COLORADO COURT OF APPEALS    Court Address: 101 W. Colfax Ave., Suite 800    Denver, CO 80202        District Court, City and County of Denver    Honorable J. Eric Elliff, Judge    Case Nos.

 2012CV2133 and 2012CV2153    ___________________________________ ___    Appellees/Cross­Appellants: COLORADO ETHICS  WATCH and COLORADO COMMON CAUSE        And        Appellants/Cross­Appellees: DAVID PALADINO;    MICHAEL CERBO; PRO­CHOICE COLORADO PAC;    PPRM BALLOT ISSUE COMMITTEE; and CITIZENS  FOR INTEGRITY, INC.  ▲  COURT USE ONLY ▲    ________________________  v.      Case No. 12 CA 1712  Appellant/Cross­Appellee: SCOTT GESSLER, in his    official capacity as Colorado Secretary of State 

_______________________________________ 
Attorneys for Colorado Ethics Watch:  Luis Toro,  #22093  Margaret Perl, #43106  1630 Welton Street, Suite 415  Denver, CO 80202  Telephone: 303­626­2100  Email: ltoro@coloradoforethics.org               pperl@coloradoforethics.org    Attorneys for Colorado Common Cause:  Jennifer H. Hunt, #29964  Hill & Robbins, PC  1441 18th Street, Suite 100  Denver, CO 80202  Telephone: 303­296­8100  Email: jhunt@hillandrobbins.com  

    JOINT OPENING­ANSWER BRIEF   

CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE    I hereby certify that this brief complies with all requirements of C.A.R. 28 and  C.A.R. 32, including all formatting requirements set forth in these rules.   Specifically, I certify that:    The brief complies with C.A.R. 28(g).   It contains 9,282 words.   It does not exceed 30 pages.    The brief complies with C.A.R. 28(k).   For the party raising the issue:  It contains under a separate heading (1) a concise statement of the  applicable standard of appellate review with citation to authority; and (2) a  citation to the precise location in the record (R.  , p.  ), not to an entire  document, where the issue was raised and ruled on.   For the party responding to the issue:  It contains, under a separate heading, a statement of whether such  party agrees with the opponent’s statements concerning the standard of  review and preservation for appeal, and if not, why not.    I acknowledge that my brief may be stricken if it fails to comply with any of the  requirements of C.A.R. 28 and C.A.R. 32.    s/ Jennifer H. Hunt             Jennifer H. Hunt                    Attorney for the Appellee/Cross­Appellant            Colorado Common Cause 

  TABLE OF CONTENTS  I. STATEMENT OF ISSUES PRESENTED FOR REVIEW...................................1   II. STATEMENT OF THE CASE .............................................................................1   III. SUMMARY OF ARGUMENT ........................................................................ 10   IV. ARGUMENT.................................................................................................... 13   A.  B.  Standard of Review ............................................................................ 13   The District Court Properly Invalidated Rules 1.10, 1.12, 1.18  and 7.2 as Impermissible Attempts to Inject the Secretary’s  Own Interpretation of First Amendment Case Law to Change  Constitutional and Statutory Requirements. ...................................... 15   1.  The Secretary’s Political Organization Definition (Rules  1.10 and 7.2) Effectively Repeals the Political Organization  Disclosure Statute.......................................................................... 15   Adding a Percentage Threshold to the Issue Committee  Definition (Rule 1.12) Arbitrarily Reduces the Scope of the  Constitutional and Statutory Provisions........................................ 23   The Political Committee Definition (Rule 1.18) Improperly  Limits the Constitutional Definition. ............................................ 27   The District Court Properly Invalidated Rule 18.1.8 as  Exceeding the Secretary’s Delegated Authority. ............................... 29   The District Court Erred in Upholding Rule 1.7................................ 31   1.  2.  Standard of Review ....................................................................... 31   Rule 1.7 Modifies and Contravenes the Colorado  Constitution and Statutory Definitions of Electioneering  Communications. .......................................................................... 32   Similarity to the Prior Rule is Irrelevant to the Analysis of  Whether Rule 1.7 Violates the Colorado Constitution and  Statutes. ......................................................................................... 37   Other Courts Have Rejected Limits on Electioneering  Communications Disclosures Similar to Rule 1.7 Pursuant to  Citizens United. ............................................................................. 41   ii   

2. 

3.  C.  D. 

3. 

4. 

V. CONCLUSION .................................................................................................. 42  

iii   

TABLE OF AUTHORITIES 
Cases 

Alliance for Colorado’s Families v. Gilbert, 172 P.3d 964 (Colo. App. 2007) ..... 29  Bd. of County Comm’rs v. Colo. Pub. Utils. Comm’n, 157 P.3d 10838 (Colo.  2007).............................................................................................................. 14, 40  Buckley v. Valeo, 424 U.S. 1 (1976) ................................................................. 19, 20  Ceja v. Lemire, 154 P.3d 1064 (Colo. 2007) .......................................................... 17  Center for Individual Freedom v. Madigan, 697 F.3d 464 (7th Cir. 2012) ............ 42  Cerbo v. Protect Colorado Jobs, Inc., 240 P.3d 495 (Colo. App. 2010) ......... 24, 25  Citizens United v. F.E.C., 558 U.S. 310, 130 S. Ct. 876 (2010) ..................... passim  Colo. Citizens for Ethics in Gov’t v. Comm. for the Am. Dream, 187 P.3d  1207 (Colo. App. 2008) ...................................................................................... 35  Colo. Ethics Watch v. Clear the Bench Colo., 2012 COA 42 ...................................3  Colo. Ethics Watch v. Senate Majority Fund, LLC, 2012 CO 12.................... passim  Colo. Office of Consumer Counsel v. Colo. Public Utils. Comm’n, 2012 CO  33 (Colo. 2012) ............................................................................................. 14, 31  Colo. Right to Life Comm. v. Coffman, 498 F.3d 1137 (10th Cir. 2007) .......... 28, 35  Colorado Citizens for Ethics in Gov’t v. Comm. for Am. Dream, 187 P.3d  1207 (Colo. App. 2008) ...................................................................................... 14  Colorado Common Cause v. Gessler, Denver Dist. Ct. Case No.  2011CV4164 (Order, Nov. 17, 2011) .......................................................... passim  F.E.C. v. Wisconsin Right to Life, 551 U.S. 449 (2007)....................... 33, 34, 35, 36  Frazier v. People, 90 P.3d 807 (Colo. 2004).......................................................... 23  Harwood v. Senate Majority Fund, LLC, 141 P.3d 962 (Colo. App. 2006)........... 35  Human Life of Washington v. Brumsickle, 624 F.3d 990 (9th Cir. 2010) ............... 41  In Re Interrogatories Propounded by Governor Ritter, Jr. Concerning the  Effect of Citizens United v. Federal Election Comm’n, 558 U.S.___ (2010)  on Certain Provisions of Article XXVIII of The Constitution of the State of  Colorado, 227 P.3d 892 (Colo. 2010)........................................................... 34, 35  iv   

Independence Institute v. Coffman, 209 P.3d 1130 (Colo. App. 2008)............ 24, 26  Ingram v. Cooper, 698 P.2d 1314 (Colo 1985) ................................................ 38, 39  League of Women Voters of State v. Davidson, 23 P.3d 1266 (Colo. Ct. App.  2001).................................................................................................................... 29  Marbury v. Madison, 5 U.S. 137 (1803)................................................................. 13  Nat’l Org. for Marriage, Inc. v. Cruz­Bustillo, 2012 U.S. App. Lexis 9898  (11th Cir. 2012) .................................................................................................... 41  Nat’l Org. for Marriage, Inc. v. McKee, 649 F.3d 34 (1st Cir. 2011)..................... 20  NM Youth Organized v. Herrera, 611 F.3d 669 (10th Cir. 2010) ........................... 29  Patterson Recall Comm., Inc. v. Patterson, 209 P.3d 1210 (Colo. App. 2009)........4  People v. Lowrie, 761 P.2d 778 (Colo. 1988)......................................................... 13  Real Truth About Abortion v. F.E.C., 681 F.3d 544 (4th Cir. 2012)....................... 41  Sampson v. Buescher, 625 F.3d 1247 (10th Cir. 2010) .............................................5  Sanger v. Dennis, 148 P.3d 404 (Colo. App. 2006) ......................................... 32, 37  State v. Nieto, 993 P.2d 493 (Colo. 2000) .............................................................. 17  Vermont Right to Life v. Sorrell, 875 F. Supp. 2d 376 (D. Vt. 2012)..................... 41 
Statutes 

26 U.S.C. § 527....................................................................................................... 18  C.R.S. § 1­45­101, et seq. ..........................................................................................1  C.R.S. § 1­45­103 ............................................................................................ passim  C.R.S. § 1­45­108 ............................................................................................ passim  C.R.S. § 1­45­111.5 ................................................................................................ 30  C.R.S. § 24­4­106 ................................................................................. 14, 26, 32, 38 
Other Authorities 

2010 Colo. Sess. Laws 1239 ................................................................................... 27  Colo. Const. art. XXVIII.................................................................................. passim  Fair Campaign Practices Act .....................................................................................1 

v   

vi   

I.  STATEMENT OF ISSUES PRESENTED FOR REVIEW  1.  Whether the Secretary of State’s authority to enact rules to 

“administer and enforce” Article XXVIII of the Colorado Constitution and the Fair  Campaign Practices Act extends to rules that contradict or amend those laws, based  on his personal interpretation of the First Amendment.  2.  Whether the Secretary of State exceeded his authority when enacting a 

rule that places a cap on fines that can be assessed for certain late filings under the  Colorado Constitution and statutes, regardless of whether the violator applies for a  fine waiver or demonstrates good cause.  3.  Whether the District Court erred in upholding a Secretary of State 

Rule that excused from disclosure requirements spending on advertisements that  meet the constitutional definition of “electioneering communication” but do not  engage in express advocacy or its “functional equivalent” as defined by that Rule.  II.  STATEMENT OF THE CASE  The heart of this case is the fundamental principle that the Colorado  Secretary of State does not have the authority to impose his own idiosyncratic  interpretation of the First Amendment upon Colorado campaign finance law  through rulemaking that effectively amends the Colorado Constitution and the Fair  Campaign Practices Act (“FCPA”), C.R.S. §§ 1­45­101 – 118. 

  1 

In 2002, Colorado voters passed Amendment 27, which became Article  XXVIII of the Colorado Constitution.  Article XXVIII creates a comprehensive  campaign and political finance system, including disclosure requirements that  apply to various categories of participants in the elections process, such as issue  committees and political committees, and public disclosure filings required when  certain types of advertisements called “electioneering communications” are  distributed in the last weeks before an election.  Section 1 of Article XXVIII states  that the “interests of the public are best served by . . . providing for full and timely  disclosure of campaign contributions.”  Consistent with this purpose, the FCPA requires issue committees and  political committees to register and report all contributions, the names and  addresses of all persons who contribute twenty dollars or more, and all  expenditures.  C.R.S. § 1­45­108(1)(a)(I) (2011).  The statement of registration  must include the name of the committee; the name of a registered agent; the  committee’s address and telephone number; the identities of all affiliated  candidates and committees; and the “purpose or nature of interest” of the  committee.  C.R.S. § 1­45­108(3).  “Issue committee” is defined, in part, as any  group “that has accepted or made contributions or expenditures in excess of two  hundred dollars to support or oppose any ballot issue or ballot question.”  Colo. 

  2 

Const. art. XXVIII, § 2(10)(a)(II).  “Political committee” (sometimes colloquially  referred to as “PAC” from the analogous federal term, “political action  committee”) is defined, in part, as any group “that has accepted or made  contributions or expenditures in excess of two hundred dollars to support or oppose  the nomination or election of one or more candidates.”  Colo. Const. art. XXVIII, §  2(12)(a); see also Colo. Ethics Watch v. Clear the Bench Colo., 2012 COA 42, ¶  12 (hereinafter “Clear the Bench”).  In response to concerns that so­called “527” groups were spending money to  influence Colorado elections without expressly supporting or opposing candidates  and therefore without disclosure as “political committees,” the General Assembly  amended the FCPA in 2007.  See C.R.S. §§ 1­45­103(14.5) and 108.5.  Section  103(14.5) defined as a “political organization” any group “that is engaged in  influencing or attempting to influence the selection, nomination, election, or  appointment of any individual to any state or local public office in the state and  that is exempt, or intends to seek any exemption, from taxation pursuant to section  527 of the internal revenue code” and Section 108.5 requires political  organizations to file reports of contributions and “spending” in excess of twenty  dollars.  See Colo. Ethics Watch v. Senate Majority Fund, LLC, 2012 CO 12 

  3 

(hereinafter “Senate Majority Fund”) (groups that were properly registered as  political organizations were not required to register as political committees).  Amendment 27 also established a two­track enforcement system.  Late  filings are subject to a fine of $50 per day, but may be reduced by the Secretary  upon a showing of “good cause.”  Colo. Const. art. XXVIII, § 10(2).  All other  violations of Article XXVIII and the FCPA are enforced only through a litigation  process pursuant to which “any person” may file a complaint with the Secretary,  who refers the case to an administrative law judge for resolution.  Colo. Const. art.  XXVIII, § 9(2)(a).  Courts in such cases may impose fines of up to $50 per day for  violations of disclosure requirements or from double to five times the amount of an  illegal contribution.  Colo. Const. art. XXVIII, § 10(1)­(2); see also Patterson  Recall Comm., Inc. v. Patterson, 209 P.3d 1210, 1216 (Colo. App. 2009).   This is the second case to reach this Court regarding this Secretary’s  attempts to use his personal interpretation of the First Amendment as a vehicle to  weaken Colorado’s campaign finance laws.  The first case arose from the  Secretary’s enactment on May 13, 2011 of Campaign and Political Finance Rule  4.27, which purported to relieve issue committees of any obligation to register or  report contributions and expenditures until they had raised or spent $5000, not  $200 as expressly stated in the Colorado Constitution.  The Secretary contended 

  4 

that this rule was supported by his interpretation of First Amendment case law,  including specifically Sampson v. Buescher, 625 F.3d 1247 (10th Cir. 2010).   Colorado Common Cause (“CCC”) and Colorado Ethics Watch (“Ethics Watch”)  filed suit challenging the rule on the ground that the Secretary lacked authority  effectively to rewrite the constitutional definition of “issue committee.”  On  November 17, 2011 the Denver District Court entered judgment that Rule 4.27 was  invalid.  Colorado Common Cause v. Gessler, Denver Dist. Ct. Case No.  2011CV4164 (Order, Nov. 17, 2011), a copy of which is in the Administrative  Record (“AR”), Tab 5­42 (Exhibit 1 to comments of Ethics Watch).  After  explaining that the Secretary’s expansive interpretation of Sampson as striking  down the $200 reporting threshold in all its applications was incorrect, the district  court went on to address the Secretary’s limited authority to “administer and  enforce” campaign finance laws, holding that the Secretary could not promulgate  rules that abrogate existing constitutional and statutory requirements.  Id. at pp. 6­ 7.  On November 15, 2011, after oral argument but just before the district  court’s final order in the issue committee threshold case, the Secretary issued a  Notice of Rulemaking Hearing and Proposed Statement of Basis, Purpose and  Specific Statutory Authority.  (AR Tab 1.)  Unlike the issue committee threshold 

  5 

rule, which was prompted by the Tenth Circuit’s ruling in Sampson, this  rulemaking was not prompted by any particular legislative or judicial directive, but  to generally “clarify existing laws and regulations” and “address questions arising  under State campaign and political finance.”  See id.  The Secretary proposed revising the entirety of the Rules Concerning  Campaign and Political Finance at 8 C.C.R. 1505­6 (“Rules”) and included in the  proposal substantive amendments to numerous Rules.  A revised notice and set of  proposed rules was issued on December 9, 2011.  (AR Tabs 2 and 3.)  Pursuant to  the revised notice, a public hearing was held on December 15, 2011.  (AR Tabs 4,  5 and 6.)  At the hearing and in written comments submitted by interested parties, the  Secretary was repeatedly warned that several of the proposed rule changes  exceeded his legal authority to administer and enforce Article XXVIII and the  FCPA by effectively amending those duly enacted laws.  See Transcript of  December 15, 2011 Rulemaking Hearing (“Trans.”) at 25­28 (testimony of Senator  John Morse); 68­71 (testimony of Luis Toro); 80­94 (testimony of Martha  Tierney); 131­34 (testimony of Grace Lopez Ramirez); AR Tab 5­2 (comments of  Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains); 5­3 (comments of Planned  Parenthood Votes Colorado); 5­10 (comments of The Bell Policy Center); 5­11 

  6 

(comments of Senator Morgan Carroll); 5­20 (comments of Mark Grueskin, Esq.  for Citizens for Integrity); 5­32 (comments of CCC); 5­36 (comments of Mi  Familia Vota Education Fund); 5­41 (comments of Martha Tierney, Esq. for  Colorado Democratic Party); 5­42 (comments of Ethics Watch).    These warnings went unheeded.  On February 22, 2012, the Secretary issued  the completely revised and recodified Rules.  Pertinent to this action, the new  Rules provided that: (1) a 527 group need not report contributions or spending  unless it both had a “major purpose” of supporting or opposing candidates in  Colorado and it engaged in “express advocacy” for or against candidates; (2) that  an “issue committee” need not register or report unless and until it spent 30% of its  annual budget on a ballot issue; (3) that a “political committee” need not register  unless and until it spent “a majority” of its annual budget on supporting or  opposing candidates for Colorado office; (4) that contributions and spending on  “electioneering communications” need not be disclosed under a variety of  circumstances, such as when the communication “merely urges a candidate to take  a position with respect to an issue” or “urges the public to adopt a position and  contact a candidate with respect to an issue”; (5) that a political party in a home  rule jurisdiction could establish a separate account to raise unlimited contributions  for county committees in home rule counties with their own campaign finance 

  7 

laws; and (6) that penalties for failure to file “major contributor” reports under  C.R.S. § 1­45­108(2.5) within twenty­four hours of receiving a contribution of  $1000 or more during the last thirty days before an election would stop accruing on  the earlier of Election Day or the date the contribution was disclosed on a regular  contribution and expenditure report.1  The rulemaking also renumbered Rule 4.27,  the $5000 issue committee disclosure rule that had already been struck down by  the Denver District Court, as Rule 4.1, and extended the $5000 registration and  reporting threshold to recall committees.  (AR Tab 8.)  Ethics Watch and CCC timely filed a suit for judicial review and declaratory  judgment, challenging several of the new Rules as exceeding the Secretary of  State’s authority.  (Complaint, CD pages 1­16.)  The suit was consolidated with a  similar suit filed by David Paladino, Michael Cerbo, Pro­Choice Colorado PAC,  PPRM Ballot Issue Committee, and Citizens for Integrity, Inc. (the “Paladino  Parties”). (Complaint, CD pages 21­36.)   While the suit was pending before the district court, the Secretary issued  revisions to the Rules that affected two issues in the lawsuit.  The Secretary’s  revisions to the Rules governing political parties operating in home rule counties  rendered Ethics Watch’s and CCC’s challenge to new Rule 14.4 regarding political                                              1  The Rules at issue in this case are all included in Addendum A attached to the  Secretary’s Opening Brief.    8 

party contribution limits moot.  (Joint Opening Brief, CD page 188 n.1.)  The other  revision changed Rule 4.1 to clarify that the $5000 threshold for issue and recall  committee reporting would not take effect unless and until the Denver District  Court’s decision in Colorado Common Cause, et al. v. Gessler (discussed above)  was reversed.  After briefing and oral argument, the trial court entered judgment on August  10, 2012, invalidating new Rules 1.10; 1.12; 1.18; 7.2; and 18.1.8 (regarding the  definitions of “political organization,” “issue committee,” “political committee”  and a cap on penalties for failure to file major contributor reports) on the ground  that the Rules impermissibly contradicted the Colorado Constitution or the FCPA.   (Order, CD pages 385­395.)  Contrary to the Secretary’s repeated contention, the  district court did not hold that the Secretary cannot promulgate rules or regulations  to codify legal standards imposed by controlling case precedent.  Rather, the  district court determined that these rules improperly modified or contravened  existing statutes without any legal basis or authority, given that the applicable  statutes had not been declared facially unconstitutional.  The court upheld, however, the new Rule 1.7 regarding the definition of  “electioneering communications” on the ground that, in the court’s view, the rule  was similar enough to the rule that preceded it that it was entitled to judicial 

  9 

deference notwithstanding the argument that it contradicted the plain language of  the Colorado Constitution.  Finally, the district court found that the challenge to  Rule 4.1 was unripe because that rule had been set aside in Colo. Common Cause,  et al. v. Gessler.   On August 30, 2012, this Court entered its decision in Colo. Common Cause  v. Gessler, 2012 COA 147, affirming the district court’s ruling that the $5000 issue  disclosure rule was invalid because it exceeded the Secretary’s authority.  (Colorado Common Cause v. Gessler COA Opinion, CD pages 456­472).  The Secretary appeals the district court’s invalidation of Rules 1.10, 1.12,  1.18, 7.2 and 18.1.8 and Ethics Watch and CCC cross­appeal the district court’s  refusal to invalidate Rule 1.7.  III.  SUMMARY OF ARGUMENT  The United States and Colorado Constitutions vest in the legislature the  power to make laws and the judiciary the power to interpret them.  The  fundamental underpinning of the Secretary’s argument in support of his  rulemaking is that he was simply adopting controlling legal standards announced in  federal and state court decision.  However, as the district court recognized, the  Secretary’s rules go beyond the incorporation of controlling case law and in fact  attempt to rewrite campaign finance laws based on his interpretation of the First 

  10 

Amendment, no different from a rogue sheriff’s claim that firearms laws do not  apply in his or her jurisdiction based on the sheriff’s own personal interpretation of  the Second Amendment.  A straightforward review of the Rules illustrates the significant  inconsistencies between the Rules and the constitutional and statutory provisions  which the Secretary has a duty to administer and enforce.  This case is  indistinguishable from Colorado Common Cause v. Gessler, 2012 COA 147,  except the rule changes under review here do not even have the fig leaf of  justification that the Tenth Circuit’s Sampson ruling provided in Colorado  Common Cause.  The Secretary’s personal interpretation of First Amendment case  law simply cannot justify rules that contradict express provisions of the Colorado  Constitution or the FCPA.  The overall effect of the Secretary’s changes is to narrow the scope of  constitutional and statutory requirements to register, report, and submit to  contribution limitations.  Reaching back for judicial precedents to justify this  power grab, the Secretary disregarded testimony in the rulemaking process  regarding the decrease in transparency that would result – directly contrary to voter  and general assembly intent.  Far from filling “gaps” in the law, these rules make 

  11 

different policy choices than the general assembly, even in situations where  legislation has specifically responded to judicial precedent by amending the FCPA.  In this case, the Secretary’s reading of First Amendment precedent ignores  the significant distinction between contribution limits and disclosure requirements.   Because contribution limits arguably stifle speech by limiting the amount of money  available to broadcast political messages, doctrines have emerged to limit the  circumstances under which governments may lawfully enact such limits.  All but  one of the laws that would be rewritten by the Secretary’s Rules, in contrast,  merely require disclosure of contributions and political spending, which the  Supreme Court has repeatedly held are not subject to the same scrutiny or  boundaries as contribution limits.  Yet the revised Rules treat disclosure rules as if  they were identical to contribution limits, and improperly import concepts from  contribution limit cases to restrict the application of disclosure laws, thereby  depriving the people of their right to know who spent money to influence their  vote.  While the district court properly held that Rules 1.10, 1.12, 1.18, 7.2 and  18.1.8 exceed the Secretary’s rulemaking authority, it erred in upholding Rule 1.7.   That rule radically restricts the definition of “electioneering communications” in  blatant disregard of the plain language of the Colorado Constitution and the U.S. 

  12 

Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. F.E.C., 558 U.S. 310, 130 S. Ct.  876 (2010), which rejected the need for such restrictions in the context of  disclosure laws.  IV.  ARGUMENT  A.  Standard of Review  The Secretary mischaracterizes both the standard of review and the district  court’s application of that standard.  See Secretary’s Opening Br. at 11­12.  The  Secretary is not a judge who may interpret the law, nor a legislative body that can  translate those interpretations into amendments of duly enacted laws. See Marbury  v. Madison, 5 U.S. 137, 177 (1803) (the judicial branch’s role is to “say what the  law is”); People v. Lowrie, 761 P.2d 778, 781 (Colo. 1988) (“nondelegation  doctrine, which has its source in the constitutional separation of powers, prohibits  the General Assembly from delegating its legislative power to some other agency  or person”).  He is merely an administrator of the laws enacted by the General  Assembly or the People exercising their legislative power through the initiative  process.  The question is not, as the Secretary would have it, whether a rule within the  Secretary’s powers is “permissible under governing standards.”  See Secretary’s  Opening Br. at 13.  Rather, a “reviewing court may reverse an administrative 

  13 

agency's action if the court finds that the agency exceeded its constitutional or  statutory authority or made an erroneous interpretation of law,” both of which are  questions of law reviewed de novo.  Colo. Common Cause, 2012 COA 147, ¶¶ 15­ 16; see also Colo. Office of Consumer Counsel v. Colo. Public Utils. Comm’n,  2012 CO 33, ¶ 9 (Colo. 2012) (“We review de novo questions of law, but defer to  the [agency’s] determination of factual issues”).  In undertaking this review, the court “shall determine all questions of law  and interpret the statutory and constitutional provisions involved.”  C.R.S. § 24­4­ 106(7) (standards for judicial review of agency action).  Although the court does  defer to the agency’s interpretation of the statutes and constitutional provisions it is  charged with administering, its interpretation is not binding.  Bd. of County  Comm’rs v. Colo. Pub. Utils. Comm’n, 157 P.3d 1083, 1088 (Colo. 2007);  Colorado Citizens for Ethics in Gov’t v. Comm. for Am. Dream, 187 P.3d 1207,  1214 (Colo. App. 2008).  Moreover, this limited deference does not extend to the  Secretary’s interpretation or application of the First Amendment, which does not  involve any agency technical expertise.  See Bd. of County Comm'rs, 157 P.3d at  1089.  A reviewing court is never bound by the agency’s action that has resulted  from a misconstruction or misapplication of the law.  Colo. Citizens for Ethics in  Gov’t, 187 P.3d at 1214 (an agency’s decision should be reversed if the agency 

  14 

erroneously interpreted the law or exceeded its constitutional or statutory  authority).  The district court properly applied this level of de novo review and  limited deference when invalidating Rules 1.10, 1.12, 1.18, 7.2 and 18.1.8.  (Order,  CD pages 386­387.)2  Appellees/Cross­Appellants agree that the issues were preserved for appeal.  B.  The District Court Properly Invalidated Rules 1.10, 1.12, 1.18 and 7.2 as  Impermissible Attempts to Inject the Secretary’s Own Interpretation of  First Amendment Case Law to Change Constitutional and Statutory  Requirements.   1.  The Secretary’s Political Organization Definition (Rules 1.10 and  7.2) Effectively Repeals the Political Organization Disclosure  Statute. 

In adopting Rules 1.10 and 7.2, the Secretary boldly collapsed the distinction  between political committees and political organizations, effectively rewriting  C.R.S. §§ 1­45­103(14.5) and 108.5 by engrafting restrictions purportedly justified  by federal contribution limit cases regarding PACs onto a disclosure­only regime  for 527 groups.  The district court properly characterized this usurpation of  legislative and judicial power as “contrary to the clear terms of the statute and the  intent of the legislature” and held that these Rules “exceed[d the Secretary’s]  delegated authority.”  (Order, CD page 393).                                              2  At another point in his brief, the Secretary concedes that agency discretion is not  unlimited and deference is not absolute when a rulemaking proceeding interprets  case law.  See Secretary’s Opening Br. at 21.    15 

Under Colorado law, “political committees” are entities subject to  contribution limitations in addition to registration and disclosure requirements.  See  Colo. Const. art. XXVIII § 3(5).  Political committee status is triggered by  accepting or making “contributions” or “expenditures” in excess of $200 to support  or oppose candidates.  See Colo. Const. art. XXVIII § 2(12)(a).  “Expenditure” is  also a defined term in Article XXVIII, meaning moneys spent “for the purpose of  expressly advocating” the election or defeat of a candidate or ballot measure.  See  Colo. Const. art. XXVIII § 2(8)(a).  Thus, an organization is only required to  register, report, and comply with contribution limitations as a political committee  when it makes express advocacy expenditures.  See Senate Majority Fund, 2012  CO 12, ¶¶18­19.  Recognizing that so­called “527” groups were avoiding words of “express  advocacy” so as to evade political committee registration and reporting  requirements, the General Assembly acted in 2007 to create disclosure­only rules  for such groups.  The new statutory provisions in §§ 1­45­103(14.5) and 108.5  recognize a new type of disclosure­only entity – “political organizations” – which  are not subject to contribution limits.  The General Assembly deliberately chose to avoid the legally significant  terms “expenditure” or “express advocacy,” which apply to political committees, 

  16 

when defining “political organization.”  Instead, it defined a “political  organization” as a group organized under Section 527 of the Internal Revenue  Code “engaged in influencing or attempting to influence” any candidate election in  Colorado.  C.R.S. § 1­45­103(14.5).  The statute similarly avoided the word  “expenditure” by defining “spending” as “funds expended influencing or  attempting to influence” a candidate election.  C.R.S. § 1­45­103(16.5).  The clear language of the statute applies more broadly than the “express  advocacy” expenditures that already defined political committee status under  Article XXVIII.  To say that “attempting to influence” means “for the purpose of  expressly advocating” is also to say that “expenditure” means “spending” and that  C.R.S. § 1­45­108.5 does not require any disclosures other than those already  required for political committees.  “[A] statute should be construed as written,  giving full effect to the words chosen, as it is presumed that the General Assembly  meant what it clearly said.”  Ceja v. Lemire, 154 P.3d 1064, 1066 (Colo. 2007)  (citing State v. Nieto, 993 P.2d 493, 500 (Colo. 2000)).  The Secretary’s addition of a requirement that a 527 group must have a  “major purpose” of influencing Colorado elections also contradicts the statute.   C.R.S. § 1­45­103(14.5) applies to any “political organization as defined in section  527(e)(1) of the [IRS code] that is engaged in influencing or attempting to 

  17 

influence the selection, nomination, election or appointment of any individual to  any state or local public office in the state.”  This language includes any 527  organization that is involved in candidate elections in Colorado – there is no  threshold regarding how much of the group’s activities must in be Colorado. 3  Rule 1.10 (incorporated by reference into Rule 7.2), on the other hand,  restricts the definition of “political organizations” not only to groups that engage in  “express advocacy” but also only to groups whose major purpose is to expressly  advocate in support of “candidates,” another defined term in Colorado campaign  finance law that refers only to candidates for Colorado offices.  Colo. Const. art.  XXVIII, § 2(2).  Thus, a national 527 group could spend millions on ads to  influence Colorado elections without transparency, so long as they avoid the  “magic words” of “express advocacy” or continue to spend in other states.  See  Senate Majority Fund, 2012 CO 12, ¶ 38.  This result is directly contrary to both  the statutory language and legislative intent.  See Comment of Sen. Morgan 

                                            3  Under the Internal Revenue Code, a 527 organization must have a “primary  purpose” of influencing the election or appointment of officials at the state or  federal level.  See 26 U.S.C. § 527 (e)(1)­(2).  Thus, a single 527 group may spend  to influence Colorado elections, federal elections, and elections in other States.      18 

Carroll, AR Tab 5.11 (stating new Rules changes “run 180 degrees opposite of the  legislative intent” of legislation she authored mandating 527 disclosures). 4  The Secretary attempts to justify this result by relying on Buckley v. Valeo,  424 U.S. 1 (1976), which considered the constitutionality of federal regulation of  “political committee” and “expenditures” through contribution limitations and  outright prohibitions.  While the Buckley Court used the concepts of “express  advocacy” and “major purpose” to limit federal statutory provisions under First  Amendment principles, the Buckley analysis is simply not relevant to Colorado’s  political organization statute, which creates only disclosure obligations and does  not limit speech through contribution limitations or prohibitions.  See Senate  Majority Fund, 2012 CO 12, ¶¶ 7­8 & n.1 (explaining difference between political  organizations and political committees and noting that contribution limits apply  only to the latter); id. at ¶ 39 (“Buckley adopted the ‘express advocacy’  requirement to distinguish discussion of issues and candidates from more pointed  exhortations to vote for particular persons”) (further quotation omitted).  Proof that  Buckley does not control the question presented is found in the 8­1 portion of the  Citizens United v. F.E.C. opinion, in which the Supreme Court held that no                                              4  Sen. Carroll also stated in her written comments that the Secretary, then a private  citizen, was the only witness who testified against the political organization  disclosure bill in committee, and admonished him that “[r]ulemaking should not be  an opportunity to re­legislate a different outcome.”     19 

“express advocacy” limitation is constitutionally required when a law requires only  disclosure of election­related spending.  See 558 U.S. 310, 130 S. Ct. 876, at 915­ 16.  Regardless, the General Assembly specifically avoided the Buckley  standards of expenditure and express advocacy when delineating the triggering  conduct for political organizations under Colorado law.  The Secretary argues that  by using the word “influencing” the General Assembly imported the Buckley  standard into the statute.  Secretary’s Opening Br. at 44­45.  However,  “influencing” is not a technical term interpreted by Buckley – Buckley interpreted  the technical terms “political committee” and “expenditure” by narrowing them for  First Amendment compliance to the use of money to engage in “express  advocacy.”  See Buckley, 424 U.S. at 78­80; Nat’l Org. for Marriage, Inc. v.  McKee, 649 F.3d 34, 64­66 (1st Cir. 2011) (refusing to apply Buckley narrowing to  the term “influencing” when the term is paired with other words in state statute).   Rule 1.10’s attempt to add an express advocacy standard that was deliberately  avoided by the General Assembly is beyond the scope of the Secretary’s delegated  authority.  The Secretary alternatively argues that Rule 7.2 only seeks to codify the §  527 statutory “primary purpose” standard in its “major purpose” provision.  

  20 

Secretary’s Opening Br. at 42­43.  By deeming the words “primary” and “major”  to mean the same thing, the Secretary’s argument ignores the substantive  difference between Rule 7.2’s limitation and the statutory provision.  The § 527  “primary purpose” threshold applies to all campaign activity at the federal and  state level, across the country.  Rule 7.2 places an additional limitation: not only  must the organization have a general primary purpose of engaging in election  activity across the country (thereby triggering §527 tax status), but its “major  purpose” must be focused on Colorado elections.  The General Assembly defined  the reach of the political organization disclosure requirements to any 527  organizations operating or “engaged” in Colorado state or local candidate races.   Rule 7.2 is not an implementation and clarification of what it means to be a 527  organization – it narrows the reach of the statute.  Because the “major purpose”  limitation imposed by Buckley is not applicable to political organizations that are  not subject to contribution limits, there is no other justification for the narrowing of  the statute that results from Rule 7.2’s “major purpose” requirement.  Under the Secretary’s Rules, the categories of “political committee” and  “political organization” completely overlap: both only contain entities whose major  purpose is making express advocacy expenditures in Colorado candidate elections.   Yet, the two categories must have distinct and separate coverage because “political 

  21 

committees” are subject to contribution limits under Article XXVIII and “political  organizations” are disclosure­only entities.    A concrete example from the recent Senate Majority Fund case illustrates  how Rules 1.10 and 7.2 collapse these two regimes.  The two 527 groups engaged  in candidate­related activity in that case were both registered as “political  organizations,” but the complaint alleged that the groups crossed the line and  should have been subject to the contribution limits of “political committees.”  See  Senate Majority Fund, 2012 CO 12, ¶ 7 & n.1.  The Colorado Supreme Court  found that the voters who enacted Article XXVIII intended to adopt Buckley’s  “magic words” test to determine when a group was engaged in express advocacy;  because the 527 defendants did not use such words, they were not “political  committees.”  Id. at ¶¶ 29, 40.  The Court also noted, however, that the 527s  conceded that they were “political organizations” and that there was no dispute that  they were disclosing pursuant to C.R.S. § 1­45­108.5.  Senate Majority Fund, 2012  CO 12 at ¶ 7.  If these same organizations were operating under the new Rules 1.10  and 7.2, the fact that they were not engaged in express advocacy would also have  excused them from reporting under C.R.S. § 1­45­108.5.  The separate statutory  category of “political organization” would have been erased by the Secretary 

  22 

charged with enforcing that law if it were not for the district court’s order in this  case.  The Rules allow out­of­state 527 organizations to spend freely in Colorado  elections without disclosure so long as they are sufficiently engaged in other states  or at the federal level enough to avoid a “major purpose” threshold in Colorado, or  if they avoid the use of “magic words” that are the defining characteristic of  political committees.  Each of these results is contrary to the General Assembly’s  intent and the statutory language itself.  “A statutory interpretation leading to an  illogical or absurd result will not be followed.”  Frazier v. People, 90 P.3d 807,  811 (Colo. 2004).  The district court correctly ruled that Rules 1.10 and 7.2 are  invalid.  2.  Adding a Percentage Threshold to the Issue Committee Definition  (Rule 1.12) Arbitrarily Reduces the Scope of the Constitutional  and Statutory Provisions 

The General Assembly has amended campaign finance statutes to address  and incorporate judicial rulings in a proper example of the separation of powers  between the branches of government.  However, the Secretary’s adoption of Rule  1.12 upsets this balance by implementing his interpretation of judicial precedent on  top of the definition of “issue committee” in C.R.S. § 1­45­103(12)(b).  The district  court correctly held that Rule 1.12 “adds a restriction not found in the statute and 

  23 

not supported by the record” to the definition of “issue committee” and is invalid.   (Order, CD page 390.)  “Issue committee” is defined in Article XXVIII as a group with “a major  purpose of supporting or opposing any ballot issue or ballot question.”  Colo.  Const. art. XXVIII § 2(10)(a)(I).  This Court has twice interpreted and applied the  major purpose test for issue committees.  See Cerbo v. Protect Colorado Jobs, Inc.,  240 P.3d 495 (Colo. App. 2010); Independence Institute v. Coffman, 209 P.3d  1130 (Colo. App. 2008).  In Independence Institute, this Court rejected vagueness  and overbreadth challenges to the major purpose provision in Article XVIII and  articulated some of the factors that could be considered by a committee to  determine if the major purpose test was met.  See Independence Institute, 209 P.3d  at 1139.  Two years later, this Court observed in Cerbo that neither statutes nor  regulations further defined the major purpose test in Article XVIII § 2(10)(a), but  still found no impermissible ambiguity in the phrase.  See Cerbo, 240 P.3d at 501.  Later in 2010 – after these two decisions – the General Assembly enacted  clarifying legislation stating that “major purpose” can be determined through the  organization’s objectives in organizational documents or the organization’s  “demonstrated pattern of conduct.”  C.R.S. § 1­45­103(12)(b)(I)­(II).  Going even  further, the statute states that the pattern of conduct is based upon: 

  24 

(A) Annual expenditures in support of or opposition to an  ballot issue or ballot question; or  (B)  Production  or  funding,  or  both,  of  written  or  broadcast  communications,  or  both,  in  support  of  or  opposition to a ballot issue or ballot question.    C.R.S. § 1­45­103­12(b)(II).  The General Assembly specifically stated that this  new provision was intended to incorporate the “major purpose” definition as  articulated in Independence Institute.  See C.R.S. § 1­45­103(12)(c).  The legislative decision to create a major purpose test in statute did not  include setting precise percentages for the amount of funding, expenditures, or  communications that would automatically trigger issue committee status.  Rule  1.12 ignores this deliberate choice by the General Assembly and inserts a 30%  threshold into the rule.  No court case had found the statutory methodology to be  ambiguous between its enactment and the 2012 adoption of Rule 1.12 (or since).   The Secretary simply disagrees with the legislative implementation and prefers the  “bright line” of a set 30% rule – a line no court or statute has drawn.  The Secretary argues that the statute still leaves the question of how these  factors should be weighed unanswered.  Secretary’s Opening Br. at 30­31.   However, the legislature decided that a case­specific inquiry into an organization’s  pattern of conduct was the appropriate test rather than an across­the­board flat  percentage.  This same approach was endorsed by this Court in both Cerbo and 

  25 

Independence Institute and has been found to survive constitutional scrutiny.  The  statute is not silent and there are no gaps to fill.  There is no justification for the  Secretary to supplant the legislative decision in statute with the test he prefers.  See  Colo. Common Cause, 2012 COA 147 at ¶¶ 21­23 (recognizing that the Secretary  has no authority to promulgate a rule to fill a gap that does not exist).  Moreover, the specific 30% threshold was adopted with no factual basis in  the rulemaking record and little justification offered even now.  The Secretary  justifies drawing this line at 30% because it is a number less than 50%, but still  representing “a meaningful portion” of the committee’s budget.  Secretary’s  Opening Br. at 35.  Such reasoning is the quintessential example of an “arbitrary or  capricious” agency action.  See C.R.S. § 24­4­106(7).  It is especially egregious  that the Secretary adopted this standard in complete disregard of the testimony  during the rulemaking, from groups across the political spectrum, regarding the  disparate impact such a rule has based on the overall size of a committee’s  spending; i.e. groups with more money to spend overall would only start reporting  their activity at a higher dollar amount than smaller groups who would hit the 30%  mark sooner.  See, e.g., AR Tab 5­2 (comments of Planned Parenthood of the  Rocky Mountains); Tab 5­11 (comments of The Bell Policy Center); Tab 5­16  (comments of Metro Organization for People); Tab 5­22 at 3 (comments of 

  26 

Coalition for Secular Government); Tab 5­24 (comments of Colorado Progressive  Coalition); Tab 5­32 at 2 (comments of Colorado Common Cause); Tab 5­41 at 2  (comments of Colorado Democratic Party); Tab 5­46 (comments of Colorado  Conservation Voters).  The 2010 legislation clarifying the major purpose test in § 1­45­103(12)  included a legislative finding that a lack of disclosure in connection with  communications supporting or opposing ballot issues “leads to a perception of  purposefully anonymous interests attempting to influence the outcome of the  election on measures…through the expenditure of large sums of money.” 2010  Colo. Sess. Laws 1239, §1(e).  Rule 1.12 undermines the purpose of the statute by  allowing large sums of money to be spent without disclosure beneath the arbitrary  30% line.  3.  The Political Committee Definition (Rule 1.18) Improperly Limits  the Constitutional Definition. 

Article XXVIII’s specific definition of “political committee” applies to any  group that has made expenditures or received contributions in excess of $200 to  support or oppose a candidate. See Colo. Const. art. XXVIII § 2(12)(a).  The voters  did not include a “major purpose” requirement in this definition – a choice that  must be seen as deliberate since a major purpose test was included in constitutional  definition of “issue committee.”  See Colo. Const. art. XXVIII, § 2(10)(a)(I).     27 

However, Rule 1.18 adds a major purpose test that does not exist in the  Constitution or statute based again on the Secretary’s reading of judicial precedent.   As the district court observed: “[the Secretary] assumes a solution without  legislative or voter input, and thereby exceeds his delegated authority.”  (Order,  CD pages 391­392.)   It is the legislature – or the voters’ – responsibility to 

design and codify a major purpose test.  The Secretary’s attempt to create law in  Rule 1.18 exceeds his delegated authority.  In any event, Rule 1.18 does not simply implement the standard from Colo.  Right to Life Comm. v. Coffman, 498 F.3d 1137, 1146­52 (10th Cir. 2007), as the  Secretary contends.  Secretary’s Opening Br. at 26.  The Rule 1.18 test is narrower  that the factors considered by the Tenth Circuit in that case.  First, the Rule limits  the major purpose test to a comparison of the organization’s expenditures to total  spending and completely ignores any calculation of the organization’s  contributions to candidates.  Surely making contributions to political candidates  would be indicative of whether or not the group had a major purpose of influencing  candidate elections.  Second, the Rule only looks to what the organization states as  to its purpose “in organizing documents.”  Under this test, an organization may talk  about candidates on websites and in solicitations and still not trigger the major  purpose test so long as the corporate documents do not mention a purpose of 

  28 

supporting or opposing candidates.  This is not consistent with the test as applied  by the courts.  See id. at 1152 (examining the “organization’s central purpose”);  see also NM Youth Organized v. Herrera, 611 F.3d 669, 678 (10th Cir. 2010)  (examining actual activities of organizations to determine organization purpose);  League of Women Voters of State v. Davidson, 23 P.3d 1266, 1275 (Colo. Ct. App.  2001) (declining to be held to analysis of group’s self­serving statements of  purpose under predecessor provision before Article XVIII enactment).  In the five years since Alliance for Colorado’s Families v. Gilbert, 172 P.3d  964 (Colo. App. 2007), first interpreted the major purpose test for political  committees, the General Assembly or Colorado voters could have revised the  FCPA or Article XXVIII.  They chose not to.  Rule 1.18 exceeds the Secretary’s  authority by implementing a contrary choice and then arbitrarily narrowing the  judicially constructed test it purports to “incorporate” into the law.  C.  The District Court Properly Invalidated Rule 18.1.8 as Exceeding the  Secretary’s Delegated Authority.  The district court properly determined that Rule 18.1.8 exceeds the  Secretary’s authority by “substantially denuding the statutory penalty” imposed for  not filing major contribution reports.  (Order, CD page 394).  Colorado law  requires entities to file a major contributor report “in addition” to any regularly­ scheduled report and assesses an automatic penalty of $50 per day for each day the    29 

report is not filed between the 48­hour deadline and whenever that specific,  separate report is filed.  See C.R.S. § 1­45­108(2.5), § 1­45­111.5(c).  Rule 18.1.8  caps penalties assessed by statute in two ways by stating that the $50 penalties  simply “stop accruing” on either the date the contribution is included on a  regularly­schedule report or the date of the general election. See Rule 18.1.8(A).   The Secretary’s power to enforce the FCPA does not permit the creation of such an  exception to the civil penalties to protect non­filers.  In both respects, Rule 18.1.8  exceeds the Secretary’s authority and contradicts the plain language of the statute.  The Secretary correctly asserts that Article XXVIII grants him the power to  “set aside or reduce” a penalty already assessed when presented with a written  appeal and waiver request.  Colo. Const. art. XXVIII § 10(2)(c).  Notably, the  Secretary may only grant waivers “upon a showing of good cause.”  Id.  Otherwise,  waiver requests must be sent to an ALJ for determination.  Id. § 10(2)(b)(I).  Rule  18.1.8 dispenses with any “good cause” requirement and effectively waives fines  in advance.  This is beyond the Secretary’s power.  Rule 18.1.8 is separate from the other portions of Rule 18, which govern the  Secretary’s exercise of discretion when presented with waiver requests that do  demonstrate good cause.  It purports to stop such penalties from ever accruing after  either of the two trigger dates – obviating the need for any particular committee to 

  30 

request a waiver under Article XXVIII, § 10(2).  Rule 18.1.8 is a separate  exception applied across the board – not in a specific waiver request – that fines  will never be applied when a contribution is reported on a regularly­scheduled  report or when the general election has passed.  Whether it is wise to impose  penalties for failure to file major contributor reports after the contribution has been  otherwise disclosed is a choice for the General Assembly to make, not the  Secretary.  This rule is beyond the authority accorded to the Secretary under the  Constitution and the statute.  D.  The District Court Erred in Upholding Rule 1.7.   1.  Standard of Review 

The Secretary’s argument that Rule 1.7’s new limitations on  constitutionally­required disclosure are necessary to comply with the First  Amendment pursuant to state and federal court decisions is a legal interpretation of  judicial precedent not entitled to deference by this Court.  See Colo. Common  Cause v. Gessler, 2012 COA 147,¶ 22; see also Colo. Office of Consumer Counsel  v. Colo. Public Utils. Comm’n, 2012 CO 33, ¶ 9 (Colo. 2012).  With regard to Rule  1.7, the district court improperly conducted this de novo review and gave too much  deference to the Secretary’s Rule.  (Order, CD page 389). 

  31 

This appeal of a district court’s review of an agency rule did not require  preservation and is properly brought pursuant to C.R.S. § 24­4­106(9).  2.  Rule 1.7 Modifies and Contravenes the Colorado Constitution and  Statutory Definitions of Electioneering Communications. 

The plain text of Rule 1.7 explicitly “imposes a restriction that is not  supported by the text of Article XXVIII” when it states:  “Electioneering  Communication”  is  any  communication  that  (1)  meets  the  definition  of  electioneering  communication in Article XXVIII, Section 2(7),  and (2)  is the functional equivalent of express advocacy…  Rule 1.7 (emphasis added); Sanger v. Dennis, 148 P.3d 404, 412 (Colo. App.  2006).  These changes again reflect the Secretary’s attempt to graft stricter case  law holdings regarding laws that limit or prohibit contributions onto the disclosure­ only provisions governing electioneering communications in Colorado today.  Far  from being a First Amendment­required limitation on public disclosure, the  “functional equivalent” standard has been rejected as an unworkable standard that  is not necessary for provisions that require only reporting.  The plain language of the “electioneering communication” definition in both  federal and Colorado law applies broadly to regulate any communication in the  30/60­day window before a primary or general election that “unambiguously refers 

  32 

to any candidate.”  Colo. Const. art. XXVIII, § 2(7)(a); 2 U.S.C. § 434(f)(3)(A). 5   In 2007, the reach of the federal law was temporarily narrowed to communications  that meet the stated requirements and contain “the functional equivalent of express  advocacy” because those provisions were tied to a corporate and labor union  expenditure ban and therefore had to be read narrowly in order to assuage First  Amendment concerns.  F.E.C. v. Wisconsin Right to Life, 551 U.S. 449, 481 (2007)  (WRTL).  However, this judicial filter limiting the scope of the electioneering  communication provision was disregarded as inadequate protection of speech in  2010, when the U.S. Supreme Court opted instead to strike down the expenditure  prohibitions in the federal law entirely.  Citizens United,130 S. Ct. at 913.  Although the corporate expenditure prohibition was struck down, the Court  upheld the electioneering communication disclosure requirement without any  limitation of disclaimer and disclosure requirements to ads that expressly advocate  for or against candidates.  Id. at 915­16.  Moreover, the Court explicitly rejected  application of WRTL’s “functional equivalent” limitations on the remaining  disclosure provisions:                                              5  The Colorado statutory definition merely states that the term “shall have the same  meaning as set forth in section 2(7) of article XXVIII of the state constitution” and  has not be revised by the General Assembly in response to any of the court cases  discussed in this section.  C.R.S. § 1­45­103(9).    33 

As  a  final  point,  Citizens  United  claims  that,  in  any  event,  the  disclosure  requirements  in  §  201  must  be  confined  to  speech  that  is  the  functional  equivalent  of  express advocacy. The principal opinion in WRTL limited  2  U.S.C.  §  441b's  restrictions  on  independent  expenditures  to  express  advocacy  and  its  functional  equivalent. 551 U.S., at 469­476, 127 S. Ct. 2652, 168 L.  Ed.  2d  329  (opinion  of  Roberts,  C.  J.).  Citizens  United  seeks  to  import  a  similar  distinction  into  BCRA's  disclosure requirements. We reject this contention.  Id. at 915.  Citizens United put an end to attempts to apply limitations from cases  involving contribution or expenditure limits into disclosure laws just as surely as  its more famous holding put an end to attempts to limit expenditures by  corporations or labor unions.  As a result, campaign finance law has been  simplified considerably.  The Court emphasized the importance of disclosure as necessary for voters  to “make informed decisions and give proper weight to different speakers and  messages.”  Id. at 916.  The impact of this 8­1 decision is clear: once the Colorado  electioneering communications provision was limited to disclosure provisions (as  confirmed in Colorado’s provision by In Re Interrogatories Propounded by  Governor Ritter, Jr. Concerning the Effect of Citizens United v. Federal Election  Comm’n, 558 U.S.___ (2010) on Certain Provisions of Article XXVIII of The  Constitution of the State of Colorado, 227 P.3d 892 (Colo. 2010)), the “functional  equivalent” standard is not applicable.  Even the district court in this case noted    34 

that “it may be that Citizens United renders both old and new rules obsolete”  before upholding Rule 1.7 based on its comparison to the prior rule. (Order, CD  page 389).  Under the plain language of the “electioneering communication” law,  spending on some of the most noxious attack ads – ones that smear a candidate  personally in the last days before an election – must be disclosed.  During the 2012  election, voters were left in the dark about those ads thanks to the district court’s  erroneous ruling.  No Colorado case has stated that the “functional equivalent” limitation from  WRTL must be imposed upon Article XXVIII’s “electioneering communications”  definition to survive constitutional scrutiny.  See In re Interrogatories, 227 P.3d at  893 (leaving the Article XXVIII disclosure requirements undisturbed); Colo.  Citizens for Ethics in Gov’t v. Comm. for the Am. Dream, 187 P.3d 1207, 1214­17  (Colo. App. 2008) (post­WRTL case applying Article XXVIII definition without  “functional equivalent” limitation); Colo. Right to Life, 498 F.3d at 1152   (declining to consider facial challenge to Colorado’s electioneering  communications provision post­WRTL and limiting holding to as­applied challenge  by certain nonprofit organization); Harwood v. Senate Majority Fund, LLC, 141  P.3d 962, 964­66 (Colo. App. 2006) (pre­WRTL case applying Article XXVIII  definition to polls).  The Secretary’s attempt to cherry­pick from outdated federal 

  35 

campaign finance cases to support his regulatory narrowing of disclosure in  Colorado is beyond the scope of his authority.  The district court’s order erroneously relied upon Senate Majority Fund,  2012 CO 12, as affirming WRTL’s applicability to Colorado’s electioneering  communications definition.  (Order, CD page 389.)  Senate Majority Fund  determined the meaning of “express advocacy” as part of the constitutional  definition of “expenditure” which triggers the requirements to register as a political  committee under Colorado law.  See id. at ¶ 19.  No claim was made that the ads  should have been disclosed as electioneering communications.  Id. at ¶ 7 n.1.  While the opinion recognized that WRTL approved of a “functional  equivalence test,” it only states that WRTL stands for the proposition that a  “broader scope of speech” can be regulated under the time­limited electioneering  communications provisions than as “expenditures.”  Id. at ¶¶ 34­35.  The Colorado  Supreme Court did not state that these limitations applied to Colorado’s provisions,  nor discuss Citizens United’s import as these issues were not before the court.  See  id. at ¶ 36 & n.8.  If anything, Senate Majority Fund is relevant to this case for its  statement that the WRTL “functional equivalent” test – which Ethics Watch argued  in Senate Majority Fund should define “express advocacy” and which the  Secretary argues here should limit “electioneering communications” – “might be 

  36 

found to create an unwieldy standard that would be difficult to apply and, as a  result, potentially serve to unconstitutionally chill protected political speech.”  Id.  at ¶ 37.  In addition to the explicit addition of the “functional equivalent” standard,  the specific safe harbors in Rule 1.7.3 create regulatory exemptions to the statutory  and constitutional reporting requirements.  The rule arbitrarily carves out numerous  types of advertisements that refer to candidates and are distributed within the final  days of an election in the district where the candidate is running for office from the  public information provided to voters.  The district court erred in holding “it  appears the Secretary did not modify or contravene an existing statute.”  (Order,  CD page 389.)  Rule 1.7 exemplifies this Court’s statement in Sanger v. Dennis  that “[t]he Secretary’s ‘definition’ is much more than an effort to define the term.   It can be read to effectively add, to modify, and to conflict with the constitutional  provision.”  Sanger, 148 P.3d at 413.  3.  Similarity to the Prior Rule is Irrelevant to the Analysis of  Whether Rule 1.7 Violates the Colorado Constitution and  Statutes. 

In its order, the district court focused the majority of its analysis regarding  Rule 1.7 on a comparison between the text of this rule and the prior regulatory  definition of “electioneering communications” in former Rule 9.4.  The court held 

  37 

that “new rule adds no substantive additional terms and imposes no additional  restrictions over the old rule” and that “the challenged rule is similar to the rule  enacted by Defendant’s predecessor, and it therefore is entitled to deference”  (citing Ingram v. Cooper, 698 P.2d 1314 (Colo 1985)).  (Order, CD page 389.)  When the Court invalidated the other regulations at issue in this case, it did  not engage in such a comparison to prior rules governing political committees or  political organizations.  Instead, the Court properly evaluated the newly enacted  regulations standing alone to see if the rules exceeding the Secretary’s authority,  contradicted constitutional or statutory provisions, or were arbitrary and capricious  under standards of administrative review.  Thus, the extent to which Rule 1.7 is  similar to former Rule 9.4 is irrelevant to a determination of the validity of the rule.   Under C.R.S. § 24­4­106(7) the court must hold an agency rule invalid if it is  shown to be arbitrary and capricious or contrary to law – there is no statutory  exception for rules based on how similar the newly enacted rule is to a prior  regulation.  As seen above, Rule 1.7 explicitly adds conditions to the constitutional  definition of “electioneering communications” and should be held invalid without  regard to the precise language of former Rule 9.4.  Nor is a court required to accord heightened deference to a rule based on  lack of challenge to a similar rule in the past.  The Ingram case relied upon by the 

  38 

district court is not controlling in this matter.  The plaintiffs in that case challenged  the Department of Corrections’ calculation of good­time credits, which had been  done using the same method since 1935 and had been unchallenged until the  Ingram challenge in 1982.  Ingram, 698 P.2d at 1316.  That is not the circumstance  of the Rule challenged in this case.  Proposed Rule 1.7’s revision of the definition  of “electioneering communications” was first presented for public comment in the  Secretary’s 2011 notice of rulemaking.  This was the appropriate time for Ethics  Watch, CCC and many other individuals and groups to express their objection to  the new subsections added in the proposed Rule.  Indeed, many commenters pointed to the new language and informed the  Secretary how these proposed changes would limit disclosures and, ultimately,  information to voters.  See, e.g., AR Tab 5­3 (comments of Planned Parenthood  Votes Colorado); Tab 5­20 at 2 (comments of Citizens for Integrity); Tab 5­32 at 2  (comments of CCC); Tab 5­41 at 2 (comments of Colorado Democratic Party);  Tab 5­42 at 2 (comments of Ethics Watch); Tab 5­46 (comments of Colorado  Conservation Voters); Tab 5­47 (comments of One Colorado).  Public testimony  also informed the Secretary that eight justices of the U.S. Supreme Court in  Citizens United held that electioneering communications disclosure provisions  which do not prohibit corporations or labor unions from making such 

  39 

communications are not required to be limited to a “functional equivalent” test in  order to comply with the First Amendment. See AR Tab 5­32 at 2 (comments of  CCC); Tab 5­41 at 2 (comments of Colorado Democratic Party); Tab 5­42 at 2  (comments of Ethics Watch).  Nonetheless, the Secretary made a choice to revise the regulatory definition  in Rule 1.7 from the prior language in former Rule 9.4.  That choice is reviewable  by the court under an “arbitrary or capricious” or contrary to law standard without  any extra deference which would place a thumb on the scale in favor of the rule’s  validity.  See Bd. of County Comm’rs, 157 P.3d at 1089 (deference is not  appropriate if agency interpretation defeats statutory intent or plain meaning of  statute).  But even assuming that it is relevant to compare Rule 1.7 to former Rule 9.4  as a part of the APA review, the district court erred in holding that the new rule  does not impose “substantive additional terms” in the definition of “electioneering  communications.”  Rule 1.7 uses a term not found in former Rule 9.4 – “the  functional equivalent of express advocacy” – and proceeds to explain what is and  is not encompassed by that new phrase.  Rule 1.7.3 is a wholly new subsection  which adds a roadmap for groups seeking to avoid constitutional disclosure of the  money financing campaign advertising.  The “safe harbor” added to the rule 

  40 

provides a get­out­of­reporting­free card for communications that otherwise meet  the constitutional definition of electioneering communications.  This illustrates the  substantial changes that Rule 1.7 made to the standards of the former Rule.  4.  Other Courts Have Rejected Limits on Electioneering  Communications Disclosures Similar to Rule 1.7 Pursuant to  Citizens United. 

After the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in 2010, other courts have reviewed  state­level electioneering communications provisions and consistently held that the  “functional equivalent” limitation need not be grafted onto disclosure­only  regimes.  See, e.g., Nat’l Org. for Marriage, Inc., 649 F.3d at 54 (stating functional  equivalent line of cases “came to a definitive end with Citizens United”); Human  Life of Washington v. Brumsickle, 624 F.3d 990, 1016 (9th Cir. 2010) (stating  Citizens United refused to apply functional equivalent standard to disclosure);  Nat’l Org. for Marriage, Inc. v. Cruz­Bustillo, 2012 U.S. App. Lexis 9898 (11th  Cir. 2012) (unpublished) (rejecting per curiam challenge to state disclosure limits  citing Citizens United and First Circuit Nat’l Org. for Marriage case); Vermont  Right to Life v. Sorrell, 875 F. Supp. 2d 376, 386 (D. Vt. 2012) (stating Citizens  United rejected the argument that electioneering communications disclosure  provisions could only cover express advocacy or its functional equivalent); see  also Real Truth About Abortion v. F.E.C., 681 F.3d 544, 552 (4th Cir. 2012) (noting 

  41 

“mandatory disclosure requirements are permissible when applied to ads that  merely mention a candidate” in federal law after Citizens United).  Since the district court’s order in this case, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the  Seventh Circuit discussed the state of electioneering communications and similar  campaign finance disclosure laws after Citizens United in a facial challenge to  Illinois’s state laws.  See Center for Individual Freedom v. Madigan, 697 F.3d 464  (7th Cir. 2012).  The court noted that all federal court of appeals that have decided  post­Citizens United challenges to state disclosure statutes have upheld the statutes.   See id at 470.  The court also held that electioneering communications provisions  in state law “may constitutionally cover more than just express advocacy and its  functional equivalent” under Citizens United.  Id. at 484.  The Secretary enacted Rule 1.7 based on his own faulty interpretation of  federal campaign finance law.  This Court’s de novo review need not give  deference to this agency analysis and should hold that such limitations are not  constitutionally required.  Thus, Rule 1.7 is invalid.  V.  CONCLUSION  For these reasons, and the reasons stated in the Paladino Parties’ Answer  Brief, the Court should affirm the district court’s judgment holding void Campaign  and Political Finance Rules 1.10, 1.12, 1.18, 7.2 and 18.1.8 as having been enacted 

  42 

in excess of the Secretary of State’s authority.  Ethics Watch and CCC also  respectfully request that the Court enter an order reversing the district court’s  judgment upholding Campaign and Political Finance Rule 1.7, and remanding this  case to that court with instructions to enter judgment that the rule is void as  exceeding the Secretary of State’s rulemaking authority.       

  43 

  Respectfully submitted on March 8, 2013.    signed original on file  signed original on file  /s/ Jennifer H. Hunt___________  /s/ Margaret Perl________________  Jennifer H. Hunt  Luis Toro  Hill & Robbins, P.C.  Margaret Perl  1441 18th Street, Suite 100  Colorado Ethics Watch  Denver, CO  80202­1256  1630 Welton Street, Suite 415    Denver, CO 80202  Attorney for Appellee/Cross­Appellant    Colorado Common Cause  Attorneys for Appellee/Cross­Appellant  Colorado Ethics Watch     

  44 

  CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE  The undersigned hereby certifies that on the 8th day of March, 2013, service  of the foregoing JOINT OPENING­ANSWER BRIEF was made via LexisNexis  File & Serve, addressed as follows:  LeAnn Morrill  Frederick R. Yarger  Matthew Grove  State Services Section  Office of the Attorney General  1525 Sherman Street, 7th Floor  Denver, CO 80203    Mark Grueskin  Heizer Paul Grueskin LLP  2401 15th Street, Suite 300  Denver CO 80202          signed original on file       s/Rae Macias           

  45 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful