link to more info if •
editor is interested in learning about you? Can you offer some writing references or a link to your website (you can do this with your LinkedIn profile - using recommendations) here's my LinkedIn profile as an example. This is VERY important. Others singing your praises > You singing your praises. (“Social proof”) Can you boost your professional credibility? - i.e. professional affiliations, links to previous cuttings in *authoritative* publications etc. Provide a link to your professionally made/looking site. Do you have a writing portfolio yet? If you’ve got the cuttings, prove it! Here’s an example of mine on Muckrack and Contently Portfolio: track record. Actions speak louder than words. People would rather judge you based on what you’ve already done than take a gamble on a ‘new’ writer. Which is why working unpaid ‘for experience’ and being paid in ‘exposure’ is (sadly) so common in the industry.

• • •

• • •

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

• Got any personal experience on the topic? Prove it. (cuttings,
testimonials, professional experience, your story…)

Timing
• Mention if any part of the article is currently in the news. • Or will be in the news at a predicted time of release? • (Obviously best for a prolonged/slow moving story idea or a
one with a seasonal tie in - i.e. a Christmas story...) • For some online properties (such as gossip/showbiz news) where stories move incredibly fast, even getting the story a few hours before everybody else is a major selling point. Can do you do that? • Consider the editorial calendar - do you know what they're planning to write about? - and can you offer to help them out in advance?

Pitch Development:
• Pitch Credibility: Can you get statistics to back up your story?
Are they from a *credible* source? (such as a government agency and not a study commissioned by a corporation – ALWAYS CONSIDER ‘ULTERIOR MOTIVES’) And can you verify them, firsthand? Can you pitch for/refine your pitch for a specific subject area(s)? Can you consider adapting/repurposing an older pitch or outline for this publication? (This can save you time having to come up with and pitch new ideas and get you more ‘bang for your buck’ out of some of your better ones)

• • • •

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

Extending The Article

• Why just do one piece? Can you pitch a series of articles? • Or can you break a pitch with a large word count into a series of
articles? • If the pitch isn't suitable, and development isn't an option, but the editor genuinely likes the idea, can you ask them for a recommendation on who else to take it to? • This can get you a ‘warm’ introduction to a possible new source of work and makes the editor look good for passing on something worthwhile (i.e. you and your story) to the other editor.

Deadlines
• As a rule: Don't miss 'em. • Consistency with hitting deadlines is one of the best ways to
demonstrate your (ongoing) professionalism as a writer. • If it looks like you are going to miss your initial quoted deadline, contact your editor as well in advance as possible. Explain your reasons and apologise.
“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

• Some deadlines are more fixed than others. It's not the end of
the world if you miss the very occasional one. But plenty of warning is important. As is a good reason.

Other Ideas…
• Can you offer a choice of topics and offer to be open on which •
the editor picks? Can you offer examples of display copy or the text you could lead/introduce the piece with? The text by which you will 'hook' the reader. You can pitch multiple ideas in one paragraph per idea and offer to work with the editor to hone the ones he/she likes, to fit the publication needs. This way you can develop multiple story ideas (and commissions) in a single email thread. You can offer 'feature suggestions' (you do have awesome ideas, right!?)

• •

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

Caveat: Westerners Beware!: Freelance Marketplaces, Globalisation & 'Lowballing' Yourself.

• • In a bidding environment (such as a freelance marketplace like elance.com), many writers from countries where English is a second language will bid well below what is economically viable for Westerners to charge. • If you are a Westerner, you may feel obliged to compete with them. Don't. • This is almost like a trap. The vast majority of these writers can't provide the kind and quality of material that a native speaker can. • There is a separate market in which clients will pay much more cheaply for a somewhat lower quality of written work. • And this is probably not the market that someone living in the West can afford to work in. • Here clients often care more about quantity of words, keeping costs down and passing copyscape tests.
“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

• It’s not a value judgment, nor is it elitist to draw the distinction
between these two, separate markets. Noticing them is the financial reality of the global marketplace and freelancing online. • You are a professional, or at least aspiring to be one. So charge that way. You don’t have to work all hours to pay the bills if you don’t want to. • Clients who want native language quality written work done, inherently will have to pay properly for it. ! • Writing should be fun. And nobody has to starve!

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

After the successful Pitch…
Money

Here's some stuff to remember and expect for after you've 'landed' your gig...

• Consider the Freelancer Commissioning Budget: • • • • • • •
Some publications don't have a budget for freelancers, others do. Some have it renew monthly, others are given a lump sum at the beginning of the year or another time. Do you know if they've actually got money to commission you? If you get the commission is there explicit written evidence that details what you'll be covering for them? Just in case there are any misunderstandings in future? If you arranged the pitch via a telephone call, it's good to send a confirmation email to your commissioning editor. In this, outline what they’re paying you, what you’ll do, and when you’ll deliver by. Ensure that they respond to this email with an affirmative to confirm that everybody agrees on what’s to be done

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

Rates: Are variable. In the UK many freelancers refer to NUJ

rates for guidance. American freelancers may want to look at AmSAW's rates. • You can state your rates in advance but you may find that your publication has their own. Is there an amicable overlap?

• • • • •

Everything is a negotiation (though this doesn't
mean snarling, ‘nickeling and diming’ and playing 'hard ball'). What's your bottom line? Don't work below it (this is what a bottom line is for) Is this a very new client or one without a reputable track record? Collect a retainer up front (30-50% is common). You'll be glad you did ! Client sprung a really imminent deadline on you? You can increase your rate ("rush surcharge") for the piece - this is often done as adding an extra % of the final project fee. Quoting by the project (not by the hourly rate) often makes the client more comfortable. It also incentivises you to work faster and more efficiently. IMHO it is perceived as much more trustworthy for the client. Cos they know what they’re going to get for what they pay! Consider your ‘unofficial hourly rate’ (AKA how long things really take). If a project pays a low fee, but you can complete it a very short period of time, your actual per hourly rate for the project might actually be very good! You can also find relatively up to date rates in the Writer's Market Wondering how much you need to charge? FreelanceSwitch have an excellent Hourly Rate Calculator which helps you work out your minimum (break-even) hourly rate, along with a bunch of other help. ** Don’t be afraid to ‘fire’ your lower paying clients when the time to ‘give yourself a payrise’ comes. You can’t take on

• • • • •

• •

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

higher paying assignments if you work all hours on lower paying ones!! **

Rewrites, Reputation & Not Being Taken Advantage Of…
• Rewrites very often happen and will often fall upon you, not the
editor to complete. Budget extra time for them and expect them to appear later on and/or when you don’t expect them. However, the responsibility for rewrites can be subjective. (See Scope creep) If a client is being unreasonable with rewrite it may not always be your responsibility to rewrite. You are here to provide epic service, and exceed your clients’ expectations, but not be taken advantage of (which can be a common (mis)treatment of any small business provider, including the writer). And so, accountability here is very much a discretionary matter. When in doubt refer to your brief (you do have a clear brief right?). Remember that freelancer service mindset: you always want to make your editor/client happy. **One unhappy client will probably make more of an impact than ten happy ones.** **Your reputation is the difference between no work ever, and the whole world singing your praises. Take care to look out for it.**

• • •

• • • • •

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

Success: becoming more ‘attractive…’

• With a stellar track record and good reputation, the law of • •
supply and demand slowly tips in your favour. This might mean reoccurring assignments, invitations to pitch, people approaching you, asking you to write for them, etc. Building ‘successful career’ and a track record is thus a side effect of doing good work consistently and letting the world know about it. (AKA building a reputation) Going from pushing for work (i.e. approaching and pitching people), to pulling in work (i.e. having work sent to you) Or you could call it ‘attracting work.’ In car dealership metaphors, it’s the difference between a prestigious company that has such a powerful reputation/brand that it can charge almost what it wants (ie Ferrari).. And say a ‘budget’ dealership who has to do a lot of marketing and play ‘games’ with car prices. (Also see differences between push and pull marketing.)

• • • •

• •

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

Your Writer’s Niche: Going Deep Vs. Going Wide

• You can think of the process as either going ‘wide’ or ‘deep’. • In depth you cultivate a very specific niche and area of •
expertise. An example of depth would be someone who was one of the only people in the world who knew about the subject (thus making it a specialist subject). They might for, example, hold a Ph.D. Depth is good because there is very little competition (almost nobody else can do what you do) – but the subject can be hard to get into without some serious background study/credentials. Also some subjects can be so niched that there’s not much work writing about them. In width, you might write for an area that is much more popular and thus more competitive. An example of a ‘wide subject’ would be say, football journalism.

• • •

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

• However, if you were to take football journalism and apply some
depth to it, you could be a writer who specialises on Chelsea FC – less work, less competition As well as being very knowledgeable on the subject, you usually have to make the effort to position yourself as an expert. ‘Cos people usually won’t just ‘appoint you. But beware the ‘flipside’ of this: don’t try to cultivate expert status in too many topics. How many you feel comfortable with is down to you, but too many will stretch your credibility. Some people who want to write on a lot of things (me included) use pseudonyms to avoid this appearance of ‘overreaching’. It’s the same reason that large brands create different brand identities, with different names, for different areas of the market (see brand extension) You can of course choose not to position yourself as an expert on anything at all (‘generalisation’) As a generalist this can allow you to write widely about almost anything at a lower, nonspecialist level. ‘Expertise gaps’ can be filled with expert interviews and a ton of research. This is often the news journalist’s approach. Chase various bylines on various subjects up to a point – versatility is good and insurance against downturns in any subject area or with any specific client. “Specialisation is for insects” - Robert A. Heinlein Don’t have a niche? Don’t worry! – The more that you work on your writing, the more likely you are to find your niche emerging. This is similar to the process of ‘pigeonholing’ in which people infer what you are good at, from your previous experience. In this way people sort of ‘assign’ you a niche and you end up doing work in that area more and more over time. The process reinforces itself…

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• • •

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

• Think about how water ‘finds its course’. It does what comes
naturally and easiest and then over time, wears out a course, which becomes the riverbed. • Which becomes the river… • It can be the same for you. • It’s basically a positive feedback loop.

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

In Closing / Summary / Takeaway
• Pitch a lot. The failure rate is high and it’s a numbers game! • Expect rejection. But a rejection of your pitch is not a rejection •
of your abilities and worth as a writer. Help everybody, including those who you wish to commission you. Be a good person, do good things, receive good things (*Kharma?*) Build contacts and cultivate a network. It’ll make you more valuable and open up opportunities you couldn’t think of. Help other people build their networks and find opportunities. Make introductions for others. Cultivate and demonstrate your expertise. Ain’t nobody else gonna do it for you! Keep a folio and cuttings. You can use a free Wordpress blog – like I have here. Or a portfolio site like Muckrack, which I have here. Editorial feedback is gold dust – solicit and apply it. You are there to serve editors, and by extension the readership. Editors need good content for their publications – you are there to help! It can help to start out pitching around subjects you are very knowledgeable/an expert in. This can help your confidence initially and your editor’s confidence in your ability to deliver. Thus, your ‘non writing experience’ transfers into your writing. Also have fun !

• • • •

• • • • • • • •

DON’T OVERTHINK IT. FEAR NAUGHT.

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

Jack’s Bitchin’ Pitchin’ Hacks v1.0 // Jack Oughton http://jackoughtonwriter.info// https://www.facebook.com/jack.oughton.writer // 2013: CC BY-NC-SA // Wanna chat? Tweet @koukouvaya

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jack Oughton, AKA Koukouvaya AKA many other names, is a writer of many things (amongst many other things) from Croydon, UK. He maintains an esoteric blog of philosophy and acerbic poetry at xijindustries.com, more ‘professional’ cuttings on Muckrack, and a portfolio of other things (mostly not writing related) at koukouvaya.co.uk. Jack can be found tweeting on as @koukouvaya and likes to say lots of words that nobody takes seriously.

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IMAGE CREDITS

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“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.”~ Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

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