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Claremont

LOCAL SCHOOLS FEEL SEQUESTRATION’S IMPACT/PAGE 9
Friday, March 8, 2013 u One dollar

claremont-courier.com

After the

FIRE

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremont residents Donah Holmes and Margaret Fulmer, with Rosie the dog, try the steep trail leading out of Sycamore Canyon Park on Saturday following the parkʼs grand re-opening. Originally opened in 1972, the park closed after the Grand Prix Fire in 2003 and underwent an extensive renovation before Saturdayʼs re-dedication. PAGE 3

Play ball! Claremont Little League holds opening day /PAGE 26

Calaycay, Schroeder re-elected/PAGE 3

A visit with Chris/PAGE 5

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POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 15

SPORTS/ PAGE 13 CALENDAR/ PAGE 18

More news and photo galleries every day at: claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

2

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City not swayed by threat

READERS’ COMMENTS
Visual pollution
Dear Editor: It’s been several weeks now and I have tried very hard to learn to love the new monument signs at the Old School House, but I can’t do it. I completely understand the desire of the merchants to have some signs with their names visible from the street, but what we have now looks like a leftover from Halloween and that gets in the way of my reading any of the text. Why couldn’t we have had 2 shorter signs with the same pastel orange as the Citibank sign, and the same background color? Why do the names have to be a jumble of sizes, fonts and colors with a minimal border around the words? All of this makes the sign very hard to read. Why not use the same font and color for all the text? Isn’t the point to make it easy for people driving by to read? A lot of people worked hard to try to preserve the OSH and to make sure it was renovated in keeping with its history and with Claremont values. These signs seriously interfere with those goals and provide an object lesson in what can go wrong when you allow large signs without sufficient restrictions on design. I may be in the minority, but to me these signs seem to create visual pollution without achieving their advertising goals very well, and to move the city toward looking like every other town. I hope we can rethink how the rules should be applied.
Sue Schenk Claremont

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
Cherry tree pink flame Reaches high for sun and sky Flawless equipoise
—Michael Bever Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
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Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
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Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
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Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Dear Editor: As reported recently in the Claremont COURIER, the city of Claremont has received several requests seeking to obtain copies of documents related to the city’s potential acquisition of the water system in Claremont. Documents that are either produced or received by the city are generally subject to the California Public Records Act (PRA). Like all requests the city receives for copies of documents and correspondence, the city has responded to these requests in accordance with state law. This specifically applies to the city’s response to the recent public records requests submitted by the Claremont COURIER and by the northern California advocacy group mentioned in the article. As the article correctly points out, this particular group is also seeking copies of correspondence the city may have received from certain Claremont residents, referred to as “activists.” The reference made by the advocacy group stating that the city has violated the Public Records Act is completely inaccurate. The city of Claremont will continue to provide documents to any individual or group in accordance with state law. Last, the article indicates that the advocacy group is threatening legal action against the city if we do not meet each of their demands and timeframes. The city of Claremont will continue to comply with every provision of the Public Records Act, and the city will not be swayed by the threat of legal action.
Larry Schroeder Mayor, Claremont

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Tuesday, March 12 City Council Council Chamber, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 13 Architectural Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Wednesday, March13 Architectural Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m.
READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 17

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

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Incumbents coast to victory in city council election
this year’s ballot may have been small, it didn’t matter to Mr. Rosenfeld, who says he has voted in every single election since the time he was able to vote. Even sickness has not kept him from the polls. “It’s a privilege,” Mr. Rosenfeld said simply. After the polls closed, a handful of constituents followed the ballots to City Hall, where a team of city workers prepared for the count. The night proved slow as City Clerk Lynne Fryman announced that the ballot counter and printer were having communication problems. Over at his Base Line Road home, Mr. Calaycay and friends anxiously awaited the returns. A friend camped at City Hall called ahead of the city’s website being updated to give them the latest results, which showed Mr. Calaycay in a healthy lead. “I’m pleased with the initial results,” Mr. Calaycay said after refreshing the election results on the city’s website, and the next couple hours proved equally pleasing. Mr. Calaycay acknowledged that while he may not be able to predict what will be at the forefront of the council agenda, he will continue to devote the same commitment. “I pledge to always stick to my 4 guiding principles: citizen-driven policy, honesty and integrity, transparency in government and fiscal responsibility,” Mr. Calaycay reiterated. On the other side of town, Mr. Schroeder gathered with family and friends at Casa Moreno. Now elected to his second term on council, Mr. Schroeder
ELECTION continues on the next page

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Councilmember Corey Calaycay meets with some of his constituents on Tuesday during an election-night party at his Claremont home. AT LEFT: Mayor Larry Schroeder visits with a supporter during his election party at Casa Moreno. Voters returned Mr. Schroeder and Mr. Calaycay to their posts.

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laremont constituents have spoken. Mayor Larry Schroeder and Councilmember Corey Calaycay will serve another 4 years on the Claremont City Council.
Voters took to the polls on Tuesday to fill the local council’s 2 open seats. Resident Michael Keenan was the only one to answer the call to run against council incumbents, submitting his campaign forms just before deadline. While confident in his campaign, Mr. Keenan fell short of unseating his oppo-

nents. Mr. Schroeder took a slim lead with 3197 votes, or 45.7 percent of the votes cast. Mr. Calaycay was a close second with 3048 votes, or 43.4 percent. Mr. Keenan came in at 773, or 11 percent of the votes. Of Claremont’s 22,962 voters, 3968 or 17.6 percent participated, a slight decrease from the city’s last biennial council election in 2011, which saw a total of 5184 ballots cast by about 25 percent of Claremont voters. In that race, 8 candidates ran for 3 open seats on the city council. The city saw a slight increase in those participating by mail. About 2422 voteby-mail or provisional ballots were cast in

this latest election as compared to about 2291 in 2011. Sonja Stump, election volunteer at Sycamore School, noted the perceived increase from years past. She also recognized an increase of voters within her precinct, which she attributed to the new, more condensed precincts. Additionally, the Sycamore precinct now includes Claremont’s politically active Pilgrim Place residents. Among Sycamore’s morning voters was David Rosenfeld, who said he was driven to the polls because there was one particular candidate he did not want elected, so he wanted to make sure to cast his vote for the other 2 candidates. While

Claremont adds more open space with grand reopening

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en years after fire forced the closure of north Claremont’s Sycamore Canyon, the park and accompanying trailheads are open once more.

About 40 hikers and 4-legged friends celebrated the park’s grand reopening over the weekend, eager to be the first to add their footprints to the newly-renovated pathway leading into Claremont’s beloved open space. A cool breeze and clear skies provided the perfect backdrop for the day as the city made good on its promise to continue to protect its wildlands. “This ceremony is a tribute to the city’s commitment to preserving our open spaces, one of the distinct features of our city,” said Mayor Larry Schroeder to the crowds awaiting entrance to the trail. With the reopening of Sycamore Canyon, the city now adds to the plethora of trails and pathways throughout the Claremont hillsides. Others include those at the Claremont Hills Wilderness Loop, Gail Mountain, Johnson’s Pasture and the Thompson Creek Trail. With the overcrowding along other Claremont pathways, notably the Wilderness Loop, hikers and city dignitaries alike welcomed the alternative means of entering the Claremont foothills. “Let’s keep this very quiet,” joked Councilmember Sam Pedroza. The journey to rebuilding Sycamore Canyon has

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff City officials and community leaders cut the ribbon on the new walking path at Sycamore Canyon Park durSYCAMORE PARK REOPENING ing a celebration on Saturday in north Claremont. The re-opened park has 2 new trails, one that is very easy continues on page 12 and winds back into the canyon. The other features a more strenuous climb up the adjacent hillside.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

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CGU announces Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award honoree

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laremont Graduate University has announced the winner of the 2013 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award.

Poet and essayist Marianne Boruch has taken the $100,000 prize, one of the largest poetry awards in the United States, for her 2011 poetry collection The Book of Hours. The award is given each year to a poet who is past the beginning stages of his or her career but who has yet to reach its pinnacle. “We are delighted to honor these poets and celebrate their achievements,” Wendy Martin, director of the Tufts Poetry Awards, said. “These awards will help them gain wider recognition and will sustain their continuing commitment to writing outstanding poetry.” Publisher Copper Canyon Press describes Ms. Boruch’s 7th poetry collection thusly: “Inspired by the tradition of homemade prayer books popular during the Middle Ages, Marianne Boruch’s The Book of Hours foregrounds the rich details of nature, which are both beautiful and ruthless. While investigating personal memory and issues of war, history, saints, god and godlessness, Boruch questions the nature of poetry itself. Within the poems are numerous, and numinous, voices.” Ms. Boruch developed and now directs the MFA program in creative writing at Purdue University. She teaches creative writing in the Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College as well as at Purdue. Ms. Boruch has earned an array of other honors, including Pushcart Prizes, a Fulbright/visiting professorship at the University of Edinburgh and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, the American Poetry Review, the Paris Review, the Yale Review and the London Review of Books. In a 2005 Washington Post column, former Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky had high praise for Ms. Boruch.

Ploughshares contributor. The Kingsley Tufts award, now in its 21st year, was established at Claremont Graduate University by Kate Tufts to honor the memory of her husband, who held executive positions in the Los Angeles shipyards and wrote poetry as his avocation. Both the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award and the Kate Tufts Discovery Award will be presented at a ceremony at Garrison Theater (231 E. 10th St. in Claremont) on Thursday, April 18. Special remarks will be given by novelist Russell Banks.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Photo courtesy of CGU Poet and essayist Marianne Boruch was named the 2013 Kingsley Tufts Poetry award winner for her collection titled The Book of Hours.

ELECTION continued from the previous page

“She sees and considers with intensity. Her poems often give fresh examples of how rare and thrilling it can be to notice...” Mr. Pinsky wrote. “Trusting observation, having the ideas and feelings emerge as continuations of that action of noticing—where others might force a sentiment or a bit of philosophizing onto things—may be a mark of genuine poetry.” Along with the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, CGU also presents the annual $10,000 Kate Tufts Discover Award for a first book by a poet of genuine promise. This year’s winner is Heidy Steidlmayer of Vacaville, California for her book Fowling Piece. Ms. Steidlmayer’s inaugural poetry collection also won the J. Howard and Barbara M.J. Wood Prize from Poetry, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award and the 2012 John C. Zacharis Award for the best debut from a

is anxious to continuing moving the city forward. “I am honored to serve,” Mr. Schroeder said. “Although it’s not always easy, some days are harder than others, it’s always nice to be able to have a voice and be entrusted with the responsibility.” Reflecting back on his campaign, Mr. Keenan is pleased with certain aspects of the outcome. His latest 776 votes exceeds his previous record of 580 votes, and he felt his message was more “clear and concise.” His one area of disappointment is the fact that more students didn’t come out to vote. “If I wasted any of the so-called $60,000, I wasted it on them,” he said. “They had a perfect opportunity to act as concerned citizens and didn’t.” Mr. Schroeder and Mr. Calaycay will be sworn in on Tuesday, March 19 at 5:30 p.m. in the City Council Chamber, 225. W. Second St.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Thursday, February 28 Snooping caused troubles for a 19-yearold La Verne resident seen peering into backyards near Mills and Miramar Avenues. In one case, Emmanuel Salazar was seen climbing onto a cement wall with one leg over before recalculating his decision. Police put an end to his sleuthing, arresting Mr. Salazar for prowling. Friday, March 1 A drunken brawl reported in the parking lot of La West Liquor, 333 E. Arrow Highway, turned out to be less of a brawl than the outburst of a loud drunk individual. Though there was no fight, police did find a couple individuals talking, one of whom was determined to be unable to care for his safety, according to Detective David De Metz. Thirty-six-year-old Michael Baird of Fontana was held at the Claremont jail until sober. Sunday, March 3 A suspected break-in attempt proved the strength of a local bank’s windows. Sometime between 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 2 and 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 3, an unknown person threw a large rock at the window of the Chase Bank on 865 S. Indian Hill Blvd. The heavy object proved insufficient, causing the window to shatter but not to break

POLICE BLOTTER

Police search for man suspected of burglary
A man’s threat was enough to keep captors at bay. Police continue the search for a man suspected of burglarizing Rhino Records on Thursday, February 28. Around 3:30 p.m., the man set off the burglar alarm while exiting the business. When confronted by store employees, he stated, “I have a gun on me.” Though no gun was seen, the employees backed off and the man was able to flee on foot. Property loss is unknown. The suspect was described as a Hispanic or white male, around 40 to 45 years old, 5 feet, 10 inches tall, and weighing 170 pounds, with a thin mustache and goatee. At the time of the incident, he was reportedly wearing a black Adidas knit cap, a gray/black North Face jacket, a black T-shirt, black Adidas warm-up pants with white stripes down Tuesday, March 5 Police are searching for a bicycle gang wanted for attacking an innocent bystander in Claremont Tuesday night. The victim was walking along San Jose Avenue around 9:30 p.m. when 5 men on bicycles approached him. One asked him for a lighter, while another offered to sell him weed. Caught off guard by the questions, the victim was further unneerved when one of the men struck him in the head with a closed fist, according to Det.

apart. No entry was made. Monday, March 4 Trevon Perry-Vandaveer, 21, of Rancho Cucamonga shattered a car window in the 800 block of Decatur on Monday night and successfully stole a stereo amplifier. He let his eagerness get the best of him and proved less lucky when he went back for more. Attempting to steal the speaker box, he was caught off guard by the owner of the vehicle. Though Mr. Perry-Vandaveer fled, he was taken down by Claremont police, who found him still in possession of the stereo amplifier. He admitted to his crime. Mr. Perry-Vandaveer was arrested for burglary and for possession of stolen property. **** Claremont police are searching for a man involved in an armed robbery Monday night. Just after 9 p.m., the man entered the Chevron Gas Station at 860 S. Indian Hill Blvd. and held a chrome handgun at the cashier, demanding cash. He took off through the parking lot with $500, according to a news release. The robber is described as a Hispanic male between 20-30 years old, about 5 feet 8 inches tall and 160 pounds, wearing a brown hooded sweatshirt and blue pants. Any information should be reported to Claremont police at 399-5411.

each side and tennis shoes with white soles. If you recognize this suspect, call the Claremont Police Department’s Detective Bureau at 399-5420. Police caution that if you see the suspect, do not approach him, but immediately call 911. De Metz. Fearing for his safety, the victim took off toward Mountain Avenue. The bicycle crew took off in an unknown direction as well. The victim was able to describe 3 of the bicyclists as 18-year-old Hispanic males, each between 5 feet 8 inches and 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighing 140 pounds. Two had black spiked hair.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

5

STATE NEWS

Assemblyman Chris Holden is on the move
Setting up his new office, talking about water, focusing on the Gold Line and making visits to Claremont are just a few projects keeping the assemblyman busy his first few months in office.

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hile Claremont residents discuss water locally, Claremont’s Assemblyman Chris Holden is continuing the discussion at the state level.
On a rare day off from his duties up in Sacramento, Mr. Holden stopped by the COURIER recently to give an update on his plans for the 41st District, which now includes the city of Claremont. One of his top priorities is calling on the California Public Utilities Commission to hold a meeting in town. He confirmed his outreach to the government-elected utilities board last week. “I’m trying to enable a deeper level of communication,” Mr. Holden said. “The first step is just opening the discussion.” This isn’t the first step Mr. Holden has taken on the local water front. On February 25, the assemblyman wrote to CPUC President Michael Peevey imploring him and the rest of the CPUC board to make a thorough assessment of the water rates from every perspective. He asked Mr. Peevey to “examine both the benefits and the detriments of this requested rate increase in the context of [Golden State Water Company’s] ability to deliver water resources and the economic impact this increase will have on homeowners and businesses.” “My goal is to ensure that the interests of ratepayers are protected, and I believe that a higher level of scrutiny is necessary to ensure this. It is imperative that the PUC fulfill this oversight role,” he continued. On Friday, in a follow-up to his letter, the assemblyman asked the CPUC to host a meeting in Claremont for both parties involved: ratepayers and the Golden State Water Company. “It’s about accountability and transparency...and they have to make themselves available to the community,” Mr. Holden said. “That’s part of their constituency.” Taking part in the water discussion is not the only area of concern for Claremont residents that Mr. Holden is taking an interest in. Holding a meeting on regional activity in regards to transportation is also at the top of his agenda. Mr. Holden says he wants to keep the lines of communication open as locals look to issues like local control of the Ontario Airport and expansion of the Gold Line. One solution he offered is to speak with the assembly’s Transportation Committee Chair Bonnie Lowenthal about hosting a meeting in Claremont to explore regional transportation connectivity. “Citizens aren’t getting integrated into the regional plan and what this all means,” he explained. He hopes to get residents involved in those discussions.

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff State Assemblyman Chris Holden was in Claremont last week to discuss legislation he has submitted and and to learn about issues that are important to the cityʼs residents.

“It’s important, understanding how local government works and gets things done,” Mr. Holden said. “And I think that’s what we can do, it’s just at another level.” From council to assembly Mr. Holden is no novice to the local sector. At age 28, he followed the footsteps of his father and ventured into politics at the local government level, becoming a Pasadena city councilman. Twenty-three years later, he holds the title as the Pasadena Council’s second longest-sitting member. Though now serving at the state level, he says he hasn’t forgotten his obligation to serve his constituents locally. “It’s part of the job. You run on a campaign that’s designed to address issues in the community, some that are institutional—like education, getting people back to work, the Gold Line— and then other issues that sort of come spontaneously to the floor.” Mr. Holden’s proposed bill on human trafficking came to be because of one such spontaneous conversation during his campaign. It was first sparked in a meeting with the Claremont Interfaith Group. He recalls the conversation on human trafficking was brought up because of its presence as a proposition on the November ballot. “I didn’t lose sight of that conversation,” Mr. Holden said. “As [my legislative team and I] started to look at different bills we would pursue, the idea

of a human trafficking bill was brought up. And it started to make sense, because human trafficking is not covered. You have drug trafficking laws and arms trafficking, but when it came to human trafficking there is nothing.” As chance would have it, not long after that conversation, one of Mr. Holden’s team members attended a rally against violence on women on the steps of the Capitol and met a woman from Arizona who had been the victim of human trafficking. She was released because an Arizona law that allowed wiretapping helped expose her persecutor. Mr. Holden saw an opportunity. With AB156, he proposes granting a judge in the state of California permission to allow wiretapping during an investigation of sex trafficking a minor. “We thought it gave an opportunity to get law enforcement an official tool in this capacity and at the same time fill a void,” Mr. Holden explained.   Mr. Holden is also spearheading a bill to help manage the current budget crisis in California schools, staying true to another issue discussed on the campaign trail. AB1064 presents a strategy to create better funding for public schools. Whereas the schools currently have budgets based on average daily attendance, Mr. Holden suggests switching to average enrollment as the way of determining a budget. “If the budget is based on enrollment, then at least your budget isn’t moving around,” he said.

One foot in the 41st District Mr. Holden certainly is busy, not only as a new assemblyman but also as the assembly’s designated majority whip, elected earlier this year. Though his schedule is certain to continue filling up, he is making strides to keep to his mission of open communication with his constituents. With that in mind, Mr. Holden is hosting monthly office hours throughout the 41st District. Mr. Holden’s staff is available to speak with Claremont residents the third Tuesday of every month from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Citrus Room above the City Council Chamber at 225 W. Second St. He also plans to host an open house next Saturday, March 16, from 2 to 5 p.m., at his new district office, located at 600 N. Rosemead Blvd., Suite 117, in Pasadena. The event is free and open to the public and Mr. Holden hopes constituents will take him up on the opportunity to share their concerns about the 41st Assembly District. “What I heard along the way [on the campaign trail] was accessibility,” Mr. Holden said. “And I’m trying to provide that.” Mr. Holden’s district office is open Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 626577-9944.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

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Changing the landscape of our treasured neighborhoods
by Joanne MacAlpine

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here is an important issue impacting residents in Claremont, namely those living in homes located north of the 210 freeway. There is a large group of us who are pursuing ways to allay our worries at what the state of California is doing to our neighborhood.

VIEWPOINT
cility. This seems suspicious to me. This home, according to a discussion with the owner, is an investment. They have friends who have many such facilities in other areas and it is reportedly quite profitable. If there is adequate watch over this facility from the state as to compliance, then we have no worry but, as the owner told me, there was no concern about traffic and parking because when people are placed in these homes, they have “no visitors.” The home is on the corner of a very busy east and west street and cul-de-sac, so there is no parking for additional cars. What about the frequency of fire trucks and ambulances for emergencies? If the residents have no visitors, who is to monitor the care they are receiving? Two local real estate agents have said it will impact our property. Our worry is that the assisted living went in without any notification to neighboring residents. Who is to say another property won’t be sold and a sober living, halfway house or independent living home won’t go in?

A hospice house is now located on the corner of Mt. Carmel and Indian Hill, with an assisted living home for the elderly located immediately behind it on San Jacinto with 6 elderly residents. Another community group for challenged foster children is located on Norwich. A halfway house is located in the Tulane Road area, and there are 3 other facilities in residential neighborhoods east of Indian Hill. Our concern is that the state of California is circumventing neighbors by allowing these establishments in areas without notification. I personally have no objection to the hospice, but many neighbors are vehemently against them. The assisted living house was leased and the businesses owner upgraded the interior and put a name on the exterior, so that when you go on the Internet you immediately find them listed back east as a 5-star fa-

We were an enclave of original-owner residents with a shared pride in our properties, along with all the new young families raising their children. The halfway house is a new addition to the Tulane area and I have heard some of the neighbors are really dismayed, to say the least. We have all been in contact with the city and each of the people contacting Councilmember Corey Calaycay received a personal visit from him. Mr. Calaycay informed me that the city has no local control over the facilities going in, as long as they stay at or below a 6-person occupancy. Mr. Calaycay has been very helpful, however, the only advice he was able to give is that each individual should get in touch with state officials, as they are the ones who make these laws and can see that they are enforced. Local regional representatives include Assemblyman Chris Holden, Senator Carol Liu, Congresswoman Judy Chu and, on the federal side, Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer. The Head Code Enforcement Officer Michael Felton responded to my call and informed me that there is nothing that the city can do except monitor the home’s exterior and see that there aren’t broken-down cars, yards not taken care of or any structural damage visible from the outside. The neighbors have to call state officials to have them enter the home and make sure they are in compliance if they believe there is a problem. As concerned citizens, we are worrying now about houses going up for lease or sale. Who is buying and for what purpose? Are our neighborhoods going to be inundated like areas in Pomona, Ontario, Fontana and San Bernardino? The crime rate has increased two-fold in our area with a home invasion on Oxford Drive and people trying to break in on Sage Court with the owners at home. Turn on your alarms and bless your big dog with its loud bark. Above all, do not open your door unless you know who is there and you are expecting visitors. Wake up, Claremont. Be advised that the state is eyeing our area for facilities. Write our legislators for complete overview and to demand better compliance of the requirements for these facilities.

The birth of comedy. [slapstick?]

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

7

Pining away in Claraboya
Dear Editor: I read with bemused interest the plight of those poor folks in the Claremont Club area attempting to save their pine trees. Frankly, they are more than welcome to them. However, if the city is determined to rid itself of some pine trees, allow those of us in Claraboya to make a suggestion. Take ours! We have begged the city to remove those destructive, messy fire hazards for years with no success. We are happy to make the sacrifice and come to the rescue of the Club neighborhood.
Bruce Langford Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS
scionable. What makes it worse is that many of the people who are espousing this actually claim to be Christian. What a travesty. In the spirit of Medgar Evers,
Dan Kennan Claremont

Freedom and safety
Dear Editor: Leslie Watkins’ letter to the editor (Friday, March 1) is hypercritical of a previous letter submitted by Ellen Taylor (Saturday, February 23), which addressed the issue of gun violence in America and encouraged legislative action. The letter expresses Watkins’ opinions forcefully, but ignores the essential points of Ms. Taylor’s letter. Watkins berates Ms. Taylor for wanting “all of us” to give up “our rights,” and for not realizing that “the bad guys” with guns would thereby gain an advantage over “the good guys.” Watkins criticizes Ms. Taylor's proposals for their “head in the sand” lack of foresight, courage and trust in her fellow man.” Along the way, Watkins totally disregards the findings of current opinion surveys on issues related to gun violence, and suggests that Ms. Taylor would have sided with the monarchy in the Revolutionary War. There are several problems here, beginning with the issue of “our rights.” The Second Amendment states: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the

Restricting voters’ rights
Dear Editor: Strike down parts of the 1965 Voting Rights Act? This, unfortunately, is not amazing to me. With the unbelievably racist bile spewed by some members of our political right in the past 4 years, it’s all too predictable. In the past 2 years, 41 states have passed 180 laws to restrict voter registration; the president of our country has been called an “ape,” a “Half-rican,” and many other sick epithets; and one of our Supreme Court “justices” calls the Voting Rights Act “a perpetuation of Black entitlement.” When did the availability of voting become an entitlement? Maybe “Justice” Scalia should trade in his black robe for a white one with a hood. The idea of striking down what many historians believe to be the single most important piece of legislation passed in the fight for Civil Rights is uncon-

people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” This is an unusual sentence structure. The first clause, known as the preamble, makes a point of explaining exactly why the right to keep and bear arms was considered necessary back in the 1780s. This was related to disagreements that were not yet resolved about the risks and benefits of maintaining a standing army. It is reasonable to wonder if the clearly-stated reason for the Second Amendment still applies in the 21st century. This debatable question might have to be reexamined by the Supreme Court. In the meantime we have some major public safety issues to consider. That is what Ms. Taylor’s letter was about, despite Watkins’ diversions. We have over 300 million guns in the United States, far more than any other country. And we have the very highest “death by gun” rate of any developed country in the world. Coincidence? Many objective Americans think not! And yet the number of increasingly lethal guns continues to increase. So, we have to wonder, would having 400 million guns really make us safer and more free? How is that possible? Ms. Taylor’s letter encouraged a reasonable and democratic approach to stemming the tide of gun violence. Responsible proposals include universal background checks, bans on sales of certain military weapons and limits on ammunition magazine capacities. Whose “freedoms” would be seri-

ously diminished by improved regulation? Cars also present safety concerns. So we have enacted hundreds of laws and regulations that serve to keep us safer, including registration, insurance requirements and specific rules defining what is “street legal.” Is that an egregious sacrifice of our rights? Where should we draw the line? That is the essential question. Should we all be able to possess atomic bombs? Why not? After all, atomic bombs don’t kill people; only people kill people. “Bad guys” with atomic bombs might pose a danger, but lots of “good guys” with atomic bombs would keep us all safe. Right? No need to infringe on anyone. Let’s try to be responsible and honest about this. Sometimes the greater public interest, the “general welfare” of our entire population, has to supersede the strident imperatives of the simple rightwing mantra, “Don't tread on me!” Our perpetual challenge is to find and maintain the optimal balance of freedom and safety.

Dave Nemer Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

8

Tickets available for CEF’s annual Toyota Prius Raffle

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olding out for a hybrid? You have until approximately 2 p.m. on Friday, April 21 to buy tickets for the Claremont Educational Foundation’s 2012-2013 Toyota Prius Car Raffle.
Tickets to win a 2012 Toyota Prius C, donated to the Claremont Educational Foundation (CEF) by Claremont Toyota, are $20. They are being sold by members of the CEF board and at various locations

in the Claremont Unified School District, including the school offices at Chaparral, Condit, Mountain View, Sumner, Danbury, Oakmont, Sycamore and El Roble schools. You can also buy raffle tickets from members of the Claremont High School Speech and Debate Team and from members of the CHS classes of 2013 and 2014 as well as from the CHS Cheer Team (also available at City Hall), with a portion of ticket sales benefiting the student groups. Those 18 and older may purchase as

many tickets as they wish. In the event that less than 1,000 raffle tickets are sold, the Grand Prize winner will receive $10,000 cash rather than the Prius. This is the third year in a row Claremont Toyota has donated a Prius to be raffled off by the Claremont Educational Foundation, a nonprofit organization founded in 1991 to promote quality public education in the Claremont Unified School District. CEF funds art and music instruction at elementary schools in CUSD and technology at El Roble Intermediate and

Claremont High School as well as sponsoring the popular SLICE summer enrichment program. A representative of Claremont Toyota will randomly draw a winning ticket at about 2 p.m. on April 21 at the showroom of Claremont Toyota (508 Auto Center Dr. in Claremont). You do not have to be present to win. For information, contact the Claremont Educational Foundation at 399-1709, email info@claremonteducationalfound ation.org or visit the CEF website at www.claremonteducationalfoundation.org.

ʻSpirit of Irelandʼ to make St. Patrickʼs Day preview
In response to the popularity of the first shows, Claremont’s Michael Ryan and Friends will be repeating their “Spirit of Ireland” show on Wednesday, March 13 at 7:30 p.m. at the Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theater at 455 W. Foothill Blvd. The celebration of Irish culture features an ensemble of musicians, singers and dancers headed by Michael Ryan’s lead vocals and guitar, Ken Soderlund on guitar and mandolin, Hai Muradian on penny whistle flute and vocals, Martie Echito on keyboard and the Irish “Craig Haus”’ band of Danny Oberbeck, vocals and mandolin, Dylan Oberbeck, mandolin, guitar and backing vocals and Julian Johnson, stand up bass. The groups will also be joined by prize-winning Irish dancers Tasha Strawzewski, Julia Straszewski and Tim Martin.

OUR TOWN
Tickets for the show are $25 each, with desserts and drinks available. Reservations can be made by calling 626-1254 or online at www.thecpdt.com.

Friends of the Claremont Library have a busy spring
Residents should mark their calendars for 2 book sales taking place at the Claremont Library at 208 N. Harvard Ave. The FOCL Annual Spring Booksale will open Thursday, April 18 from 4 to 7 p.m. with a members-only presale. The sale opens to the general public on Friday and Saturday, April 19 and 20, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Between 3 and 4 p.m. on Saturday afternoon, book-lovers

may fill a shopping bag with books for only $3 or for fill a box with books $5. The Friends supply the bags and boxes. A second sale, the Book Lovers and Antiquarian Booksale, is set for Saturday, May 4 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Organizers note that over the last few months, they have received community donations of “the most beautiful, interesting, quirky, rare, artistic and delightful books.” The second annual Children’s Book Festival—Hats, Hats, and More Hats!—will take place next Saturday, March 16, from 1 to 4 p.m. Children from preschool through 6th grade and their parents/caregivers are invited to an afternoon of stories, crafts, activities and magic. Every child will receive a free book to take home, while supplies last. Free and open to the public. The Friends of the Claremont Library survives and operates solely on donations. To donate books, simply drop them off at the library. For more information, visit www.claremontlibrary.org or visit the library.

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

9

Sequestration to take a toll on local schools, students

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ith President Obama and Congress having failed to reach a deal on March 1 to stave off across-the-board cuts to federal funding for domestic and defense programs, the Claremont Unified School District stands to lose $134,000 per year, according to CUSD Assistant Superintendent of Business Services Lisa Shoemaker.

The good news is that while most of the wide-scale cuts to federal programs, called sequestration, go into effect immediately, education will have a grace period. Districts across the nation will have until July 1, 2013, the start of the new fiscal year, to figure out how to operate with a 5.9 percent reduction of federal funding for Title I, Title II and Title III programs as well as for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Nationally, sequestration, also known as sequester, means a $1 billion reduction in IDEA funding alone, taking the federal contribution for special educa-

tion programs back to where it was in 2005, according to a recent Minneapolis Post article titled, SCHOOL “Most vulnerable stuFUNDING dents to get one-two punch under sequester.” Because the Disabilities Education Act mandates that schools must provide assistance for the education of all children with disabilities, the district won’t be cutting any programs, despite the funding shortfall, Ms. Shoemaker notes. Assuming that sequester does, indeed, take effect in the area of education, the district will have to make up the missing 5.9 percent of federal funding, most likely by dipping into the general fund, she said. Disabled students are not the only vulnerable group poised to feel the pain of budget cuts. Title 1 funding to be slashed is earmarked for socio-economically disadvantaged (SED) students, whose families are living below the poverty line. Local schools receiving Title 1 funding include Oakmont, Vista, Sumner and Mountain View elementary schools. The national school lunch program is notably exempt from sequestration. Like special education students, the district’s SED students tend to lag be-

With the reduction in that funding, we might only have money for aides and no supplies
Lisa Shoemaker, CUSD Assistant Superintendent of Business Services

hind their peers in academic achievement. One way the district attempts to narrow the achievement gap for kids in poverty is by using Title I funding to pay for additional classroom aides. “With the reduction in that funding, we might only have money for aides and no supplies,” Ms. Shoemaker said. Also on the chopping block are nearly 6 percent of Title II funds aimed at professional development—used for preparing, training and recruiting highquality teachers and principals—and Title III funds, which are devoted to the support of students with limited English proficiency, such as ESL (English as a Second Language) students. President Obama has stated that he

will continue to press Congress to replace the automatic cuts, which he has called devastating, via more specific spending cuts as well as through tax hikes for the most wealthy Americans. CUSD administrators and staff are not holding their breaths, however, and are instead preparing for the looming cuts. “At this point, if nothing changes by July—if Congress doesn’t either solve the budget problem or figure out another way to do the cuts—we are subject to sequestration,” Ms. Shoemaker said. “I haven’t heard any discussion that education would be singled out as being exempt.”
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

10

Johnathan Thomas

BOOKMARK
still flips through his old comics from time to time and is an avid patron of the San Diego comic convention Comicon. Fantasy also appealed to Mr. Thomas when he was a kid, and he still finds the genre fascinating. “Oh my God, I loved the Lord of the Rings series,” he said. “If you analyze it, it all has meaning. Look at The Hobbit. It’s not about the destination. It’s the journey.” Five years ago, Mr. Thomas began a great journey himself, studying Buddhism. He wanted insight into a higher consciousness as well as help taming his “over-thinking mind.” He also thought it might help him in his work. “I wanted to not only offer a psychological approach but also a spiritual approach for dealing with people’s problems and situations,” Mr. Thomas said. “I think of Buddha as the first great psychologist.” Mr. Thomas no longer reads to escape from school bullies. He does, however, look for insight on how to escape the patterns of thought that make people miserable. The book Shambala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior by Gogyam Trungpa Rinpochet—a Tibetan Buddhist meditation master—who is one of Mr. Thomas’ personal heroes, proved hugely influential. “This book changed my life,” Mr. Thomas said. “It’s about getting through spiritual materialism—it’s really about cutting through all the bullshit. “You can appear to be spiritual, but it’s about your experience,” he continued. “You can’t fake Buddhism. You live it.” Mr. Thomas has a favorite axiom from Shambala: “Live life as an experiment.” In fact, he is planning for these words to be etched on his body as his next tattoo. The statement may be profound, but it’s pithy compared to the quote from

T

here’s no getting around it. Johnathan Thomas, a local psychologist and the founder of a fast-growing local meditation group, is a bibliophile.

He devours 3 books a week, furthering his spiritual development with books on Buddhism and occasionally indulging in the guilty pleasure of a supernatural romance. As a student of Zen Buddhism, which teaches adherents to focus on small moments of beauty, he sometimes take a moment to savor a book as a physical object, flipping through its pages and breathing in the scent of ink on paper. Mr. Thomas’ love affair with books began early. As a skinny, slightly offbeat kid, he didn’t have many friends in school. He took refuge from loneliness and bullying in the school library. During the summer, his local library sponsored a book-reading contest. Young Jonathan ran with it, once reading 27 books to take the prize. “I started reading everything: Beverly Clearly, Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew. My absolute favorite book was From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler,” he said, referencing the story of 2 siblings who run away from home, living for a time at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. He soon moved onto more advanced fare, reading everything from fantasy novels to Shakespeare and discovering J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye. Like countless young people before him, he identified with Salinger’s bright, angst-ridden protagonist Holden Caulfield. Comic books were also hugely important to Mr. Thomas, now 32, with his favorite being the Ghost Rider series. It centers on a man who is possessed by an evil spirit, yet fights evil. Though he no longer collects them, Mr. Thomas, a self-described “big dork,”

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Johnathan Thomas is the owner of the Claremont business Whole Person Healing and the founder of the New Mind Meditation Society.

BOOKMARK continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

11

BOOKMARK continued from the previous page

Shantideva’s Way of the Bodhisattva, which is inked on the inside of his upper arm and which he calls his life’s mantra: “As long as space endures, as long as there are beings to be found, may I likewise remain to drive away the sorrows of the world.” Mr. Thomas strives toward that lofty aim when counseling troubled clients and when guiding his meditation group, which has grown to more than 50 people in less than 3 months, to release their attachment to impermanent things. He is not, however, ensconced in an ivory tower—far from it. Mr. Thomas is more than happy to engage in a bit of pop culture diversion. He has a favorite TV show, Supernatural, in which 2 brothers hunt down an array of evil creatures. The show first aired when Mr. Thomas was in college and he was immediately hooked. In between seasons, the creators of Supernatural release books furthering an intricate storyline that pits angels against demons in a world teetering on

the edge of apocalypse. Mr. Thomas also enjoys the vampire-centric True Blood TV show and book series. “When I get home after a 13-hour day, I don’t need something stimulating that’s going to make me think,” he said. “It’s something where I can go home and empty my mind.” Mr. Thomas gets his books from Amazon or Barnes & Noble and he prefers them in print form. He tried to read books on his iPad for a while, but it didn’t give him the same satisfaction. Last week, in between clients, he could be found in his Claremont office, which is dominated by a light in the form of a large yin-yang sign, plus lots of books. “I go ‘ah,’” he said, inhaling deeply. “From the smell to the feel of the pages, there’s just so much beauty in books.” Mr. Thomas’ meditation group meets on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in the Permadirty Project Space of the Claremont Packing House, 532 W. First St., in Village West.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

End-of-life plans discussed at Pilgrim Place
The Health and Wellness Committee at Pilgrim Place and VNA Hospice are presenting “The Conversation: When End-of-Life is Nearing.” The one-hour presentation will be held Wednesday, March 20 at 11 a.m. at Decker Hall at Pilgrim Place. The speaker is Dr. Timothy Dauwalder, the medical director of VNA Hospice of Southern California. There is no charge for admission. For more information, contact VNA Hospice at 800-969-4862.

OUR TOWN
City focuses on public art master plan
The city of Claremont is currently working with a consultant to prepare a Public Art Master Plan. The goal of the master plan will be to identify a unified community vision, clarify key themes and values, and provide direction for the selection and placement of public art throughout the community. Staff and the consultant are seeking input from the community related to public art. The community is invited to attend a special public meeting on Wednesday, March 20 at 6:30 p.m. in the Padua Room at the Hughes Community Center. Comments and questions may also be submitted by email to Melissa Vollaro, community and human services manager, at mvollaro@ci.claremont.ca.us or by phone at 399-5490.

With honors
Adrian Tramp-Ligorria of Claremont has earned placement on the dean’s list for the 2012 fall semester at Berklee College of Music. To be eligible for this honor, a full-time student must achieve a grade point average of 3.4 or above; a part-time student must achieve a grade point average of 3.6 or above. Also, Jory Lerback of Claremont made the dean’s list for Franklin & Marshall College’s fall 2012 semester. Jory is a graduate of Claremont High School.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

12

Mark von Wodtke of the Claremont Environmental Design Group speaks with 2 park visitors on Saturday following the grand re-opening of Sycamore Canyon Park in north Claremont.

SYCAMORE CANYON PARK REOPENING continued from page 3

been years in the making, a daunting task after the 2003 Grand Prix Fire left much of the area ravaged and overrun with debris. It was devastating for Azren Tarynsai and her daughters Geniece Dibble, Dayla Zdunich and Denelle Zdunich, who enjoyed nearly weekly hikes and picnics in Sycamore Canyon, or what they referred to as “the secret park.” “It was so peaceful up here so we were really sad when it closed down,” Ms. Tarynsai said. COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff In December 2010, the Claremont City CounA line of park visitors try out the new footpath up the canyon on Saturday during the grand re-opening of Sycamore cil sought to restore the public amenity with its Canyon Park. The canyon trail is a short easy stroll to the ruins of an old cabin. unanimous approval of the Sycamore Canyon Park Restoration Project. With thousands of dollars in grant money and the help of several local Claremont City Councilmemorganizations, the work began. The Los Angeles ber Corey Calaycay and Fire Department helped clear the debris from the Mayor Larry Schroeder join canyon, while the Los Angeles Conservation other park visitors hiking the Corps chipped in to remove 35 non-native Eucanew trail that connects lyptus trees. Sycamore and Oak tree seedlings Sycamore Canyon Park with were planted in their place. the Claremont Hills WilderTwo of the more popular aspects of the restoraness Park on Saturday in tion were reconstructing the half-mile walking north Claremont. trail leading toward the Boy Scout ruin and the addition of another 3-quarter-of-a-mile trailhead connecting Sycamore Canyon with the greater BELOW: Ann Joslin and Bob wilderness area. After a ceremonious ribbon cutTener enjoy the view from ting, hikers flooded onto the new pathways. the new hiking trail. The pair Among the first to venture in was Molly Tanner had attended the ribbon-cutand her Border Collie Merlin, residents of the ting ceremony and then Sycamore Canyon neighborhood who frequent joined dozens of others trythe Wilderness Park trails. ing out the steep trail. “We are excited about the new shortcut home,” she said of the trailhead down Gail Mountain and through the canyon. Just a few yards away, Ms. Tarynsai prepared to head up the trail with her daughters, who had surprised her with the trip to the park’s grand reopening. With an extra bundle along for the journey, Ms. Dibble’s 5-month-old son, Dash, the girls prepared to embark on what they hope will be many hikes and picnics to come at “the secret park.” Hikers were pleased to see the hillside nook as lush as it was years ago. Those who helped with the canyon restoration hope hikers will continue to enjoy the natural beauty of Sycamore Canyon and the city’s prized open spaces. “We have been able to demonstrate, here in this canyon, how we are able to regenerate nature and the natural environment,” said Mark von Wodtke of the Claremont Environmental Design Group. “I think this really is a cause for celebration.” Sycamore Canyon is located along the foothills, to the back of Higginbotham Park, at 599 Mt. Carmel Drive. The hours correspond with the Wilderness Park hours, which can be found by visiting the city’s website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us. —Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

13

CHS boys golf comes from behind to beat Troy

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n a late winter day with absolutely perfect golf conditions, Claremont took on Troy in an early season- match at Marshall Canyon Golf Course on Monday. Low scores were the theme of the afternoon, as both teams teed off on the par 5 first hole and breezed through the course.

In the end, the Wolfpack was able to hold off its foe, narrowly beating the Warriors 207-209. CHS coach Octavio Hernandez knows why his team has been so competitive. “We have great team chemistry which translates into success on the course.” The Wolfpack improved their team score from 222 to 207, a drastic upgrade from the week before. “We’ve got some great guys on the team. They like to have fun out there but they know how to work hard to better their play,” Hernandez said. First, Paul Yu and captain Adelbert Wang stepped up to tee off and play their way through the course. Yu, the newest varsity member, and Wang shot 44 and 47, respectively. Meanwhile, Troy’s first pairing of Joseph Crisostomo and Robert Lee each shot a 38. This put the Warriors in a good position to take the match with their later pairings. The second Wolfpack pairing was Braydon Fidak and Jonathan Yoo, who caught up against Troy pairing William Chua and Doyeon Kim. Fidak shot 42, while Yoo put forth an important 40stroke performance. Coach Hernandez said, “Jonathan Yoo had 2 one-putts that were crucial on holes 7 and 9.” Claremont’s final 2 varsity golfers sealed the match for Claremont against the Warriors’ Matt Coleman and Justin

Claremont High School sophomore Jonathan Yoo watches his tee shot on the fourth hole Monday during the Packʼs varsity golf match against Troy High School in La Verne. Yoo shot 40 over 9 holes for the third best score of the match.

Yuan. Claremont narrowly edged Troy on the back of a day’s-best 37 strokes over the 9 holes by Ben Whitham. Kyle Cohen rounded out the final pairing with a 44, making up the strokes the Wolfpack needed to win. Coach Hernandez was pleased with the win against a strong Troy team. “We only had one player shoot under 40 strokes, while Troy had 2 players do that. We were more consistent, though.” On Monday, March 11 at 3 p.m., Claremont will take on Troy again, this time on the Warriors’ turf in Fullerton. The next day, Tuesday, March 12, Claremont returns to Marshall Canyon Golf Course to take on Chino Hills. This will be Claremont’s first league match and a good indicator as to how the season will play out. The match is March 12 at 2:30 p.m.

—Chris Oakley sports@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff The Claremont High School boys golf team took on the visiting Troy High School Warriors on Monday at Marshal Canyon Golf Course. The Pack narrowly won ending up just 2 strokes behind Troy to win at 207-209.

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

14

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15

Harley Reifsnyder
Musician, teacher, consummate host
Harley Alvin Reifsnyder, a longtime Pomona College professor, died on February 24, 2013 after a long decline due to Alzheimer’s disease. He was 86. Mr. Reifsnyder was born on June 19, 1926 to Harold and Jeanette Reifsnyder and raised in Long Beach, California. An exceptional student, both in music and academics, he headed for Pomona College at age16. There, he met a talented violinist named Marilyn. They began doing recitals together and fell in love. He earned a bachelor’s degree at Pomona and then enlisted in the Navy. After being honorably discharged, Mr. Reifsnyder, an accomplished pianist, headed for Europe and joined Marilyn, who was studying at the Lausanne Conservatory of Music. They were married in Paris in 1948. The couple won 2 international music competitions before Ms. Reifsnyder gave birth to their first child, a daughter named Laurie, in Switzerland in 1949. The Reifsnyders returned to the United States, opting to settle in Portland, Oregon for its vibrant music scene. While Ms. Reifsnyder served as first violinist in the Portland Symphony, which was then conducted by Leonard Bernstein, Mr. Reifsnyder taught high school science and math. At night, he served as a professional accompanist in Portland nightclubs, playing piano behind actor/folksinger Burl Ives for one notable gig. Mr. Reifsnyder also went back to school, earning a master’s degree in music from the University of Portland. An academic paper he wrote, “The Harmonic Idiom of Gabriel Fauré: Characteristics and Evolution of High Chordal Treatment,” was published by the University of Portland in 1952. In 1955, the Reifsnyders moved their family, which had grown to include 2 sons, Norman and Glenn, to Claremont. Mr. Reifsnyder pursued a master’s degree in chemistry from the University of Redlands and soon undertook 3 jobs that he would have for more than 40 years. He was a chemistry professor at Mt. SAC, he taught piano and organ at Pomona College, and he played the organ at the First Christian Church in Pomona every Sunday. Mr. and Ms. Reifsnyder also continued to perform with many classical ensembles as well as with the Claremont Symphony, and their home was always full of music. “It was wonderful, beautiful,” their daughter Laurie said. One of Mr. Reifsnyder’s proudest accomplishments was bringing master organ-builder Rudolf Von Beckerath over from Germany in 1972 to build the 3-manual organ in the Thatcher Music Building. Mr. Reifsnyder was devoted to music but he was far from one-sided. The fam-

OBITUARIES

ily spent many years traveling and camping in Mexico. He later traveled internationally. On weekends, Mr. Reifsnyder, a gourmet cook and wine collector, would throw elaborate dinner parties, inviting fellow musicians and teaching colleagues. “He was very social, bright and funny,” Laurie said. Mr. Reifsnyder was preceded in death by his ex-wife, Marilyn, and his sons, Norman and Glenn Reifsnyder. He is survived by his daughter, Laurie Reifsnyder, of Nipomo, California and by a granddaughter, Anna. In keeping with Mr. Reifsnyder’s wishes, there will be no service. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to a charity of your choice.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

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Nelson’s music rings true for multiple generations

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t’s true that famed country star Willie Nelson’s trademark braids have long since grayed and his guitar is noticeably worse for wear. But as evidenced by the diverse crowd amassed in front of the Bridges stage last week, present for the auditorium’s latest star performance, the Red Headed Stranger remains as poignant today as he has throughout his nearly 40-year music career.  
“His music is immortal,” said longtime Willie fan Sheryl Dunn. “It’s like Elvis and Johnny Cash. They transcend generations.” Mr. Nelson is one of many famous faces that have graced th Bridges’ stage as of late. In recent months the longtime Claremont theater has upped its game and country-wide notoriety by including performances by internationally-known celebrities like country sensation Taylor Swift, comedian/actor Aziz Ansari and party-rockers LMFAO, with a presentation by Emmy-nominated political comedian Bill Maher set for this coming May. “In the past, Pomona was about bringing world-class leaders, speakers and artists to the colleges and to the surrounding community,” said Christopher Waugh, associate dean of students and director of student activities, in a previous interview with the COURIER. “We’re interested in bringing back the classic Bridges.” The inclusion of Mr. Nelson drew a strong and spirited
WILLIE NELSON continues on the next page

Legendary country music singer Willie Nelson performs on his equally famous guitar Trigger last Thursday evening at Bridges Auditorium . COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff

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WILLIE NELSON continued from the previous page

COURIER photo/ Steven Felschundneff

turnout. The near full house cheered and crooned along as the Texas native provided back-to-back fan favorites like “Whiskey River” and “On the Road Again,” while singing a few of his latest, such as his tounge-in-cheek “Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die.” His set was a seamless hour-and-a-half of hits. It was well worth the trip for concertgoers, many of whom drove hours to see Shotgun Willie. Ms. Dunn made the drive from Coto De Caza for the opportunity to hum along with one of her favorites. And Mr. Nelson didn’t disappoint. His mindset might have been no-nonsense—the audience had barely a second to blink before he was on stage singing “She’s Got a Name”—and his set was equally to the point, with just his band, a few spotlights and a large Texas flag behind him. His performance, however, was all about his audience. In nearly every song, Mr. Nelson beckoned for the audience to join along in singing and clapping. “He knows how to put on a good show,” Ms. Dunn noted. “He’s fabulous.”

Ms. Dunn, a Texas girl herself, has always had a special place in her heart for Mr. Nelson, long before his name became widely known around the world and across generations. As a student at the University of Texas at Austin, she remembers taking trips down to the Armadillo World Headquarters where a young Mr. Nelson, and many other great stars still undiscovered, played. “He was fabulous, a true country western artist of that time period,” Ms. Dunn recalled. While Ms. Dunn appreciates the purity of Mr. Nelson’s country roots, for other fans it’s about his ability to push boundaries. Twenty-six-year old Adam Jones of Oceanside was introduced to Mr. Nelson’s tunes by his father, who would take his son to concerts as a father-son bonding opportunity. At age 16, at a concert in Oakland, Mr. Jones had the opportunity to meet Mr. Nelson. It left an impression on the young music aficionado. Ten years later, Mr. Nelson’s music remains at the top of his list. “He’s not just country—he came out

with a reggae album not too long ago,” Mr. Jones said. “He keeps himself fresh.” His ability to reinvent himself is what continues to make Mr. Nelson relevant today, said Melinda Freese of Mission Viejo. “He’s timeless,” she said. He helps keep her young, Ms. Freese said. It doesn’t feel so long ago that she was at her last Willie Nelson concert and was pulled into the aisle by her date to dance. Ms. Freese vividly recalls Mr. Nelson pointing her out by saying, “That ‘b’ can dance!” More than 20 years later, though she wouldn’t be dancing in the aisles this time around, Ms. Freese said she is happy to see Mr. Nelson’s music continue to resonate with another generation. “There are maybe 4 or 5 guys in a lifetime that touch everybody’s heart no matter what generation they’re in,” Ms. Dunn added. “We love Willie.”
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Friday, March 8 to Saturday, March 16

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

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YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

CALENDAR
March Sunday

Movie listings
Documentary Citizen Hearst shows at Laemmle.

Party Parade
Latest updates on the Party Parade schedule.

Page 21

Page 22

March Friday

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March Wednesday

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VOICES A community collaboration between the artists of Danbury School, Sumner School and the First Street Gallery, Claremont. Special education artists of Danbury School are constructing an installation work for the Millard Sheets Center for the Arts at Fairplex. “VOICES” is a special art installation commissioned at the request of the curator for the second annual regional High School art exhibit ArtReach. Students from Joe Tonin’s sixth grade class at Sumner School have joined to work collaboratively with Ken Johnson’s Danbury class in this very special project. An opening reception and awards ceremony will be held tonight from 8 to 9 p.m. The exhibition continues through March 13. Regular show hours are noon to 5 p.m.

ARTIST TALK with Sumi Foley. 11 a.m. Fellowship Room of the Claremont Meetinghouse, Religious Society of Friends, 727 Harrison Ave., Claremont. TEA BLENDING Learn how to blend the teas and botanicals Spring. The base teas will be black tea and green tea. Organic herbs and botanicals will be available to blend. At the end of the workshop, students will receive a recipe and your own tea blend to take home. 2 to 5 p.m. $15. Buddhamouse Emporium, 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. RSVP to reserve your tea tin: tiffany@boutiqueteas.com.

SUSTAINABLE CLAREMONT Garden Club presents a workshop on the positive and negative effects of transforming traditional non-native gardens to native gardens, led by Wallace Meyer, director of the Bernard Field Station. 7 p.m. Free admission. Pilgrim Place Napier Center, 660 Avery Road, Claremont. Visit www.sustainableclaremont.org.

DESERT UTOPIA Mid-century Architecture in Palm Springs is the first feature-length documentary on the midtwentieth-century architecture in and around Palm Springs, CA. The 80-minute documentary film weaves architectural images, vintage photography, classic film clips and interviews with architects and others to tell the story of the desert’s innovative architecture. 7 to 9 p.m. $10. Seeley G. Mudd Theater at Claremont School of Theology, 1325 North College Ave., Claremont. 621-0848.

March Thursday

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March Friday

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March Monday

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March Saturday

FITNESS CERTIFICATION Fly gym fitness instructor certification training. A 6-hour program designed for fitness instructors, yoga and Pilates teachers, personal trainers and fitness enthusiasts who are interested in learning to design and teach aerial fitness. After showing proficiency in the program and demonstrate teaching skills, students in this class may receive a certificate of completion in aerial fitness instruction. Sign up at www.flygym.com. 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Pilates Studio M, 548 W. First St. Claremont Packing House.

9 March

SHAKESPEARE CLUB of Pomona Valley will host guest speaker Arin Gaw, who will discuss “Directing Much Ado About Nothing.” Tea will be served. 2 p.m. Joslyn Senior Center, 660 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont. 629-2711.

Tuesday

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FILM SERIES The film Urban Roots follows the urban farming phenomenon in Detroit, in light of the nation’s collapsed industrial towns and the need to forge a sustainable and prosperous future. The series is hosted by the Elemental Arts Initiative, the Environmental Analysis Program of the Claremont Colleges and the Sustainability Integration Office. The film is followed by a Q&A session hosted by Professor Char Miller. 7 p.m. Pomona College’s Rose Hills Theatre at the Smith Campus Center, located at 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. char.miller@pomona.edu.

SPANISH GUITAR performed by Kimera in the VIP lounge. 7 to 10 p.m. Walter’s Restaurant, 310 N. Yale Ave., Claremont. 624-2779, ext. 2.

March Saturday

CHILDREN’S BOOK FESTIVAL presented by Friends of the Claremont Library. Children and their families are invited to the library for an afternoon of stories, activities, crafts, magic and more. 1 to 4 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont.

RISING FROM THE ASHES “Regeneration of Native Plants after Wildfire” presented by Cy Carlberg, arborist and horticultural consultant. She will show the amazing resilience of trees and shrubs after a devastating fire. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $5. The University Club meets each Tuesday in the Alexander Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont.

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PERFORMING ARTS
ALLEN THEATRE: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. 607-4375. —April 11 through 14: Krunk Fu Battle Battle directed by Joyce Lu. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. BALCH AUDITORIUM: 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. 607-2671. —Friday, April 5: Friday Noon Concert featuring Danielle Ondarza (horn), Stephen Klein (tuba), Maria Perez Goodman (piano) and Jason Goodman (percussion). 12:15 p.m. BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box office hours: Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 621-8032. Tickets may be purchased online at www.pomona.edu/bridges. Military discounts are available through box office for most shows. —April 20 and 21: Inland Pacific Ballet’s Cinderella is an enchanting version of the classic story featuring music of the famous waltz king, Johann Strauss. $29 to $39 with discounts for seniors and children. Show times are 1 and 7 p.m. —May 12: Emmy-nominated political comedian Bill Maher, called “one of the establishment’s most entertaining critics” by The New York Times, will perform at Pomona College’s Bridges Auditorium. Mr. Maher, who has garnered 23 Emmy nominations over 18 years, is the host of HBO’s television series Real Time,

which features Maher’s funny, sociopolitical commentary and a roundtable of guests, including Arianna Huffington, Ben Affleck, Michael Moore and Robin Williams, among numerous others. He has described himself as a libertarian and “as a progressive, as a sane person.” Maher’s 2008 film Religulous (directed by Larry David), a satirical skewer of organized religion, is the seventh highest grossing documentary of all time. He is formerly the host of the Comedy Central and ABC late night talk show Politically Incorrect. Maher has written 4 bestsellers, most recently The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass (2012), Does Anybody Have a Problem with That? Politically Incorrect’s Greatest Hits (2010) and New Rules: Polite Musings from a Timid Observer (2005). His most recent HBO stand-up special was Bill Maher: But I’m Not Wrong (2010). Mr. Maher is a frequent commentator on CNN, MSNBC and HLN cable networks. Tickets cost $50.25 and $70.25, with additional online fees. Tickets may be purchased by visiting www.pomona.edu/bridges or calling 607-1139. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Sunday, March 10: Bobby Bradford and the Mótet perform jazz. Free admission. 3 p.m. —Sunday, March 17: The Claremont Symphony Orchestra will present a free concert titled “A United State Landscape.”

Associate conductor, Ruth Charloff, will lead the symphony in a variety of contemporary pieces that reflect the history and culture of the United States. Featured in the program is “Souvenir de Porto Rico” by Louis Moreau Gottschalk, the suite from the Hitchcock film Vertigo by Bernard Hermann, Afro-American Symphony by William Grant Still, George Whitefield Chadwick’s “Jubilee” from Symphonic Sketches and selection from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess. 3:30 p.m. —Saturday, April 6: West African Music and Dance presented by the CalArts African Music and Dance Ensemble directed by Yeko Ladzekpo-Cole and Andrew Grueschow. The performance features traditional repertoire from the Ewe and Dagomba people of Ghana, Togo and Benin, West Africa. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through March 24: The Sound of Music. —March 29 through May 5: Sweet Charity. GARRISON THEATER: 241 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Scripps College Performing Arts Center. 607-2634 or visit www.scrippscollege.edu. —Saturday, March 9 at 8 p.m. and Sun-

day, March 10 at 3 p.m.: The Claremont Concert Orchestra conducted by David Cubek, featuring violinist Hee Yeon (Sarah) Chung. —Saturday, May 4 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, May 5 at 3 p.m.: The Claremont Concert Orchestra and Concert Choir, conducted by Charles W. Kamm and directed by David Cubek. LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural Center Drive, Rancho Cucamonga. Call 477-2752 or visit www.lewisfamilyplayhouse.com. —Through March 10: The Fantasticks. SEAVER THEATRE COMPLEX: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. The box office is available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and one hour prior to curtain times. Call 607-4375 or e-mail seaverboxoffice@pomona.edu. —Through March 10: Stand and Deliver directed by Alma Martinez. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. —May 2 through 5: Pomona College Spring Dance Concert with artistic direction by Laurie Cameron. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. SYCAMORE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AUDITORIUM: 225 W. Eighth St., Claremont. —March 8, 9, 14, 15 and 16: The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee presented by the Claremont High School Theatre Department. 7:30 p.m.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

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NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 445-1200. —Thursday: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Friday through Sunday: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. to closing. —Sunday: Mariachi San Pedro. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EUREKA! GOURMET BURGERS & CRAFT BEER: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open daily from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, March 21: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka! Thursday Night Music featuring Escency. THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open Mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.;

performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. —Saturday, March 16: I See Hawks in LA perform at 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m. $12. —Saturday, April 20: The Dustbowl Revival is a Venice, California-based roots collective that merges old school bluegrass, gospel, jug band, swamp blues and hot swing of the 1930s. Performance at 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m. $10. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —March 8 and 9: Philly native Jimmy Shubert began performing stand-up right out of high school. After moving to Los Angeles, Sam Kinison included him as one of the original “Outlaws of Comedy”. His hour-long stand-up comedy special won Punchline’s top 10 comedy dvds for 2010. Mr. Shubert’s reel includes his role as Jimmy on Two Broke Girls and Off Their Rockers. He has also been seen in a recurring role, as Jimmy once again, on CBS’s King of Queens for 5 seasons. —March 15 and 16: Tom Clark has performed for corporate environments, colleges and clubs across the country. He has performed at the Capetown Comedy Fes-

tival in South Africa and at the Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. Mr. Clark’s credits include Comedy Central’s Premium Blend, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, NBC’s Last Comic Standing, and The Bob and Tom Radio Show. Visit www.tomclark.com. FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. www.fox pomona.com. —Friday, March 8: Flogging Molly. —Wednesday, March 20: The Specials. —Friday, April 19: Bullet for my Valentine. —Thursday, April 25: Crystal Castles. THE GLASS HOUSE: 200 W. Second St., Pomona. 865-3802. —Friday, March 8: The Ghost Inside. —Saturday, March 9: The Hush Sound. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, March 8: Tim Gill All-Stars (big band). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, March 9: Phat Cat Swinger (swing/jump blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, March 10: Chico’s Bail Bonds (blues). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, March 12: Ladies Night (female DJs). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, March 13: Open Jam Night with Geno’s Standard Band (jazz). 8 p.m. —Thursday, March 14: Hound Dog performs at 7 p.m. and Beat Cinema (DJ) at 10 p.m. —Friday, March 15: Lil “A” and the All-

nighters (blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, March 16: The Dustbowl Revival (Americana/bluegrass/swing /jug band) THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Friday, March 8: Ash Reiter (indie). 10 p.m. —Saturday, March 9: The Neighborhood Bullys (rock n’ roll). 10 p.m. —Tuesday, March 12: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, March 13: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. —Thursday, March 14: Waylon Hicks (jazz). 8 p.m. —Friday, March 15: Greater Pacific (alternative/country). 10 p.m. —Saturday, March 23: The Claremont Voodoo Society (blues). 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

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RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. General admission $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: Amour [PG13], Quartet [PG13], Jack the Giant Slayer [PG13], Lore [R], Silver Linings Playbook [R], Koch [NR]. —March 10 at 10 a.m. and March 12 at 7:30 p.m.: Notre-dame De Paris [NR] ballet from La Scala Ballet starring Natalia Osipova and Roberto Bolle. Esmeralda, Quasimodo, Frollo and Phoebus; 4 great characters around which a highly dramatic, passionate story revolves. The Corps de Ballet underscores the dynamics almost like an ancient choir. And in the background is the silent but incumbent presence of the cathedral, both witness and actress in this drama. Notre-Dame de Paris, inspired by Victor Hugo’s novel, with music by Maurice Jarre, sets by René Allio and the renowned costumes of Yves SaintLaurent, returns to La Scala after more than 10 years since its last performance. Once again it will be celebrating Roland Petit and his artistic vein, his ability to evoke and synthesize in bringing the essential core of the story to light. His vision brought alive by the choreography, sets, costumes and music is the culmination of his triumph in this production.

—Thursday, March 14: Citizen Hearst [NR] at 7:30 p.m. From Academy and Emmy Award nominated director Leslie Iwerks comes one of the great media success stories—the compelling and dramatic rise of one of America’s best known companies told in a new documentary, Citizen Hearst. This original feature-length documentary, narrated

by Academy Award nominee William H. Macy, explores the 125-year journey of Hearst Corporation, from William Randolph Hearst’s conviction that print newspapers could boldly inform public opinion to the global impact of the company’s multimedia brands and diversified businesses today. The iconic nature of W.R. Hearst has long enthralled the public and was famously dramatized in the 1941 film Citizen Kane, starring Orson Welles. Crafted from indepth interviews and historical footage, Citizen Hearst features both the personal stories and media milestones that have created today’s Hearst Corporation. It includes stories of daily life at Hearst’s newspapers, television stations, entertainment shows and magazines, including behind-the-scenes access to photo shoots. The film provides a rare glimpse behind the glass walls of the Hearst Tower, interviewing top magazine and fashion editors of Harper’s Bazaar, Cosmopolitan, Esquire and Town & Country, among others, while also traveling to San Simeon, California, for unprecedented access to the Hearst Castle and interviews with Hearst family members. The film features interviews with Oprah Winfrey, Dan Rather, Mark Burnett, Ralph Lauren, Donna Karan, Bob Iger, Leonard Maltin, Dr. Oz and Heidi Klum, among others. Citizen Hearst chronicles the rise of American journalism and Hearst’s newspaper rivalry with Joseph Pulitzer; traces the beginnings of newsreels and films—and, later, magazine brands and cable; provides glimpses inside the personal lives of W.R. Hearst and Marion Davies (including reactions to Citizen Kane); explores the influences of media on politics through the decades; investigates Mr. Hearst’s steadfast pursuit of diversification; and examines the company’s bold commitment to building Hearst Tower in the wake of 9/11.

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

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Announcing Party Parade 2013
he Claremont Community Foundation (CCF) invites residents to their 17th annual Party Parade, a series of events hosted by community members and local businesses to raise money for the many programs and endeavors supported by the CCF. To purchase tickets to any of the following events, visit www.claremontfoundation.org. Organizers recommend making reservations early—several events have already sold out. To join “the best non-party in town,” opt for Party Parade event #17, Do Your Own Thing, which allows guests to donate to CCF without having to attend an event. # 4 Cabaret at the Apollo Take a sentimental journey at the Hoffmann’s Cabaret, featuring uptown soul food and Apollo-inspired cocktails. It will be a truly “unforgettable” evening. Friday, March 8 at 6 p.m. Hoffmann’s Cabaret, 2605 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont. $75 per person (40 guests). Hosts: Janice and Larry Hoffmann, Diane Ring, Ellen and Marshall Taylor, Sandy Baldonado, Reggie and Rene Webb, Megan and Rick Perez, Steven Llanusa, Glen Miya. Sponsor: Rapour. # 5 California Microbrews The new Dale Brothers’ tasting room is this year’s venue for sampling craft microbrews accompanied by small bites and informative patter. Saturday, March 9 from 4 to 6 p.m. Dale Bros. Brewery, 2120 Porterfield Way, Upland. $40 per person (45 guests)

T

Hosts: John and Brenda Hill, Cheryl and Tom Donnelly, Teresa Shaw and Jeff Groves. Sponsors: Dale Bros. Brewery, Le Pain Quotidien. # 6 The Pound at Padua Wag your tails on the dance floor to the music of featured band, The Dogs. See who wins the Dog Eat Dog Chef Challenge and the Top DOG trophy in the Homegrown Talent Class. Friday, March 15 from 7 to 11 p.m. Padua Hills Theatre. $50 per 2 legs (maximum 200 guests). Sponsors: Dr. Harry and Maria Brown, Casey Jones, Andy and Liisa Primack, Chris and Ellie Soltis. With special thanks to: Bert and Rocky’s Cream Company, The BREW Crew, Claremont Craft Ales, The Dogs, Susan Guntner, Heirloom, Paul Henry, Over The Top Rentals. Chefs: Applebees, Casa de Salsa, Chef Henry Gonzales of Spaggi’s, Darvish Restaurant, Delhi Palace, Espiau’s and The Press. Hosts: Floy and Lloyd Biggs, Rosie and Leo Bister, Dee Ann and Mark Estupinian, Michelle and Julio Guillen, Megan Hampton, Joan and Jack Harper, Judi and Bill Manis, Liisa and Andy Primack, Wendy and Bob Reeder, Mary Jane and Arthur Shapiro, Rosemary and Jeff Smith, Diane and Kent Stalwick, Dawn and Paul Steffen. # 7 SPAA = Spin, Pilates, Attitude Adjustment 30 mins. SPIN* 30 mins. Pilates* 30 mins. Attitude Adjustment! Sample these muscle-shaping, heartpumping physical activities, then enjoy some healthy nibbles and li-

bations plus a relaxing chair massage. Saturday, March 16 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (classes start on the halfhour). WundaBar Pilates & Pedal Spin Claremont Studios, Second Street and Indian Hill Boulevard in Village West. $30 per person (30 guests). Hosts: Michelle Bell, Pedal Spin Claremont; Stacey Ziegler, WundaBar Pilates Claremont. # 8 A Taste of Chicago, Then and Now (SOLD OUT-CALL FOR WAIT LIST) Fine dining with treats from Chicago’s famous restaurants and renowned chefs. Saturday, March 16 at 7 p.m. 1080 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. $125 per person (10 guests). Hosts: Mike Conkey, Sheryl Ragland, Rob Ragland, Grillmeister. # 9 A Night In Buenos Aires - Cooking Class/Party Learn cooking techniques at a funfilled class by Chef Linda Heilpern featuring foods of South America. Enjoy the meal at the end of class. Wednesday, March 20 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. $50 per person (12 guests). Hosts: Linda and Michael Heilpern. # 10 Bunco Central Win prizes and enjoy chef-prepared appetizers at Claremont Place in an evening of this popular, mindless dice game.Friday, March 22 at 7 p.m. Bunco Central at Claremont Place Senior Living, 120 W. San Jose Ave., Claremont. $35 per person (40 guests). Hosts: Claremont Place Senior Living—Judith Jones, Sonja Stump Photography—Sonja Stump and Bob Fagg.

#11 Dom’s Speakeasy Our very own 1920s-style illicit nightclub with PROHIBITED libations and decadent morsels. Vocalist Tony Di Gerlando will provide mood music from a bygone era. Friday, March 22 at 7:30 p.m. Dom’s Lounge, Smith Campus Center (lower level, southeast end), Pomona College, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. $65 per person (60 guests). Hosts: Annie and Mike Alpert, Suzanne Hall and Ken Corhan, Vicki Hardy and Richard Chute, Victoria and Jack Greening, Kristen and Steve Hagstrom, Janell and Randall Lewis, Tracey and Spike Meury, Michelle and Jim Mitchell, Don Pattison, Liisa and Andy Primack, Marion and Jess Swick, Kathy and Ray Woodbury. With thanks to Pomona College, Wine Warehouse and Spike Meury. # 12 MAHJ! Bring your current American Mah Jongg card and come play, laugh, snack, win unique prizes and experience the thrill of yelling “MAHJ!” Saturday, March 23 from 1 to 4 p.m. 1207 Berkeley Ave., Claremont $40 per person (9 or 10 guests) Host: Tammy Zipser. # 13 An Evening in the Ol’ South Chefs Lee and Duane Jackman present a meal fit for Jefferson Davis! Ham ‘n’ biscuits, chicken ‘n’ dumplings, ‘Lynchburg’ peach cobbler and more. Saturday, March 23 at 6 p.m. The Jackman Plantation, 150 S. College Ave., Claremont. $65 per person (8 guests). Hosts: Lee and Duane Jackman.

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #201

Across
1. Used to be 4. Standout Claremont High baseball player, now going to Stony Brook University, Jeremy _____ 9. Cocoon dwellers 14. Air hero 15. In a cold manner 16. Complete reversal 17. Back muscle, familiarly 18. Sections 20. Chinese street gang 22. Decree ____ 23. Bright colored flowers 26. German cathedral city 30. Protection, var. 32. Staggered 34. Six 39. Catalan surrealist

40. Small forest buffalo 41. Mount 43. States further 44. John ___ of the Byrds who sang in November at the Gelencser House 45. Shoulder exposing 47. Rests 50. Drop 51. Attempts 53. Drool 58. Catch 60. Guarded 61. Deprive of by deceit 67. Physique, informally 68. Exterior 69. Small intestine section 70. "___ to Billie Joe" 71. Minor 72. Eccentric

73. Pay-___-view

Down
1. Dance 2. Bugs 3. Arrive, as darkness 4. Made dizzy 5. Rocks, to a bartender 6. Back talk 7. Gusto 8. Its flag has two green stars 9. Porous stone 10. Colorado Native American 11. Bad joke 12. Craft 13. Coast Guard officer, abbr. 19. Peter the Great, e.g. 21. Used before a vowel 24. Eager 25. Store selection 27. Pertaining to blood vessels 28. Pass over 29. Social rejects 31. Brief, sharp argument 33. Cheap lodging place 34. "Airplane!" actor Robert 35. New Zealand chameleon 36. Stories of history 37. Pseudos 38. Customs 42. Clinch 46. Hellenistic geographer 48. Sweet food made from dough 49. In ___ (together) 52. Sir, in India 54. To stay the same 55. Jazz style 56. Eat away at 57. Golfing cup 59. August event 61. Soak (up) 62. Peach or plum 63. Baseball's Mel 64. Soak flax 65. Bring home 66. Based on instincts

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #200

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

23

GALLERIES
57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona Arts Colony. Friday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., second and last Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. 397-0218. —March 8 through April 27: Two midcareer women artists from the Inland Empire are featured this month at 57 Underground. Mary Hughes has exhibited all over the region, establishing herself as painter of darkened and elusive dreamscapes, in which forms appear and disappear from behind seemingly arbitrary and random patterns of paint, and recognizable objects move from background to foreground depending on the viewer’s focus. Yi-li Chin Ward has had a career notable for her consistent and persistent interpretations of the female form. Ms. Chin’s paintings are economical of line, and seem not at all that particular. Yet, if one spends the time with them, one sees that they are very particular, and very specific about thought and emotion. Opening reception: Saturday, March 9 from 5 to 9 p.m. Closing reception: Saturday, April 27 form 5 to 9 p.m. Art walk: March 9 and 30; April 13 and 27 from 5 to 9 p.m. AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. www.amoca.org. 865-3146. —Through May 5: “Friendship Forged in Fire: British Ceramics in America,” featuring British pottery in a thematic and chronological order, from the industrial potteries of the Victorian era, to the Arts and Crafts movement, to the traditionalist approach of Bernard Leach and his followers. Modern ceramic artists will be represented by the works of Lucie Rie, Hans Coper and Ruth Duckworth. The largest segment of the exhibition will display contemporary innovations of “postmodern” ceramic art being created in Great Britain today. —Saturday, March 9: British ceramics collector and “Friendship Forged in Fire” co-curator, Richard Jacobs, will speak about the relationship between ceramics collectors and ceramics with an emphasis on British ceramics. 6 p.m. —Saturdays, March 9 and April 13: Free Admission Days sponsored by Southern California Edison. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 626-3322. —Through March 31: “Partnering” tells of the relationship of individuals with each other. Also included are collages, prints and a number of constructions made from antiques and found items. Jan Wheatcroft exhibits tapestry weavings, woven from handspun and naturally dyed wools and silks, and depicts a rat who meditates, partners who dance, a circus goat that balances on a high wire and a cat who flies across the sun on the back of a bird. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. www.loft204.com. —Through, March 31: The Claremont COURIER is featured at The Colony for

the month of March as they celebrate the kick-off of their weekly edition. Participants in The Colony this month include stained glass/mosaics by Jenifer Hall, watercolors by Arwen Allen, photography by Vicki, limited edition prints by Melody Grace Cave, photography by Barbara Sammons, plus a boutique by Clare Miranda and oddities by Sarah Toribbio and friends. —Saturday, March 9: “Metaphorically Speaking.” Learn how to create strong and cliché-free imagery, metaphors and word pictures. 1 to 2 p.m. $10. —Tuesday, March 12: Workout belly dance class with Jacki Torres of the Renaissance Pleasure Faire. Bring a yoga mat. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Wednesday, March 13: Traditional belly dance class with Adina Dane of Casablanca Bar & Grill. Bring a yoga mat. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. dA CENTER FOR THE ARTS: 252 S. Main St., Pomona Arts Colony. Wednesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m., Thursday 12 to 9 p.m. 397-9716. —March 9 through 30: Guest Curator, Walter Christensen, was inspired to invite artists to use art as an ambassador in various mediums to create works that express and communicate eastern and western cultures: “East Meets West:” East means Artwork or Artists related to China, Japan, Vietnam Iran and Iraq. West means Artwork or Artists related to the United States, Britain and Canada. Opening reception: March 9 from 5 to 9 p.m. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: 626-5455. —Through April 12: “Found in Translation,” an investigation into the role of technology as a catalyst for human connectivity featuring Charles Long. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 624-0548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Open Sundays from noon to 3 p.m.: Visitors welcome anytime, appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. —Sunday, March 24: Opening reception from 3 to 6 p.m. Internationallyrecognized watercolor painter and author Gerald Brommer. GALLERY SOHO: 300-A S. Thomas St., basement level, Pomona Arts Colony. Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. —March 8 through 29: Student work, grades 7 through 12. Awards reception: Saturday, March 9 from 2 to 4 p.m. IRENE CARISON GALLERY: The University of La Verne, Miller Hall, 1950 Third St., La Verne. 593-3511 ext. 4281. —Through April 5: Mitch Dobrowner’s “Vital Firmament.” LATINO ART MUSEUM: 281 S. Thomas St. Suite 105, Pomona. www.lamoa.net. 620-6009 or 484-2618. —Through March 30: Ninth Women International Exhibition. Opening reception: Saturday, March 9 from 4 to 9 p.m. L E N Z N E R FA M I LY A RT GALLERY: First floor of Atherton Hall on the Pitzer College campus. Free admission. Tuesday through Friday, 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment

throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through March 22: Emerging Artist Series #7: “Tannaz Farsi: Crowd Control.” MAIN STREET GALLERY: 252C S. Main St., Pomona. 868-2979. —Through March 30: “Mind In Transition: The Art of Yi Kai,” featuring paintings from the artist’s Tibetan travels resulting in a personal comparison of the spiritual and material values between the east and west. Closing reception: Saturday, March 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 980-0412, info@malooffoun dation.org or www.malooffoundation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, advance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features droughttolerant plants native to California and other parts of the world. NICHOLS GALLERY: First floor of the Broad Center on Pitzer College campus. Tuesday through Friday, 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through March 22: “Martha Wilson,” an independent traveling exhibition. PEGGY PHELPS & EAST GALLERY: Claremont Graduate University, 251 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 621-8071. —Through March 8: “iSolated Infinite” Kelsey Kimmel MFA Thesis Exhibition. Peggy Phelps Gallery. —Through March 9: “Concession to the Obsession” by Julie Orr. East Gallery. —March 11 through 15: “Blue Balloons and White Fog,” MFA Thesis Show featuring Stephanie Meredith. Opening reception: Tuesday, March 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. Peggy Phelps Gallery. —March 11 through 15: “Traces of Earthly Things,” MFA Thesis Exhibition featuring Kristin Frost. Opening reception: Tuesday, March 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. East Gallery. PERMADIRTY PROJECT SPACE: 532 W. First St., Unit 219, Claremont. Thursday through Sunday. Visit www.permadirty.org. —Through May 3: “Intertwine Originals,” an exhibition celebrating 7 emerging artists who got their start in the Inland Empire and Chaffey College community. The artists exhibiting are some of the original resident artists of PermaDirty Project Space and intertwined in many different ways with each other and PermaDirty since it opened one year ago. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURALART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 B.C. to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. 399-5544.

—Through March 24: “Fabulous Fauna: Mythical Beasts from around the Globe.” Mermaids, dragons, griffins, phoenixes, fu dogs and more. This exhibit will also give the public a rare look at some of the amazing imperial Chinese dragon robes in the museum’s collection. —April 20 through July 28: “Celebrating the Arts of Polynesia and Micronesia.” Opening reception: Saturday, April 20. Enjoy an all-day event featuring music, dance, food and crafts from the region. POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 330 N. College Ave. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Admission info: 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum. —Through April 14: “Nuance of Sky: Edgar Heap of Birds Invites Spirit Objects to Join His Art Practice” unites the work of Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds with historic American art works from the collection of the Pomona College Museum of Art. —Through April 14: “Project Series 45 – Kirsten Everberg: In a Grove” consists of a new suite of 4 paintings and 4 drawings based on Akira Kurosawa’s film Rashomon (1950). —Through April 14: “Art and Activism in the US: Selections from the Permanent Collection” showcases American artists of the 20th and 21st centuries who have made their art work an integral part of their political activism. RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN: 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The gallery is open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Admission to the garden is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors (65+) and students with valid ID, $4 for children 3 to 12, no charge for children under 3 and members. 625-8767 or www.rsabg.org. —March 9 through June 9: “Where They Grow Wild,” an exclusive display of original artworks from Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s archival collections, complementing the “When they were Wild” collaborative exhibition with the Huntington and the Theodore Payne Foundation. Opening reception: Saturday, March 9 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Light refreshments will be served and guided tours will be offered for the “Wild in Print” collection and “Where They Grow” exhibits. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., on 11th and Columbia, Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. 607-3397 or www.scrippscollege.edu/wil liamson-gallery/. —Through April 7: “Denatured Nature,” Scripps College Ceramic Annual—the longest-running exhibition of contemporary ceramics in the United States. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every 6 weeks. Call 621-9091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. —Through March 30: “Embracing the Cross” paintings by featured artist Fr. Bill Moore. Closing reception: March 30 from 6 to 9 p.m.

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, March 8, 2013

24

CHS thespians to cast ‘spell’ on audiences with musical

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Emmalyn Spruce has her hair styled for a dress rehearsal of the Claremont High School Theatre Departmentʼs production of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. Ms Spruce plays Rona Lisa Perretti, the beeʼs moderator, who has flashbacks to the day she won the competition.

f it had to happen to any production, this is the one. With the opening of the newly renovated Don Fruechte Theatre for Performing Arts delayed until March 22, the Claremont High School Theatre Department’s “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” opens tonight in the Multipurpose Room at Sycamore Elementary School.

I

It’s a fitting setting for a show based on the vicissitudes of a group of misfit spelling bee contestants. “We’re very fortunate. ‘Medea’ wouldn’t have worked here,” said CHS Theatre Director Krista Elhai, referring to her students’ upcoming production of the classic Greek play. Ms. Elhai and her protégés are also lucky their rendition of the Tony Award-winning musical has some help in the form of choreographer DJ Gray. A CHS Theatre alumna, Ms. Gray served as associate choreographer for “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” from its workshop period through its acclaimed off-Broadway and Broadway runs. Ms. Gray knows what works and—as the old grade school report card comment goes—this show works well with others, both critics and audiences. It follows 6 hyper-achieving, offbeat kids struggling to fit in and to spell like champs, “overseen by grown-ups who

barely managed to escape childhood themselves.” The musical is an amalgam of catchy songs and cringe-worthy childhood moments, spiked with laugh-out-loud humor. Think of it as a “Chorus Line” for the elementary school set. There’s Chip Tolentino, whose reign as the current bee champ is threatened by the sudden eruption of puberty, triggered by the presence of an opponent’s pretty sister. There’s Leaf Coneybear, a spacey kid who is labeled dumb by his family but can spell nearly anything when he snaps into one of his inexplicable trances. There’s Olive Ostrovsky, a lonely kid with a workaholic father and a mother in an Indian ashram, who finds solace in her one true friend: the dictionary. There’s the lisping spelling prodigy, Logainne SchwartzandGrubenierre, who is prodded toward success by 2 overbearing gay dads. There’s Marcy Park, who is fitting the stereotype of the over-achieving Asian student at the cost of happiness. A master of 6 languages, several instruments and 2 sports, Marcy attends a Catholic school called “Our Lady of Intermittent Sorrows,” sleeps only 3 hours a night, isn’t allowed to cry and is fraying at her seams. There’s William Barfée, who is beset by respiratory ailments and the world’s insistence on pronouncing his last name as “barfy,” and whose spelling acumen is aided by a mnemonic device involving a “magic foot.” Caution: Watching “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” will spur flashbacks to that

awkward period when you hovered on the cusp of adolescence. And former spelling bee contestants may feel a moment of vicarious rage as the characters experience a timeless example of life’s iniquity, with one student being quizzed on the word Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and another asked to spell cow. As Ms. Gray watched the students’ dress rehearsal on the Sycamore Elementary stage this past Monday, it was a full-circle experience. She attended Sycamore herself and also danced there as a young ballet student. “I performed on that stage,” she marveled. Since the 2005 Broadway premiere of “Putnam County Spelling Bee,” Ms. Gray has choreographed the one-act musical comedy for numerous regional productions. “I’ve fallen in love with the heart of the show,” she said. “Every time I work with it, there is something new I haven’t seen before.” This the first time Ms. Gray has staged the musical with a cast of teens rather than adults. “They are much closer in age to the characters. They bring a natural youth to their roles that is so glorious to work with,” she said. Scotty Jacobson, a 17-year-old CHS theatre veteran who will head for Pace University this fall, said that playing Chip has been a blast. “I kind of had to channel myself a couple years
CHS Theatre continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

25

Emmalyn Spruce, as Rona Lisa Perretti, casts a shadow across the contestants as she explains the rules on Tuesday evening at Sycamore.

The playʼs choreographer, DJ Gray, has worked on and off Broadway, including as associate choreographer for the Broadway run of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. Ms. gray is also a graduate of Claremont High School and attended Sycamore Elementary School.

CHS THEATRE continued from the previous page

ago,” he said. “I can relate to him, because he’s very passionate about what he does” Given that he graduates soon, Scotty will spend very little time in the new CHS theatre, which is all but ready to go. Less than 10 seats out of an original 266 are available for purchase through the Theater Boosters’ Save a Seat sponsorship campaign, which has helped bring professional-grade theater seats into CHS thespians’ new digs. He’s not bitter, though. “I’m super thrilled,” he said. “Even though I don’t get to spend as much time in the new theater as some other students, it’s kind of like a senior gift. It makes it even more special.” As a sophomore, 16-year-old Emmalyn Spruce is one of the CHS theatre students who will get to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art new theater. In this production, she plays Rona Lisa Peretti, the top

The cast of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, including Fiona Bradford, left, Scotty Jacobson, Alex Ubalde, Emerson Dauwalder, Ezequiel Gonzalez and Ally Gorder, perform the opening number during rehearsal on Tuesday at Sycamore Elementary School.

realtor in the county and a returning moderator. As a former Putnam County bee champ herself, she takes the business of spelling pretty seriously. Emmalyn brings a soaring soprano and an air of earnestness to the role. “I sort of imagine her as a former pageant queen,” Emmalyn said. The teen actress said she loves the way the kids, and even the adults, are all misfits in the show. “Everyone has someone they can identify with. They go through struggles kids go through every

day,” Emmalyn noted. “I also like the enthusiasm and color of the show—it’s very exciting.” “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” will be held at Sycamore Elementary School, 225 W. 8th St. in Claremont. Admission is $12 at the door. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. on the following dates: March 8, 9, 14, 15 and 16. For more information, call 624-9053, ext. 30463 or visit www.chstheatre.cusd.claremont.edu.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

26

SO LONG, RAKU Raku on Yale Avenue has closed. The space has been for lease for sometime, but the owners previously said they were looking for a new spot to lease in the Village. Raku, and its sister store Paper Star, have been located on Yale for 40 years, offering cards and unique gifts. SO MANY QUESTIONS It was noted by a reader that at last week’s Active Claremont/League of Women Voters candidates’ forum, Councilmember Opanyi Nasiali, the only sitting member of council to attend, submitted a question in the Q & A portion of the forum. One has to wonder. PREMIUM PRICE Harold Turnbull, a Claremont resident and professor at Cal Poly Pomona, and his wife had a run-in with the Bank

of America. The Turnbulls allege that they were forced for years to pay the bank for insurance on a dwelling that didn’t exist. Their home had burned down in the Padua Hills wildfire of 2003 and was never rebuilt. After the fire, Bank of America, the mortgage holder, put what is called force-placed insurance on the Turnbull’s home. Problem was, there was no home. After repeatedly notifying the big bank of the situation, they were continuously ignored. Bank of America continued to aggressively overcharge the Turnbulls 1,111 percent (yes, that’s one thousand, one hundred, eleven percent) over-market for the unneeded coverage. The good news is, the Turnbells hired the Claremont law firm of Shernoff, Bidart, Echeverria, Bentley and were successful in recovering all their premium payments.

BACK PAGE
THE CRASH OF 1936 Former Claremont resident Bud Weisbrod, now of Hawaii, recently shared a blast from the past. Mr. Weisbrod, who was born in Pomona and grew up on 10th Street in Claremont, inquired about a plane crash that occurred near his home in 1936. “I saw a biplane spin into a stone greenhouse on 12th Street, just west of College Avenue,” he wrote. “Both pilots survived. I watched the rescue crew remove them from the plane. I’ve been wondering about the details ever since.” If anyone remembers, email sammy@claremont-courier.com.

STUCK IN THE ‘80s The city of Claremont doled out nearly $1.7 million for its most recent warrant register, an expense report published by the city twice a month. Of that, $471,494.43 went to payroll and $134,034.15 for insurance premiums. Other high ticket items included $12,000 to American Express, $620,278.79 for street slurrying and $26,742 to Best, Best & Krieger, the city’s law firm. An additional $49,078.85 was given to the Claremont Chamber of Commerce’s Business Improvement District, for its promotion of tourism in Claremont from October to December, 2012. One expenditure of interest was $65.27 paid to USA Mobility Wireless. It seems the city may be in a bit of time warp. The payment was for pagers.
Until next time, Sammy sammy@claremont-courier.com

It’s time to play ball!

C

laremont Little League threw a massive Opening Day Ceremony on Saturday, complete with speeches, fantastic food and a number of raffle drawings.
Needless to say there was plenty of food to be had by all involved. First, Kiwanis Club of Claremont held a always popular pancake breakfast. Lunch was provided by a Tortas 2 Die 4 food truck, which was started by Claremont Little League dad Zeke Casas. The food truck donated a portion of its proceeds back to the league. After a few words from Mayor Larry Schroeder, surprise guest Chief of Police Paul Cooper threw out the first pitch to his son Cole, and the 2013 youth baseball season officially began. Finally, the league held a silent auction and an opportunity drawing, and participants were able to win a number of baskets loaded with items such as Dodgers tickets and Flemings Steak House gift certificates. The gift baskets were all donations from parents and community partners.
—Chris Oakley sports @claremont-courier.com

Photos courtesy of Randy Scott ABOVE: The Major TigersʼNathan Chavez delivers a fastball during game one of the Claremont Little League season. AT LEFT: Catcher Clayton Scott leaves the field at the end of an inning. AT RIGHT: Justin Deal (Major Tigers) takes the throw at second base to apply a late tag on Jordan Kaiser (Major Giants), with Andrew Hammill backing up the throw.

909.621.4761
Friday 03-08-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

27

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals............27 legals...............28 services...........30 real estate.......33
RENTALS
House for Rent
SPACIOUS north Claremont home. Three bedrooms, 1.75 bathrooms, fenced yard, 2 car garage. Pool, central air, new paint and carpeting. No pets. No smoking. $2000 monthly. Agent 624-5662. SAN Antonio Heights home for rent. Ten minutes from Village. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, large kitchen, great schools, pets okay. $1895 monthly, yard service and water included. Call Kevin at 714-402-0034. CLAREMONT: 3 bedroom, one bathroom. Walk to Village, park. Detached garage, hardwood floors, fireplace. $1850 monthly. Call 624-6547. FOUR bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car garage. New paint, tile. Central A/C. Fenced yard. $1900 monthly. Trash and gardener paid. Close to Village. No pets. Carroll Property Management. Lic# 00520794. 627-3507.

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
DISHWASHER/food prep at independent school in Claremont, part-time 9:30 to 1, Monday through Friday. Experience a plus. Must be able to lift 50 pounds, have CDL and speak fluent English. Email resume to: jshue@foothillcds.org. DRIVERS: Daily or weekely pay. One cent increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. Choose your hometime. Three cent quarterly bonuses. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-4149569. www.driveknight.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS! Inexperienced? Get on the road to a successful career with CDL training. Regional training locations. Train and work for Central Refrigerated. www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com or 877-369-7091. (Cal SCAN) DRIVERS: A few pro drivers needed! Top pay and 401K. Recent CDL graduates wanted. www.ad-drivers.com. Call 877258-8782. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Antiques
A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. La Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com. AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 212 W. Foothill Blvd. 621-6628.

BULLETINS
Business
MY computer works. Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections- fix it now! Professional, U.S. based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-888865-0271. (Cal-SCAN) HIGH speed internet everywhere by Satellite! Speeds up to 12 mbps! 200 times faster than dial up. Starting at $49.95 a month. Call now and go fast! 888-718-6268. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE money on auto insurance from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call ready for my quote now! Call 1-888-706-8325. (Cal-SCAN) DISH Network. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and High Speed Internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! 888540-4727. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE on cable TV, internet and digital phone. Packages start at $89.99 a month (for 12 months). Options from all major service providers. Call Aceller today to learn more! Call 1-888897-7650. (Cal-SCAN) AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month. Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone and TV and get a free prepaid Visa card (select plans)! Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT

Assistant Engineer
$5,685 – $6,868 per month (38 hour work week) The City is looking for a highly motivated, creative, enthusiastic, customer service oriented individual to perform professional engineering work in the design, construction and maintenance of public works projects. Applicants must have two years of professional engineering experience and a Bachelorʼs degree from an accredited college or university. Additional information about job duties and qualifications are available on the City website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us or from the Personnel Office at 909-399-5450. Completed application required and must be received by Wednesday, April 3, 2013, by 1:00 p.m. EOE.

Donations
DONATE your car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN) DONATE your car. Fast free towing, 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

Fleet Maintenance Supervisor
$5,517 – $6,665 per month (38 hour work week) The City of Claremont is looking for one highly motivated, enthusiastic, customer service oriented individual with a strong work ethic to work in a fast paced and multi-task environment. Applicants must have five yearsʼ experience in the repair and maintenance of vehicles and equipment, including at least two years of lead experience and be certified by the national institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). Additional information about job duties and qualifications are available on the City website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us or from the Personnel Office at 909-399-5450. Completed application required and must be received by Tuesday, April 2, 2013, by 1:00 p.m. EOE.

Financial
GET free of credit card debt now! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (Cal-SCAN) EVER consider a reverse mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home and increase cash flow. Safe and effective. Call now for your free DVD. Call now, 888698-3165. (Cal-SCAN)

Job Offered
DRIVERS. Job stability. Ashley Distribution Services seeks regional/LTL drivers. CDL-A, minimum one year OTR and yard drivers second shift! Great pay and benefits! jobs@ashleydistributionser vices.com. 800-837-2241. (Cal-SCAN)

For Sale
SAWMILLS from only $3997. Make and save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free information/DVD. www.NorwoodSawmills.com. (Cal-SCAN) EdenPURE portable infrared heaters. Join the 3 million beating the cold and winter heater bills. Save $229 on our EdenPURE model 750. Call now while supplies last! 1-888-752-9941. (Cal-SCAN)

Studio for Rent
CLAREMONT studio with eating, sleeping area. Carpet, A/C, window coverings, stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer. 462 Grinnell Drive. $750 monthly. 626-327-8436.

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
THE business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. Reach Californians with a classified in almost every county! Over 270 newspapers! Combo: California daily and weekly networks. Free brochures. elizabeth@cnpa.com or 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) “MANY a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” —Mark Twain. Advertise your business card size ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over 3 million plus Californians. Free brochure, elizabeth@cnpa.com or 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) DID you know that 10 million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million plus Californians. For a brochure call Elizabeth, 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Health
CANADA drug center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent off all your medication needs. Call today, 1-866-723-7089, for $10 off your first prescription and free shipping. (Cal-SCAN) DO you know your testosterone levels? Call 888-904-2372 and ask about our test kits and get a free trial of Progene, an all natural testosterone supplement. (Cal-SCAN) CANADA Drug Center es tu mejor opcion para ordenar medicamentos seguros y economicos. Nuestros servicios de farmacia con licencia Canadiense e Internacional te proveeran con ahorros de hasta el 90 en todas las medicinas que necesities. Llama ahora al 1-800-385-2192 y obten $10 de descuento con tu primer orden ademas de envio gratutio. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it for free. Call now, 1888-866-3166. (Cal-SCAN) CHAT with local men. Local men are waiting for you! Call Livelinks now. 800-291-3969. Women talk free! (Cal-SCAN)

Education
ATTEND college 100 percent online. Medical, business, criminal justice and hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computers available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888210-5162, www.CenturaOnline.com. (Cal-SCAN) AIRLINES are hiring. Train for a hands-on aviation maintenance career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance, 877-804-5293. (CalSCAN)

Want to Rent
WANT to rent or house sit a guesthouse, small house or apartment near downtown Claremont. Needed 2 months; April to May, or May to June. I am flexible. Will use for home base to visit parents at Claremont Manor and work on book project. 505983-4482 or betteb@q.com.

Want to Buy
CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away. Help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime! 24 hours, 7 days a week. 888-491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

ANIMALS
Free Animal
MALE adult Maltese, neutered. Free to a good home. For information or photos please call or text 263-1974.

REAL ESTATE
Land for Sale
AMERICA’S best buy! 20 acres only $99 monthly! Zero dollars down, no credit checks, money back guarantee. Owner financing. West Texas beautiful mountain views! Free color brochure. www.sunsetranches.com. 1-800-755-8953. (Cal-SCAN)

AUTOS
Autos Wanted
WANTED: Any condition pre-1973 Mercedes SL, other convertibles, Porsche 356 or 911, Volkswagen Bus, Jaguar XK120 through Etypes. Gas station memorabilia and signs. Other interesting cars considered. 714-267-3436 or michaelcanfield204@gmail.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Health
ATTENTION Sleep Apnea sufferers with Medicare. Get free CPAP replacement supplies at no cost, plus free home delivery! Prevents red skin, sores and bacterial infection! Call 888-699-7660. (Cal-SCAN)

Lost Pet
SMUDGE an all black cat with six digit front paws is missing in the vicinity of Towne and Bonita sine February 11. Call 621-3864.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 029127 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as SCHAEFER & COMPANY, CPA, 1254 Harvard Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. James T. Schaefer, 584 Wesley Way, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in January, 2002. /s/ James T. Schaefer This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/11/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: February 16, 23, March 1 and 8, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 029117 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as La Bella Spa, 410 Auto Center Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Yu Ming Bai, 117 W. Garvey Ave., Apt. 275, Monterey Park, CA 91754. Hongmei Li, 1316 Gladys Ave., San Gabriel, CA 91776. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Yu Ming Bai This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/11/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: February 16, 23, March 1 and 8, 2013 Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES If an application for a premises to premises transfer or original license at a premises located in a census tract with undue concentration of licenses, the following notice must be published once a week for three consecutive weeks pursuant to Government Code Section 6063, in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication. The publication must be in the city in which such premises are situated, or if such premises are not in a city, then publication shall be made in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication nearest the premises. Affidavit of publication shall be filed with the following office: Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control 222 E. Huntington Dr., Ste 114, Monrovia, CA 91016 (626) 256-3241 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: February 14, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: HUFF FOODS, LLC The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 373 W BONITA AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711-4703 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 – On-Sale Beer And Wine – Eating Place CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Ste 205B, Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 6214761. Publish: February 23, March 1 and 8, 2013 Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES If an application for a premises to premises transfer or original license at a premises located in a census tract with undue concentration of licenses, the following notice must be published once a week for three consecutive weeks pursuant to Government Code Section 6063, in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication. The publication must be in the city in which such premises are situated, or if such premises are not in a city, then publication shall be made in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication nearest the premises. Affidavit of publication shall be filed with the following office: Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control 222 E. Huntington Dr., Ste 114, Monrovia, CA 91016 (626) 256-3241 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: February 21, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: T. KELANI, INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 590 W 1ST ST, CLAREMONT, CA 91711-4618 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 – On-Sale Beer And Wine – Eating Place CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Ste 205B, Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 6214761. Publish: February 23, March 1 and 8, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 036554 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as HK Investments, HK Financial Services, 420 Heidelburg Lane, Claremont, CA 91711. Heran Kim, 420 Heidelburg Lane, Claremont, CA 91711.

LEGAL TENDER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Heran Kim This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/22/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 034167 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as REAL EXERCISE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 2980 First St., Unit A, La Verne, CA 91750. Mailing address: 424 N. Neil St., West Covina, CA 91791. Roy A. Nystrom, 424 N. Neil St., West Covina, CA 91791. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Roy Nystrom This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 034881 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as ETANA inc. dba Made 4 Museum, 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. ETANA inc. dba Made 4 Museum, 5050 Arrow Hwy., Montclair, CA 91763. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in December, 2012. /s/ Walter Ebrahimzadeh Title: CEO This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/21/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 T.S. No. 12-2719-11 Loan No. 3011757014 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/4/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: MI RAN KIM, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HERSOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: The Wolf Firm, A Law Corporation Recorded 12/12/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2752666 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 3/22/2013 at 09:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $488,569.61, estimated Street Address or other common designation of real property: 1637 SILVER RAIN DR DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 A.P.N.: 8702-018-025 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 12-2719-11. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 2/21/2013 The Wolf Firm, A Law Corporation 2955 Main Street, 2nd Floor Irvine, California 92614 Foreclosure Department (949) 720-9200 Sale Information Only: (714) 573-1965 www.priorityposting.com Frank Escalera, Team Lead P1022656 3/1, 3/8, 03/15/2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SAN BERNARDINO ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS OR CITATION Case Number: CIVRS1202404 PLANTIFF (S)/PETITIONER(S): J.A. CARR vs. DEFENDANT(S)/RESPONDENT(S): THOMAS REES, et al. Upon reading and filing evidence consisting of a declaration as provided in Section 415.50 CCP by Douglas Sloan, and it satisfactorily appearing therefrom that the defendant, respondent, or citee, “All persons unknown claiming any legal or equitable right, title, estate, lien or interest in the property described in Plaintiff’s Complaint adverse to Plaintiff’s title, or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title thereto.” cannot be served with reasonable diligence in any other manner specified in Article 3, Chapter 4, Title 5 of the Code of Civil Procedure, and it also appearing from the verified complaint or petition that a good cause of action exists in this action in favor of the plaintiff, petitioner, or citee therein and against the defendant respondent, or citee and that the said defendant, respondent, or cited is a necessary and proper party to the action or that the party to be served has or claims an interest in, real or personal property in this state that is subject to the Court or the relief demanded in the action consists wholly or in part in excluding such part from any interest in such property: NOW, on motion of Mitchel J. Ezer Attorney for the Plaintiff(s), Petitioner(s), or contestant(s), IT IS ORDERED that the service of said summons or citation in this action be made upon said defendant, respondent, or citee by publication thereof in CLAREMONT COURIER a newspaper of general circulation published at Claremont, California, hereby designated as the newspaper most likely to give notice to said defendant; that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FUTHER ORDERED that a copy of said summons or citation and of said complaint or petition in this action be forthwith deposited in the United States Post Office, post-paid, directed to said defendant, respondent, or citee if his address is ascertained before expiration of the time prescribed for the publication of this summons or citation and declaration of this mailing or of the fact that the address was not ascertained be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. /s/ GILBERT G. OCHOA, Judge Dated: September 10, 2012 Filed: Superior Court, County of San Bernardino Rancho Cucamonga District 8303 Haven Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 /s/ Jeanne Zour, Deputy Dated: September 10, 2012 Attorney For: John Carr Mitchel J. Ezer SBN: 30100 LAW OFFICE MITCHEL J. EZER 1153 Lachman Lane Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 Ph.: 310-347-4608 Publish: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 TSG No.: 4231636 TS No.: 20099134003938 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 8307-008-004 Property Address: 546 CLARION PLACE CLAREMONT, CA 91711 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 04/12/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 03/21/2013 at 10:00 A.M., First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 04/20/2006, as Instrument No. 06 0866937, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of California. Executed by: AUDREY MCCLAIN FIELDER and ALLAN JOHNSON FIELDER II, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 8307-008-004 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 546 CLARION PLACE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or war-

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 8, 2013
ranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $630,838.85. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case 20099134003938 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse. First American Title Insurance Company First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC 3 FIRST AMERICAN WAY SANTA ANA, CA 92707 Date: FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)939-0772 First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.NPP0214110 CLAREMONT COURIER 03/01/2013, 03/08/2013, 03/15/2013 T.S. No. 12-2638-11 Loan No. 0713212413 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 2/6/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: MELANIE K. HANSEN, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN Duly Appointed Trustee: THE WOLF FIRM, A LAW CORPORATION Recorded 2/17/2006 as Instrument No. 06 0369741 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 3/28/2013 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: At the Vineyard Ballroom, Doubletree Hotel Los AngelesNorwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $709,046.84, estimated Street Address or other common designation of real property: 2296 NAVARRO DRIVE CLAREMONT, CA 91711 A.P.N.: 8670027-007 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this

information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280-2832 or visit this Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the file number assigned to this case 12-2638-11. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 2/14/2013 THE WOLF FIRM, A LAW CORPORATION 2955 Main Street, 2nd Floor Irvine, California 92614 Foreclosure Department (949) 720-9200 Sale Information Only: (800) 280-2832 Auction.com Frank Escalera, Team Lead P1021217 2/20, 3/1, 03/08/2013 T.S. No.: 1003732CA Loan No.: 0000014082 A.P.N.: 8671-041-042 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/20/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the notes(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: AMANDA ROBINSON, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: Seaside Trustee, Inc. Recorded 10/3/2005 as Instrument No. 05 2377192 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 4/2/2013 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, Ca. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $970,629.73 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 870 LAWRENCE CIRCLE CLAREMONT, CA 91711 A.P.N.: 8671-041-042 As required by California Civil Code Section 2923.5, the current beneficiary has declared to Seaside Trustee Inc, the original trustee, the duly appointed substituted trustee, or acting as agent for the trustee, that the requirements of said section have been met by one or more of the following: 1. Borrower was contacted to assess their financial situation and to explore the options for the borrower to avoid foreclosure 2. The borrower has surrendered the property to the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary or authorized agent 3. Due diligence to contact the borrower was made as required by said Section 2923.5. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder al the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and dale for the sale of this property, you may call 800-50-SALES Sale line or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com using the file number assigned to this case 1003732CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 2/27/2013 Seaside Trustee, Inc. Trustee Sales Information: 800-50-SALES www.priorityposting.com Seaside Trustee Inc. P.O. Box 2676 Ventura, Ca. 93014 Melissa B. Olmos, Admin Assistant P1024349 3/8, 3/15, 03/22/2013

28

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR THE CLAREMONT PLANNING COMMISSION FOR A PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO CHAPTER 16.036 OF THE CITY’S ZONING CODE IN ORDER TO MODIFY THE CITY’S INCLUSIONARY HOUSING REQUIREMENTS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Municipal Code of the City of Claremont and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the Planning Commission is scheduled to hold a public hearing to consider a proposed ordinance amending Chapters 16.036 of the Claremont Municipal Code to modify the City’s inclusionary housing requirements. The public hearing is scheduled to be held on Tuesday, March 19, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the City Council Chamber, located at 225 West Second Street, Claremont. At the conclusion of the public hearing, the Commission will be requested to make a recommendation to the City Council regarding adoption of the ordinance. The proposed changes to the ordinance are as follows: • Elimination of the inclusionary housing requirements for rental housing to comply with recent case law. • Replacement of the long-term covenant requirement with an equity-sharing requirement. • Incorporation of an Inclusionary Housing Transaction Fee to recover City costs incurred to administer the inclusionary housing units. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Director of Community Development has determined that this ordinance is exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) under Section 15061(b)(3) of CEQA on the basis that the ordinance does not have the potential for causing a significant effect on the environment. Adoption of the ordinance would not result in the approval of any new development projects, result in any physical change in the environment, make any changes to the City’s adopted Land Use Plan, or change the intensity of any planned uses. The individual development projects which the ordinance is applicable will be reviewed as a project by project basis for their own environmental impact. Written comments on the proposed ordinance may be submitted to the Planning Division, Claremont City Hall, P.O. Box 880, Claremont, CA 91711. The public is also invited to make comments on the proposed ordinance at the scheduled public hearing. Questions may be directed to the City of Claremont Planning Division at (909) 399 5470. The ordinance is available for review at the Planning Division counter in City Hall, 207 Harvard Avenue, or the City’s website, www.ci.claremont.ca.us. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), if you need special assistance to participate in the above-mentioned public hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (909) 399-5461 “VOICE” or 1 (800) 7352929 “TT/TTY.” Notification three working days prior to the meeting, or time when special services are needed, will assist City staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide access to the meeting. Publish: Friday, March 7, 2013 Trustee Sale No. 250665CA Loan No. 1596871266 Title Order No. 837785 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02-26-2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04-02-2013 at 9:00 AM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 03-02-2007, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 20070458719, , and as modified by the Modification of Deed of Trust recorded on 10-02-2009, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 20091501930 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: PATRICK SULLIVAN AND DEBBIE SULLIVAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA Legal Description: PARCEL 1: LOT 56 OF TRACT NO. 50568, IN THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 1274 PAGES 20 THROUGH 46, INCLUSIVE, OF MAPS IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 2: NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENTS FOR USE, INGRESS, EGRESS, ACCESS, REPAIR, DRAINAGE, ENCROACHMENT, OR OTHER PURPOSES ALL AS DESCRIBED AND/OR DEPICTED IN THE ''DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS, AND RESERVATION OF EASEMENTS FOR STONE CANYON'', RECORDED ON OCTOBER 21, 2003, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 033139167, AND THE ''NOTICE OF ANNEXATION FOR PHASE 2 OF STONE CANYON'' RECORDED ON APRIL 28, 2004, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 041042744, BOTH IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, AS SAME MAY BE AMENDED, MODIFIED, AND/OR RERECORDED FROM TIME TO TIME (''DECLARATION''). PARCEL 3: A NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENT APPURTENANT TO SUCH LOT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS, ACCESS, USE AND ENJOYMENT ON, OVER, AND ACROSS THE COMMON AREA WITHIN THE PROJECT, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AND OR DEPICTED IN THE DECLARATION. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,317,280.70 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 1389 FERGUS FALLS CLAREMONT, CA 91711 APN Number: 8673-040-011 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s)

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to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 03-052013 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee FRED RESTREPO, ASSISTANT SECRETARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-280-2832 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales & Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting & Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for “Advanced Search” to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1-800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. P1024005 3/8, 3/15, 03/22/2013 T.S. No.: 2012-24528 Loan No.: 7100414064 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/5/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: CRISTIAN O. LOPEZAND ERIN L. KELLY, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Recorded 10/12/2005 as Instrument No. 05 2456736 in book ---, page --- and rerecorded on --- as --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 4/8/2013 at 9:30 AM Place of Sale:By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $349,040.40 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 640 SOUTH SYCAMORE AVENUE, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 91711 A.P.N.: 8315-029-023 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. Pursuant to California Civil Code §2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: The beneficiary or servicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or the timeframe for giving Notice of Sale Specified in subdivision (s) of California Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the requirements. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender my hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)-9608299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/Tr usteeServices.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case 2012-24528. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale Date: 2/25/2013 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee c/o 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299 http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 240-3530 __________________________________ Laterrika Thompkins , Trustee Sale Assistant Publish: 3/8/13, 3/15/13, 3/22/13 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE AND OF INTENTION TO TRANSFER LIQUOR LICENSE(S) (Secs. 6101-6107 U.C.C.) Escrow No. 126884 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale of assets and a transfer of liquor license(s) is about to be made. The name(s), and mailing address, and zip Code Number of the Seller/transferor(s) are: SECONDSTREETPROMENADELLC, 205 E. 2ND ST, POMONA, CA 91766. dba: BABYLON RESTAYRANT The name(s), and mailing address, and zip Code Number of the Buyer/transferee(s) are: JSJ RESTAURANT GROUP, LLC, ATTN: STEVE MELNICK, 5317 VIA DONTE, MARINA DEL REY, CA 90292 That the assets to be transferred are described in general as: MATERIALS, SUPPLIES, MERCHANDISE, EQUIPMENT, (OR) FIXTURES, FURNITURE, FURNISHINGS, SUPPLIES, LEASEHOLD IMPROVEM,ENTS, EQUIPMENT and are located at: 205 E. 2ND ST, POMONA, CA 91766 together with the following described alcoholic beverage license(s): Type:ON-SALE GENERAL EATING PLACE, License Number: 47-481608 now issued for the premises located at: SAME That the total consideration for the transfer of said assets and said license(s) is sum of $272,000.00, including inventory estimated at $NONE, which consists of the following: DESCRIPTION, AMOUNT: CHECK $10,000.00, DEMAND NOTE $262,000.00 That it has been agreed between the transferee(s) and said transferor(s) that the consideration for the transfer of said assets and of said license(s) is to be paid only after transfer has been approved by the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, pursuant to Sec. 24073 et seq. That the herein described transfers are to be consummated, subject to the above provisions, at: WILSHIRE ESCROW COMPANY, 4270 WILSHIRE BLVD, LOS ANGELES, CA 90010, on or after 10:00 A.M., MARCH 29, 2013 All other business names(s) and address(es) used by the transferee(s) within three years last past, so far as known to transferee(s) are: BABYLON RESTAURANT AND HOOKAH LOUNGE, 205 E. 2ND ST, POMONA, CA 91766 Name and address of escrow holder: WILSHIRE ESCROW COMPANY, 4270 WILSHIRE BLVD, LOS ANGELES, CA 90010 Dated: FEBRUARY 11, 2013 SECONDSTREETPROMENADELLC, Seller(s)/Licensee(s) JSJ RESTAURANT GROUP, LLC, Buyer(s)/Applicant(s) LA1275403 CLAREMONT COURIER 3/8/13 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF PATRICIA LEE STOUT CASE NO. KP 015005 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of PATRICIA LEE STOUT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DAVID ELLIS STOUT in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DAVID ELLIS STOUT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: 03/28/13 at Time: 8:30 a.m. in Dept. A located at: Superior Court Of California, County of Los Angeles, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766. EAST DISTRICT IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of the estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner In Pro Per: David Ellis Stout 736 West 12th Street, Claremont, CA 91711 Phone # 951-663-5288 Publish: March 8, 15 and 22, 2013

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 8, 2013

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NOTICE OF SPECIAL EVENT PERMIT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Municipal Code of the City of Claremont, Janice L. O’Neil and Frank Bedoya, representing Pomona College, have petitioned for the renewal of Pomona College’s Annual Senior Class Day Parade, Commencement Ceremony, and Freshman Orientation Parade (Special Event Permit #13-SEP02). The Senior Class Day Parade is scheduled for Saturday, May 18, 2013, from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The parade route will start at the steps of Carnegie and will proceed north on College Avenue, then east on Sixth Street, and will terminate at Merritt Field, located on the east side of the Rains Athletic Center. All street segments along the parade route will be temporarily closed during the ceremony. The Commencement Ceremony is scheduled for Sunday, May 19, 2013, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. To accommodate the Commencement Ceremony on Marston Quad, College Avenue from Bonita Avenue to Sixth Street, and Fourth Street between College Avenue and College Way will be temporarily closed during the ceremony. All street segments associated with the commencement ceremony will be temporarily closed during the ceremony. The Freshman Orientation Parade is scheduled for Sunday, August 25, 2013, from 6:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The parade route will begin at College Ave and Sixth Street, just outside the Pomona College Gates. The parade will precede south on College Avenue, then east on Fourth Street and will terminate at Bridges Hall of Music, located on the south side of Fourth Street, east of College Avenue. All street segments along the parade route will be temporarily closed during the procession. All events are scheduled to move in a reasonable and timely fashion. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Director of Community Development has determined that this proposal is exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) in accordance with Chapter 3 of Claremont’s Local Guidelines for Implementing CEQA. This is exempt because each of the three Special Events is of short duration and will not create long term physical impacts to the City of Claremont; therefore, no further environmental review is necessary. The public review period will commence March 8, 2013, and will run through March 18, 2013. Any interested person is directed to contact Associate Planner Joanne Hwang, Department of Community Development Planning Division, 207 Harvard Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711, or at (909) 399-5353 for further information. DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CITY OF CLAREMONT PUBLISH: Friday, March 8, 2013 MAPS: Senior Class Day Parade Saturday, May 18, 2013

Commencement Ceremony Sunday, May 19, 2013

“Enter Here” Freshman Orientation Parade Sunday, August 25, 2013

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Claremont COURIER Classifieds

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KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Handyman
A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Antiques
ANTIQUES wanted. Fair prices for the following old items: Hollywood, comics, toys, watches, medals, coins, badges, jewelry, postcards, books, magazines, military, photos, tools, sports, fishing, Disneyland, medical, historic documents, autographs, holiday decorations and other interesting items. 909-2389076. micklet@earthlink.net.

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

Caregiver
CAREGIVER/Personal Assistant. Experienced, compassionate and caring. CPR and First Aid certified. References. Barbara, 949-228-2128. PRIVATE duty care provider with 6 years experience, specializing in elderly care. Current CPR, TB test. For a free assessment contact: Wendi Griffin, 909-4372298. Bond#71294838.

951-283-9531
Claremont resident. Lic.860606

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795.

Contractor
WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616.

Hauling
Serving Claremont Since 1995.
Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED finish remodeler. Does kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting and more. Call Paul, 909919-3315.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182. HACIENDA Carpet, upholstery and tile cleaning. Special: with any carpet cleaning, 20 percent off tile cleaning. Senior discounts. Since 1970. 909-985-3875.

Residential, Commercial. Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, trouble-shooting, landscaping lighting, pool and spa equipment replacement. Free estimates 24-hours. References. 909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149 Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

909-599-9530

Hayden’s Services Inc.

House Cleaning
CHRISTIAN lady will clean homes, offices, windows. Bonded. Licensed. Excellent references. 21 years. Yolanda, 909-621-2162. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Call Lupe, 525-3273. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929.

KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Drywall

Girl Friday
I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Childcare
AFFORDABLE childcare. Families with multiple children welcome. Large Claremont home. Miss Carmen, 909621-3108 or 909-367-3560.

Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-2512013. Lic.922000

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360. Claremont Handyman Service All your handyman needs. Carpentry, lighting, painting. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 921-6334

Aikido

909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

Programs for adults and children. Established 1983. Call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

SERVICES
Irrigation
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Friday 03-08-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

31

Landscaping

Painting

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Tutoring
AFFORDABLE K-5 Reading Tutor. Retired teacher. 35 years. Multiple strategies, resources. Individual, group. Janice, 909-596-1266.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

Plumbing
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994. COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484. STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-9821604.

Upholstery

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

Tile

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont.

PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Weed Abatement
JOHNNIES Tree Service. Weed abatement and land clearing. Disking and mowing. Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Please call 909-946-1123 or 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Please call 909-989-9786.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175. Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.

Learn Japanese
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-9228042. www.vjpaint.com.

Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
30 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning specialist of your perennials. 909-624-8238 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909-629-6960.

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 CHARLES' Landscape. 30 years experience. Drought tolerant design. 909-217-9722. TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909626-3066.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls. Service and repair. Drain cleaning, leak detection, gas lines, water heaters, installation of plumbing fixtures, bathroom remodels. Fully insured and bonded. All work guaranteed.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

909-260-4376
www.ThePlumbersConnection.net

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691

Lic.839835

Pet Sitting
PET SITTER/DOG WALKER
Reliable, friendly, knowledgeable. Local references available.

Tutoring
PRIVATE tutor available for afterschool and weekend homework help. Secondary teaching credential in English Language Arts. Will work with your student on any subject. Fee negotiated at first meeting. 909-261-3099. HELP your child achieve success in school. Family man, currently completing graduate work in education, available for homework help and tutoring in your home or in my Claremont home. Evenings or weekends. $20 hourly. 626-466-8391, rcmsangab@gmail.com. Free initial consultation. PRIVATE tutor. Reading, writing and vocabulary. Experienced teacher over 40 years. Contact Allen, agross91768@yahoo.com or 909-629-6007.

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

AMANDA, 818-219-3268

Yoga

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron

Pilates

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. YOUR neigborhood classical Pilates studio. 665 E. Foothill Blvd. Unit M., Claremont, Ca 91711. Call for a free demo! 909-730-1033. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

909-615-4858
Lic.778506 D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

RESTORATIVE YOGA
Classes and workshops. Susan Perry 35 year yoga practitioner. Weekly classes held at Musubi Dojo. Please call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

909.621.4761
Friday 03-08-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

32

SERVICES
AUTOMOTIVE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

COMPUTERS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

909-262-4633

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOUSE CLEANING

Cleaning Service
Call for a free estimate: House or Business!

909-621-5626
LANDSCAPING SPECIALTY SERVICE

909.234.5766
SPECIALTY SERVICE

Kandi Ford

Dick Oosterheert
Landscape Services
Donʼt Landscape…Renovate! Lic. #C-27 876953
• Save money by designing with drought tolerant materials! • Conserve water by converting existing irrigation to low flow!

Free E-Waste drop-off facility!

909-579-0248 • 1551 W. 13th Street, Upland CA 91786
10% OFF first-time customers & senior citizens!

909.621.4761
Friday 03-08-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

33

D.R.E. #00997900

REAL ESTATE
OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
Sunday, March 10
1-4 p.m. 645 W. 20th St., Upland. Curtis Real Estate. 2-4 p.m. 270 W. 10th St., Claremont. Gordien & Associates.

Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property.

GEOFF HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

Geoff is #1 in Claremont Sales & Listings since 1988

“Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time”
909.621.0500 Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

Claremont Real Estate Market Snapshot

February
Number of Homes Sold Number Sold > $750,000 Number Sold < $750,000 Highest Sale Price Lowest Sale Price Average List Price Average Sold Price Average Days On Market

2013 23, 3 20 $1,125,000 $285,000 $554,024 $539,102 59

2012 14 2 12 $1,505,000 $189,000 $506,529 $490,530 111

Change From Previous Year +64 +50 +67 -25 +51 +7 +10 -47 percent percent percent percent percent percent percent percent

Through my affiliation with Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty, I am able to offer local, national and international marketing programs that are unparalleled in the industry. These programs complement my extensive working knowledge of the local market allowing me to provide my sellers properties maximum exposure to attract the most qualified buyers possible. If you are considering selling, please contact me and I will help you determine the optimum sales price for your home. I currently have several anxious buyers looking for Claremont properties.

Madhu Sengupta

Sales are significantly higher than the same time last year. This makes another month of 2013 with sales showing strong signs of growth in both number of transactions, and sale prices. Most interesting is the drastic difference in how long homes are sitting on the market before selling. While the statistics show the average days on market as 59, many segments of the market are seeing homes selling in less than 7 days after hitting the open market.
Information provided by Ryan Zimmerman, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty, ryan.zimmerman@sothebysrealty.com

909.260.5560

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 8, 2013

34

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

Expertise in Claremont since 1978 Complete Professional Confidential Service

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 PM

HISTORIC UPLAND HOME

645 W. 20th St., Upland

OPEN HOUSE
CLAREMONT VILLAGE

Listing Agent: Carol Wiese Fabulous home built in 1918. Old world charm updated with new wiring, copper plumbing, insulation, drywall, central heat/AC, roof and more. Mountain and city views. Sparkling pool and spa. Four car, 1050 sq. ft. garage. Situated on an expansive corner lot. $589,000. (T645)

(909) 621-3944 (909) 709-3944
JOLI GORDIEN & AILEEN GORDIEN
Lic.#00837223 Lic.#00667324

CLAREMONT CLUB TERRACE
Immaculate 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom condo. Approximately 1563 sq. ft. with vaulted ceilings, sky lights, laminate flooring and private balcony off master bedroom. Lots of storage. Community pool and spa. $435,000. (A1831)

FOR LEASE: 2 Bedroom Claremont House - $1,525 2 Bedroom "West Arms" condo - Claremont - $1,600 3 Bedroom - 3 Bathroom Condo - $1,800

Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Carol Curtis, Broker

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4 P.M. 270 W. 10TH ST., CLAREMONT
Located in the heart of the Claremont Village, lovely Prairie style home built in 1906. Outstanding gourmet kitchen with marble counters and custom appliances. Updated plumbing and electrical systems. Tankless water heater. Hardwood floors. Stunning fireplace in the living room. Four bedrooms and a charming large family room. Professionally landscaped with many fruit trees and mature plants. Offered for sale: $795,000. (T270)

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

GORDIEN & ASSOCIATES • IN THE VILLAGE • CLAREMONT, CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 8, 2013

35

Grand Centurion • Determined • Honest • Dedicated • Diligent
NANCY TELFORD/C-21 BEACHSIDE BROKER ASSOCIATE (909) 575-8411 EMAIL: Telford@Telford.com www.NancyTelford.com DRE #01191038 Top 1% In the USA! #1 in the Inland Empire/San Gabriel Valley & awarded again for the Best Quality Service

Nancy Telford
N EW LI ST IN G !
PRESTIGOUS HILLTOP VIEW ESTATE This estate is located on a cul-de-sac in the Claraboya community in north Claremont. Panoramic views of the entire valley, city lights and beautiful sunsets. Approximately 3500 sq. ft. of spacious living space with 4 bedrooms (2 are master suites) and 4 bathrooms. Features: bright, light and airy floor plan, vaulted ceilings, skylights, formal living and dining rooms, 2 atriums plus dual heating and A/C units. Spacious kitchen with island, breakfast bar and nook area. Adjoining family room perfect for entertaining with rock fireplace and wet bar. Lovely backyard with covered patio and grass area. Only $895,000. (V2751)

ONE-OF-A-KIND MASTERPIECE WITH SPECTACULAR VIEW
This Spanish style estate is situated in the elegant and exclusive Claraboya community. Extensively remodeled showing pride of ownership with lots of character and charm throughout. This is truly an entertainerʼs delight with approximately 4200 sq. ft. of gracious living space, 5 spacious bedrooms and 5 bathrooms. Custom spiral staircase leads to upstairs bonus room with wet bar and huge balcony overlooking spacious, private courtyard and sweeping views of the Inland Empire, city lights and sunsets. Features include: gleaming wood floors, dual pane windows, 3 A/C and heating units. Gourmet remodeled kitchen with top of the line stainless steel appliances, Thermador refrigerator, 3 ovens, 6 burner and grill stove, warming tray, wine refrigerator, granite counter tops, island and extensive cabinetry. Two large master suites. One is set up perfectly for mother-in-law or guest quarters. Formal living room with fireplace and lanai doors leading out to a huge backyard with lush landscaping, black bottom pool/spa, covered patio areas and more. Too many amenities to mention. Call today for private showing 909-575-8411. See virtual tour at, http://tour.circlepix.com/home/U2TKGD. (V729)

SINGLE STORY VIEW HOME WITH POOL This unique Claraboya panoramic view home has approximately 2700 sq. ft. with 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. Special features include: lots of windows for bright and airy feeling, double door entry with Terrazzo tile, recessed lighting, spacious kitchen with island, breakfast bar, built-in appliances and wine cooler. Lovely, formal living room and family room with dual sided rock fireplace. Private backyard with a swimming pool and grass area creates a peaceful haven with panoramic view of the Inland Empire. Owner may carry. For more details call Nancy today (909) 575-8411. (V796)

WE HAVE QUALIFIED BUYERS WANTING A CLAREMONT HOME
Call or text Nancy Telford today for a free market analysis and the best quality service 909-575-8411 or visit Nancyʼs website, www.NancyTelford.com.

TWO LOVELY SINGLE STORY HOMES Located on a 17,600 sq. ft. lot at the end of a cul-desac. Front house has approximately 1766 sq. ft. of living space with a detached house in the back. Features: recess lighting, dual pane windows, lots of storage, laundry room plus newer A/C unit, heater and interior paint. Cozy kitchen with nook area. Huge family room with brick fireplace. Backyard features regulation half basketball court, fruit trees, RV parking and a covered patio area with trek wood deck surrounding a pond, bridge and stream. Nice curb appeal with view of the mountains. Only $350,000. Standard sale. (P8215)

SOLD IN ONE WEEK- MULTIPLE OFFERS BEAUTIFUL ROSEMONT ESTATE HOME This lovely Claremont Pool home shows pride of ownership. Situated on corner lot close to Cahuilla Park, Condit Elementary School and Claremont High School. Double door entry welcomes you into 2218 sq. ft. of spacious living space with 4 bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms. $598,000. (R1802)

Our experience with Mason selling our house could not have been better. He was so professional and prompt. I also attribute Mason and his knowledge to us getting almost our full asking price. Mason is the best! Thanks for everything.
—Kevin & Siara B.

SO

LD

!

To read more of what my clients are saying, please visit MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on Yelp.com.

Mason Prophet

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034

Family owned and operated since 1960

PROMINENT & LEGENDARY ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIC CLAREMONT VILLAGE ESTATE
One of the finest and grandest homes in Claremont. Presiding on 3 prime city lots on over 2/3 acre, magnificent Italian Renaissance style home has embellishments plus extensive recent upgrades inside and out. (C1105) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

NEW LISTING! CLARABOYA CONTEMPORARY SHOWCASE VIEW HOME - $1,250,000
Panoramic valley, city lights, canyon and mountain views! Newly rebuilt and expanded to showcase your favorite art collection. This classic one story residence boasts an open floor plan with extensive architectural built-ins. (M2556) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

2420 SAN ANTONIO CRESCENT EAST, UPLAND - $975,000
Classic San Antonio Heights custom home, serene setting among pine and birch trees with views of the valley below.Three bedrooms plus a bonus room, remodeled kitchen and bathrooms, saltwater pool and a 3-car garage. 4000-4500 sq. ft. (S2420) Jeannette Ewing jeannette.ewing@sothebysrealty.com – 909.670.0322

2135 W. SILVER TREE ROAD, CLAREMONT - $565,000
Classic 1965,Tri-level home with 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms and 2569 sq. ft. Formal living and dining room plus a spacious family room with fireplace. RV parking. Near Webb Schools, Condit Elementary School and excellent Claremont schools. (S2135) Bernadette Kendall bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com - 909.670.1717

1540 ROSEWOOD, UPLAND - $438,000
Gary Miller home nestled in a premier north Upland neighborhood. Home features soaring windows, remodeled kitchen, wood accents, 2 fireplaces plus a 3 car garage. Expansive backyard and a bubbling spa! (R1540) Jeannette Ewing jeannette.ewing@sothebysrealty.com – 909.670.0322

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500 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont

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