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HARRISBURG Gov.

Tom
Corbetts top Department of
Public Welfare ofcial smiled
and once again offered a varia-
tion of a statement that she had
made countless times already in
the past 24 hours to lawmakers
pressing her for answers.
At this time were moving
down the path to look at all ways
we can allow Pennsylvanians to
have access
to affordable,
quality health
care, Bev
Mackereth told
members of
the House Ap-
propri at i ons
Committee on
We dne s da y,
the day after
she testied before the Senate
Appropriations Committee.
That path will take Corbett to
Washington to meet with U.S.
Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
about whether Pennsylvania
should undertake a massive
expansion of Medicaids health
care coverage, largely to low-
income adults, under the 2010
Affordable Care Act.
The meeting possibly in
late March or early April, Cor-
betts administration says a date
isnt set yet will be closely
watched by people on both sides
of the debate.
The federal government
would foot nearly all of the cost
of providing health care to hun-
dreds of thousands of additional
Pennsylvanians by widening
Medicaids income eligibility
guidelines to 133 percent of the
federal poverty level, or about
$31,300 for a family of four.
But Corbett, a Republican
who sued unsuccessfully to
throw out the 2010 law, is not
embracing that option, which
is available to every state as a
result of a U.S. Supreme Court
decision last summer that said
the law could not force states
into an expansion.
Corbett maintains that the
expansion would require a tax
increase because of future costs
the state might have to shoulder,
unless the federal government
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VATICAN CITY A pas-
tor in Ontario wondered about
behind-the-scenes politicking
ahead of the conclave to elect
the next pope. He could have
read news reports or listened to
briengs by the Vatican spokes-
man. Instead, he asked a cardi-
nal. Less than
an hour later,
the response
arrived.
What I see
is a real desire
to know, and
so evaluate,
the papabili
against criteria
of qualities de-
manded by situations, wrote
Cardinal Wilfrid Napier of Dur-
ban, South Africa, using the
term papabili for cardinals
seen as papal contenders.
The exchange occurred on
Twitter, one of many online in-
teractions that have made this
papal succession unlike any
other for Roman Catholics and
observers of the church. While
the election starting Tuesday
will remain strictly secret, social
media is providing a direct link
to the events surrounding the
succession, creating a virtual
conclave that involves lay peo-
ple in everything from voting to
prayer.
I think its fabulous for the
church, said Brother Martin
Browne, a Benedictine monk in
County Limerick, Ireland, who
is following Vatican analysts and
reporters on Twitter instead of
watching general news cover-
age. I think more people un-
derstand whats going on now
because theres greater access to
good information.
No one will be posting up-
dates from inside the Sistine
Chapel. The Vatican will acti-
vate electronic jamming devices
so no one can listen in or report
out. You obviously cant have
cardinals inside the conclave
tweeting Uh-oh, trending right
Selection
of pope
a cyber
situation
The inuence of the Internet
makes this papal succession
unlike any before it.
By RACHEL ZOLL
AP Religion Writer
Napier
Health care
for Pa. gets
D.C. input
Gov. corbett to meet with u.S.
health and human Services
secretary about Medicaid.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
Corbett
The massive Avondale pit in
Plymouth Township one of
the largest coal-mining scars in
the state is now a memory.
Mike Dziak stood atop the
now-lled void last week, rel-
ishing the panoramic Wyoming
Valley view that might someday
be enjoyed by the occupants of
houses and townhomes he envi-
sions there.
As executive director of the
nonprot Earth Conservancy,
which owns the site, Dziak
pushed hard for $3.47 million to
reclaim the 90-acre site, which
was strip-mined for about two
decades and abandoned in 1959
by the Glen Alden Coal Co.
The restoration was funded
through the state Department
of Environmental Protections
Bureau of Abandoned Mine
Reclamation using fees received
fromcoal mined in recent years.
Its really rewarding, said
Dziak. This place was unus-
able and dangerous.
The pit has been a magnet
for illegal dumping for decades.
Tires, rusted cars ditched by
thieves and hundreds of televi-
sions and refrigerators had to
be removed when the reclama-
tion began in mid-2000, Dziak
said.
Locals used to call it the Blue
Lagoon in the 1960s when the
DON CArEy /ThE TimES LEADEr
Michael A. Dziak, president/CEO of the Earth Conservancy,
admires the view from former Avondale Mine pit.
Plymouth Twp. officials envision new homes, revenue
After reclamation, this land no longer the pits
See MINE, Page 13A
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
See HEALTH, Page 13A
T
he photo depicts a family of six stand-
ing in front of a Christmas tree, each
holding popular electronic devices,
including iPads and cellphones.
Posted on the personal blog page of a Florida
woman, the snapshot apparently was meant as a
lighthearted glimpse into the bloggers life that
she wished to share with family and friends.
Web privacy? Ha!
Digital detectives can trace your online information
for good or bad
PETE G. WiLCOX PhOTOS/ThE TimES LEADEr
Jonathan Weber, an Internet security expert, demonstrates gaining access to someones personal information on
social media websites is very easy when security settings are not enabled.
A website can read code embedded in photos taken with
cellphone cameras, exposing your information.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See INTERNET, Page 14A
Can your pet compromise your email security?
IT SEEMED like an
innocuous question:
Whats your favorite
pets name?
Posed to me by the
Internet provider I
use to access the Web,
I quickly answered
the query when I set up my account
years ago. I named the dog. Other than
worrying that my two cats might be of-
fended, I never thought about it again.
It wasnt until I met Jonathan Weber,
a junior at East Stroudsburg University
studying computer security, that I real-
ized I had opened the door for my iden-
tity to be stolen.
Weber, owner of Marathon Studios
Inc. a company that develops inter-
active websites and Internet applica-
tions explained I had made a com-
mon mistake that could allow a hacker
to hijack my account.
I had chosen a far too common an-
swer to the security question my pro-
vider asks any time I forget my pass-
word.
He was about to show me how much
trouble that could cause.
Sitting at a computer in his ofce at
the university, Weber attempted to log
O P I N I O N
TERRIE
MORGAN-BESECKER
See SECURITY, Page 14
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M
arlyne Ann Lipfert, 71, of
Dallas, passed away peace-
fully at the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital on Thursday, March 7,
2013, surrounded by several mem-
bers of her large family of friends.
She was born in Kingston on
Feb. 22, 1942, the only child of the
late William and Justine Miller
Lipfert. She grew up in Trucks-
ville and graduated from West-
moreland High School in 1960.
She then decided to become the
primary caretaker of her maternal
grandmother, Lilith Miller, in the
family home.
After her grandmothers death,
she moved to Washington, D.C.
Her rst position was working
as a secretary for OB-GYN doc-
tors Dusbabek, Liverett, Erken-
beck and Skilling, in downtown
Washington. She quickly became
very uent in the medical terms
needed to assist patients. She
then moved to another secretarial
position with the National Confer-
ence for Community and Justice
(NCCJ) and again became pro-
cient in that area.
Next she went to work as a re-
ceptionist for U.S. Sen. Clifford
P. Case of New Jersey. Her work
with him was extremely reward-
ing in a variety of ways. Unfortu-
nately, Sen. Case was defeated in
the primary in his bid for
re-election in 1979. This is
when Marlyne found her true
niche in life: working for the En-
vironmental Protection Agency as
a paralegal.
Once again, she became very
accomplished in her work and
was often thought to be an attor-
ney. Marlyne retired from in EPA
in the mid-90s and returned to
the family home in Trucksville.
After searching for a ranch-style
home for many years, she nally
purchased a home in the Elmcrest
section of Dallas, residing there
for approximately six years. At a
certain point, she decided to buy
a home in Brevard, N.C., but was
not able to move there perma-
nently.
Upon returning to the Back
Mountain area, she became very
active in the North Branch Land
Trust, serving as treasurer for
many years. The next endeavor
that was near and dear to her
heart was The Lands at Hillside
Farm, serving on its board of
directors until her demise. She
spent many hours volunteering
there. One of her biggest and
time-consuming efforts was re-
storing The Cottage. Marlyne
was a strong advocate for the con-
cept of a sustainable farm and the
many educational services that
are provided.
She is survived by cousins, Lin-
da Werner, Tom and Carol Ram-
say, and Judy Myers of Columbus,
Ohio; Don Lipfert, Michigan; and
Claire Gallagher, Texas.
Marlyne will be greatly missed
be her family of friends and her
beloved pets, Jake, Mollie and Le
Le.
Her family of friends will be
planning a memorial service in the
late spring. Arrangements have
been in the care of the Yanaitis
Funeral Home Inc., Plains Town-
ship. Condolences and memories
of Marlyne can be posted at www.
yanaitisfuneralhome.com.
WEST PITTSTON Hard-
ing resident Marianne Lurie
gave a demonstration Saturday
afternoon at the West Pittston
Library on the art of creating
pysanky eggs a Ukrainian Eas-
ter tradition.
The vividly colored, elabo-
rately decorated eggs have been
an Eastern European custom
for more than 2,000 years, Lurie
said.
Luries talents previously
caught the attention of the li-
brarys director, Anne Bramblett-
Barr, after she saw the pysanky
donkey that Lurie designed in
2002 as part of a community art
event. The donkey was one of
Scrantons painted mules and
was purchased by West Pittston
resident Cliff Melberger.
Bramblett-Barr decided to
learn more about the art, and lat-
er invited Lurie to demonstrate
the process at the library. Lurie
learned the art from her grandfa-
ther and mother, she said.
Sixteen people attended Satur-
days demonstration and discus-
sion, drawn there for various rea-
sons. Plains Township resident
Dottie Rodriquez said that she
always admired the eggs and
wanted to see how they were
done.
Avoca resident Ann Francis
said her grandparents were
of Polish heritage and they
also made pysanky. Francis
broughther 9-year-old grandson,
Andrew Francis, of Moosic, so
that he could learn about the
process.
Jennie Veloski, of Franklin
Township, said she admires
those with a lot of talent. Ve-
loski, who is part of a Trucksville
quilting group that distributes
handmade quilts to Hersheys
Childrens Hospital, said this is
the rst year she attended the
pysanky demonstration.
Forty Fort resident EdithJones
attended a similar program two
years ago and came back to see
how it is done again. Jones add-
ed that she has never tried (the
art) herself.
David and Arlene Grudkowski,
of Dallas, brought their 10-year-
old daughter, Amelia, to viewthe
designing of the pysanky. Arlene
and Amelia Grudkowski also be
attending a mother-daughter
pysanky party on Palm Sunday,
they said.
The afternoons demonstra-
tion ended with some of the
attendees trying out the art of
pysanky for themselves.
D
orothy Lousie Simko, 90, of
Harding, went peacefully
to be with the Lord on March 8,
2013 surrounded by her loving
family.
Born in Pittsburgh, she was the
daughter of the late Victor and
Bertha Moxley Gawlik.
Dorothy lived a full and blessed
life with her late husband Ste-
phen P. Simko. Together, they
celebrated 66 years of marriage
while raising eight children.
Dorothy was a graduate of West
Wyoming High School, where she
loved and excelled in basketball
and softball. She insisted on hunt-
ing and always having a garden
for fresh food and canning.
Her love of the Lord and fam-
ily led her on many paths to in-
spire others where she taught and
cooked, at the Full Gospel Acad-
emy, Pittston, and also started
the organization Mission Impos-
sible to help others who were
less fortunate.
She was a lifelong Christian
who touched the lives of everyone
she met with her strong faith and
belief in the Lord. To this day, she
is known as Mom to the count-
less friends and strangers she ex-
tended her helping hand to.
Preceding her in death, in ad-
dition to husband, Stephen P.
Simko, on March 3, 2010, were
a son, Daniel, and a sister, Helen
Conrad.
Surviving are her children, Ger-
aldine and her husband, Wallace
Talley, of Newark, Del., Stephen
V., of Harding, James and his
wife, Michele, of Pittston, George
and his wife, Diane, of Pittston,
Thomas and Joseph Simko, Hard-
ing and Theresa Bishop, Hard-
ing; 12 grandchildren; four great-
grandchildren; brother, Victor
Kupcek, Rockport, Ind.; sisters,
Marion Belvins, New Market,
Md., and Barbara Palmer, Middle-
town, Pa.; and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
on Wednesday at 11 a.m. from the
Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030
Wyoming Ave., Exeter. The Rev.
Jerry L. Lewis, pastor of the Ap-
ostolic Lighthouse Church, will
ofciate.
Interment will be in St. John
the Slovak Cemetery, Schooley
Street, Exeter.
Relatives and friends may call
on Tuesday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home and also on Wednes-
day from 10 a.m. until time of ser-
vices.
To send the family an expres-
sion of sympathy or an online
condolence, please visit www.
gubbiottifh.com.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SunDAy, MARch 10, 2013
timesleader.com
DETAILS
WEEKLY
LOTTERY
SUMMARY
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 6-1-3
Monday: 8-4-2
Tuesday: 2-5-8
Wednesday: 4-6-5
Thursday: 4-5-0
Friday: 2-4-3
Saturday: 4-6-7
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 3-6-7-9
Monday: 4-6-4-6
Tuesday: 5-3-5-0
Wednesday: 2-2-8-5 (2-3-4-3,
double draw)
Thursday: 8-5-6-9
Friday: 3-3-3-2
Saturday: 5-6-7-0
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 8-5-1-9-0
Monday: 9-1-5-3-6
Tuesday: 2-1-0-7-3
Wednesday: 3-1-9-5-9
Thursday: 4-8-3-3-3
Friday: 1-1-1-5-3
Saturday: 6-7-4-9-1
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 05-13-16-25-30
Monday: 01-04-15-19-29
Tuesday: 02-12-15-19-20
Wednesday: 15-16-27-28-30
Thursday: 06-09-10-17-27
Friday: 02-07-09-12-18
Saturday: 11-15-18-20-28
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 0-0-2
Monday: 7-2-3
Tuesday: 7-4-4
Wednesday: 4-4-7
Thursday: 3-7-9
Friday: 2-4-5
Saturday: 8-6-2
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 5-6-0-5
Monday: 8-7-5-4
Tuesday: 3-6-9-6
Wednesday: 0-9-5-9
Thursday: 0-9-1-0
Friday: 2-8-2-5
Saturday: 5-2-0-0
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 0-3-9-2-2
Monday: 0-0-0-6-2
Tuesday: 4-4-7-5-5
Wednesday: 5-2-9-4-6
Thursday: 3-3-6-7-7
Friday: 5-5-7-5-2
Saturday: 6-1-7-8-4
Cash 5
Sunday: 05-09-18-36-39
Monday: 09-13-20-29-31
Tuesday: 18-20-26-30-34
Wednesday: 05-16-23-27-33
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Friday: 11-18-23-34-36
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Match 6 Lotto
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Thursday: 09-11-24-30-39-47
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Wednesday: 06-10-23-41-45
powerball: 01
Saturday: 10-37-40-46-52
powerball: 12
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Tuesday: 06-20-39-41-46
Megaball: 42
Megaplier: 03
Friday: 04-11-25-34-35
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Megaplier: 04
OBITUARIES
Bath, Edward Sr.
Centi, Eugene
Chesnavich, Jessie
Ferguson, Robert
Frew, Thomas
Kozicki, Veronica
Kubasti, Richard
Letinski, Eva
Lipfert, Marlyne
Lizza, Ann
OMalley, Regina
Martin, MaryAnn
Menn, Joseph Jr.
Perovich, Florence
Rish, Daniel
Rizzo, Carolyn
Simko, Dorothy
Winslow, Veronica
Zurawski, Vivian
Pages 2A, 10A, 11A
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Issue No. 2013-069
A SCOREBOx ON Page 1B of
Saturdays edition listed the
wrong score for the GAR-Mount
Carmel girls basketball game.
The score should have read
Mount Carmel 80, GAR 70.
WyOMiNg AREA wrestler Andy
Schutzs name was misspelled in
a headline on Page 1B of Satur-
days edition.
BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in
this spot. If you have infor-
mation to help us correct an
inaccuracy or cover an issue
more thoroughly, call the
newsroom at 829-7242.
An eggs-quisite custom
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Amelia, 10, and Arlene grudkowski, of Dallas, examine a pysanky egg made by Marianne Lurie.
Marianne Lurie demonstrates how to make pysanky eggs, a
Ukrainian Easter tradition, at Saturdays event in the West
Pittston Library.
Egg decoration
in Ukrainian style
draws admirers
By SuSan Bettinger
Times Leader correspondent
Dorothy Louise Simko
March 8, 2013
Marlyne A. Lipfert
March 7, 2013
MORE OBiTUARiES, Page 10A, 11A
3 escape unharmed from W-B apartment re
WILKES-BARRE - Three resi-
dents escaped a re at a Barney
Street apartment building Friday
night, the city re department
said.
City reghters responded at
10:03 p.m. Friday to a re on the
second oor of 15 Barney St., a
three-story multi-unit apartment
building, said Assistant Chief
Thomas Makar. Flames were
shooting from rear second-story
windows and spread to the third
oor, Makar said.
Three residents of a rst-oor
apartment were home at the
time of the re, but escaped after
smoke alarms sounded in their
apartment. They are staying with
family members, Makar said.
The second and third oors
were unoccupied, Makar said.
The re was signicant enough
that re crews called for a third
alarm and placed a reserve engine
into service. There were at least
four hoses pumping water into
the building until the re was ex-
tinguished, Makar said. The extra
crews were able to extinguish the
ames relatively quickly, Makar
said, with the department clearing
the scene at 1:18 a.m. Saturday.
The cause of the re is under in-
vestigation by the city re inspec-
tor, Makar said.
The building sustained heavy
re, smoke and water damage to
the second oor, and moderate
smoke and water damage to the
third oor. Damage to the rst-
oor apartment was lighter, but
Makar said the tenants will not be
able to return home until the dam-
ages have been repaired.
When you have all that water
in the house, that comes down
through where all the wiring is,
he said. So until thats dried out
and checked out, that poses a re
hazard.
Veronica Ronnie Winslow
March 9, 2013
V
eronica Ronnie Winslow, 88,
of Avoca, passed away peace-
fully Saturday morning in Wesley
Village.
Born in Avoca, she was a daugh-
ter of the late Lawrence and Mary
Dembitski Haduck and was a grad-
uate of Duryea High School.
She worked in various capacities
for more than 22 years with Topps
Chewing Gum, Duryea. Ronnie
loved animals and spending time
with her family, especially her
granddaughters.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her
husband, Henry; brothers, Tony,
Eddie, Larry, Mike and Paul; and
sisters, Victoria Sara Sankus and
Frances Jones.
Surviving are her son, Richard
Winslow and his wife, Mary Ellen,
South Abington Township; daugh-
ter, Beverly Yelpo and her husband,
Joseph, Whitehouse Station, N.J.;
granddaughters, Jennifer and Ash-
ley Yelpo; a sister, Louise Chernef-
ski and husband, Bernie, Moosic;
and several nieces and nephews.
a Mass of Christian Burial
will be held Tuesday at 9:30 a.m.
in Queen of the Apostles Church,
Hawthorne Street, Avoca, with the
Rev. Phillip Sladika, ofciating.
Friends and relatives are asked to
go directly to the church.
Interment will be in Ss. Peter &
Paul Cemetery, Moosic.
Friends may call from 4 to 7
p.m. Monday at Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea.
The family thanks the staff of
Wesley Village and Dr. Guy Fas-
ciana and his staff for their kind-
ness and caring. And also a special
thanks to her sister Louise and hus-
band, Bernie, for their companion-
ship and care.
Memorial donations may be
made to St Francis of Assisi Kitch-
en, 500 Penn Avenue, Scranton PA
18509 or Grifn Pond Animal Shel-
ter, 967 Grifn Pond Road, South
Abington Township, PA 18411.
Online condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfuneralser-
vices.com.
By Matt HugHeS
mhughes@timesleader.com
2 adults, 5 children are killed in Ky. re
The Associated Press
GRAY, Ky. Fire erupted
Saturday at a rural Kentucky
home, killing two adults and
ve children inside, a coroner
said.
Knox County Coroner Mike
Blevins said Saturday after-
noon that the adult victims
found inside the ranch-style
home were a woman and her
boyfriend. The woman was
the mother of three of the chil-
dren who died, while two oth-
er children were from another
family, he said.
New rules went into ef-
fect this year restricting
where you can pitch that
old console TV, Apple II or
Commodore 64.
Under the states Cov-
ered Device Recycling Act,
homeowners can no longer
dispose of televisions, com-
puters, printers and other
hooded electronics in the
trash.
Heres what you need to
know about the law and
how to dispose of your un-
wanted electronics.
What does the act mean
to me?
Covered electronic de-
vices such as computers,
monitors, printers and
televisions may no longer
be discarded in landlls.
Pennsylvania landlls are
prohibited from accepting
them. Manufacturers of
these items are required to
accept them for recycling,
and owners wishing to dis-
pose of them should con-
tact the manufacturer. They
also can be disposed of at
electronics recycling events
hosted by Luzerne County
in June and October. Cer-
tain retailers also accept
them for recycling.
What else does it do?
Manufacturers of elec-
tronic devices sold in Penn-
sylvania now must be reg-
istered with Department of
Environmental Protection
and have a plan for collect-
ing and recycling the cov-
ered devices they market in
the state. Covered electron-
ics may be sold in Pennsyl-
vania only if they have been
labeled with a brand name
that has been registered
with DEP. Manufacturers
must renew their registra-
tions with the state annu-
ally.
What items do the new
rules concern?
The disposal ban affects
only desktop and laptop
computers, computer moni-
tors and computer peripher-
als such as printers and tele-
visions. The department
also encourages residents
to recycle other electronic
devices, such as cellphones,
rather than throwing them
away, and to think of others
who might use the equip-
ment before disposing of it
at all.
Why were these rules
enacted?
Electronic equipment
contains metals and other
materials including cad-
mium, leaded glass, mer-
cury, hexavalent chromium,
lithium and phosphorous
that can harm the environ-
ment and human health if
improperly disposed.
When will the county
accept these items for re-
cycling?
Luzerne County plans to
hold electronics collections
in June and October. Dates
HAZLETON Area tele-
vision news personality L.A.
Tarone said he wonders if crime
rates are increasing in the region
or simply being exaggerated by
the new media a question
that might get
answered dur-
ing a Crime
at Home dis-
cussion to air
live at 7 p.m.
Monday on
WYLN-TV 35.
Moderators
from the TV
station will
host a conver-
sation about
crime causes
and possible
s o l u t i o n s
with area law
enforcement
and commu-
nity ofcials, including Luzerne
County District Attorney Ste-
fanie Salavantis, Hazleton Police
Chief Frank DeAndrea and Ha-
zleton Area School District Su-
perintendent Francis Antonelli.
The discussion, at the Wiltsie
Center for the Performing Arts,
will be open to the public.
Tarone, news director at
WYLN, said this kind of forum
is newto the TVcompany. This
is kind of uncharted territory,
Tarone said. Im hoping that by
trading some information, there
might be some kind of conclu-
sion.
According to reports in the
Pennsylvania Uniform Crime
Reporting System, there were
229 robberies in Luzerne Coun-
ty recorded in 2012 45 fewer
than the prior year. Similarly,
there were 1,508 assaults re-
corded in 2012, with 1,794 in
2011.
Meanwhile, as there were
modest declines in robbery
and assault, there were about
25 more reported sex-related
crimes last year than in 2011
and about 10 more drug viola-
tions.
Tarone said there is a com-
mon misconception with crime.
People assume because it is rel-
evant in the news, that they are
vulnerable to it, he said.
Just because the guy who
lives down the street had his
See CRIME, Page 7A
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, March 10, 2013
timesleader.com
PAGE 3
LOCAL
SCRANTON
Street ramp closed Monday
The Pennsylvania Department of
Transportation advises motorists that the
Cedar Avenue ramp from Orchard Street
to the Central Scranton Expressway will
be closed at 9 a.m. Monday.
The road will be closed until July as
PennDOT begins work to replace the
bridge on state Route 307, Moosic and
Spruce streets. The posted detour will be
Cedar Avenue to Lackawanna Avenue to
Spruce Street.
WILKES-BARRE
Elmo will visit Osterhout
Elmo and Super Grover from Sesame
Street will be on hand to greet children
at the Osterhout Free Library from 1:30
p.m. to 2 p.m. March 14. To register for
one of the visits, contact the library chil-
drens department at 823-0156 ex. 217.
The Osterhout Library is located at 71
South Franklin Street.
WEST HAZLETON
Hershey School sets meeting
The Milton Hershey School is hosting
a family event at 6 p.m. March 16 at the
Bonanza Steakhouse, 574 Susquehanna
Boulevard/Route 93. Family events are
informal get-togethers that offer everyone
especially children a chance to learn
more about school.
Following a free meal and brief pre-
sentation, attendees will have time to
ask questions and talk with Milton Her-
shey School staff, students, parents and
alumni. No registration is required. For
information, call 1-800-322-3248. For di-
rections only, call 454-8767.
To be considered for enrollment, a child
must come from a family of low income,
be between the ages of 4 and 15, be free
of serious emotional and behavioral prob-
lems that disrupt life in the classroom or
home, and be born in the United States.
Enrollment is not guaranteed, and pro-
spective students must demonstrate the
capability to benet from the schools
programs. Preference is given to children
born in Pennsylvania.
The school is a cost-free, private, co-
educational home and school for children
from families of limited resources and
social need. For more information, visit
www.mhs-pa.org.
JENKINS TWP.
School safety discussion
A state senator and representative, a
mom whos a school superintendent and
a former congressman with a top NRA
rating will be answering questions on the
issue of armed guards in NEPA schools
on WVIA-TVs next State of Pennsylva-
nia, airing at 7 p.m Thursday.
Joining WVIA President Bill Kelly will
be state Rep. Kevin Haggerty, D-Dun-
more, state Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman
Township, former congressman Chris
Carney and Margaret Billings-Jones,
mom and superintendent, Lakeland
School District.
To be part of WVIAs live audience, call
602-1150 or visit wvia.org to reserve your
free seats. An encore presentation of this
episode of State of Pennsylvania can be
seen at 7 p.m.
HARVEYS LAKE
Polar Bear Plunge on tap
A Polar Bear Plunge to benet the
American Cancer Society will be held
at noon March 16 at the Garrity Realty
dock, pole number 89 along Lakeside
Drive.
Rene Rismondo and Amy Williams,
juniors at Lake-Lehman High School, are
coordinating the event for their senior
project.
Participants must raise a minimum of
$10. Anyone who raises more than $50
will receive a T-shirt. There also will be a
bake sale, hot chocolate stand and basket
rafe.
WEST HAZLETON
Arbys franchisee sought
The Arbys restaurant on Susquehanna
Boulevard (state Route 93) closed in Feb-
ruary, but the corporation is working to
nd a new franchisee to reopen the eat-
ery.
Jason Rollins, spokesman for Atlanta-
based Arbys Restaurant Group, said Ar-
bys terminated the agreement with the
franchise holder and the store closed ef-
fective Feb. 4.
Another existing Arbys franchise
owner has stepped forward and expressed
interest in reopening that location, said
Rollins. Those discussions are under
way, and were hopeful that things will
work out.
I N B R I E F
See RECYCLING, Page 7A
C R I M E
AT H O M E
When: 7 p.m.
Monday
Where: Wiltsie
Center, 700 N.
Wyoming St.,
Hazleton, and
on WYLN-TV
35
Program will
be rebroadcast
on WYLN-TV
35
at 7 p.m.
Thursday,
12:30 p.m. Sat-
urday, 3 p.m.
Sunday.
Group gets primer on gun rights
DALLAS The Irregulars
Think Tank group, consist-
ing of Back Mountain profes-
sionals who gather monthly
for self-improvement over
breakfast, on Saturday heard
presenter, chaplain, retired
welfare ofcer and U.S. Ma-
rine Ken Fatula, of Berwick,
discuss guns in the United
States.
Fatula explained the evolu-
tion of rearms regulations,
starting with the relation-
ship between King Alfred
the Great of England and his
subjects in the late 800s, A.D.
The people possessed weap-
ons to protect their homes,
property and family, he said.
Secondly, the people had a
responsibility to their coun-
try, he said.
Citizens should be armed
so they can be called upon to
defend their country, Fatula
said.
The 10 amendments were
written to clarify the U.S.
Constitution, so that it would
not be misconstrued by its
executors and legislators. A
person and his or her gov-
ernment achieve a symbiotic
relationship through mutual
respect, he said.
If law-abiding citizens are
given the right to bear arms
responsibly, the government
reveres the people because
they are armed. Likewise,
he said, the people revere
their government because it
grants the right to bear arms
and they earn mutual trust.
He referenced the United
Kingdoms current restrictive
gun laws that limit purchase
to shotguns and non-auto-
matic ries and call for an
extensive licensing process.
He believes, because of this
heavy-handed restriction,
crime rates are greater there
than anywhere in the West-
ern Hemisphere, he said.
Concerning automatic
weapons, said Fatula, since
the early 1930s, people have
been able to buy them. In
the past 80 years, he said, a
legally obtained automatic
weapon was used in a crime
only once in this country.
Though illegally obtained
automatic weapons are used
in crimes, more homicides
are committed each year
with clubs and hammers
than ries of any kind, Fatula
said.
Tunkhannock Mayor Norm
Ball is an Irregular partici-
pant. At the breakfast he said
By Jon OConnell
Staff writer
Back Mountain profession-
als hear overview of Second
Amendment issues.
JON OCONNELL/THE TIMES LEADER
Ken Fatula
Dialogue
on crime
in area
scheduled
By JON OCONNELL
Staff Writer
Discussion about causes and
possible solutions to include
District Attorney Salavantis.
Perfect march day in Scranton
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
T
he Irish seemingly had luck
with the weather Saturday,
as evident by the sunshine and
blue sky for the St. Patricks Day
Parade in Scranton. Only a day
earlier, winter was in full force
as it blew through with a snow-
storm. Thousands marched,
walked or rode in the 10 divi-
sions that made up the 52nd
annual parade, and thousands
more watched along the route
on what turned out to be a day
with warm, spring-like tempera-
tures. The parade drew people
from Northeastern Pennsylvania
and beyond to the downtown.
In above photo, with a smile
and a wave, Miss Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton Cassie Cerulli greeted
spectators from atop her ride.
With the boom of a bass drum,
the snap of snare drums and the
unmistakable strains of bag-
pipes, the Wyoming Valley Pipe
& Drum Band, at right, stepped
smartly along Wyoming Avenue.
Discard your electronics properly in Pa., state says
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
New rules in effect this year
regarding disposal of TVs,
computers, other devices.
See IRREGULARS, Page 7A
5% SENIOR
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CAIRO Egyptian soccer
fans rampaged through the
heart of Cairo on Saturday,
furious about the acquittal
of seven police ofcers while
death sentences against 21 al-
leged rioters were conrmed
in a trial over a stadium me-
lee that left 74 people dead.
The case of the Feb. 1, 2012
stadium riot in the city of
Port Said at the northern tip
of the Suez Canal has taken
on political undertones not
only because police faced al-
legations of negligence in the
tragedy, but also because the
verdicts were announced at
a time when Egypt is in the
grip of the latest and most
serious bout of political tur-
moil in the two years since
Hosni Mubaraks ouster.
Saturdays verdicts also
were handed down against the
backdrop of an unprecedented
wave of strikes by the nations
police force over demands for
better working conditions and
anger over what many believe
are attempts by President Mo-
hammed Morsi and his Mus-
lim Brotherhood to take con-
trol of the police force.
Tensions over the riot
which began when support-
ers of Port Saids Al-Masry
club set upon fans of Cairos
Al-Ahly club after the nal
whistle of a league game that
the home team won have
fueled some of the deadliest
street violence in months.
Police guarding the stadium,
meanwhile, faced allegations
ranging from not searching
people entering the stadium
to failing to intervene to stop
the bloodshed.
Shortly after the verdict
was announced Saturday,
angry fans of Cairos Al-Ahly
club who had gathered in the
thousands outside the teams
headquarters in central Cairo
went on a rampage, torching a
police club nearby and storm-
ing Egypts soccer federation
headquarters before setting it
ablaze.
The twin res sent plumes
of thick black smoke billow-
ing out over the Cairo skyline,
prompting Defense Minister
Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi to dis-
patch two army helicopters to
extinguish the res.
At least ve people were in-
jured in the protests over the
verdict, a Health Ministry of-
cial told the MENAstate news
agency.
Some demonstrators in Port
Said also burnt tires on the
citys dock to prevent vessels
from coming in and released
speedboats into trafc lanes
of the Suez Canal in attempts,
foiled by the navy, to disrupt
shipping in the vital waterway
linking the Red Sea to the Med-
iterranean.
ALBANY, N.Y. A health
study cited by leading environ-
mentalist Robert F. Kennedy Jr.
as pivotal in helping persuade
Gov. Andrew Cuomo to hold off
on plans for limited gas drilling
is likely years away from conclu-
sions about whether the tech-
nology involved is safe, accord-
ing to the projects leaders.
With New York entering the
fth year of review of the pro-
cess known as
hydraulic frac-
turing, or frack-
ing, growing
calls to wait for
the Geisinger
Health System
study to be
nished could
push a nal de-
cision back several more years,
frustrating landowners and the
industry that had hoped to begin
tapping the gas reserve that lies
below parts of the state.
Preliminary results could be
released within a year.
We dont really believe that
there is a fast answer here, if
youre looking at the issue of
health impacts, Andy Deubler,
an executive vice president at
Geisinger Health System in
Pennsylvania, said in an inter-
view. Youve got to have all the
data before you can come to a
conclusion.
The study, still in early plan-
ning stages with only a fraction
of its necessary funding, is but
one piece of a larger body of in-
dependent research just getting
under way and seeking funding.
Geisinger, based in Danville,
serves 2.6 million patients and
operates hospitals, clinics and
an insurance program in 44
Pennsylvania counties, where
fracking is being done. That
gives it vast troves of health
care data concerning everything
from cancer to car accidents to
asthma attacks. The company
says research has been funda-
mental to its mission since it
was founded in 1915 but also
says its never done a study like
this.
Alan Leshner, CEO of the
American Association for the
Advancement of Science, wrote
in an email that its extremely
rare for any single scientic or
health study to resolve a difcult
question. Complex issues typi-
cally require a series of incre-
mental studies that either build
on or test the suggestions from
previous work, he said.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 20132013 N A T I O N & W O R L D PAGE 5A
BEIRUT
Peacekeepers set free
R
ebels in southern Syria freed 21
U.N. peacekeepers on Friday after
holding them hostage for four days,
driving them to the border with Jor-
dan after accusations from Western of-
cials that the little-known group had
tarnished the image of those ghting
to topple President Bashar Assad.
The abduction and the tortured
negotiations that ended it highlight
the disorganization of the rebel move-
ment, which has hindered its ability
to ght Assad and complicates vows
by the United States and others to
provide assistance.
It also has raised concerns about the
future of United Nations operations
in the area. The Filipino peacekeep-
ers were abducted on Wednesday by
one of the rebel groups operating in
southern Syria near the Jordanian
border and the Israeli-occupied Golan
Heights, where a U.N. force has pa-
trolled a cease-re line between Israel
and Syria for nearly four decades.
SAN FRANCISCO
Device safe, but not super
The future is unclear for a promis-
ing heart device aimed at preventing
strokes in people at high risk of them
because of an irregular heartbeat.
Early results from a key study of
Boston Scientic Corp.s Watchman
device suggested it is safer than previ-
ous testing found, but might not be
better than a drug that is used now
for preventing strokes, heart-related
deaths and blood clots in people with
atrial brillation over the long term.
More than 2.7 million Americans
and 15 million people worldwide have
atrial brillation. The upper chambers
of the heart quiver instead of beating
properly. That lets blood pool in a
small pouch. Clots can form and travel
to the brain, causing a stroke.
WASHINGTON
Export U.S. natural gas?
The natural gas boom in North
Texas is sputtering, with the number
of rigs working the Barnett Shale
recently hitting a 10-year low. Its an
issue elsewhere, as well, as the glut
of domestic energy thats transform-
ing America drives down the price
of natural gas and makes drilling less
protable.
An industry association based in
Fort Worth, Texas, is among those
arguing that a solution is for the
federal government to allow exports
of Americas natural gas to foreign
nations, where the price can be ve
times higher.
ARLINGTON, VA.
Civil War sailors buried
More than 150 years after the USS
Monitor sank off North Carolina
during the Civil War, two unknown
crewmen found in the ironclads turret
when it was raised a decade ago were
buried Friday at Arlington National
Cemetery.
The evening burial, which included
a gun salute and a band playing
America the Beautiful, might be the
last time Civil War soldiers are buried
at the cemetery overlooking Washing-
ton.
Today is a tribute to all the men
and women who have gone to sea,
but especially to those who made the
ultimate sacrice on our behalf, said
Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, who spoke
at a funeral service before the burial.
I N B R I E F
Cuomo
AP PHOTO
Egyptian soccer fans celebrate in front of their club in Cairo,
Egypt, after an Egyptian court conrmed death sentences
against 21 people for their role in a deadly 2012 soccer riot. AP PHOTO
Pakistani rioters target Christians
Men who were part of an angry
mob react after burning belong-
ings of Christian families, in Lahore,
Pakistan, on Saturday. Hundreds of
people attacked a Christian neigh-
borhood after hearing accusations a
Christian man had committed blas-
phemy against Islams prophet.
Egyptian soccer fans riot over verdict
Acquittal of seven police
ofcers in 2012 stadium
violence re-ignites tensions.
By AYA BATRAWY
HAMZA HENDAWI
Associated Press
N.Y. awaits
Geisingers
natural gas
health data
Results could be released
within year, but conclusion on
drilling impact still years away.
By MARY ESCH
Associated Press
Venezuelan dictators body to be displayed, a la Lenin
No one lives forever nor do they
last forever. At least not without a lot
of tuneups.
As much as it might seem as if the
bodies of famous world leaders such
as Vladimir Ilyich Lenin and Mao Ze-
dong have been preserved for all eter-
nity, their enduring physical presence
is simply an illusion aided by science.
Only the Venezuelan ofcials who
have promised to preserve Hugo
Chavez and display his body for eter-
nity inside a glass tomb know exactly
how theyre going to do it.
But if they were to followprocedures
that are used in the United States, the
technique might be rather simple: re-
peat embalming.
The rst thing to remember about
embalming as we do it in the U.S. is
that it is designed to delay the natural
deterioration of the body; its not for-
ever, said Vernie Fountain, a licensed
embalmer and owner and founder
of the Fountain National Academy
of Professional Embalming Skills in
Springeld, Missouri.
So what does that mean exactly?
You might want to put down your
sandwich before you read on.
In the United States, most em-
balmers use a machine that injects
uid laced with chemicals, principally
formaldehyde, into an artery of the
body, while the majority of the blood
is emptied from a vein. Often a chemi-
cal known as a humectant is added,
which helps to ll out the body, some
of the hollow spaces, and adds a de-
gree of moisture, Fountain said.
While he stressed that he has no
personal knowledge about the condi-
tion of Chavezs body at the time of
his death or when it was or will be
embalmed, Fountain said one possible
method of preserving his corpse is to
follow the embalming process with
a periodic injection of humectant or
something similar to keep moisture in
the tissues.
Makeup also helps to cover areas
that have gone brown with dehydra-
tion.
Just to be safe, Venezuelan ofcials
could take an extra precautionary step
and make a face mask, using Chavezs
real face to form a mold that could be
placed over the esh in the future and
keep it looking more like he did when
he died, Fountain said.
AP PHOTO
A Venezuelan army ofcer salutes a photo of late President Hugo Chavez outside the Venezuelan Embassy in Buenos
Aires, Argentina.
Chavez now, Chavez forever?
By LUIS ANDRES HENAO
Associated Press
Violence mars Hagels rst trip to Afghanistan
KABUL, AfghanistanTwo
suicide bombings and a host of
looming disagreements with
the Afghan president cast a
shadow on Saturday over U.S.
Defense Secretary Chuck Ha-
gels rst visit to Afghanistan
since taking the post.
Nineteen Afghans were
killed including eight chil-
dren in the suicide attacks
in Kabul and in the eastern
Khost province. A U.S. con-
tractor was killed and four
soldiers injured when attack-
ers thought to be Afghan sol-
diers stormed their base and
opened re Friday, only hours
before Hagel arrived.
This attack was a message
to him, Taliban spokesman
Zabiullah Mujahid said in an
email to reporters about one
of the bombings, which was
outside the countrys Defense
Ministry in Kabul.
Afghan President Hamid
Karzai, meanwhile, was stand-
ing by a demand that U.S. spe-
cial operations forces leave a
province neighboring Kabul
by Monday for alleged abuses
of Afghan civilians charg-
es U.S. ofcials deny. And a
handover ceremony scheduled
for Saturday of a U.S. deten-
tion facility also fell through,
when U.S. and Afghan ofcials
ran into last-minute disagree-
ments.
The barrage of crises herald-
ing Hagels arrival illustrates
the complex mineeld of dip-
lomatic and military issues fac-
ing the U.S.-led NATO force.
Attacks coinciding with
defense secretarys visit a
message, Taliban says.
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel participates in a
Purple Heart medal presentation ceremony Saturday.
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Dates and locations will be
announced later this month.
Plains Township residents can
dispose of electronic devices
between 6:30 a.m. and 2:30
p.m. at the e-waste collection
bin at the township recycling
center. Certain other munici-
palities also collect the items
periodically.
Where else can I take
these items for recycling?
Some retailers and com-
mercial recyclers in Luzerne
County will accept covered
electronic equipment for free.
According to the Luzerne
County Department of Solid
Waste Management, they
are: Best Buy in Wilkes-Barre
Township will acce
pt computers, monitors and
other computer equipment,
printers, cellphones and at-
screen televisions smaller than
72 inches. Limit: three items
per day.
Staples in Wilkes-Barre
Township will accept com-
puters, monitors and other
computer equipment, desktop
printers, cellphones and other
small electronic devices (but
not televisions, commercial
copiers and printers, large serv-
ers, appliances or stereo equip-
ment). Limit: six items per day.
Municipal Recovery on
Stanton Street in Wilkes-Barre
will accept computers, moni-
tors and other computer equip-
ment, printers, scanners and
televisions.
Can I be charged for recy-
cling these items?
Yes and no. State law prohib-
its manufacturers and retailers
from charging consumers a fee
for collecting, transporting or
recycling covered devices un-
less a nancial incentive of
equal or less value, such as a
coupon or rebate, is provided.
The following real estate
transactions were recorded in
the Luzerne County Ofce of the
Recorder of Deeds the week of
March 4-8:
* Hudsoncross Reo Funding
XI LLC to Robert M. Jr. and
Bethany Lee Otte, 428-430 Park
St., Foster Township, $69,000.
* Estate of Helen Krushin-
ski to Kristen L. Pegarella, 600
Jones St., Nanticoke, $130,000.
* Estate of Joseph D. Pavlick
to Michael and Lillian M. Con-
ran, 68 Carey St., Lot 53, Ashley,
$70,000.
* First National Bank of Penn-
sylvania to Jose R. Jimenez, 531
Alter St., Hazleton, $55,000.
* Dorothy W., Dorothy and
James E. Baumgardner to Mi-
chael and Elizabeth Starrick, 162
Brookhill Road, Sugarloaf Town-
ship, $154,000.
* Glenn M. and Joan F. Goul-
stone to Anthony Z. and Gail M.
Nieczykowski, 199 Warsaw St.,
Swoyersville, $69,150.
* Helen Seferyn and Helen
and Keith Dingle to Anna M.
Fittipaldi, 40 Poplar St., Wilkes-
Barre, $104,000.
* Estate of Norma J. Pluskie
to Valerie J. Fusco, 126 Manor
Drive, Lot 24, Kingston Town-
ship, $153,000.
* Luzerne Bank to Real Estate
Magnate LLC, 456 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, $58,000.
* Bruce Dove and Eric Dov-
man to Sportsmen Acquisitions,
LP, Sans Souci Parkway, Ha-
nover Township, $1,100,000.
* Charles Argenio Sr. to Rob-
ert T. and Terry Ann Krause,
1094 Old Exeter Ave., Exeter,
$116,000.
* Bernard T. Jr. and Mary M.
Suda to Jessenia Solis, 33 Oak
St., Wilkes-Barre, $77,000.
* Estate of Paul L. Hydock to
Jason Boice, 15 Washington St.,
Harveys Lake, $68,523.
* John James Malloy to Ju-
lio Enrique Martinez-Medina,
149-151 S. Pine St., Hazleton,
$83,000.
* Jonathon Tufts to Dulcinea
Reyes, 332 Spruce St., Hazleton,
$50,000.
* John C. Cinque Jr. to Adam
Johnson and Caterina Iovino-
Johnson, Port Jenkins Road,
Dennison Township, $180,500.
* Estate of Thomas R. Cipri-
ano Sr. to Angel L. Pagan, 761
Peace St., Hazleton, $87,000.
* Estate of Frank J. Braccini to
Ronald A. Hankey Jr., 122 Valley
St., Exeter, $87,500.
* Charles Zanta to Nicole
Hampton, 311 Oak St., $176,700.
* Alan S. Cohnen to Creative
Reality 2, LLC, 416 E. Washing-
ton St., Nanticoke, $73,346.
* Kimberly Tambur to Da-
vid Chiampi, SR 92 and Sul-
livan Trail, Exeter Township,
$260,000.
* Deutsche Bank National
Trust Company and Ocwen Loan
Servicing, LLC to Nance Rice,
26 Grifth St., Hughestown,
$73,429.
* Estate of Eva M. Naples to
Bernhard Meier, 25 Washington
St., Exeter, $80,000.
* Catherine and Helen Stec
to Walter M. III and Ann Marie
Barcheski, 76 N. Grant St., Wil-
kes-Barre, $50,505.
* Azmathunissa Mohiuddin
and Ahmed Touq to Pizzmar
Development Inc., state Route
309, Wright Township, $170,000.
* Robert J. Altomare to David
H. and Jennifer L. Ratzel, Hilltop
Drive, Black Creek Township,
$56,500.
* Kristin J. Bello to Catherine
R. and Daniel J. Lee, 225 Gordon
Road, Lake Township, $149,500.
* Richard L. and Barbara Freer
to Patrick P. Conahan and Marie
E. Brozowski, 273 Hemlock Ter-
race, $290,000.
* Anthony, Tina, Anthony
P. and Ella M. Greskewicz to
Stephanie Nestorick and Debo-
rah Harry, 546 Gareld St., Ed-
wardsville, $87,000.
* William J. Jr., Joseph H. and
Robert J. Sauerwine to Belkis A.
Mendoza and Evelyn S. Batista
Mendoza, 255 S. Main Road,
Wright Township, $117,250.
* M&T Bank to Victoria A.
Lucas, 315 Salem St., West
Pittston, $89,900.
*Fadil Ahmetovic andBosiljka
Djordjevic to Nina Nikolic, 1006
Grant St., Hazleton, $100,000.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 10, 2013 N E W S PAGE 7A
house broken into, doesnt mean
its going to happen to you, he
said.
In most of the crimes his
team reports on, he said, the
victims know the criminal in
some way. My reporters are
trained, Tarone said. The rst
thing you ask (when you get to
a crime scene is) Was this ran-
dom?
More often than not, he said,
the answer is No.
The commercial-free broad-
cast will begin with a few ques-
tions from the moderators, then
move to an open question time
during which audience mem-
bers can poll the panel or make
comments.
Audience members are free
to offer constructive criticism
of agencies and individuals, but
aggressive remarks will not be
tolerated, Tarone said.
Continued from Page 3A
CRIME
he has a sportsmans permit
to carry a concealed weapon
because he often works with
the police. However, he said he
keeps his guns locked at home.
He believes automatic weap-
ons and especially large am-
munition magazines should
not be readily available to civil-
ians, he said.
JimZardecki, an Irregular at-
tendee and past Luzerne Coun-
ty chief detective known best
for his role in collaring con-
victed mass murderer George
Banks, in 1982, said even as he
has left the detectives ofce to
work for banking companies
in fraud prevention, he is sur-
prised by the minds volatility.
The most important thing
Ive learned in my career is
how fragile the human mind
is, Zardecki said.
The hardest part is keeping
guns away from those people
unt to own them, Zardecki
said. Privacy law makes it dif-
cult to properly screen poten-
tial criminals, he said. He also
agreed that, like anything else,
if criminals want guns, they
will nd a way to get them.
Continued from Page 3A
IRREGULARS
FOR NOW, THESE FISH OFF THE HOOK
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
I
n what amounts to a harbinger of spring in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Mike Vermack, of Taylor, a volunteer with the state Fish
and Boat Commission, participates in the stocking of trout Friday at Frances Slocum State Park.
pROpERTY TRANSFERS
Continued from Page 3A
RECYCLE
now: new young cardinal from
wherever, said Greg Burke,
a Vatican communications ad-
viser.
But in the run-up to the cer-
emony, several cardinals have
been interacting with the faith-
ful on Facebook, Twitter and
elsewhere in some cases even
during the interview ban the Col-
lege of Cardinals imposed last
week to prevent leaks about their
daily meetings.
Cardinal Ruben Salazar Go-
mez, archbishop of Bogota, Co-
lombia, tweeted that although
God would ultimately choose the
next pontiff, he wanted to know
what his followers hoped for in a
new pope.
I would very much like your
feedback, he wrote in Spanish.
Onzulumissions.org, a site for the
Archdiocese of Durban, church
ofcials have been providing up-
dates for parishioners leaving
messages and prayers for Napier.
Along with daily meetings and in-
formal dinners, several of the 115
cardinal-electors, some of whom
had never met, say theyre using
Google to research each others
writings and church works.
Yet, the numbers of cardinals
who directly participate online
is relatively small. About two
dozen had Twitter accounts
when Benedict XVI stepped
down. Many church leaders
have accounts in their name, or
on behalf of their dioceses, but
leave it to their communications
staff to actually write Facebook
posts and send tweets. Benedict
used the Twitter handle (at)
pontifex, but he, too, let advis-
ers write the messages. The ac-
count has been taken down and
the papal tweets saved.
The more intensive activity is
springing up among parishioners
and the generally curious.
Spotify has a conclave-themed
music list. (The hymn Ubi cari-
tas et amor, or Wherever char-
ity and love are, is included.) A
fan of Cardinal Luis Antonio Ta-
gle, archbishop of Manila, posted
a YouTube video of a song about
why Tagle should be the next
pope. (About 8,600 hits by the
weekend.) Several sites saying
theyre trying to crowd-source the
conclave by setting up their own
election sites. A Twitter account
recently opened with the handle
(at)papalsmokestack. It has a
photo of the Vatican chimney that
will carry the white smoke signal
alerting the world when a new
pope has been elected.
OnAdopt-a-Cardinal, people
register an email address and in
return receive the name of a car-
dinal to adopt in prayer through
the conclave. The site was the
work of some members of Youth
2000, a church-recognized group
in Germany. Someone saw a
newspaper feature with photos
of all the cardinals and remarked:
Those cardinals need to be
prayed for, said Ulli Heckl, who
works with the organization.
Volunteers created the web-
site in German and English and
drew so many responses the
server briey crashed. Others
who ran across the site offered
to translate it into additional lan-
guages. Soon, versions went live
in Spanish, Italian and French, as
well. Nearly 400,000 people had
signed up days before the con-
clave.
Heckl said she has heard from
entire families who are together
praying for one cardinal. Anoth-
er family put a photo of the car-
dinal at each of their bedsides so
they would remember to pray
every night.
Continued from Page 1A
VIRTUAL
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON Few
presidents in modern times
have been as interested in gun
control as Richard Nixon, of all
people. He proposed ridding
the market of Saturday night
specials, contemplated ban-
ning handguns altogether and
refused to pander to gun own-
ers by feigning interest in their
weapons.
Several previously unreport-
ed Oval Ofce recordings and
White House memos from the
Nixon years show a conserva-
tive president who at times
appeared willing to take on
the National Rie Association,
a powerful gun lobby then as
now, even as his aides worried
about the political ramica-
tions.
I dont know why any indi-
vidual should have a right to
have a revolver in his house,
Nixon said in a taped conversa-
tion with aides. The kids usu-
ally kill themselves with it and
so forth. He asked why cant
we go after handguns, period?
Nixon went on: I know the
rie association will be against
it, the gun makers will be
against it. But people should
not have handguns. He laced
his comments with obsceni-
ties, as was typical.
Nixon made his remarks
in the Oval Ofce on May 16,
1972, the day after a would-be
assassin shot and paralyzed
segregationist presidential
candidate George Wallace. As
president, Nixon never pub-
licly called for a ban on all
handguns. Instead, he urged
Congress to pass more mod-
est legislation banning Satur-
day night specials, which were
cheaply made, easily concealed
and often used by criminals.
Nixon wanted total handgun ban
Thank you for the difference youve made in
Northeastern Pennsylvania!
The Times Leader wishes you all the best!
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TYPOGRAPHIC ERRORS. ARTWORK FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com PAGE 9 Sunday, March 10, 2013
TSAs new knife policy befuddles ofcials, travelers
LOS ANGELES A move
by federal ofcials to allow pas-
sengers to board planes carrying
pocket knives has sparked a back-
lash by airline workers and is sow-
ing confusion among travelers.
The union representing air
marshals has joined ight atten-
dants, pilots and airline insurance
rms in calling on the Transpor-
tation Security Administration to
reconsider its decision to relax a
list of prohibited carry-on items.
More than 12,000 people have
signed an online petition urging
President Obama to keep knives
off planes.
Even airline management has
entered the fray. Richard Ander-
son, chief executive of Delta Air
Lines, sent a letter to the agency
Friday saying he, too, opposes the
policy change.
Allowing small knives will do
little to speed the screening of
passengers and result in addi-
tional risk to our cabin staff and
customers, the letter said.
Last week, the TSA said it
would allow air travelers to board
U.S. aircraft with small folding
knives, golf clubs, novelty bats,
hockey sticks, lacrosse sticks and
pool cues.
The agency said the move,
which would take effect April 25,
was aimed at freeing up security
ofcials to focus on bigger threats
while allowing passengers a bit
more freedom.
But for many travelers, the lat-
est change adds to the confusion
that has reigned at U.S. airports
since the 9/11 attacks.
With these changes, can we
now bring hair spray, or is that
considered more of a threat than
golf clubs? asked Sue Dessayer
Porter, a retired market research-
er from Portland, Ore.
As it is, TSA bins are overow-
ing with shampoo bottles, tooth-
paste tubes, toy guns and jugs of
booze. At Los Angeles Interna-
tional Airport, screeners ll boxes
with about 1,400 pocket knives
per month.
The list of banned items in-
cludes nine categories with more
than 70 individual items, and has
been expanded and revised sev-
eral times over the years.
TSA ofcials say the list is ad-
justed regularly in response to
intelligence about potential ter-
rorist threats. But confusion, the
TSA says, cannot be blamed on a
lack of information.
The agency distributes pam-
phlets and news releases and
posts signs at airport terminals
explaining the list. The federal
agency even created a smart-
phone app that answers the ques-
tion: When I y, can I bring my
?
Some people just dont know
what is prohibited and others just
forget and dont think twice that
the ceremonial knife that they
used to cut their wedding cake is
still a knife, said TSA spokesman
Nico Melendez.
(570) 881-9716
www.CareGiversAmerica.com
Nursing Home???
Your Home!!!
Decision Made Easy! Decision Made Ea
By Hugo Martin
MCT
Jessie L.
Chesnavi ch,
formerly of
the Provi-
dence Section
of Scranton,
died Thurs-
day March 7,
2013 at the
Newton Me-
morial Hospital, Newton N.J.
She was the widow of Vincent
J. Chesnavich who died May 4,
1988.
Born in Buffalo N.Y., she was
the daughter of the late Felix and
Mary Koslosky.
Jessies early life was as a home-
maker; cooking, sewing, & taking
care of her husband and children.
She was an accomplished
bowler, winning many trophies at
Green Ridge Lanes.
In her later years, she enjoyed
lifes simple pleasures; watching
the Game Show Network, talking
on the phone with her friends and
relatives, visiting/playing cards/
going to the casino with neighbor-
hood friends, and shopping at the
Dollar Store and Ollies.
She was most proud of her fam-
ily, supporting and celebrating
her childrens, Grandchildrens
and Great-Grandchildrens goals
and accomplishments. Family
visits and dinners were special
for her. Jessies grandchildren
and great-grandchildren were
the light of her life. Jessie lived a
long, full life.
Long time member of St. Vin-
cent de Paul Church until its
closing, now a member of Mary,
Mother of God Parish.
Surviving are a son Robert V.
Chesnavich and wife Beverly,
Pittston; a daughter Nancy Mecca
and husband Joseph, Andover
N.J.; three grandchildren, Brian,
Erin, and Marissa; two great
grandchildren, Ally, and Brian; a
sister, Helen Drazdowsky, Bridge-
port, CN.; several nieces and
nephews. Also a sister, Florence
Moran; two brothers, Victor, and
Edmund Kosolosky preceded her
in death.
The funeral will be conducted
on Tuesday from the Solfanelli-
Fiorillo Funeral Home Inc., 1030
North Main Ave., with Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in
Mary, Mother of God Parish at
Holy Rosary Church, 316 William
St. Interment will followat Cathe-
dral Cemetery. Friends may call
Monday from 4 to 7 p.m.
Please visit www.solfanellio-
rillofuneralhome.com For infor-
mation, directions or to send an
online condolence.
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50 East Main Street, Plymouth, PA (570) 779-5353
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 O B I T U A R I E S PAGE 10A
The Times Leader publishes
free obituaries, which have a
27-line limit, and paid obituar-
ies, which can run with a photo-
graph. A funeral home repre-
sentative can call the obituary
desk at (570) 829-7224, send a
fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail
to tlobits@timesleader.com. If
you fax or e-mail, please call
to conrm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday. Obituaries
must be sent by a funeral home
or crematory, or must name
who is handling arrangements,
with address and phone num-
ber. We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15 typing
fee.
OBI T UARY P OL I CY
CHROMEY - Mary Ann, Shiva 7
to 9 p.m. today at the home of
Rosemary Chromey, 92 River-
side Drive, Wilkes-Barre.
DALESSANDRO - Patrick,
funeral services 9 a.m. Monday
at Corcoran Funeral Home Inc.,
20 S. Main St., Plains Township.
Mass of Christian Burial 9:30
a.m. in Ss. Peter & Paul Church,
Plains Township. Friends may
call 5 to 7 p.m. today.
DAUTRICH - Kenneth Jr., funeral
services 11 a.m. Saturday at
Corcoran Funeral Home Inc.,
20 S. Main St., Plains Township.
Friends may call 10 a.m. until
time of services.
DICKSON - James, funeral servic-
es 10 a.m. Monday at Edwards
and Russin Funeral Home, 717
Main St., Edwardsville. Friends
may call 5 to 7 p.m. today.
HALL - Vera, funeral services 10
a.m. Monday at Davis-Dinelli
Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad St.,
Nanticoke. Friends may call 2 to
5 p.m. today.
KRAJEWSKI - Elva, funeral ser-
vice 9 a.m. Monday at Lehman
Family Funeral Service Inc., 689
Hazle Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass
of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in
St. Leos/Holy Rosary Par-
rish, 33 Manhattan St., Ashley.
Friends may call 2 to 5 p.m.
today and 8:30 a.m. until time
of service Monday.
LAVELLE - John Sr., friends may
call 5 to 7 p.m. today at Kniffen
OMalley Funeral Home Inc.,
728 Main St., Avoca. Funeral
services 9 a.m. Monday at the
funeral home. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in Queen of the
Apostles Church, 715 Hawthorne
St., Avoca.
MACY - Joseph, Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. Monday in Saint
Monicas Parish, Our Lady of
Sorrows Church, 363 W. Eighth
St., West Wyoming.
MORAN - John, funeral services
9:30 a.m. Monday at Kearney
Funeral Home Inc., 173 E. Green
St., Nanticoke. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in St. Faustina
Parish. Friends may call 4 to 7
p.m. today.
NOAKES - Florence, memorial
service 1 p.m. Monday at H. Mer-
ritt Hughes Funeral Home Inc.,
a Golden Rule Funeral Home,
451 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call noon until time
of service.
PARTASH - Charlotte, funeral
services 10:30 a.m. Monday at
Yanaitis Funeral Home Inc., 55
Stark St., Plains Township. Mass
of Christian Burial 11 a.m. in Ss.
Peter and Paul Church, Plains
Township. Friends may call 2 to
4 and 6 to 8 p.m. today.
SAWICKI - Dorothy, funeral servic-
es 9 a.m. Monday at Desiderio
Funeral Home Inc., 436 S. Moun-
tain Blvd., Mountain Top. Mass
of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m.
in St. Judes Roman Catholic
Church, Mountain Top. Friends
may call 5 to 7 p.m. today.
SCAVO - Arthur, viewing 1 to 3
p.m. today, with services at
2:45 p.m. at Bernard J. Piontek
Funeral Home Inc., 204 Main St.,
Duryea.
STUSH - Laura Ann, memorial
Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m.
Monday in Holy Spirit Parish/
St. Marthas Church, Fairmont
Springs. Friends may call 9
a.m. until time of service at the
church.
YURKO - Donna, memorial service
6 p.m. Saturday at Yallicks Farm
Clubhouse, Dallas.
ZIMMERMAN - Cora, funeral ser-
vices 11 a.m. Monday at Clarke
Piatt Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sun-
set Lake Road, Hunlock Creek.
Friends may call 2 to 4 and 7 to
9 p.m. today.
FUNERALS
THOMAS L. FREW, 89,
of West Pittston, passed away
Friday evening at his home.
Arrangements are pending
from Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopcza
Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wyo-
ming Ave., Wyoming.
EUGENE A. CENTI, 56,
of Yatesville, passed away
unexpectedly at home on Friday,
March 8, 2013.
Funeral arrangements
are pending from the Peter J.
Adonizio Funeral Home, 251
William Street, Pittston. The
complete obituary will appear in
Mondays edition.
MRS. FLORENCE W.
PEROVICH, of Duryea, passed
away Thursday, March 7, 2013,
at Wesley Village, Pittston.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Bernard J.
Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea.
Daniel Rish
March 5, 2013
D
aniel Rish, 91, of East Green
Street, Nanticoke, passed
away March 5, 2013 at Guardian
Elder Care, Nanticoke.
He was born July 15, 1921 in
Wanamie, Newport Township, to
Martin and Frances Klutz Rish.
Daniel was a lifetime resident
of the Nanticoke area and was a
member of the Kingdom Hall of
Jehovahs Witnesses, 1240 Scott
St., Wilkes-Barre, previously
based in Nanticoke, where he
was the oldest Elder in his circle.
He was employed in the retail
auto parts business as a parts
salesman.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, the former Gladys
Wright, in 2006; daughter, Lynn
Troyano; grandson, Peter Paul
Troyano; brothers, Stanley, Ka-
zimir, Michael and Edward Rish.
Surviving are a son-in-law,
Paul Peter Troyano, Alden; and
grandson, Daniel Peter Troyano,
Santa Anna, Calif.
Interment will be in Slocum
Cemetery at the convenience of
the family.
Friends and relatives are in-
vited to attend a memorial ser-
vice for Daniel at the Kingdom
Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses,
Nanticoke Congregation, 1240
Scott St., Wilkes-Barre, at a later
date.
Arrangements are by the
Grontkowski Funeral Home, 51-
53 W. Green St., Nanticoke.
Carolyn Lorraine Rizzo
March 6, 2013
C
arolyn Lorraine Rizzo, 69, for-
merly of Wilkes Barre, passed
away Wednesday, March 6, 2013,
in St. Lukes Hospice House,
Bethlehem, Pa.
Born June 22, 1943, in Queens,
N.Y., she was the daughter of
Leonard and Sophie Ziemak
Karas.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Phillip, and sisters,
Joan Goggin and Linda Farace.
Surviving are her daughter,
Deborah Bodayle and husband,
John J., Philipsburg; brother,
Robert Karas and wife, Susan,
Menifeen; and granddaughter,
Ariana Bodayle, Philipsburg.
Memorial Services will be
held Saturday at 11:30 a.m. from
the Earl W. Lohman Funeral
Home Inc., 14 W. Green St., Nan-
ticoke.Friends may call Saturday
from 9:30 a.m. until time of ser-
vice.
In lieu of owers, memorial do-
nations, if desired, may be made
to Visiting Nurse Association of
St. Lukes, 1510 Valley Center
Parkway, Suite 200, Bethlehem,
PA 18017-2267.
Regina L. Jean OMalley
March 5, 2013
R
egina L. Jean OMalley
passed away Tuesday, March
5, 2013, at her home in Ashford
Court, Jacksonville Beach, Fla.
Born on March 13, 1930, she
was the daughter of the late Hen-
ry and Ann Dzaldowski Leyman.
Jean was an ofcer at the for-
mer Peoples Bank of Nanticoke
for many years, and a member of
the former St. Francis Catholic
Church, Nanticoke, before mov-
ing to Florida. Although Jean
loved the Florida weather, the
beach and spending time there
with her daughter, she never for-
got her beloved Nanticoke.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her
husband of 56 years, Thomas
OMalley.
Surviving are her daughter,
Assistant U.S. Attorney Kathleen
OMalley, Jacksonville Beach,
Fla.; sisters, Ann Campton, Palm-
erton, and Carol Burke, Bowie,
Md.
Funeral service will be held
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. from Ke-
arney Funeral Home Inc., 173 E.
Green St., Nanticoke, with a Mass
of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
in St. Faustina Parish. Entomb-
ment will be in St. Francis Cem-
etery. Family and friends may call
Wednesday from 9 a.m. until time
of service.
In lieu of owers, the family
would suggest contributions to
Community Hospice of Northeast
Florida, 4266 Sunbeam Road,
Jacksonville, FL 32257. The fam-
ily is eternally grateful to Com-
munity Hospice for allowing Jean
to remain in her home until she
passed away peacefully.
Richard J. Kubasti
March 5, 2013
R
ichard J. Kubasti, 70, of
Pittston, passed away at home
on Tuesday, March 5, 2013, with
his loving wife at his side.
Born in Swoyersville on July
11, 1942, he was the son of the
late Joseph and Victoria Swircek
Kubasti.
He attended Dallas schools. He
was the owner/operator of Rich-
ards Upholstery for 45 years. He
loved the outdoors and his dogs.
He was a member of St. John
the Evangelist Church, Pittston.
He is survived by his wife of
26 years, Susan White Kubasti;
brothers, Edward Kubasti, of Dal-
las, Joseph Kubasti, Lehman, and
Robert Kubasti, Swoyersville;
sister, Dorothy Butler, Florida;
nieces and nephews.
A Blessing Service will be
held on Tuesday at 10 a.m. in the
Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home,
251 William St., Pittston. Inter-
ment will be in Memorial Shrine,
Wyoming. Friends may call Mon-
day from 5 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home. Memorial donations may
be made to Juvenile Diabetes
Research Foundation, 225 City
Ave., Suite 104, Bala Cynwyd, PA
19004. Online condolences may
be made at www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com.
Edward G. Bath Sr.
March 7, 2013
E
dward G. Bath Sr., 84, passed
into eternal life Thursday,
March 7, 2013.
Born March 10, 1928 in War-
rior Run, Peely, he was the son of
the late George and Eva Jeckell
Bath of Warrior Run.
Cutting his education short, he
joined the Navy at age 17, serv-
ing in the South Pacic aboard
the aircraft carrier, USS Antietam
CV36 until the end of Word
War II. After being honorably dis-
charged, he worked in coal mines
at the Loomis, Trusdale and Hu-
ber collieries.
He was preceded in death by
his son, Edward Jr., and brother,
George Bath.
Surviving are his wife of 62
years, Dora S. (Beverly) Bath;
daughters, Rhonda Davis and her
husband, Bill, of Wilkes Barre,
Sharon Grant, of Shickshinny, and
Joyce Bath, Warrior Run; son, Wil-
liam Bath, at home; 11 grandchil-
dren; nine great-grandchildren;
sisters, Efe Ann Metcalf, Askam;
Shirley and husband, Allen Lar-
nard, Dupont; brother, John and
wife, Barbara Bath, Warrior Run;
and several nieces, nephews,
great-nieces and great-nephews.
He was an Elder and the oldest
member of the Welsh Presbyte-
rian Church of Warrior Run. He
was Past Grand of Askam Lodge
No. 899 of the Independent Order
of Odd Fellows, where he served
as lodge secretary for more than
30 years. Edward had many
memberships in various organiza-
tions: past Master of Nanticoke
Masonic Lodge No. 541 F&AM.,
Irem Temple Shrine Transporta-
tion Unit, Caldwell Consistory of
Bloomsburg, Irem Temple Shrine
Club, a life member of the War-
rior Run Volunteer Fire Co., the
Six Country Firemen Association,
the Warrior Run American Legion
Post No. 176, Peely Rod and Gun
Club, trustee for the Hanover
Green Cemetery, COOP Sams
Travel Group, Susquehanna Val-
ley NCT No. 43, and previous Boy
Scout master for the Boy Scouts
of American Troup 417. He re-
tired from the United Brother-
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of
American Local 514.
Well done, good and faithful
servant, enter into the joy of the
Lord.
Funeral Services
will be held on Tuesday
at 11 a.m. from the Earl
W. Lohman Funeral Home Inc.,
14 W. Green St., Nanticoke.
Friends may call Monday from
5 to 8 p.m.
The Order of Odd Fellows will
conduct services Monday at 7
p.m., and the Masonic Lodge will
conduct its services at 7:30 p.m.
Interment will be in Memorial
Shrine Cemetery, Carverton.
Jessie L. Chesnavich
March 7, 2013
Ann (Nancy)
Flanagan Lizza
March 6, 2013
A
nn (Nancy) Flanagan Lizza,
79, of Hughestown, passed
away Wednesday, March 6, 2013,
in Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
surrounded by her family.
Born in Pittston Township on
Aug. 1, 1933, she was a daughter
of the late Patrick and Mary Gil-
vary Flanagan.
She was a graduate of St. John
the Evangelist High School,
Pittston.
She was a loving mother and
grandmother who will be greatly
missed by friends and family.
Her grandchildren were every-
thing to her.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Joseph (Smokey)
Lizza, in 1992; sisters, Mary
Louise Donahue and Dorothy
McHale.
Surviving are her children,
Joseph Carmen Lizza, of Wyo-
ming, Patrick Lizza and his wife,
Anita, of Exeter, and Mary Pa-
glianite and her husband, Greg,
Hughestown; grandchildren,
Christina Koons, of Dupont, Pat-
rick Lizza, of Philadelphia, and
Brandon Lizza, Exeter; sister,
Eileen Duggan, Lake Harmony;
numerous nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated on Monday
at 9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of the
Eucharist Parish, North Main
Street, Pittston. Interment will
be in Mount Olivet Cemetery,
Carverton. Those attending the
funeral Mass are asked to go
directly to the church on Mon-
day morning. There will be no
calling hours. Funeral arrange-
ments are entrusted to the Peter
J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251
WilliamSt., Pittston. Online con-
dolences may be made at www.
peterjadoniziofuneralhome.com.
Robert W.
Ferguson
March 8, 2013
R
obert W. Ferguson, 50,
passed away suddenly Fri-
day, March 8, 2013, at his resi-
dence in Mountain Top.
Born on June 9, 1962 in Phila-
delphia, he was a son of the late
John and Laura Gabel Ferguson.
He was employed at Sealey Com-
ponent Group, Mountain Top.
Robert enjoyed shing and cook-
ing. He also loved the Philadel-
phia Phillies, Eagles and Flyers.
He is survived by his wife, the
former Regina Henry; daughter
Laura, and son Brian, at home;
sister, Charlotte Gardner, Nanti-
coke; brothers, John and his wife,
Denise, of Philadelphia, Charles,
Florida and Kevin, New Jersey;
many nieces and nephews; and
will be missed by his pet cats,
Patches, Rascal and Smokey.
Memorial services will be
held Monday at 6:30 p.m. from
the Clarke Piatt Funeral Home
Inc., 6 Sunset Lake Road, Hun-
lock Creek, with the Rev. Dan
Brubaker ofciating. Friends
may call on Monday from 5 p.m.
until the time of service at the
funeral home.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the American Cancer Society,
190 Welles St., Kingston, PA
18704.
MORE OBITUARIES, Page 2A, 11A
VERONICA KOZICKI, 82,
formerly of Plains Township and
a resident of Courtright Street,
Wilkes-Barre, died Friday,
March 8, 2013, at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements
are pending from the Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains.
EVA LETINSKI, 97, of the
Hudson section of Plains Town-
ship, died Friday, March 8, 2013,
at home. A lifelong resident of
Hudson, she was a daughter
of the late Stephen and Mary
Mirowski Serniak. She formerly
was employed as a seamstress.
She was a charter member of
Holy Trinity Orthodox Church.
Eva enjoyed quilting and her
bus trips to Atlantic City. She
was preceded in death by her
husband, John Letinski. Surviv-
ing are daughters, Mary Iorio
and Joan Drevenik, Hudson;
sister, Genevieve Gromoll and
husband, Walter; four grandchil-
dren, Mark, Dawn, Gregory and
Denise.
Funeral will be held at 8:30
a.m. Monday from the Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains. Requiem Service at 9
a.m. in Holy Trinity Orthodox
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Interment
in Ss. Peter & Paul Cemetery,
Plains Township. Friends may
call today from 2 to 5 p.m. with
Parastas service at 4 p.m.
Vivian A.
Zurawski, 67,
of Dorrance
To w n s h i p ,
passed away
March 9, 2013
at home sur-
rounded by her loving family.
Born Jan. 29, 1946, she was
daughter of the late John and
Helen Vasauskas. Vivian grew
up in the Miners Mills section
of Wilkes-Barre and graduated
from Coughlin High School.
She was a member of St. Marys
Church in Dorrance.
She was last employed at
Berwick Offray prior to retire-
ment. She was a volunteer rst
responder with Dorrance Fire
and Ambulance. She enjoyed
camping, sewing and watching
movies. Vivian was a loving wife,
mother and sister.
She was preceded in death by
her sister, Audrey.
Surviving are her loving hus-
band, Joseph; her daughter,
Ranae, of Maryland; Vivians
identical twin sister, Valerie Os-
trowski, of Wapwallopen; and a
brother, Ronald Vasauskas, of
Maryland.
Funeral services will be
held Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. from
the Desiderio Funeral Home
Inc., 436 S. Mountain Blvd.,
Mountain Top, with a Mass of
Christian Burial at 10 a.m. at St.
Marys Roman Catholic Church,
Dorrance, with interment at the
parish cemetery.
Friends may call Monday from
5 to 7 p.m. at the funeral home.
In lieu of owers, donations
can be made to the Dorrance
Fire and Ambulance Co., 402 St.
Johns Road, Wapwallopen PA
18660. Online condolences may
be expressed at www.desideri-
ofh.com.
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MORE OBITUARIES, Page 2A, 10A
Joseph J. Menn Jr.
March 8, 2013
J
oseph J. Menn Jr., 76, of Echo
Valley Drive, Shavertown, died
on Friday at his home.
Born in Pittston, he was the
son of the late Joseph J. Menn
Sr. and Mary Gerrity Menn. He
graduated from Wyoming High
School and served in the U.S.
Navy Reserve.
Joseph had resided in Shaver-
town for the past 13 years. Pre-
viously he had resided for many
years in Forty Fort and Kingston.
Prior to his retirement he was
self-employed and sold electrical
equipment.
Joe was a member of St.
Thereses Church, Shavertown,
and he served as an Eucharistic
minister. He was a 4th degree
Knight with the Knights of Co-
lumbus Assumpta Council 3987,
Luzerne. He was past president
of Forty Fort Little League, Fort-
Swoyer Teeners League, the Forty
Fort Lions Club and other parent
and service organizations. He also
served as a PIAA swim ofcial for
more than 30 years. He devoted
much of his time to whatever his
sons were involved in.
His wife, Nancy Davis Menn,
preceded him in death in 2003.
Surviving are his sons, Dr.
Joseph J. Menn, III, of Surfside
Beach, S.C. and his wife, Dr.
Karen, Robert W. Menn of Forty
Fort and his wife, Kelly, Gary
C. Menn of Dallas and his wife
Lynn, Richard D. Menn, Danbury,
Conn.; sisters, Mary Lou Skesav-
age, Manasquan, N.J.; Virgina
Perry, Binghamton, N.Y., and her
husband, David; brother, David
Menn, and wife, Diane, Ridge-
eld, Conn. A proud grandfather,
Joe was always happiest spending
time with Robbie, Michael, Ma-
rissa, Sara, Joe and Cassie.
A Mass of Christian
Burial will be held on
Wednesday at 10 a.m.
at St. Thereses Church, 64 Da-
vis St., Shavertown, with Father
James Paisley, ofciating. The
interment will be at Mount Olivet
Cemetery, Carverton.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions, if desired, can be
made to the National Kidney
Foundation.
Arrangements are by the Hugh
B. Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral
Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty
Fort. For any information or to
send the family an online mes-
sage of condolence, you may visit
the funeral home website at hugh-
bhughes.com.
Vivian A.
Zurawski
March 9, 2013
MaryAnn Irene Martin
March 3, 2013
M
aryAnn Irene Martin, 60,
went to be with the Lord on
March 3, 2013, in Virginia Beach,
Va.
Daughter of the late Albert Ya-
nuskavich Sr. and Betty Delasan-
dro, she graduated from Pittston
Area High School, class of 1970.
A longtime member of Spring
Branch Community Church, she
loved life, the outdoors, teach-
ing and, most of all, her beloved
daughter and grandson.
She is survived by her daugh-
ter, Maria Colarusso and her -
ance, Ernest; grandson, Gregory
M. Colarusso; sister, Ann Marie
ODonnell and her husband, Pete;
and brother, Albert Yanuskavich
Jr. and his wife, Diane.
A memorial service will be
held on Wednesday at 4 p.m.
at Spring Branch Community
Church, 1500 N. Great Neck Road,
Virginia Beach, Va., with the Rev.
Michael Simone ofciating.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the building fund
at Spring Branch Community
Church in Virginia Beach.
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Navigation, Entune, Leather & Moonroof
pit held clear spring water, but
the water turned murky and
rust-colored from mounting
trash.
Dangerous pit res
Township Supervisor Joseph
Yudichak recalls pit res over
the years that endangered re-
ghters who had to scale the
strippings to extinguish them.
In the summer of 1989, a re
in the pit began a conagration
that continued for two months.
The Ofce of Surface Mining
had to build a mile-long water
pipe from the Plymouth Reser-
voir to put out the re.
The fear of someone falling
off the pit precipice was always
in the back of Yudichaks mind.
Im relieved that we no longer
have to worry about this liabil-
ity, he said.
Colleen Connolly, state DEP
regional spokeswoman, said
Avondale is one of the largest
mine reclamation projects that
has been tackled in eastern
Pennsylvania. It was an open
sore, an open wound on the
area, she said.
The word pit understates
the size of the manmade hole,
which was 800 feet wide, 2,600
feet long and more than 200
feet deep, Dziak said.
Figuring out how to ll the
void was an engineering chal-
lenge because funds werent
available to purchase and truck
in ll, he said.
Instead, contractors ini-
tially NAPCON Construction
Co. and later C.E. Ankiewicz
Construction and Excavation
Inc. of Mountain Top dug up
and transported rock and dirt
from the rest of the property
using special heavy equipment
designed to navigate the sloped
terrain, Dziak said.
A total of 1.2 million cubic
yards of material was moved to
ll the pit and reconstruct the
adjacent lands, he said.
Contractors created tiered
plateaus that can hold struc-
tures and a network of rock-
lined channels and basins
designed to drain and hold
stormwater including water
that would have gone into the
pit, he said.
Black to green
Most of the site has been
mulched and seeded to prevent
erosion. This spring, it will be
green instead of black, Dziak
said.
Future development on the
site will depend on the town-
ships success securing funds
for sewer system additions
and upgrades, Dziak said. The
township is required to com-
plete sewage work elsewhere,
and the project would include
a connection to the Avondale
property, he said.
The township received a $1
million grant for sewer work
and is in the process of applying
for another $5 million, which
should cover the lions share of
the project, Yudichak said.
The Avondale site would be
accessible from Jersey Road off
U.S. Route 11.
A residential project on
higher ground is a key to fu-
ture growth in the municipality,
which will have about 60 fewer
properties due to past and fu-
ture ood buyouts, said town-
ship Supervisor Gale Conrad.
Property taxes from one new
home valued around $225,000
compensate for the loss of
about three or four ood-prone
structures, she said.
The construction of 15 homes
in recent years is offsetting the
lost taxes frombuyouts, and the
Avondale project would allow
the township tax base to grow,
she said.
If 100 homes go up there, it
will be a nancial resolve for
Plymouth Township and its fu-
ture, she said. The views from
the Avondale site are unbeliev-
able. That alone is worth so
much.
Yudichak predicts homes at
Avondale would sell like hot-
cakes.
Ive had people tell me they
would buy a home there today if
it was available, he said.
A master plan completed in
2006 proposed around 214 sin-
gle family homes, 92 townhome
units and 90 condominiums.
The plan stated there is avail-
able access to public water,
electric and gas from the site.
Dziak pointed to some of the
locations visible from the for-
mer pit, including Nanticoke,
Sugar Notch, buildings near
the Wyoming Valley Mall and
the wind turbines in Bear Creek
Township.
He pointed out a path of
trucks climbing a distant pass
of Interstate 81.
The property also abuts the
700-acre Lackawanna State For-
est.
Thats another big selling
point, Dziak said.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 10, 2013 N E W S PAGE 13A
Continued from Page 1A
MINE
SUBMITTED PHOTOS
The word pit understates the size of the manmade hole, more than 200 feet deep.
Earth Conservancy snapshot
Earth Conservancy is a
nonprot corporation formed
in 1991 to reclaim 16,496 acres
of mine-scarred land formerly
owned by the bankrupt Blue
Coal Corp.
The nonprot received $14.6
million in federal funding to
acquire the land in 1994. Of
that, $8 million went to local
governments for back taxes,
$2.4 million was funnelled to
Black Lung benets and $3.7
million covered state and fed-
eral back taxes.
Earth Conservancy sold
4,155 acres and donated 205
acres to date, leaving 12,136
acres.
A total 1,543 acres of Earth
Conservancy property have
been reclaimed so far, largely
with state revenue that comes
from a fee on mined coal.
The nonprots goal is for
10,000 acres of the property
to be preserved as open space,
and 2,789 is in that category
to date.
After coal mining ended, the pit became a magnet for illegal
dumping and was prone to res.
allows Pennsylvania the ability
to tailor the programs medical
benets to different types of
people it covers.
I cant recommend it right
now on the facts that I have
right now, Corbett told a Fox
Business News interviewer
Thursday.
If the facts substantially
change, then I would have to
reconsider where we are, but I
dont see that.
Corbett, along with many
lawmakers, also worries that
the federal governments prom-
ise to pay the lions share of the
tab 100 percent of the cost
for newly eligible enrollees for
the rst three years, and gradu-
ally shrinking to 90 percent af-
ter that cant be trusted.
Still, Corbett is under pres-
sure to do something about
health care, as more than half
the nations governors join the
expansion, consider it or look
for alternatives.
The AARP, hospital execu-
tives and Democratic lawmak-
ers all support the expansion.
Many Republicans in the GOP-
controlled Legislature either
oppose it or say they are unde-
cided, but a growing number
support it.
Im going to push the gover-
nor on it, said one supporter,
Senate Banking and Insurance
Committee Chairman Don
White, R-Indiana.
Time is ticking: The money
from the federal government
starts owing next year.
With Corbett up for re-
election next year, Democrats
routinely remind Corbett that
he ended a subsidized health
care program for 40,000 adults
called adultBasic and that his
administration apparently
stopped Medicaid coverage
for thousands of eligible adults
and children if not tens of
thousands amid an effort to
root out waste.
A meeting with Sebelius
could be productive.
Two other governors Re-
publican Rick Scott of Florida
and Democrat Mike Beebe of
Arkansas returned to their
states in recent weeks after
meeting with Sebelius, seem-
ingly bearing concessions.
In Beebes case, it was the
ability to use Medicaid funds
to purchase private insurance
for people who would be new-
ly eligible, an idea designed to
win over the states Republi-
can-controlled Legislature. For
Scott, it was a willingness to
allow Florida to enroll tens of
thousands of older, long-term
care patients into a Medicaid
program run by managed care
organizations.
Beebe already supported the
expansion when he met with
Sebelius; Scott changed his po-
sition after meeting with the
former Kansas governor.
Its not necessarily clear
whether Beebe and Scott had
to ght for those concessions,
or whether Sebelius agreed
to the sweeteners precisely to
get Florida and Arkansas to
join the Medicaid expansion,
said Alan Weil, the executive
director of the National Acad-
emy for State Health Policy in
Washington, D.C.
But it is clear that she wants
states to join.
Its some deal-making, but
its also some showmanship,
Weil said.
Its a win-win to do this.
(The Department of Health
and Human Services) wants
the win, but the governor also
wants to stand up in front of
the state and say, Heres the
concession I got from HHS. I
just dont know how much of
its real and how much of its
show.
Corbett is expected to bring
his own requests to a meeting
with Sebelius.
The question is whether Se-
belius will be exible enough
for Corbett.
I would say theyre abso-
lutely trying to be as exible
as possible, said Joan Alker,
the co-executive director of
Georgetown Universitys Cen-
ter for Children and Families
in Washington, D.C.
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PHILADELPHIA A former
Arizona State University professor
has been ordered to stand trial for
allegedly claiming to have explo-
sives at Philadelphias Liberty Bell.
The Philadelphia Inquirer
says 41-year-old Carlos Balsas of
Tempe, Ariz., was held for trial on
charges of making a bomb threat,
possessing an instrument of crime
and related counts following a pre-
liminary hearing Friday.
Police say Balsas entered the
tourist site in Philadelphias his-
toric district on Jan. 26 and told
a screener that his bags contained
explosives.
Man to stand trial in
Liberty Bell threat
The Associated Press
8
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Monterrey
81/50
Chihuahua
52/27
Los Angeles
72/50
Washington
58/41
New York
54/38
Miami
78/67
Atlanta
68/53
Detroit
54/42
Houston
67/46
Kansas City
40/26
Chicago
51/32
Minneapolis
32/16
El Paso
54/33
Denver
38/24
Billings
48/35
San Francisco
64/43
Seattle
56/44
Toronto
53/40
Montreal
46/37
Winnipeg
16/3
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
MON WED
THU FRI
TUE
SAT
TODAY
56
39
A shower
in the
afternoon
56 46
Clouds and
sun; cooler
44 23
Clouds and
sun; breezy
41 21
Clouds
and sun,
flurries
42 22
A chance
of rain
51 28
Partial
sunshine
39 26
Partly
sunny
HEATING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.
Yesterday 27
Month to date 291
Season to date 4514
Last season to date 4079
Normal season to date 4875
Anchorage 36/27/sn 36/22/s
Baltimore 59/38/s 59/49/c
Boston 42/34/pc 50/40/c
Buffalo 54/42/c 53/33/r
Charlotte 66/44/pc 64/54/pc
Chicago 51/32/r 40/25/sf
Cleveland 56/43/c 48/29/r
Dallas 62/35/c 56/35/s
Denver 38/24/pc 55/31/pc
Honolulu 81/65/sh 82/65/r
Indianapolis 58/43/sh 46/28/r
Las Vegas 65/48/s 68/48/s
Milwaukee 46/33/r 35/23/sf
New Orleans 75/59/c 63/44/r
Norfolk 56/42/s 65/54/pc
Okla. City 46/28/pc 53/33/s
Orlando 79/56/s 81/63/pc
Phoenix 72/52/s 76/53/s
Pittsburgh 60/44/pc 56/37/r
Portland, ME 43/31/s 46/38/c
St. Louis 58/35/sh 43/27/c
San Francisco 64/43/s 65/45/s
Seattle 56/44/c 51/46/r
Wash., DC 58/41/s 59/52/c
Bethlehem 2.12 -0.07 16
Wilkes-Barre 3.05 -0.07 22
Towanda 1.91 -0.04 16
Port Jervis 3.01 +0.04 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Saturday.
Today Mon Today Mon Today Mon
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Mar 11 Mar 19
Mar 27
New First
Full Last
Apr 2
7:24 a.m.
6:23 a.m.
7:05 p.m.
6:11 p.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 52-58. Lows: 32-38. Partly sunny today. Partly cloudy tonight.
Rather cloudy and mild tomorrow.
Highs: 45-51. Lows: 33-39. Mostly sunny today. Partly cloudy tonight.
Mostly cloudy tomorrow. Tuesday: windy with rain.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 49-55. Lows: 35-41. Periods of sun today. Mostly cloudy tonight.
A couple of showers tomorrow afternoon.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 54. Low: 38. Mostly sunny today. Partly cloudy tonight. Rather
cloudy tomorrow. Tuesday: rain. Wednesday: windy.
High: 59. Low: 37. Sunshine and patchy clouds today. Partly cloudy
tonight. Mostly cloudy and mild tomorrow.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Saturday
High/low 54/22
Normal high/low 43/25
Record high 73 (2000)
Record low 2 (1943)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.00"
Month to date 0.11"
Normal m-t-d 0.66"
Year to date 3.46"
Normal y-t-d 5.06"
56/39
55/41
59/37
63/35
57/34
63/34
59/42
56/38
57/38
50/37
50/35
52/38
48/34
55/31
54/38
Summary: It will turn out milder and sunny across much of the East today while
rain falls from Michigan through eastern Texas. There will be a few storms in the
Mississippi Valley while the West remains mainly dry.
Computer security expert Jona-
than Weber of Marathon Stu-
dios Inc. saw it as something
much different: an invitation for
trouble.
With a few clicks of a com-
puter mouse, Weber was able
to copy invisible information
embedded in the photo into a
readily available Internet appli-
cation, allowing him to pinpoint
the location of the home where
the shot was taken. Another
click and the Google Maps ser-
vice provided him directions to
the womans door in Florida.
The experiment, conducted
in an ofce at East Stroudsburg
University where the 21-year-
old Weber is a student, served
as a startling example of how
easily someone with even mod-
erate knowledge about comput-
ers can obtain information that
was never meant to be public.
Getting in harms way
Weber, a junior majoring in
computer security, had no ne-
farious intentions in mind. His
demonstration, conductedat the
request of a reporter, was meant
to reveal the dangers people can
create for themselves when they
fail to employ security measures
to protect their online posts.
Internet security has become
a major concern in the past de-
cade as more people have be-
come victims of identity theft.
In 2011, 11.6 million people in
the United States were victims
of identity fraud, a 13 percent in-
crease from 2011, according to
the Javelin Strategy & Research
group.
The increased popularity of
Facebook, Twitter and other
popular online social media net-
works has provided a treasure
trove of personal information
that can be used by thieves, We-
ber said.
In the Florida bloggers case,
Weber took advantage of little
known fact: Photos taken with
cellphones and most digital
cameras include something
known as meta data, or exif
data, embedded in the photo.
Weber simply clicked on the
photo posted on the womans
webpage, then pasted the In-
ternet address (url) associated
with it into an Internet applica-
tion that allowed him to pull up
a host of information about the
picture.
He knows it was taken on Dec.
5, 2012 by an iPhone 4s and that
the ash did not go off. He also
knows the exact longitude and
latitude of the camera when the
shot was taken. That longitude
and latitude, when punched
into Google Maps, allowed him
to use the street view feature to
pull up the exact address and
photo of the womans home.
Its very important people
know what kind of information
is out there and that the stuff
they are doing drops digital foot-
prints they dont know about,
Weber said. That information
can be used in ways people dont
want.
Fortunately, Weber said, Face-
book and Twitter, the nations
most popular online networks,
automatically remove exif data
from photos when they are
posted. But there are numer-
ous other sites that leave the
data intact, including Google+,
the photo sharing sites Flickr
and Photobucket and Tumblr, a
microblogging service popular
with teenagers, Weber said.
Phone and digital camera
users can alter the settings on
their cameras so that they dont
include the meta data, Weber
said. Exact instructions for each
type phone vary, but typically
its done through the settings
menu on the camera.
Privacy concerns with pho-
tos are only a small part of the
security issues the public faces
in the online world, Weber said.
More troublesome are the bla-
tant security lapses with email
accounts and postings on social
networking sites that can allow
thieves to gather information to
steal your identity, he said.
Common mistake
One of the most common
mistakes people make is allow-
ing too much information about
themselves to be publicly avail-
able on Facebook the hugely
popular social networking site
allows people to post pictures,
videos and comments about
themselves and others.
The Javelin groups study
found 68 percent of people with
public proles shared their
birthday information, with 45
percent of them providing the
exact date and year informa-
tion thats key to a person want-
ing to steal your identity.
Facebook contains several dif-
ferent privacy settings that per-
mit a person to restrict who can
see their information and posts.
The most open setting is public,
which means everything posted
on the page is open to anyone in
the world with a Facebook ac-
count to see.
A more restrictive mode al-
lows only those the page owner
deems to be friends to see
posts and information. That pri-
vacy setting might not be quite
as private as people think, de-
pending on how its set up, We-
ber said.
Users assume limiting their
posts so that only their friends
can see them prevents strangers
from from viewing their infor-
mation, Weber said. What many
dont understand is that if their
settings allow mutual friends,
or friends of their friends, to see
their postings, theyre opening
themselves up to be seen by po-
tentially thousands of people.
Consider: If you have 500
Facebook friends, and each of
your friends has an average of
300 friends
Thats hundreds of thou-
sands of people who can see ev-
erything you post, Weber said.
Friends of a friend in Facebook
gets really big really fast.
Another thing people dont
fully comprehend is the impact
of other peoples postings that
involve them.
You knew it wasnt a good
idea to post that picture of you
passed out at the company party
on your Facebook account. But
that doesnt mean one of your
friends or co-workers wont
post it and tag you in it. If you
dont have your security settings
set to limit who can see things
that tag, it will be posted on
your Facebook page and your
friends page.
You can control what you do,
but you gotta remember, you
cannot control what other peo-
ple post about you, he said. Its
not just you you have to worry
about. Its the people youre in-
teracting with.
And then there are the pho-
tos and posts you make to other
peoples Facebook pages. People
dont realize those are not pri-
vate to that person alone and
are subject to whatever privacy
settings that person has. If their
account is public, everyone can
see it.
When you post to another
persons Facebook page, its pub-
lic by default. There is no way
to make it private, Weber said.
It wont happen to me
Why should you care about
any of this?
Most people dont, and thats
a concern, Weber said.
Part of the reason people
dont take this seriously might
be tied to the belief it wont
happen to me.
Identity theft is a growing
problem, but the reality is most
people will never be victimized.
In a 2010 report, the U.S. De-
partment of Justice found 7 per-
cent of households in the United
States had someone who had
been a victim of identity theft.
And while its possible a thief
will use Facebook to nd out
when someones away, most
burglars are not that sophisti-
cated, Weber acknowledged.
What people need to under-
stand, he said, is there are other
ramications for allowing too
much personal information
about yourself to become public.
For one, employers are in-
creasingly using Google, Face-
book and other Internet search
tools to check out people theyre
looking to hire. If you dont take
steps to control the public in-
formation thats available about
you on line, the consequences
can be troubling.
Take the case of a Monroe
County teenager, for example.
The teens mother agreed to
be a test case for Weber to see
how much information he could
obtain about the mother and her
family.
The woman, whose name is
being withheld to protect her
familys privacy, was actually
pretty good at protecting her
online identity, Weber said. She
employed high security settings
on her Facebook account and
did not provide any personal
information that was publicly
available. She also kept her
friends list private, meaning
others could not see it.
Her family and friends were
not quite as diligent, however.
Weber was able to gather in-
formation about the womans
daughter because she had made
a post to her mothers Facebook
page. That allowed him to learn
the daughters username for
her Facebook account, which
he then accessed. Information
he gained there led him to ac-
counts she had on Twitter and
Photobucket.
Weber was able to view hun-
dreds of photos she had posted,
including numerous shots of her
engaging in underage drinking
that mom had not known about.
Worse yet for the teen, some
of those images made it out-
side the Facebook world and
are available simply by doing a
Google search of her name.
You Google her name in
quotes and the rst thing that
comes up is her waving two
vodka bottles, Weber said.
In three years shes going to
get out of a college and need
a job. Every employer at least
Googles the person theyre hir-
ing.
The rst thing theyre going
to get is a picture of her under-
age, waiving a bottle of vodka.
Continued from Page 1A
INTERNET
at the university, Weber at-
tempted to log into my email
account of a popular service
provider.
Weber already had obtained
my email address on his own
(Ill explain more about that
later). When queried for my
password, he hit a random
set of letters. The provider,
of course, said he had entered
the wrong password. When
he did it again, it repeated
the message, and offered him
the opportunity to change the
password.
In an attempt to protect
me, the provider had, years
ago, asked me to set up a se-
curity question I must answer
correctly in order for me to
change the password.
It popped up on the screen:
Whats your favorite pets
name?
Weber doesnt know me at
all, so thats not information
he would readily have. But I
quickly learned, it wouldnt
take much for him to take a
very educated guess.
All he had to do was visit
my Facebook page.
Pet photos revealing
People love to post pic-
tures of their pets on their
Facebook page, Weber ex-
plained.
Im no exception. My Face-
book page was semi-private,
so he could not see every-
thing. But he could see all my
photos, which, at the time,
I did not restrict access to
(thats now changed).
If he went to my photo
page, he would see lots of pic-
tures of my furry little friend,
some of which had her name
attached. If he was an identity
thief, he would have just hit
the jackpot.
Without my knowledge, he
could have accessed my email
and all the information it
contained, including sensi-
tive nancial details in emails
from my bank and other ac-
counts, such as Paypal.
Next he could have
changed the password and se-
curity question, meaning Id
be locked out of the account,
leaving him free to contact
all my other accounts and at-
tempt to change those pass-
words as well.
That likely wouldnt be too
hard, he said.
I guarantee you, your pass-
word for a lot of things is the
same, or some variation of
the same, Weber said. Once
I have your email account,
everything else comes down
like a house of cards.
I felt like an idiot. My only
solace came in learning Im
not the only one out there
who failed woefully in prop-
erly securing my account.
I had some pretty notable
company, Weber said, includ-
ing Sarah Palin, the former
governor of Alaska and vice
presidential candidate.
Palins email was hacked
a few years ago, Weber said,
because someone gured out
her dogs name. She, like I,
had used that information as
her security question, he said.
Your pets name, mothers
maiden name and anniver-
sary date are among some
of the most popular security
questions sites ask to conrm
your identity. That type of in-
formation is public informa-
tion that, with only a moder-
ate amount of knowledge, can
be obtained by a hacker.
In my case, this wasnt even
hacking, as Weber didnt
need to input any type of
computer code to access my
computer. All he needed was
my name and email address,
which he obtained through a
Google search using a rela-
tively unsophisticated com-
puter search tactics.
Weber explained he got my
email by taking advantage of
a security aw in a program
run by the Pennsylvania De-
partment of Transportation.
Years ago, I had signed up
for email and text alerts of
road closings and delays. I
had lled out a form, via the
Internet, that listed my email
address and cellphone num-
ber. Weber was able to ac-
cess that form, as well as the
forms of thousands of others,
because PennDOT failed to
employ security features that
would ensure it did not be-
come public.
I plan to contact PennDOT
ofcials to advise them of the
issue.
Increasing security
In the interim, Ive taken
several steps to shore up my
online security.
I immediately changed
my security question for my
email. Its unique enough that
you wouldnt be able to gure
it out by looking at my Face-
book page.
Ive also removed all per-
sonal information from my
prole on Facebook and set
the privacy settings to the
highest level available. Now
only my Facebook friends can
see my photos.
Im also taking time to re-
view my passwords and se-
curity questions for all my
accounts to ensure theyre
sufciently obscure.
Im sure I wont be perfect,
but Weber advises people,
they dont need to be.
You dont need to have
Department of Justice secu-
rity level. The only thing you
need is to be more secure
than 90 percent of people,
Weber said.
As long as you know a lit-
tle about protecting yourself,
someone who is looking for
a target is going to pass over
you and go to someone else
who is easier.
If you dont want that to be
you, take some simple steps
to help protect yourself, We-
ber said.
Dont use common infor-
mation, such as your birth
date, in creating a password.
Equally important, make
sure your security question
is something only you could
know.
Your password can be as
long and complicated as you
want, but its irrelevant if all
it takes is your pets name to
reset it, Weber said.
Continued from Page 1A
SECURITY
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 10, 2013 N E W S PAGE 14A
P R o T E c T yo u R P R I vA c y
What can you do to better protect
your online privacy?
Jonathan Weber, of Marathon
Studios Inc., offers the following
advice:
LImIt the Amount of informa-
tion that you allow to be public on
your Facebook page.
Many people post their birthdays
so that friends can message them
on their special day. If you are
going to do that, at least withhold
the year you were born.
You should also carefully consider
whether to put information about
where you work, or the high
school or college you attended.
That information makes it easier
for people from your past to nd
you, but it also gives thieves valu-
able information they can use to
steal your identity, he said.
Only share what is necessary
and what you are comfortable
with everyone seeing and know-
ing, he said.
Set your FACebook privacy
to control who sees posts of oth-
ers.
Facebook gives you control over
who can see posts and photos
that your friends and family
upload. To do that, go to who can
see posts in your settings and
select just me. That will prevent
others from seeing a post, or any
photo you were tagged in. You
can then review the post and if
you want to share it, you can post
it.
You cant control what others do,
but you can control who sees it
on Facebook, Weber said. I want
to decide what photos Im tagged
in. Thats important if you want
to be in control of your online
persona.
CLoSe down any old social net-
working accounts you no longer
use:
Remember that Myspace account
you created years ago? The site
has changed signicantly since
it was rst launched and is now
primarily a music service. But
everything you posted on it is still
there.
Some people have a Myspace
account they havent logged into
in ve years. They still have all
the old pictures they took during
high school, all their personal
information, their birthday, their
mothers maiden name, he said.
Think of them as digital ghosts
people leave behind If you have
an account you dont use, close
the thing down.
remember thAt anything you
post anywhere on the Internet will
likely be there forever, so choose
carefully.
The main point I want people to
understand is that, whether or
not you can see it right now, in-
formation (about you) is available
online, Weber said. Everything
you put out there will be seen
and judged by other people The
thing about the Internet is, once
you put something on it, it doesnt
come off.
by
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THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013
SECTI ON B
timesleader.com
NEW YORK There would be
no happily ever after for Cinder-
ella without her glitzy glass slippers,
so careful attention was paid to the
shoes for the princess-to-bes Broad-
way opening last weekend.
For Rodgers + Hammersteins
Cinderella, which ofcially opened
Sunday at the Broadway Theatre, cos-
tume designer William Ivey Long and
footwear designer Stuart Weitzman
created a pair of pumps so sparkly
they light up the upper balcony,
Weitzman says.
The shoe is its own character in
the show, and it will inspire the dream
for so many other women.
Shoe shopaholics and Carrie Brad-
shaw types surely have been inspired
by the Cinderella fashion fantasy,
muses Weitzman, a 26-year industry
veteran. How could they not? After
all, he says, Cinderella gets the shoes
attering, delicate and powerful all
at once and then gets her Prince
Charming.
When people describe the stunning
bride or the prettiest red-carpet star-
let, the comparison rarely if ever
is made to Sleeping Beauty or Snow
White.
Its always Cinderella, belle of the
ball.
Cinderella is the gold standard for
aspiration, Long agrees. The slip-
pers are so iconic, and they are recog-
nized worldwide.
He says their only rival might be
Dorothys red ruby slippers in The
Wizard of Oz.
Because the shoes are so famous,
the designers had to work with a cer-
tain set of expectations: The shoes
had to be romantic and sexy, have a
sparkly fairy-dust touch and they
had to be seen by everyone in the the-
ater.
Actress Laura Osnes, who plays
Cinderella, couldnt risk shards and
splinters from real glass, so the de-
signers used Plexiglas instead.
Weitzman employed a welded-
construction technique that uses no
screws, normally used in high heels,
so Cinderella could have a seamless
look.
This is the most magical world Ive
been asked to conjure up, says Long,
whose 60-plus show credits include
costumes for Chicago, Hairspray
and The Boy From Oz. Instead of
going all Disney or using the famous
French illustrations that came a cen-
tury before (Cinderella-style folk tales
are hundreds of years older than that)
as inspiration, Long decided to weave
nature with an emphasis on but-
teries and vines into his visual
picture instead of a particular time or
place.
The idea that Cinderella had to
be the most beautiful woman in the
room, with the most gorgeous dress
and coveted shoes, is what guided
him and Weitzman, Long says.
They had to walk a ne line to avoid
Cinderellas slipper: the new, ultimate must-have shoe
Actress Laura Osnes will wear this pair
of glass slippers designed by Stuart
Weitzman in the title role of the Broadway
musical Rodgers + Hammersteins Cinder-
ella on Broadway.
AP PHOTO
The Associated Press
See CINDERELLA, Page 3
Dana Capitano, an 11th-grade student and dancer from Dallas, painted this picture, which she calls Apollo.
Majesty
and
MeMory
Student artwork ShineS in honor of Suzanne roSSetti
LEFT: Steven Kirk, an
11th-grade student from
Dallas, photographed a
pair of hands holding a
kitten and called it New
Life with Old Life.
RIGHT: Aloysha Acker-
man, an eighth-grade stu-
dent from Dallas, created
this three-dimensional
cabin and campre.
I
f the artwork they created is any clue,
14-year-old Rachel Caudell fromTunkhan-
nock likes dragons, 16-year-old Dana
Capitano from Dallas enjoys classical bal-
let and 15-year-old Kelsey Monahan from
Dallas is a big fan of the beach. Is that
all true? Yes, Caudell said. Yes, Capitano
conrmed. As for Monahan, well
Ive only been to the shore one time, she said.
Despite her preference for mountain vacations, Mo-
nahanpainteda dune sorealistic youcanalmost feel the
sand between your toes. Its on exhibit at the Luzerne
County Community Colleges SchulmanGallery, as part
of the Suzanne Maria Rossetti Memorial Juried Art Ex-
hibit for students in grades seven through 12.
We always get between 700 and 800 to 1,000 en-
tries, said artist Sue Hand, who has organized the
contest for the past 32 years to honor the exuber-
ance, love and faith of Rossetti, who was tragically
kidnapped and murdered in Arizona in 1981.
This year eight judges, all of them Rossetti alum-
ni, spent hours winnowing the entries down to 275
winners of rst, second, third and fourth place as well
as honorable mentions in many categories.
It made me so excited to win a rst-place ribbon,
Monahan said. I worked so hard on that piece, and
all my hard work paid off.
Walk through the gallery and youll see what hun-
dreds of hours of hard work can accomplish.
Green of scale and with a glint in his eyes is
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
IF YOU GO
What: Suzanne Maria
Rossetti Memorial Ju-
ried Art Exhibit, 32nd
annual contest for stu-
dents in grades seven
through 12
Where: Schulman Gal-
lery, Luzerne County
Community College,
1333 S. Prospect St.,
Nanticoke
When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mondays through Fri-
days through March 26
Admission: Free
More info: 740-0727
See ARTWORK, Page 2
Sure, theyve been downtown.
But since they live in the gym, two
Bloomsburg University wrestlers tell
each other, theyve never really been to
the neighborhoods.
Until September 2011, that is, when
they volunteer to clean ood-soaked
basements and force residents to see
them as more than a couple of college
guys who probably spend a lot of time
at noisy parties.
Afterward, a grateful mom takes her
8-year-old son to see his heroes on the
mat.
I didnt know that kid, but now we
see him at all the matches, one wres-
tler says. Its awesome.
Thats just one
of many anec-
dotes heart-
warming, poi-
gnant slices of
life, some humor-
ous, some sober-
ing you will
hear if you attend
the Bloomsburg
Theatre Ensem-
bles production
of Flood Stories,
Too.
Through the
experience of
shared vulnera-
bility, we become
stronger, director Jerry Stropnicky
said, explaining why he invited people
to talk about the autumn oods of 2011
that hit Bloomsburg and the rest of the
Susquehanna Valley hard.
One storyteller felt torn about going
to work, leaving family members to
move furniture by themselves. Another
was amazed by abundant donations of
ood-relief lasagna. Many felt numb as
they came to grips with losing a home
they loved.
Some 70 participants ranging in
age from 6 to none of your business
formthe shows three alternating casts.
Among them are people who lost their
homes to the Lee Flood but, Stropnicky
A ood of
memories
comes back
During the ooding that hit Blooms-
burg in September 2011, Jerry
Stropnicky wrote in his directors
notes, Fully one-fourth of our
homes were damaged, condemned or
simply gone.
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
SubMiTTEd PHOTO
See FLOOD, Page 2
IF YOU GO
What: Flood Sto-
ries, Too
Where: Alvina
Krause Theatre, 226
Center St., blooms-
burg
When: Through
March 17 with shows
at 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
day and Fridays, 2
and 7:30 p.m. Sat-
urdays and 3 p.m.
Sundays
Admission: Free-will
donation
Reservations: 784-
8181
Building Industry
Association
Of Northeastern
Pennsylvania
Building Industry Association of NEPA
Keystone Award Winner
BUILDER OF THE YEAR
Ron Piccolotti
Pride Builders, Inc.
347 Main Street, Swoyersville PA 18704
Phone (570) 283-0327 / Fax (570) 283-1743
Established in 1995 and incorporated in 1999
by company President Ron Piccolotti, Pride Builders,
Inc. began as a small custom home builder in Northeast
Pennsylvania. With his unique eye for detail, Mr. Piccolotti
quickly gained a reputation for building nely appointed,
quality custom homes.
Since those humble beginnings, Pride Builders has
grown and diversied. As a Residential Developer, owning
Applewood Estates in Exeter Township PA, a Commercial
Builder, and a full service Home Improvements company
specializing in roong & siding, replacement windows,
garages, and customdesigned and built decks. Pride Builders
is also a Premier contractor for Timber Tech Decking in
Northeast PA.
Te success of Pride Builders can be attributed to Mr.
Piccolottis belief in taking pride in your work, treating
every client with the same respect that you would want to
be treated with, and paying attention to the small details.
Pride Builders has received several awards over the years
for various projects in categories such as:
2008 - Single Family Home over 4,000 Square Feet,
Over $500,000 and BIA of NEPA Home
Show Most Creative Display
2009 - Builder of the Year, and Award for a
Custom Deck project.
2010 - Remodeler of the Year
2010 - Single Family Home 2,000 - 3,000
Square Feet over $250,000
2010 - Unique Project up to $15,000 & an award
for a Custom Deck project
2011 - Builder of the Year
2011 - Remodeler of the Year
In 2009 Mr. Piccolotti served as Vice President of the
Building Industry Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania
and as President of the association in 2010 & 2011.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 S U N D A Y E X T R A
Kelsey Monahan, a 10th-grade student from Dallas, prefers
mountain vacations yet painted an inviting beach scene.
I was plunk-
ing down a
twenty for
gasoline at the
convenience
store when I
spotted my
buddy alner
surveying the
rack of candy bars.
Decisions, decisions, he
muttered. Ive been in a state
of confusion ever since they
abolished the Mars bar and
then said theyd bring it back.
I hear you, I said. These
fakes just dont cut it. But you
know what you looked like just
now?
ahis this going to be
another trip back to your old
days? he said.
I hardly had time to grin
before thanks to my power
of metaphysical travel we
were making our way down a
wyoming Valley street of some
60 or so years ago.
I knew it, alner said. I
should have just grabbed an al-
mond Joy and kept my mouth
shut. How long are we going to
be here?
Long enough to show you
one of the lost treasures of
western civilization, I replied.
I said you reminded me of
something a kid making a
nickels worth of choices at the
penny candy counter in an early
20th-century neighborhood
grocery store.
This Ive got to see, he nod-
ded. I think you also have the
power of what did you call
it theoretical invisibility so
nobody can actually see us?
You got it, buddy, I said,
ushering alner into a little
corner emporium.
Boy, theyve sure got a lot of
stuff in here, he said. a maga-
zine rack and look at those
comic books. shelves from oor
to ceiling full of canned goods,
bags of sugar and tea. a bread
rack. You could feed your fam-
ily here.
actually this is the kind of
place where most folks did their
shopping. You told the guy at
the counter you wanted a can of
beans, and he reached up with
a grabber stick and snared it for
you. Maybe he even put it on
credit. But step over here and
take a gander at what I really
brought you here for.
alners jaw dropped when he
saw the glass-enclosed counter
full of boxes of little pieces of
candy.
wow, a kids paradise, he
whistled.
I hear you, I said. If youd
been a proper little boy or girl
all week, your mom would
hand you a nickel and down to
the store youd trot, dreaming
of sweet delights.
I like those tiny little brown
bags, he laughed.
Hey, put ve candies in
there and youre king, I said.
Neat stuff, said alner, lean-
ing close up to the glass. I rec-
ognize some of those chocolate
goodies, the ones with peanut
butter inside or with sprinkles
all over them.
I never knew why those
little black hard candies were
called ben hurs, I said, but
darn they were good.
You can still get those
squirrel Nut Zippers, he said,
his eyes widening. Turkish
Taffy whatever happened
to it? Did everybody chew
bubble gum? Look at all the
different kinds. wow licorice
pipes. Omigosh, I cant believe
those big red wax lips or the
enormous teeth. Id love them.
Got a nickel?
sorry, I laughed. The
storekeeper would call the
cops over our 2013 coins.
anyway, I have to go pump
my gas.
within seconds we were back
at the convenience store and
I was heading for the pumps
when alner laughed and
ashed a mouthful of huge wax
teeth.
You didnt, I moaned.
I left my smartphone in
exchange, he said. Youve got
to have some values in life.
A full-edged candy bar: How sweet it
TomMooney is a Times Leader colum-
nist. Reach himat tmooney2@ptd.net.
ARTWORK
Continued from Page 1
Rachel Caudell, an eighth-
grade student from Tunkhan-
nock who likes to read about
dragons, created this mixed-
media portrait.
said, There are only a couple
of occasions when I have people
telling their own stories.
Theres a real value in people
being able to tell their own sto-
ry, but theres a different thera-
peutic value in the validation
that happens when you hear
someone else tell your story.
Theater is built for that, the
ability for people to see their
story framed.
so, you can expect to see
most participants in this full-
stage production playing a
role as they tell someone elses
story.
You also can expect a variety
of music, with the Bloomsburg
Bicentennial Choir singing
numbers by present-day com-
posers Van wagner and Paul
Loomis as well as the late Rob-
ert Lowry, who wrote shall
we Gather at the River? in the
1800s.
He wrote that at the susque-
hanna in Lewisburg. Im count-
ing it as one of our river songs,
stropnicky said.
If youve never experienced
community-centered perfor-
mance, youre in for a treat,
added the director, whose
previous shows in this genre
include the local Letters to
the Editor as well as the inau-
gural Flood stories. Hes also
worked on similar projects in
other states.
Im often invited to work
with communities that are post-
trauma, he said.
surely there was a great deal
of trauma in Bloomsburg where,
because of an ammonia leak,
even the evacuation center was
evacuated.
But there are bright spots
some might see them as
miracles in the tapestry
stropnicky has woven. Just
listen to the testimony of
Eileen Chapman, who ran a
small outreach group called
agape. The group was dwin-
dling, with a dearth of funds
and only 24 volunteers. Then
Chapman learned agape
would be handling flood re-
lief. soon she had upward of
4,200 volunteers and much
to offer the flood victims, in-
cluding sufficient food dona-
tions to serve lunch and din-
ner every day.
But, as Chapmans character
explains in the Flood stories,
Too, one resource in particular
was difcult to nd.
The one thing we needed
was rubber boots. To put on
people to muck out, she says.
wed bought out and given out
all the boots in Columbia and
Montour counties. There were
no more rubber boots to be
had.
at that point in the script,
a woman walks in and says
she has 750 pairs of rubber
boots in her pick-up truck.
she wants to donate them,
as well as the other 750 pairs
that happened to be in a
warehouse she and her hus-
band bought.
we didnt know what to do
with them, the woman tells
Chapman, so we left them un-
til, until, um, until God asked
for boots.
FLOOD
Continued from Page 1
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Caudells Cornelius, which
she describes as a erce but
protective dragon.
For another fantasy animal,
considerMaegan wrubels
Raspberry Milk, a cow with
a purple face and the sugges-
tion of lots of milk jugs.
If you prefer realistic crea-
tures, look at Katie aldrichs
portrait of a gentle domestic
cat or Kelsey Joyces The
Eyes Have It, which appears
to showcase the eyes of lion
and lynx, tiger and leopard.
Then, just try to stop your-
self from saying awwww when
you see steven Kirks photo-
graph of a tiny kitten cradled
in human hands and titled
New Life with Old Life.
and, if you have a pet of
your own, youll probably
sigh with recognition when
you see Morgan Gilhooleys
rendering in charcoal of how
a little animal can get in the
way as it tries to command
your attention when youre
working.
Most of the art in the Ros-
setti exhibit is a painting or
sketch, from Hannah Cross
Lights of China Town to
Kiera Browns Mare Hair
Days portrait of a horse with
a feather in its owing mane
to Timothy Nerozzis I am
the Law, a rendering that
calls to mind Russell Crowes
performance as Javert in Les
Miserables.
But youll find three-di-
mensional work as well, and
may find yourself marveling
at the way Joelle serafin
used wire, fabric and yarn
to represent a girl walking
a dog, while aloysha acker-
man built a wilderness Liv-
ing cabin, complete with a
kettle over the miniature
fire.
I remember what I was like
when I was their age, Hand
said. These kids are over the
top.
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SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAge 3 TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com S U N D A Y E X T R A
anything too gimmicky, even
working on the giant Broadway
stage, so they decided against
threading lights through the
heel of the shoe or other special
effects.
Weitzman knows how to cre-
ate shoes that light up a room.
For years, he made million-
dollar Oscar shoes, diamond-
covered footwear that a celeb-
rity would wear to the Academy
Awards. He gave that up at the
height of the recession but says
he can do pretty much the same
dazzling look with crystals.
The designer says he could
imagine his typical customer
wearing a version of the Cinder-
ella slipper at a summer party, a
night at the opera or a night on
the town. He adds: It would be
one sexy shoe with cool jeans.
Yes, his Clearly Timeless col-
lection based on the fairy-tale
footwear is being shipped to
stores.
CINDERELLA
Continued from Page 1
HONOR ROLL
TUNKHANNOCK AREA HIGH SCHOOL
Tunkhannock Area High School recently
announced the Honor Roll for the second
marking period.
Grade 9: Mikayla Abbott, Christopher Bach,
Tommy Bachman, Jarod Bernosky, Cody
Brown, Colton Brown, Courtney Brown,
Denver Brown, Austin Burke, Patrick
Casey, Daulton Cavanaugh, Lane Cec-
carelli, Emily Chesner, Stacey Christof-
ferson, David Coole, Michael Corby, Cyrus
Cornell, Nikole Costaris, Patrick Cronin,
Karen DeWolf, Kimberly DeWolf, Elizabeth
DUlisse, Emily Dunning, Ian Farr, Joshua
Flaherty, Colin Franko, Gracie Franko, Al-
exander Frear, Gabrielle Frigano, Autumn
Frost, Meridian Garinger, Dakota Gensel,
Robert Gilpin, Michael Greene, Jonathan
Greenip, Zachary Greenip, Brianna Grey,
Gina Hall, Elliott Hammersley, Amanda
Hardy, Lindsay Heck, Maria Heft, Kyle
Hegedty, MacKenzie Hobbs, Kady Hodge,
Lexi Hubbs, Hunter Jones, Paige Jones,
Cheyanne Kasmierski, Dana Kuffa, Allison
Lamoreaux, Patrick Landes, Miranda Lee,
Ariana Lizza, Michael LoBuono, Jordan
Mahon, Anthony Maloney, Sierra Maloney,
Megan Manglaviti, Morgan Manglaviti,
Michael Manley, William Manley, Douglas
Mapes, Kaitlyn Markovitz, Natalie Mar-
kovitz, Daniel Mayer, Megan McCauley,
Haley Melan, Ethan Metzer, Shianne
Michalowski, Kaitlyn Mikulka, Andrew
Mills, Gerard Mirabelli, Rachel Miroslaw,
Madison Mokychic, Kristyn Murray, Shelby
Ogozaly, Zoe Ostrowsky, Emily Pharr, Jus-
tin Phillips, Rachel Phinney, Jake Psolka,
Haley Puterbaugh, Jeremy Rabe, Saman-
tha Rafferty, Dalton Ray, Eric Reichle,
James Reichle, Kailey Reposa, Brandon
Romanowski, Miranda Rosencrance,
Christine Rossi, Kristen Rusinko, Chelsea
Schoonover, Taylar Schultz, Kyle Seward,
Owen Seymour, John Shebby, Margaret
Sohns, Brett Soltysiak, Brittany Stoner,
Victoria Strohl, Zaccary Strohl, Haley
Toczko, Jacob Toczko, Maggie Toczko,
Bethany Weber, Colton Westeld, Abigail
Yurksza, Alissa Zamber.
Grade 10: Brian Beauchemin, Amanda
Blankenship, Brooke Blankenship, Steven
Boyd, Harry Brown, Karlie Bulford, Kurtis
Carichner, Cory Case, John Chavis, Leila
Christofferson, Alexander Clark, Aidan
Cronin, Brandon Dailey, Katherine Davis,
Bryan DeRemer, Gerard DonVito, Makayla
Drost, Cody Dunlap, Ashley Dunn, Trevor
Dunning, MatthewDymond, Cody Fabiseski,
Renay Faux, Dylan Grandinetti, Matthew
Grebeck, Paige Greenley, Felicia Guiles,
Molly Hampsey, Connor Hemme, Abbey Hir-
key, Wendy Hoover, Krista Hoskins, Aaron
Ide, Jessica Ide, Traci Kromko, Ellen Kuzma,
Lindsey Kwiatkowski, Connor Light, Kayla
Martin, Morgan McCloskey, Ashley Morgan,
Gary Musselman, Summer Nolder, Vraj Pa-
tel, Jill Patton, Tara Patton, Sabrina Peters,
Emma Pizzolanti, Joseph Popiwchak, Alexa
Prebola, Sarah Purdy, Megan Quick, William
Reidenbach, Charles Richter, Olivia Romano,
Erin Rome, Martin Saporito, Stefan Sehne,
Kaylee Seward, Georgia Sherry, Daniel
Shurtleff, Jeffery Sickler, Jessie Sickler,
Symantha Simmons, Kennedy Smales,
Jamie Smith, Jessica Sorokach, Eric Stamer,
Brittany Stempien, Shane Straley, Zachary
Swilley, John Tidball, Alexis Tinna, Mya
Toczko, Jessica Tomsak, David Trexler, Kelcy
Vandorick, Lucas Verbeek, Erika Wallace,
Keith Ward, Alyson Wilbur, Kristin Wilhelm,
Alexander Williams, Nikki Winters, Jacob
Woodruff, MatthewWootten, Maegan Wru-
bel, Austin Yanora, Brooke Yeager, Gabriel
Yerdon, Alexander Zelna.
Grade 11: Tiffany Atkins, Carson Ayers,
Michael Bednarz, AdamBillings, Alexander
Bishop, Tatiana Bogedin, Shequoya Bonner,
Alexis Brown, Miranda Colburn, Morgan
Cross, Donald Curtis, Zachary Daniels,
Alexys Deal, Shane Edmondson, Margaret
Elias, Austin Ely, Brandon Emmett, Zachary
Faux, Taylor Finan, Joseph Fiore, Anthony
Fiorenza, Ryleigh Fitch, Desiree Flaherty,
Rachel Fowler, Samantha Frear, Harold Gib-
erson, Ryan Giberson, Rebecca Giovino, Mi-
chelle Goodwin, Kelly Hall, Sara Hicks, Seth
Jones, Derek Kline, Keri Klinges, Stephen
Klinges, Abigail Kohl, Joshua Kosak, Felicia
Lane, Alison Leiser, David LoBuono, Theresa
Longstreet, John Loomis, Brian Ly, Timothy
Mackiw, Brooke Maloney, Angelo Maruzzelli,
Sara Mayer, Harley McCain, Samantha
McNamara, Laura Miller, Amber Milliron, Jo-
seph Moftt, Joshua Montross, Eric Mosley,
Megan Myers, Robert Nast, Amanda Nole,
Nicholas Norris, David Packer, Nicole Perez,
Sarah Pharr, John Vito Powell, Michael
Pugh, Taylor Ray, Samantha Reposa, Kelsey
Rincavage, Samantha Seidel, Tony Shao,
Savannah Shea, Claudia Sick, Logan Sickler,
Benjamin Siegel, David Sinker, Jessica Sirko,
Erin Smith, Sean Soltysiak, Brianna Stem-
pien, Benjamin Swilley, Haylee Underwood,
Cailyn VanHouten, Austin Vosburg, Melissa
Walker, Paul Webber, Tessa Wells, Cassandra
Werner, Genevieve Whittaker, Holt Wiggans,
Miranda Woodruff, Madison Yatsko.
Grade 12: Gabrielle Alguire, Ryan Aulisio,
Dylan Barber, Gabriella Belt, Kanesha Bon-
ner, Jessica Brennan, Ashley Brong, Tyler
Brown, Austin Brozusky, Rachel Brozusky,
Tessa Bucciarelli, Cameron Bunavage,
Joshua Car, Kyle Caudell, Marlena
Chesner, Brent Christy, Meghan Clark,
Richard Clark, Daniel Clemens, Alexis Cun-
ningham, Kristen Darling, Paige Deininger,
James DeWitt, AdamDodge, Mackenzie
Drungell, Morgan Drungell, Corey Dulsky,
Mary Dziadosz, Shayne Ely, Raven Evans,
Elizabeth Franko, Alicia Giberson, Jennifer
Grasso, Christina Green, Katie Greene,
Austin Gregory, Amanda Grundman, Kaitlin
Hall, Lindsey Harris, Jonathan Headman,
Carly Heck, Justin Hill, Aaron Holton,
Christopher Homa, Austin Hoskins, Michael
Hoskins, Brandon Howell, Jacob Hughes,
Cheyenne Hunsinger, Keith Hutchins, Kalee
Ide, Nicholas Ide, Lucas Jackson, Katelyn
Jacques, Sean Jenkins, Sarah Jewell, Ian
Jones, Breanna Keiper, Briana Knowles, Da-
kota Kresge, Stephanie Kridlo, Katie Kuzma,
Benjamin Labs, MalcolmLayaou, Jade Levi,
Charlotte Linz, Natalie Lizza, Alicia Lomas-
colo, Ian Manglaviti, Alexandra Martenson,
Douglas McCarty, Joshua McClain, Kyonna
McClain, LiamMcClurg, Taylor McCormick,
Nolan McMahon, Steven Mercer, Rebekah
Mills, Kaitlin Morgan, Darian Mosluk, Andrew
Muckin, Hope Murray, Timothy Nerozzi,
Alexander Nole, Nathan Nystrand, Rebecca
ONeill, Cory Otto, Sarah Parkhurst, Prutha
Patel, James Proulx, Katelyn Proulx, Mark
Reeves, Raymond Reeves, Joshua Robin-
son, Savannah Robinson, Colby Rome, Scott
Salus, Kayla Schoonover, Lucas Schoonover,
Mark Schork, Elizabeth Sechrist, John Shaf-
fer, Kelcie Shaw, Jeffrey Sheer, Diandra
Sherman, Lance Sherry, Justin Shotwell,
Race Sick, Katie Smith, Benjamin Spencer,
Samantha Stare, Brian Stephenson, Mark
Trexler, Cory Valvano, Kelsey VanHorn, Craig
Veety, Kandis Venn, Madonna Venson, De-
siree Ware, Wade Weber, Owen Weisenuh,
Tyler Weiss, Quinn Wells, Breana Wilde, Mi-
kayla Wright, Lindley Yerg, Anna Zavrotny,
Chantel Zionkowski.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 4B SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 O C C A S I O N S
Tigue, Galat
E
lizabeth Marie Galat and
Christopher Aaron Tigue were
united in marriage June 23, 2012,
at St. Peters Cathedral, Scranton.
The ceremony was officiated by
Monsignor David L. Tressler. Con-
celebrants were the Rev. Christo-
pher T. Washington, the Rev. Philip
A. Altavilla, and the Rev. Thomas
M. Muldowney,V.G. The Most Rev.
James C. Timlin, Bishop Emeritus
of Scranton, offered the nuptial
blessing.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Millard Galat Jr., Nanti-
coke. The groom is the son of Ann
Marie Tigue, Dunmore, and David
Tigue, Scranton.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride chose her sister, Ni-
cole Barletta, as matron of honor.
Bridesmaids were Dr. Sara Kane,
Jill Houseknecht and Lauren Davi-
son, friends of the bride, and Julie
Gronski, cousin of the groom. Flow-
er girls were Madeline and Isabelle
Barletta, nieces of the bride.
The groom chose his cousins,
Robert and Matthew Gronski, as
best men. Groomsmen were Attor-
ney Frank Barletta, brother-in-law
of the bride, and William Tigue,
friend of the groom.
Scriptural readings were given
by Sister Leonita Duhoski, R.S.M.,
cousin of the bride, and Amy San-
drowicz, friend of the groom. The
Prayer of the Faithful was offered by
Amy Stevenson, Lisa Jefferson and
Mallory Nobile, friends of the bride
and Dominick Siciliano, friend of
the groom. Offertory gifts were
presented by Katherine Gutowski
and Gerald Boock, godparents of
the bride, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Gronski Sr., aunt and uncle of the
groom.
The bride and groom were hon-
ored at an engagement party hosted
by Attorney and Mrs. Frank Barletta
at their home in Hanover Township.
The bride was honored at a display
shower hosted by the mother of the
bride at the Colonnade, Scranton. A
rehearsal dinner was hosted by the
mother of the groom at La Buona
Vita, Dunmore. An evening cocktail
hour and reception were held at the
Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre.
The bride and groom were also hon-
ored at a send-off brunch hosted by
the parents of the bride at the Wyo-
ming Valley Country Club.
The bride is a 2004 graduate of
Bishop Hoban High School. She
graduated from Kings College in
2008 with a Bachelor of Arts degree
in elementary education and a cer-
tification in special education. She
earned a Master of Science degree
in special education from Misericor-
dia University in 2011. She is em-
ployed as a special education teach-
er by Luzerne Intermediate Unit 18.
The groom is a 1994 graduate
of Bishop OHara High School. He
graduated from Marywood Uni-
versity in 1998 with a Bachelor of
Science degree in elementary edu-
cation and a minor in special educa-
tion. He earned a Master of Science
degree in educational leadership
from Marywood University in 2006.
He is employed as the principal of
Wyoming Area Catholic School.
As part of their honeymoon, the
couple traveled to Walt Disney
World to celebrate their recent nup-
tials as well as the 40th wedding an-
niversary of Millard and Rita Galat,
parents of the bride, and the 10th
wedding anniversary of Frank and
Nicole Barletta, sister of the bride.
The couple also honeymooned at
La Playa Beach and Golf Resort,
Naples, Fla.
Rotondaro, Miller
C
arla Miller and Vincent Rotond-
aro, together with their families,
would like to announce their engage-
ment and approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
the late Douglas and Penny Miller. She
is the granddaughter of Ed and Connie
Miller and Larry and Kathy Boop, all of
Reedsville, and the late Phyllis Boop.
The prospective groom is the son of
Vincent and Karen Rotondaro, Pittston
Township. He is the grandson of Philo-
mena Reh, Forty Fort; the late Vincent
Rotondaro; and Romaine Ambrozaitis,
Jenkins Township, and the late Leon-
ard Ambrozaitis.
The bride-to-be is a graduate of In-
dian Valley High School and earned
a bachelors degree in marketing and
management from Shippensburg Uni-
versity. She is employed at Tobyhanna
Army Depot.
The prospective groom is a gradu-
ate of Seton Catholic High School and
earned a bachelors degree in criminal
justice from Shippensburg University.
He is employed at the Social Security
Administration.
The couple will be exchanging vows
in the summer of 2013 in Lewistown,
Pa.
Edwards, Russick
R
ebecca Edwards and Gregory J.
Russick announce their engage-
ment and upcoming marriage.
Rebecca, the daughter of Hugh W.
Edwards III and Jean Stackalis Edwards,
Courtdale, is a graduate of Wyoming
Valley West High School. Rebecca pro-
ceeded to Kings College, Wilkes Barre,
where she earned her Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree in business administration.
Rebecca holds a Master of Science de-
gree in human resources management
from Holy Family University in Philadel-
phia and is employed as a director of Hu-
man Resources.
The prospective groom, Gregory J.
Russick, is the son of Joseph G. Russick
and Olga Gatto Russick, Old Forge. He
graduated from Old Forge High School
and matriculated at The University of
Scranton. Gregory earned a Bachelor of
Science degree in secondary education/
citizenship/ history, summa cum laude.
He also holds a Master of Science degree
in education fromWilkes University.
The couple plans to have a spring
wedding at Grace Episcopal Church in
Kingston.
Kreidler, Boris
D
esiree Boris and Jeffrey Kreidler,
together with their families,
announce their engagement and ap-
proaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Charles Boris and Grace Boris, both of
Wilkes-Barre. She is the granddaughter
of Grace Proeller and the late William
Proeller and Mary Ann and the late
Charles Boris, all of Wilkes-Barre.
She is a 2003 graduate of Coughlin
High School and a 2007 magna cum
laude graduate of Manseld University,
where she majored in elementary and
special education. She earned her mas-
ters degree in education from Wilkes
University in 2010 and is employed by
Northwest High School as a 10-grade
learning support teacher.
The prospective groom is the son
of Michael and Cynthia Kreidler, Hun-
lock Creek. He is the grandson of Ann
Kreidler and the late Robert Kreidler,
Wilkes-Barre, and the late Barbara and
the late Anees Barakat, Dallas.
He is a 2006 graduate of Northwest
High School and a 2012 graduate of
Misericordia University, majoring in
accounting. He is employed by Paren-
teBeard as an accountant.
The couple plans to exchange vows
Oct. 26, 2013, at St. Nicholas Church,
Wilkes-Barre, with an Oyster reception
to follow at the Genetti Hotel and Con-
ference Center, Wilkes-Barre.
Carroll, Suchoski
S
ara Kristen Suchoski and Mi-
chael Anthony Carroll, togeth-
er with their families, announce
their engagement and upcoming
marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter
of Mary and J. Ken Suchoski, Bear
Creek, Pa. She is the granddaughter
of Annabelle and Edward Suchoski
Sr. and the late Mary and Joseph
Nowicki, all of Plains Township.
Sara is a 2001 graduate of James
M. Coughlin High School and the
University of Scranton, where she
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in mathematics in 2005 and Master
of Business Administration degree
in finance in 2008. She is employed
by Prudential as a U.S. businesses
planning and analysis manager.
The prospective groom is the son
of Frances and John Carroll, Toms
River, N.J. He is the grandson of
Martin Carroll and the late Bridget
Carroll and Dina Cerutti and the
late Anthony Castoro, all of Bronx,
N.Y.
Michael is a 2001 graduate of
Toms River East High School and
the University of Scranton, where
he earned a Bachelor of Science
degree in accounting in 2005. He is
employed by Bloomberg, LP as a fi-
nancial analyst.
The couple resides in Hoboken,
N.J.
A November, 2013, wedding is
planned.
The Times Leader allows you
to decide how your wedding
notice reads, with a few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in
Sundays People section, with
color photos, free of charge.
Articles must be limited to 220
words, and we reserve the right to
edit announcements that exceed
that word count. Announcements
must be typed or submitted via
www.timesleader.com. (Click on
the people tab, then weddings
and follow the instructions from
there.) Submissions must include
a daytime contact phone number
and must be received within 10
months of the wedding date. We
do not run rst-year anniversary
announcements or announce-
ments of weddings that took place
more than a year ago. (Wedding
photographers often can supply
you with a color proof in advance
of other album photographs.)
All other social announcements
must be typed and include a
daytime contact phone number.
Announcements of births at local
hospitals are submitted by hospi-
tals and published on Sundays.
Out-of-town announcements
with local connections also are ac-
cepted. Photos are only accepted
with baptism, dedication or other
religious-ceremony announce-
ments but not birth announce-
ments.
Engagement announcements
must be submitted at least one
month before the wedding date
to guarantee publication and
must include the wedding date.
We cannot publish engagement
announcements once the wedding
has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are
published free of charge at the
10th wedding anniversary and
subsequent ve-year milestones.
Other anniversaries will be pub-
lished, as space allows, without
photographs.
Drop off articles at the Times
Leader or mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Questions can be directed to
Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or
e-mailed to people@timesleader.
com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
The Varchols
M
r. and Mrs. Daniel Varchol, Low-
er Askam, Hanover Township,
celebrated their 70th wedding anniver-
sary on March 6. The couple both turned
92 years old in December.
They rst met at a dance at the Crys-
tal Ballroom in the Heights section of
Wilkes-Barre. They married two years
later in Wilkes-Barre, one week prior to
Daniels entrance into the Army in World
War II. He servedinthe 345thFieldArtil-
lery and saw battle in England, France,
Czechoslovakia and Germany. He was
awarded the Bronze Star for his heroic
ghting in the Battle of the Bulge.
Upon Daniels return home at the
wars end, two years later in 1945, the
couple was able to begin their lives to-
gether. They purchased a home in Lower
Askam, where they raised their family
and still reside.
Mary was employed in a silk mill dur-
ing the war and later worked at Alta
Footwear until her retirement.
Daniel worked for Wilkes-Barre
Chrome and retired from Kanaar Corpo-
ration.
The couple has two children: a son,
Brinley Varchol, who resides in Ohio
with his wife, Dottie; and a daughter,
Linda Messimer, who resides with her
husband, Robert, in Mountain Top.
They have ve grandchildren: Karen
Worley, Ohio; Lisa Perron, Massachu-
setts; Carissa Hyman, Maryland; Kylie
Martis, Ashley; and Kerri Messimer,
Mountain Top. They also have three
great-grandchildren, Brooke and Sara
Worley and Mia Perron.
The momentous occasion was cel-
ebrated with family.
The Gildeas
M
r. and Mrs. M. Gerald Gildea,
Plains Township, celebrated
their 60th wedding anniversary on Feb.
14, 2013.
They were married in 1953 in Sa-
cred Heart Church, Plains Township,
by the late Rev. William Purcell. Their
attendants were the late Mrs. Marilou
Rozanski, sister of Mrs. Gildea, and the
late Harry Shovlin, uncle of Mr. Gildea.
Mrs. Gildea is the former Jeanne
Gray, daughter of the late Charles and
Margaret Gray, Plains Township. She is
retired from Leslie Fay Inc.
Mr. Gildea is the son of the late Wil-
liam and Edna Gildea, Plains Town-
ship. He is retired from Nachllis Furni-
ture.
The couple has two children, Kath-
leen and husband, Wayne Segar, Bear
Creek, and Michelle and husband, At-
torney J. Frederick Rohrbeck, Moosic.
They also have three grandchildren,
Wayne Segar and Kerry and Michael
Rohrbeck.
The couple celebrated the occasion
with a family dinner.
Joseph Proeller
celebrates 100th birthday
J
oseph R. Proeller celebrated
his 100th birthday on March
4, 2013. He was born on March 4,
1913, to the late George and Anna
Proeller.
The sixth of 13 children, he is the
last surviving Proeller sibling. He
attended Coughlin
High School, where
he played football
and baseball for the
school teams and
was captain of the
football team. Dur-
ing World War II,
he was stationed at
Fort Meade and later became part
of the 41st Infantry Division out of
the Pacific Northwest, which served
in Australia and New Guinea. He
was in the service for a total of
43 months. Following the war, he
worked on the Pennsylvania Turn-
pike until his retirement in 1978.
He was married to the late Mary
V. McGroarty for 39 years prior to
her death in 1988.
They have two children, George J.
Proeller of Colorado Springs, Colo.,
and Ellen Proeller Dennis, Larks-
ville, Pa.
Joseph is the grandfather to five,
Kate Nicoli, Jenny Proeller and Ju-
lie, Theo and Becca Dennis. His
first great-grandchild, Lorenza L.
Nicoli, was born on Jan. 27, 2013.
Joe is an active member of St. Nicho-
las Parish, Wilkes-Barre, in particular
in the Holy Name Society. He recently
served for St. Nicks 48th annual Ger-
man Night. He is a lifetime member of
the Kingston VFW Post 283 and was
Grand Marshall in many a Memorial
Day Parade. In his early retirement, he
and his wife enjoyed traveling to the 48
continental United States.
Joe celebrated the special occa-
sion with a party held in his honor.
He was so thrilled that many family
members and friends were able to
gather together for the celebration.
Jolie Beauty holds fundraiser
for CSC
Jolie Beauty Academy, Wilkes-Barre,
recently held a fundraiser to support
Childrens Service Center (CSC) and do-
nated the proceeds to the center during
the Christmas season. CSC provides be-
havioral health services for children and
adolescents. At the check presentation,
from left, are Mike Hopkins, president
and chief executive ofcer, CSC, and
Dee Ashford, Jolie Beauty Academy.
Harveys Lake American Legion
donates to community living
center
American Legion Post 967 of Harveys
Lake recently presented a $1,000 check
to the veterans at the Department of
Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Wilkes-
Barre. The American Legion earmarked
the funds for the residents of the Com-
munity Living Center, a transformative
nursing home-care unit. The funds will
be used to support any needs or spe-
cial requests that will enhance the lives
of veterans. At the check presentation,
from left, are George Casterline, repre-
sentative, American Legion Post 967,
and Vince Riccardo, public affairs ofcer,
Department of Veterans Affairs Medical
Center.
Wright Twp. Fire department
receives pet oxygen kit
Wyoming Valley Dog Squad Troop
221, Dog Scouts of America, recently
delivered a pet oxygen mask kit to the
Wright Township Fire Department. For
more information, or to join the troop,
contact Phyllis at phyllis@thebarking-
basket.com or Liza at sewcrazy@epix.
net. At the presentation, fromleft: Chris
Krout, reghter, Wright Township;
Kirby, Sheila and Pasha, Dog Scouts;
Phyllis Sinavage, troop leader; and Liza
Roper, secretary/treasurer, Wyoming
Valley Dog Squad Troop 221.
sunday, march 10, 2013 page 5b TImes Leader www.timesleader.com S U N D A Y E X T R A
Ronald McDonald House of Scranton hosting gourmet gala
More than 50 local eateries will come together on April 7 to support the annual fundraiser for the
Ronald McDonald House of Scranton with the theme of Aloha Hawaii. Decorations and food will
transform Genetti Manor, Dickson City, into a tropical paradise. Proceeds from the event help cover
the Ronald McDonald Houses operating costs. The Ronald McDonald House provides a place to stay
for families of sick children who need treatment in local hospitals. Also available through Ronald
McDonald Family Room program are an overnight room at Geisinger Community Medical Center and a
lounge-style room at Moses Taylor Hospital. Event sponsors are First Liberty Bank and Trust, WNEP-
16 and Lamar Advertising. For information on volunteering, purchasing tickets or participating as a
restaurant or sponsor, contact the Ronald McDonald House at 969-8998 or visit www.rmhscranton.
org/fundraising-events/the-gourmet-gala-overview/. Some of the committee members and event
chairs, from left: Jan S. Brown, restaurants chair; Jan Brown, arrangements chair; Elaine Shepard,
sponsors chair; Carol Chisdak, event chair; Lucille OBoyle, badges chair; Carole Rosencrance, event
co-chair; Sara Levy, hostesses chair; Richard Bradshaw, executive director, Ronald McDonald House;
and Michele Margotta Neary, publicity chair.
Dress for Success Lackawanna hosting annual luncheon and fashion show
Dress for Success Lackawanna is hosting its 14th annual luncheon and fashion show at 11:45 a.m.
on March 20 at the Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, Scranton. Presented by Pennstar Bank, this
years event aims to show gratitude to those who have inspired all women to grow personally and
professionally and elaborate on how the communitys support has inspired the organization to grow
its provisions and services. Keynote speaker will be Lori Wolf, a Dress for Success Lackawanna client.
Local personality Laurie Cadden will be the emcee and musical entertainment will be provided by EJ
the DJ. Sponsors of this years event include hair and make-up by Alexanders Salon and Spa, media
sponsor WNEP-TV and photography sponsor Michael Straub Photography. Cost is $40 per person.
To make a reservation or a donation, call 941-0339 or visit www.dressforsuccess.org/lackawanna.
Some of the participants, from left, rst row, are Leslie Collins, Roxanne Frenchko, Jennifer Mancuso,
Chloe Mancuso, Madeline Mackarey, Paula Mackarey and Elizabeth Nagy. Second row: Heidi Smith,
Lisa Malos, Lisa Povilitus, Carla Zero, Diane Calabro, Mary Ann Iezzi, Amy Belcher, Angela Seibert and
Ellen Sheridan.
Heights-Murray students celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s birthday
Fifth-grade students at Heights-Murray Elementary School recently celebrated Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr.s birthday with a presentation from Todd Jones. Jones used Prezi software to discuss some of the
individuals who stood for equality and civil rights. Some of the people the students discussed were
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Douglas, Rosa Parks, Jesse Owens, Jackie Robinson and Barrack
Obama. The students worked together to create Dreams they had by using an online site that allows
multiple users to post and share text and images live on a single wall. The wall was projected on the
Smart board so that everyone could see their peers dreams and hopes. At the event, from left, rst
row, are Kimnaja Johnson, Jesus Morals, Marina Ardo-Boyko, Lizbeth Guzman and Timothy Aberant.
Second row: Jessica Palakoski, fth-grade teacher; Jones; Hal Gabriel, principal; Robert Makaravage,
assistant principal; and Helen M. Semanski, fth-grade teacher.
Northwest Area holds awards assembly
Northwest Area Senior High School recently held its Department Awards Assembly for Quarters 1 and
2. Award recipients for grades 9 to 12, from left, rst row: Emily Buerger, World Language, Quarter
1; Olivia McCorkel, Fine Arts, Quarter 2; Maggie Murphy, Wellness, Quarter 1; Kristen Kondrosky, Lan-
guage Arts, Quarter 1; and Bailey Evans, Social Studies, Quarter 1. Second row: Kelby Truchon, World
Language, Quarter 2; Angel Rollo, Mathematics, Quarter 2; Crystal Seashock, Business and Computer
Technology, Quarter 1; Taylor Schell, Fine Arts, Quarter 1; and Amanda Jimcosky, Science and Tech-
nology, Quarter 1. Third row: Joshua Piestrak, Science and Technology, Quarter 2; Matt Korea, Social
Studies, Quarter 2; Kevin Volkel, Mathematics, Quarter 1; Kirsten Walsh, Language Arts, Quarter 2;
Nick Long, Wellness, Quarter 2; and Harry Haas, Business and Computer Technology, Quarter 2.
Wilkes-Barre Academy students
perform rock and roll play
The third- and fourth-grade students at Wilkes-
Barre Academy recently performed the play, Rock
& Roll Forever, at Walsh Auditorium at Misericor-
dia University. Participants, from left, rst row,
are Lauren Repella, Isabella Nardone, Anthony
Paraventi, Maria Pais, Shailee Desai, Haley Sullick,
Emma Babcock, Cameron Krugel, Ethan Stine, Kyle
Buchanan, Alexys Corbett and Alivia Serkosky.
Second row: Jennifer Zemetro, Taedrah Randolph,
Dominique Kline, Robert Decker, Lauren Touey,
Zahra Chittalia, Olivia Murray, Jenna Santuk and
Christa Berrin. Third row: Julie Duris, Nicole Miller,
Meredith Purcell, Aidan McFarlane, Grace Darby,
Amelia Banks, Jordyn Ruane, Antonio DApollonio,
Rhiannon Borchert, Aashvi Sethi, Mya Pyke, Alek-
zander Radziewicz, Ava Boellmann, Ayesha Iqbal
and Audrey Flynn. Fourth row: Aarit Mitra, Caleb
Cackowski, Brady Sholtis, James Kelly, Michael
Strunk, DeShawn Knox, Nathaniel Wren and Logan
Orlando. Shlomo Kornblatt also participated.
Foster Grandparent Advisory Council elects ofcers
The Advisory Council for the Foster Grandparent Program of Luzerne/Wyoming Counties recently
celebrated the New Year with a luncheon meeting at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center. Newly
elected ofcers include Marge Gushka as chairman and Norma Fagan as vice chairman. The Advisory
Council meets bi-monthly to support and advise the project staff in day-to-day operations of the
program and promotes community support and awareness of the project. Foster Grandparents are 55
years of age and older, who have a limited income and volunteer their time and talents assisting spe-
cial needs children. They serve in day care centers, area schools and specialized agencies. Advisory
Council Members, from left, rst row: Kathy Dwyer, coordinator, FGP; Deidre Kaminski; Gushka; Mary
Lou Zerfoss, director, FGP; Fagan; and Mary Jean Simpson. Second row: Peg Cuscela, Foster Grand-
parent; Susan Dinofrio; Alexia Kita Blake; Scott Rave; Brian Benedetti; Elaine Pekar, Foster Grandpar-
ent; Rosalie Strasser; and Sandra Lee, Foster Grandparent.
Hanover ofcials discuss school safety and security
Members of the Hanover Area School District administration and local law enforcement recently met
to continue their mission to improve and maintain school safety and security. Improving school safety
by utilizing new technologies and streamlining communication was the main focus of discussion.
Participants, from left: Dean Stair, Hanover police detective; William Kane, assistant principal; Joe Al-
berola, building and grounds supervisor; Anthony Podczasey, superintendent; Daniel Malloy, principal,
high school; Al Walker, Hanover police chief; Chris Pelchar, Sugar Notch police chief; Ron Hummer,
technology supervisor; and William Shultz, Nanticoke/Warrior Run police chief.
Boston University, Boston, Mass.
Katelyn Reinert, Trucksville.
Gettysburg College
Charles Generotti, Tunkhannock;
Allison Golden, West Pittston; John
Lasko, Mountain Top; Brianne
Tomko, Nanticoke; James Frye,
Conyngham.
Greensboro College, Greensboro,
N.C.
Stephanie Medina, Kingston.
Lafayette College, Easton
Erik Cannon, Dallas; Christine
McCarthy, Dallas; Eugene Warnick,
Hanover Township; Maria Machal-
ick, Mountain Top.
Marist College, Poughkeepsie,
N.Y.
Leah Butterwick, Kingston.
Mercer University, Macon, Ga.
Michael Hirthler, Wilkes-Barre.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,
Troy, N.Y.
Gregory Stankiewicz, Wilkes-Barre.
Rider University, Lawrenceville,
N.J.
AdamWayman, Wilkes-Barre.
Saint Francis University, Loretto
Victoria Frederick, Sweet Valley;
Megan Hine, Shavertown; Michelle
Lipski, Shavertown; Kelly Poray,
Wilkes-Barre; Nicole Snyder, Har-
veys Lake.
Saint Josephs University, Phila-
delphia
Ali Ahmed, Mountain Top; Johnna
McGovern, Ashley; Michael Mazur
Jr., Shavertown; Brianna Simpkins,
Drums; Meghan Lenahan, Kingston;
Alyson Bartolomei, Forty Fort; Ken-
neth Sorick, West Pittston; Michael
Strellish, Wyoming; Dominic Pino
III, Hazleton; Mercedes Yanora,
Wilkes-Barre; Angela Carrato,
Hazleton; Erica English, Kings-
ton; Katie Moran, Larksville;
Alyson Kotch, Plymouth; Ryan
Agurkis, Wilkes-Barre; Thomas
Bernardo, Mountain Top; Kristen
Boyle, Shavertown; John Gera,
Freeland; Lindsey Stamer,
Tunkhannock
Susquehanna University, Selin-
sgrove
Timothy Accurso, Glen Lyon; Rosa
Bartoletti, Wilkes-Barre; Sarah
Connolly, Swoyersville; Donald
DeRemer, Shavertown; Kelly
Grebeck, Swoyersville; Sarah
Gzemski, Mountain Top; Nicholas
Klug, Hanover Township; Kailey
Roberts, Mountain Top; Loren
Schott, Drums; Jake Stamatis,
Tunkhannock; Karen Stewart,
Hazleton.
University of the Sciences, Phila-
delphia
Dennis Marjoncu, Hazle Township;
Samantha Spishock, Drums; Chel-
sea Martin, Dallas; Megan Wills,
Dallas; Caitlin Fay, Duryea; Linnae
Homza, Exeter; Ashley Zielen,
Harding; Shona Ferrey, Shickshin-
ny; Ryan Burkhardt, Wilkes-Barre;
Krista Chakan, Wilkes-Barre; Julie
Mercadante, Wilkes-Barre; Melissa
Jankoviak, Forty Fort; Sasha
Lisowski, Wilkes-Barre; Thomas
Mirowski, Wilkes-Barre; Jay
Patel, Wilkes-Barre; Julia Kravitz,
Mountain Top; Samantha Shaver,
Wilkes-Barre; Maria Heaney,
Plains Township; Courtney Proz-
eralik, Hanover Township; Brianna
Ligotski, Hanover Township.
West Virginia University, Mor-
gantown, W.Va.
Cameron Ferdinand, Shavertown.
Widener University School of
Law, Wilmington, Del.
Christopher Opiel, Mountain Top.
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 6B SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 S U N D A Y E X T R A
DALLAS SENIOR HIGH
SCHOOL
Jeffrey D. Shaffer, principal, Dal-
las Senior High School, recently
announced the Honor Roll for the
second marking period.
Grade 12: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Alyssa Belskis, Bridget Boyle,
Christopher Colacito, Paige Cuba,
Blake Donovan, Megan Fleming,
Clara Grube, Taylor Hodle, Abigail
Hunter, Luisa Klemm, Merissa
Konnick, Christopher Lafratte,
Steven Nave, Krysti Oschal, Gates
Palissery, Andrea Parmelee, Sarah
Payne, Amber Roberts, Rebecca
Schnable, Olivia Sod, Brian Step-
niak, Marcus Wagner, Jamie Wise,
Danna Yu, Ryan Zapoticky. First
Honors: Evonna Ackourey, Chloe
Alles, Bryan Biesecker, Caitlin Cam-
eron, Colin Casto, Alan Cheskie-
wicz, Maria Chielli, Anna Chinikaylo,
Rebecca Darling, James Delpriore,
Deidre Deluca, Laura Dewitt, Mat-
thew Diaco, Ashley Dunbar, Kristian
Dyrli, John Emil, Tanner Englehart,
Amanda Foote, Nicole Giampietro,
Jessica Hiscox, Alyssa Horvath,
Richard Luksic, Tess Macarty, Mary
Manganello, Katharine Marianacci,
Joshua McEntee, Alyssa Menzel,
Katherine Metcalf, Stephen Mingey,
Madeline Mulhern, John Murray,
Taylor Newhart, Meghan OBrien,
Rachel Olszewski, Jillian Payne, Da-
vid Payne, Michael Podskoch, Lau-
ren Rando, Megan Redlich, Francois
Ross, Michael Ryan, Brandon Scott,
Jason Simonovich, WilliamStoss,
Abrianna Tolomello, Tyler Tuck,
Skyler Velazco, Eric Yurko, Eric Za-
watski. Second Honors: Miranda
Besecker, Michael Carey, Ronald
Chupka, Michaela Coolbaugh,
Dante DeAngelo, Dominic De-
Graba, Christina Diltz, Morgan Gil-
hooley, Brian Goode, Brian Goyne,
Wendy Greenwood, Allison Grose,
Dylan Hertel, Shane Jacobsen,
Lauren Jones, Nathan Kish, Ryan
Kozloski, Zachary Macosky, Mi-
chaela Marek, Casey McAndrew,
Jenna Morgan, Marlee Nelson,
Cara Pricher, Jaydon Richards,
Courtney Sickel, Joshua Smith,
Dana Sotko, Gregory Strazdus Jr.,
Barry Stubeda, Cary Vailes, Kyle
Williams, Josie Yankovich, Jen-
nifer Yannuzzi.
Grade 11: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Lauren Butruce, Jennifer
Cave, Decklan Cerza, Lauren
Charney, Kathryn Comitz, Kristi
Culp, Bethany Dennis, Bryanna
Dissinger, Magdalena Fannick,
Amber Habib, Drew Harding, Sara
Hudak, Leonard Javick, Patrick
Madaya, Amanda Martin, Bryan
Morgan, Erin Muldoon, Andrew
Nardone, Patrick Newhart, Samuel
Reinert, Regan Rome, Natasha
Rostova, Michael Stachnik, Michelle
Thompson, Nora Tidey, Kayla
Wanek, Taryn Weaver, Stephen
Wempa, Haley Wilcox, Krista Zim-
merman, Samantha Zimniski. First
Honors: Nell Adams, Lily Amadio,
Allison Amos, Britnee Atherholt,
Casey Barrett, Abigail Berger,
Olivia Birdsall, Emily Blessner,
Dana Capitano, Stephanie Cybulski,
Jenna Davis, Kelsie Davis, Dominic
Deluca, Elizabeth Dillon, Alyssah
Dombek, Brenden Ehret, Cath-
erine Gawlas, Patrick Gelso, Ryan
Georgetti, Kiera Gross, Jonathan
Higgins, Jared Hoats, Kelly Jacobs,
Sarah Kerdesky, Leah Kleynowski,
Peter Kuritz, Emily Long, Connor
Martinez, David Matcho, Gurmail
Mathon, Bryce Mattson, Lauren Mc-
Dermott, Erin Michael, Samantha
Missal, Jaime Moran, Emma Niznik,
Vincenzo Parente, Michael Pierce,
Peter Shaver, Cortlyn Van Deutsch,
Joshua Weaver, Sarah Wittle,
Madison Ziemba. Second Hon-
ors: Omar Abualburak, Kellyann
Anderson, Jacob Arnold, Giovana
Augustine, Sarah Blamire, Logan
Brace, Justin Brojakowski, Grace
Carolan, Thomas Christman, Mar-
cus Clain, Logan Darling, Chad
Debona, Curtis Evans, Zachary
Goodwin, Alexandra Hood, Frank
Hullihen, Ashley Kapral, Taylor
Kelley, Alexandra Klinges, Taylore
Lewandowski, Maria Lombard,
Patrick Maley, Alex Manganella,
Travis Mattson, Margaret Michael,
Michael Mihal, Christopher Mil-
ligan, Rory Mullin, Megan Ostrum,
Mason Palissery, Kaitlyn Palmer,
Ayman Paris-Hasan, Blake Pertl,
David Pomfret, Heaven Pratz,
Amanda Rando, Joshua Rukstalis,
Jillian Simon, Kelsie Sincavage,
Sarah Smith, William Spare, Nigel
Stearns, Joseph Steve, Jacque-
line Sutton, Samantha Tencza,
Kaila Thomas, Victoria Wells,
Khadayah Whitaker.
Grade 10: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Peter Baut, Jacob Bozentka,
Madalyn Bozinski, Nicholas Con-
way, Erik Dyrli, Melissa Fleming,
Aleksey Gitelson, Lindsey Jacobs,
Kelsey Karasinski, Connor Kos-
celansky, Michael Kusma, Ryan
Marshall, Olivia Musto, Kajal Patel,
Grace Schaub, Ashley Strazdus,
Talia Szatkowski, Christina Val-
enti, Tara Zukosky. First Honors:
Jesteen Adams, Michael Alves,
Dorian Anderson, Kaylin Augustine,
James Baut, Alysha Becker, Abigail
Bendick, Amy Bolton, Sarah Boyd,
Alexandra Bruch, Jeremy Burton,
Katie Conrad, Gabriella Darbenzio,
Brian Drouse, Caitlin Gill, Jesse
Goode, Cheyanne Gray, Haley Had-
dle, Anthony Huntington, Caylee
Irvin, Omar Kazimi, Sydney Kern,
Owen Kiluk, WilliamLuksic, Luke
Matusiak, Aidan McLaughlin, Kellie
Meehan, Devin Michalec, Alexandra
Milligan, Kelsey Monahan, Alexis
Murdoch, Catrina Notari, Milan
Novak, Alexandria Olson, Jessica
OMalley, Lindsey Oremus, Madison
Perez, Eric Pincofski, Jacob Plank,
James Rinehart, Lia Ruggerio,
Jonathan Sabatini, David Schnable,
Amanda Schwerdtman, Michael
Shutlock, Samantha Starbuck,
Olivia Thomas, Caroline Thomas,
Courtney Wagner, Joanna Wallace,
Kassandra Weeks, Brittany Wein-
stein, David West, Jonathan Wilson.
Second Honors: Brendan Baloh,
Anastasia Baney, Emily Banta,
Brian Butler, Calvin Crane, Michael
Davis, Ronald Dickerson, Christo-
pher Diltz, Abigail Downs, Mallory
Faux, Allen Fell, Katelyn Force, Lia
Giampietro, Jackson Hamilton,
Heather Harvey, Katelyn Hunter,
Brian Jefcoat, Amandeep Kaur,
Tyler Kerkowski, Thomas Ketchner,
Ross Kleinman, Peter Konnick,
Elizabeth Kutza, Amanda Lopez,
David Mallarkey, Kameryn McGee,
Maria Mendizabal, Ryan Monk, Ezra
Moore, Morgan Morris, Julianna
Murray, Gregory Navestad, Saman-
tha Onda, Anthony Pace, Alexis
Pelchar, Leah Popple, Carissa Price,
Marissa Rollman, Richard Sarker,
Jacob Schmid, Allyson Sebolka,
Justus Shultz, Kelly Snyder, Kurtis
Sod, Caitlyn Vailes, Stephanie
Vanderhoff, Mykala Wright.
Grade 9: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Mohammad Abualburak, Lia
Barbacci, Christopher Biesecker,
Catherine Blankensop, Catherine
Dillon, Alexa Dosiak, Tanner
Gattuso, Courtney Hoats, Lauren
Hudak, Michael Kovalick, Kyleigh
Kravits, Angelo Kwak, Michelle
Leonard, Rachel Luke, Ryan
Martin, Justin Novitski, Mar-
lena Ostrowski, Julia Ramirez,
Kathryn Roberts, Alexandra
Rome, Janelle Sherman, Kathryn
Snedeker, Rebecca Stout, Brian
Tomaszewski, Nicholas Tomasze-
wski, Krista Vivian, Kaitlyn Yakus,
Emilee Zawatski. First Honors:
Saleem Abualburak, Maria Ansilio,
Brendan Balara, Joseph Blaine,
Jessica Blat, Jessica Bowden,
Brielle Brace, Jacob Buda, Julie
Butwin, Peter Capitano, Danielle
Caputo, Maura Chappell, An-
drew Chupka, Noah Cote, Allison
Deboer, Anthony Deluca, Tayler
Dove, Mariana Dymond, Timothy
Elston, Madison Evans, Chase
Feeney, John Fessler, Lauren
Finnegan, Joseph Fiorello, Joshua
Frankevich, Devon Gerstein, Anna
Giacometti, Madison Goodwin,
Tabitha Grabowski, Tabbytha
Greene, Kathryn Grose, Makayla
Guzzo, Alexis Hockenberry, Mad-
eline Jones, Madison Kaminski,
Katie Kapral, Morgan Kapral, Jar-
ed Krawetz, Jillian Kwak, Caitlyn
Landau, John Luksic, Stephanie
Lyons, Rachel Magnotta, Robert
Martin, Sukhmail Mathon, Ruby
Mattson, Daniel Mingey, Connor
Motley, Adam Niznik, Michaela
OConnell, David Oley, Megan
Parsons, Bria Polachek, Samantha
Pollick, Katherine Pugh, Saman-
tha Rinehimer, Jacob Roberts,
Charles Siegel, Justin Sweeney,
Alexis Wyandt, Tyler Yang, Justin
Yavorski. Second Honors: Em-
HONOR ROLL
OUT-OF-TOWN
DEANS LISTS
See DALLAS, Page 7
THE TIMES LEADER Welcomes
THE TIMES LEADER
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Your orthopedic, sports injury,
and rehab specialists
Dr. Richard Cohen & Dr. Aaron Haydu
At Cohen & Haydu Chiropractic Clinic, your health is our top priority.
We promise to provide the most complete and up-to-date treatments for
your pain or injury. At our clinic, you are sure to nd a comfortable at-
mosphere that promotes health and wellness. Dr. Richard Cohen and Dr.
Aaron Haydu have some of the most extensive post-graduate credentials
in Northeast PA and have over 40 years of combined success treating
painful conditions of the spine and extremities.
Our wide variety of treatments blends traditional chiropractic with
some of the most effective therapy, rehabilitation, nutrition, and manual
medicine techniques. Our style of chiropractic is not just for the spine,
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fessional athletes such as Active Release Technique, Graston Technique,
the Functional Movement Screen, and Kinesio Tape.
In addition to chiropractic care we also offer massage therapy, spinal
decompression therapy, and a full line of top quality nutritional supple-
ments that will help you feel better and restore your health. We partici-
pate with all major private insurance, workers compensation, auto injury,
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Our highly experienced and friendly staff are experts in chiroprac-
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They are sure to make each and every visit in our clinic a
pleasant experience.
We welcome new patients and encourage you to experience chiro-
practic at its highest level. We are currently accepting new patients and
have exible weekly hours including Saturdays. We look forward to
serving you.
Dr. Richard Cohen
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SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 7B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com B I R T H D A Y S
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday.
Your information must be typed
or computer-generated. In-
clude your name and your re-
lationship to the child (parent,
grandparent or legal guardians
only, please), your childs name,
age and birthday, parents,
grandparents and great-grand-
parents names and their towns
of residence, any siblings and
their ages. Dont forget to in-
clude a daytime contact phone
number. Without one, we may
be unable to publish a birthday
announcement on time.
We cannot guarantee return of
birthday or occasions photos
and do not return community-
news or publicity photos. Please
do not submit precious or origi-
nal professional photographs
that require return because
such photos can become dam-
aged, or occasionally lost, in the
production process.
Email your birthday announce-
ment to people@timesleader.
com or send it to: Times Leader
Birthdays, 15 North Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.
You also may use the form un-
der the People tab on www.
timesleader.com.
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
GUIDELINES
Gabrielle M. Miller
Gabrielle Marie Miller, daughter
of Anna and James Miller, Plains
Township, is celebrating her
sixth birthday today, March 10.
Gabrielle is a granddaughter
of Brenda and Robert Sipple,
Edwardsville, and Margaret
and Charles McGrath, Jenkins
Township.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Shea P. Harvey
Shea Parker Harvey, son of
April Shultz and Garrett Har-
vey, Factoryville, is celebrating
his third birthday today, March
10. Shea is a grandson of Jeri
Jordan, Tunkhannock; Chris-
topher Shultz, Albuquerque,
N.M.; Rick and Diane Harvey,
Lake Winola; and Bitsy and
Jim Lenz, Factoryville. He is a
great-grandson of Charles and
Donna Shultz, Tunkhannock;
Robert and Pamela Nulton,
Tunkhannock; Barbara Harvey,
Lemon; and Sybilla Ruark,
Tunkhannock.
Irelynn R. Pampus
Irelynn Rose Pampus, daugh-
ter of Stacey Wallace and Bill
Pampus, Ashley, celebrated her
rst birthday March 8. Irelynn
is a granddaughter of Suzanne
Wallace Conyngham and Judy
and Frank Priore, Hanover
section, Nanticoke. She is a
great- granddaughter of Teresa
Wallace, Ashley, and Barbara
Richards, Sugar Notch.
Tyler M. Price
Tyler Matthew Price, son of
Barbara and Andrew Price,
Plains Township, is celebrat-
ing his second birthday today,
March 10. Tyler is a grandson
of Rita and Charles Harrison
Jr., Plains Township, and San-
dra Price and the late Andrew
Price, Wilkes-Barre. He is a
great-grandson of Jean and
Hubert Zim; the late Jane and
Edgar Raub; the late Grace
and Joseph Price; and the late
Dorothy and Charles Harrison,
all of Wilkes-Barre. Tyler has a
brother, Michael, 5.
William T. Wisneski
William Thomas Daniel Wisneski,
son of Kathy and Mark Wisneski,
Marietta, Ga., is celebrating his
11th birthday today, March 10.
William is a grandson of Martha
and Tom Elgar, Marietta, Ga.,
and Irene and Dan Wisnieski,
Shavertown. He has a sister, Kate
Frances, 7.
Easton Hospital, Easton
Baumgartner, Althea and
Joseph, Easton, a son, Feb. 12.
Grandparents are John and
Deborah Yenchik, Hanover
Township.
Nesbitt Womens and Childrens
Center at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital
Nelmes, Melissa and Chris, Weath-
erly, a daughter, Feb. 26.
Chamberlain, Tiffany and Tierik
Grifn, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Feb. 26.
Collins-Kelly, Kelli and Sean Kelly,
Mountain Top, twin sons, Feb. 26.
Reakes, Kayla and Brian Smatko,
Nanticoke, a son, Feb. 26.
Grifths, Jennifer and Thomas
Adams, a son, Feb. 26.
Weaver, Gena, Noxen, a son, Feb. 26.
Manassy, Natasha and Michael,
Harveys Lake, a son, Feb. 27.
Watkins, Candice and Robert Frey,
Sweet Valley, a son, Feb. 27.
Middleton, Nicole and Donald, Plym-
outh, a daughter, Feb. 28.
Twardowski, Leanne and Frank,
Jenkins Township, a daughter, Feb.
28.
Martinez, Christine and Juan,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, March 1.
Shimko, Sarah and Mark Ankner,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, March 1.
Marranca-Keren, Christine and
Liron Keren, Luzerne, a son, March
2.
BIRTHS OUT-OF-TOWN
BIRTHS
LCCC Nursing Forum
elects ofcers
The Luzerne County Communi-
ty College Nursing Forum recent-
ly elected ofcers to serve for
the 2012-13 academic year. The
nursing students participate in
several community service proj-
ects and educational programs
throughout the school year. New
Nursing Forum ofcers, from left:
Brook Selenski, Dallas, secretary;
Peggy Sosnak, Wilkes-Barre, ad-
visor, Nursing Forum, and associ-
ate professor, nursing; Angelica
Granahan, Scranton, president;
Susan Porter Allen, Mountain
Top, vice president; and Stacy
Kaiser, Wilkes-Barre, treasurer.
Atiyeh, Dominic Augustine,
Anthony Brominski, Kathleen
Brown, Lorenzo Buchhalter, Ar-
thur Coolbaugh, Lauren Dottor,
Tyler Dragon, Rachel Healey,
Annalisa Jolley, Christian
Kimmerle, Kaitlyn Kochanski,
Katherine Kravitsky, Paige
Lewandowski, Connor Macarty,
Megan Mancinelli, Cassidy
Muldoon, Grant Payne, Derek
Peters, Arden Rice, William
Robbins, Jacob Ross, Jackson
Shaver, Shawn Spencer, Grifn
Stone, Bret Storrs, Jayson
Strausser, Cameron Tuck,
Danielle Walsh, Anne Yanik,
Julia Zochowski.
The Knights of Columbus of Our Lady of Czestochowa Assembly 1928 recently held its 30th annual
charter night at Assumpta Council, Luzerne. The evening included a cocktail hour, dinner, a brief pro-
gram and presentation by guest speaker Chris Calore of the Pennsylvania Pro Life Movement. Music
was provided by the George Tarasek Orchestra after the program. Some of the attendees at the head
table, from left: Sir Knight William C. Jones, former Master of The Calvert Province; Shelia Gabriesh-
eski; Sir Knight Robert Gabriesheski; and Calore. Second row: Sir Knight John Duesler, toastmaster;
Sir Knight Michael Berish, faithful navigator; Ann Berish; and Sir Knight Anthony Blaso, past faithful
navigator. Also in attendance was Sir Knight the Rev. Robert Kelleher, faithful friar.
DALLAS
Continued from Page 6
Knights of Columbus Assembly holds charter night
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APRIL 25 - 28, 2013
1-800-745-3000
HERES HOWTO ENTER: No purchase necessary. Must be 18 years old or older to enter on behalf of a child. Prizes have
no cash value and are nontransferable. Copies may be examined at our 15 N. Main St., Wilkes Barre office. The winner will
be drawn from all entries received by Friday March 29, 2013. This newspaper cannot answer or respond to telephone calls
or letters regarding the contest. Sponsors employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter. Winners will be
announced in the Wed., April 3, 2013 edition of the Times Leader.
All Entries must be received by Fri., March 29, 2013. Winners will be announced April 3, 2013 in the Times Leader.
ENTRY FORM
Childs Name: __________________________Age:_______
Address: _________________________________________
City/State/Zip:_____________________________________
Daytime Phone:___________________________________
Parent Guardian Name:_____________________________
Mail Entries to:
Times Leader
Ringling Bros.

Contest,
15 North Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Ringling.com
Enter For A Chance To Win A Family Four Pack Of Tickets
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APRIL 5-7, 2013
SCRANTON CULTURAL CENTER
FRIDAY @ 8 SATURDAY @ 2 & 8 SUNDAY @ 1 & 6
ON SALE NOW!
Scranton Cultural Center Box Ofce or 1-800-745-3000
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 8B SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 S U N D A Y E X T R A
KINGSTON: The North-
east Pennsylvania Music
Teachers Association an-
nounces the upcoming Anne
Liva Youth Piano Competi-
tion for junior high school
through college-level pianists
on June 8 at Wyoming Semi-
narys Great Hall. A recital by
the winner of the competition
will take place a 2 p.m. on
June 9 at the Great Hall.
The event is being held to
honor the late Anne Vanko
Liva, a prominent piano
teacher and arts personality
from Northeastern Pennsyl-
vania.
For more information and
registration requirements,
visit NEPMTA.org.
LUZERNE COUNTY: The
Luzerne County Council of
Republican Women (LCCRW)
is offering a $500 scholarship
to one female student from
Luzerne County based on
a 500-word essay that high-
lights Republican Party prin-
ciples.
The essay competition is
open to women accepted to
or enrolled in any college,
university, technical or voca-
tional school and who have
registered as a Republican to
vote in Luzerne County. This
years essay theme is How
Republican Values Benefit
American Women. The dead-
line for essay submission is
May 1.
The award recipient and
guest will be honored at the
annual LCCRW Scholarship
Presentation Dinner later in
May.
Further guidelines are avail-
able at the financial aid offices
of local colleges and universi-
ties. Essays should be mailed,
along with the writers bio-
graphical and contact infor-
mation, to: LCCRW Scholar-
ship, P.O. Box 114, Dallas, PA
18612. If information is not
available at the school, those
interested should write to the
above address for submission
guidelines.
NANTICOKE: The West
Side Auxiliary will not meet
in March.
IN BRIEF
THE MUSIC BOX DINNER PLAYHOUSE
196 HUGHES ST, SWOYERSVILLE, PA 18704
Call 283-2195 or 800-698-PLAY
Visit www.musicbox.org for a complete list of shows in 2013
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MARCH 15, 16, & 17
SPAGHETTI DINNER AND SHOW: $20.00, SHOW ONLY: $16.00
CATERED BY ELLIS FAMILY CATERING
THE MUSIC BOX PLAYERS PRESENT:
Dont just watch a movie, experience it!
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3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
MET OPERA
March 16th - Francesca da Rimini
240 min - 12:00 PM
Oz: The Great and Powerful in 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG -140 min.
(1:20), (4:20), 7:20, 10:10
***Oz: The Great and Powerful RealD 3D -
PG - 140 min.
(1:20), (4:20), 7:20, 10:10
*Oz: The Great and Powerful 2D - PG -
140 min.
(1:00), (1:40), (2:00), (4:00), (4:40), (5:00),
7:00, 7:40, 8:00, 9:50
*Dead Man Down - R - 130 min.
(1:45), (4:30), 7:15, 9:55
***Jack the Giant Slayer in RealD 3D -
PG-13 - 125 min.
(1:10), (3:50), 7:00, 9:35
Jack the Giant Slayer 2D - PG-13 - 125
min.
(2:00), (4:45), 7:30, 10:05
21 and Over - R - 100 min.
(2:30), (4:45), 7:15, 9:40
The Last Exorcism Part II - PG-13 - 95
min.
(2:30), (4:45), 7:20, 9:35
Snitch - PG-13 - 120 min.
(2:30), (5:00), 7:30, 9:55
Escape From Planet Earth - PG - 100 min.
(1:30), (3:50), 7:00
Safe Haven - PG-13 - 125 min.
(1:45), (4:20), 7:20
Identity Thief - R - 120 min.
(2:00), (4:50), 7:30, 10:00
Silver Linings Playbook - R - 130 min.
(1:30), (4:10), 7:15, 10:00
A Good Day to Die Hard - R - 105 min.
10:00
Dark Skies - PG-13 - 105 min.
9:50
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OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL
(XD-3D) (PG) NEW MOVIE
1:15PM, 4:15PM, 7:15PM, 10:15PM
21 AND OVER (DIGITAL) (R)
12:40PM 1:50PM 3:00PM 5:20PM 6:25PM
7:40PM 10:00PM
A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD (DIGITAL) (R)
1:35PM 4:05PM 6:40PM (9:05PM NOT ON
WED. 3/13/13)
ARGO (DIGITAL) (R)
1:10PM 4:00PM 7:00PM 9:55PM
DARK SKIES (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:25PM 2:45PM 5:15PM 7:55PM 10:25PM
DEAD MAN DOWN (DIGITAL) (R)
1:30PM 4:25PM 7:35PM 10:20PM
NEW MOVIE
ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH (3D) (PG)
(11:55AM 4:50PM NOT ON WED. 3/13/13)
ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH (DIGITAL) (PG)
(2:20PM 7:05PM NOT ON WED. 3/13/13)
IDENTITY THIEF (DIGITAL) (R)
12:00PM 2:40PM 5:25PM 8:00PM 10:35PM
JACK THE GIANT SLAYER (3D) (PG-13)
1:00PM 1:55PM 4:40PM 6:35PM 7:25PM
10:10PM
JACK THE GIANT SLAYER (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:05PM 2:50PM 3:45PM 5:35PM 8:20PM
9:15PM
LAST EXORCISM PART II, THE (DIGITAL)
(PG-13)
12:45PM 3:05PM 4:10PM 5:30PM 7:45PM
8:50PM 10:05PM
OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL (3D) (PG)
12:30PM 3:30PM 6:30PM 9:30PM
NEW MOVIE
OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL (DIGITAL)
(PG)
11:45AM 2:00PM 2:45PM 5:00PM 5:45PM
8:00PM 8:45PM
NEW MOVIE
QUARTET (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:10PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 7:20PM 9:45PM
SAFE HAVEN (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
1:45PM 4:30PM 7:10PM 9:50PM
SIDE EFFECTS (DIGITAL) (R)
(9:25PM NOT ON WED. 3/13/13)
SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (DIGITAL) (R)
1:25PM 4:45PM 7:30PM 10:20PM
SNITCH (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:50AM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:50PM 10:30PM
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating.
at participating locations with this coupon. 1 coupon per customer
Expires 3/31/13
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YOUR MASTERS OF SOCIAL WORK
LEARN MORE!
Temples MSW Program at
Misericordia University.
YOURE INVITEDTOAN OPEN INFORMATION SESSION
Temple University staff will be on the Misericordia University
campus to share with interested students information about
the Temple MSW part-time program including: admission
information, requirements, course sequencing, course
descriptions, tuitioncosts, andanswer your individual questions.
Insalaco Hall, Room216
Misericordia University
Tuesday, March 12 - 6:00 to 8:00pm
In neighborhoods and on a global stage, members of the Temple community
are making things happen. Join us!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com b o o k s
FICTION
1. Green Eggs and Ham by Dr.
Seuss (Random House Childrens
Books)
2. One Fish Two Fish Red Fish
Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss (Random
House Childrens Books)
3. Alex Cross, Run by James
Patterson (Little, Brown)
4. Calculated in Death by J.D.
Robb (Putnam Adult)
5. The Cat in the Hat by Dr.
Seuss (Random House Childrens
Books)
6. The Storyteller by Jodi Pi-
coult (Atrai/Emily Bestler Books)
7. Fox in Socks by Dr. Seuss
(Random House Childrens Books)
8. Hop on Pop by Dr. Seuss
(Random House Childrens Books)
9. Oh, the Places Youll Go by
Dr. Seuss (Random House Chil-
drens Books)
10. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The
Third Wheel by Jeff Kinney
(Amulet Books)
NONFICTION
1. Jesus Calling: Enjoy Peace in
His Presence by Sarah Young
(Thomas Nelson Publishers)
2. Life Code: The New Rules for
Winning in the Real World by
Phil McGraw (Bird Street Books)
3. Shred: The Revolutionary
Diet: 6 Weeks 4 Inches 2 Sizes
by Ian K. Smith (St. Martins Press)
4. The Wimpy Kid Do-It-Yourself
Book by Jeff Kinney (Abrams)
5. Killing Kennedy by Bill
OReilly, Martin Dugard (Henry
Holt & Co.)
6. American Sniper by Chris
Kyle, Scott McEwen and Jim DeFe-
lice (Harper)
7. StrengthsFinder 2.0 by Tom
Rath (Gallup Press)
8. Killing Lincoln by Bill OReilly,
Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.)
9. No Easy Day by Mark Owen
(Dutton)
10. Oh, Say Can You Say Di-no-
saur? by Bonnie Worth (Random
House Books for Young Readers)
FICTION E-BOOKS
1. Calculated in Death by J.D.
Robb (Putnam Adult)
2. Never Too Far by Abbi Glines
(Self-published via Amazon Digital
Services)
3. The Storyteller by Jodi Pi-
coult (Atrai/Emily Bestler Books)
4. Alex Cross, Run by James
Patterson (Little, Brown)
5. Safe Haven by Nicholas
Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)
6. The Silver Linings Playbook
by Matthew Quick (Sarah Crichton
Books)
7. Wait For Me by Elisabeth
Naughton (Elisabeth Naughton)
8. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
(Crown Publishing Group)
9. Mirror Image by Sandra
Brown (Grand Central Publish-
ing)
10. A Week in Winter by Maeve
Binchy (Knopf)
NONFICTION E-BOOKS
1. Mere Christianity by C.S.
Lewis (HarperCollins)
2. EntreLeadership: 20 Years of
Practical Business Wisdom from
the Trenches by Dave Ramsey
(Howard Books)
3. Drinking and Tweeting: And
Other Brandi Blunders by Brandi
Glanville and Leslie Bruce (Gallery
Books)
4. American Sniper by Chris
Kyle, Scott McEwen and Jim DeFe-
lice (Harper)
5. No Easy Day by Mark Owen
(Dutton)
6. Proof of Heaven by Eben
Alexander (Simon & Schuster)
7. Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food
Giants Hooked Us by Michael
Moss (Random House)
8. The Four Agreements by
Don Miguel Ruiz (Amber-Allen
Publishing)
9. The 7 Habits of Highly Effec-
tive People by Stephen R. Covey
(Free Press)
10. The FastDiet: Lose Weight,
Stay Healthy, and Live Lon-
ger with the Simple Secret of
Intermittent Fasting by Michael
Mosley and Mimi Spencer (Atria
Books)
By JOY TIPPING
MCT Wire Service
Kind of Kin by Rilla Askew;
HarperCollins ($25.99)
I rst encountered the ab-
sorbing, beautifully written
work of Oklahoma native
Rilla Askew in her 2007 novel,
Harpsong. Ive since read her
three earlier books and have
eagerly anticipated a new one.
Whatever topic she tackles, I
have faith that Askew will gen-
tly yet forcefully knead it into
something unforgettable.
Kind of Kin does not disap-
point. In fact, it is so good, so
cogent and poignant and dead-
on perceptive, I would very
much like to make it required
reading for anyone who har-
bors strong opinions on immi-
gration policy, on either side of
the metaphorical border fence.
She sets Kind of Kin in
2008, among a tight-knit South-
east Oklahoma clan thats
cash-poor but rich in extended-
family ties. Askews portray-
als of family spats, nitpicking,
loyalty and love bring the book
much of its laugh-out-loud hu-
mor, even amid unsettling and
daunting circumstances.
The novel opens with a line
that should become an instant
classic Your grandpa is a fel-
on, Aunt Sweet said. A felon
and a Christian. He says hes a
felon because hes a Christian.
Now, what kind of baloney is
that?
The speaker, Georgia
Sweet Brown Kirkendall, is
talking about her father, Bob
Brown, whos in jail for the
crime of allowing 14 illegal
Mexican immigrants to take
temporary shelter in his barn.
Askew structures the novel,
in part, around a 2007 Okla-
homa law that made it a felony
for U.S. citizens to knowingly
provide shelter, transportation
or employment to illegal im-
migrants, and also a follow-up
bill to make English the states
ofcial language.
The author focuses the legis-
lative part of the story around a
ercely ambitious female state
representative whose main con-
cernis howshe looks oncamera.
Grandpa Bob, having joined
forces with a Pentecostal pas-
tor named Jesus (which in it-
self annoys some of the areas
citizens, including Sweet), has
not only gone to jail, he intends
to stay there, refusing bail or
even legal counsel, to make his
point about the unfairness of
the law.
Askew gets right to the inti-
mate heart of the immigration
debate via Sweets interaction
with Juanitos daughter Con-
cepcion. The narrative heats
up with the disappearance of
Sweets 10-year-old nephew
and the revelation of the family
member who turned Bob in.
Askew leaves no doubt
where she comes down on
the immigration issue. But
she does it with such grace,
deftly juggling multiple narra-
tors and viewpoints, that read-
ers cant help but see that the
moral crossroads where the
book stands has far more side
alleys than you might imagine
and the one you ultimately
choose just might not be the
track youd have marked on the
map when rst setting off on
the journey.
Kind of Kin is
easy to relate to
By RASHA MADKOUR
The Associated Press
Out of Order: Stories From the
History of the Supreme Court
(Random House), by Sandra Day
OConnor
In the old days, lawyers
arguing before the Su-
preme Court could blather
on, uninterrupted, for as
long as 10 days. Nowa-
days, theyre strictly lim-
ited to 30 minutes of argu-
ment time and theyre
deemed lucky if they can
speak more than two sen-
tences before the justices
interject.
The rst chief justice,
John Jay, resigned to be-
come governor of New
York. He didnt think the
Supreme Court would
amount to much.
And until Chief Justice Wil-
liam Howard Taft, a former
president, lobbied for a Supreme
Court building, the nations high-
est court shared ofce space
over the years with merchants,
lower courts and Congress.
For an institution so seem-
ingly steeped in tradition, the
nature of the Supreme Court
has changed and evolved dras-
tically over its lifetime.
Thats the main takeaway
from a new book by former
Justice Sandra Day OConnor,
the rst woman appointed to
the job. Out of Order: Sto-
ries From the History of the
Supreme Court is readable,
accessible and full of riveting
anecdotes, even if the level of
detail may occasionally bore
the casual reader.
OConnor skillfully high-
lights myriad personalities in
the history of the court, from
John McLean, who ran unsuc-
cessfully for president four
times while serving on the
court, to Byron White, who
played professional football for
the Pittsburgh Pirates (now
Steelers) and Detroit Lions
before being appointed to the
bench. (He was also a Rhodes
scholar and served in the
Navy.)
The dubious designation as
one of the worst justices ever
falls on James McReynolds,
who wrote comments like
This makes me sick on col-
leagues circulating opinions.
A self-professed anti-Semite,
McReynolds read a newspaper
during a Jewish colleagues
swearing-in ceremony, and
at his funeral in 1946, not a
single fellow justice was in at-
tendance.
OConnor offers a few juicy
tidbits about life as a Supreme
Court justice. She writes that
each newly appointed justice is
permitted to sit in the historic
chair used by Chief Justice John
Marshall. (Justice Sonia Soto-
mayor said she felt as if history
were coursing through her
when she sat on it.)
Just before taking the bench
during oral arguments, the
justices gather in the robing
room and partake in a judicial
handshake, with each justice
shaking the hand and greeting
every other justice. After morn-
ing arguments wrap up, the
justices have lunch together
and no work talk is allowed.
Out of Order is, at its core,
a compact history book on
the Supreme Court albeit a
more lighthearted, personality-
lled one than you might nd
in a high school classroom.
OConnor may have overes-
timated peoples interest in
reading about every person
nominated to the court, and
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 10B SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 T R A V E L
Art deco, music and more in Tulsa
TULSA, Oklahoma
As an Oklahoma trans-
plant a native New
Englander who moved
here for love Ive had
fun getting to know the
Sooner State. I also host
the occasional out-of-
town visitor, so Im al-
ways on the hunt for col-
orful history, interesting
art, quirky shopping and
a great meal. I have found
it all, plus some surpris-
es, in Oklahomas second-
largest city: Tulsa.
Tulsa was initially occu-
pied by Native American
tribes forced to relocate here
from their home territories
by the Indian Removal Act
of 1830. But the modern city
was built from oil money in
the early 20th century. There
was already a railroad station
here serving the cattle indus-
try when oil was discovered
in nearby Red Fork in 1901,
so Tulsa became the logical
place for oilmen from ty-
coons to middlemen to so-
called wildcatters looking for
the next big well to settle
with their families.
What you find here now is
an eclectic mix of new and
old: artsy hangouts that show
off Tulsas thriving hipster
culture as well as well-pre-
served historic gems that har-
ken back to the oil boom of
the early 1900s. As somebody
who seeks out both highbrow
art and underground subcul-
ture, I love this about Tulsa.
DOWNTOWN ARCHITECTURE
At rst glance, downtown
Tulsa can seem quiet and a
little rugged at the edges. But
if you know where to go and
you practice the art of looking
up at the buildings instead of
down at your feet, youll nd a
great display of art deco archi-
tecture and other turn-of-the-
century styles.
Tulsa was a young city
experiencing unprecedented
growth and prosperity in the
Roaring Twenties, just as the
Art Deco movement came
into vogue, according to the
Tulsa Preservation Commis-
sions website. Flush with
oil money, prominent Tulsans
started building the skyscrap-
ers that would spur one of the
pre-eminent Art Deco collec-
tions in the United States.
The most striking example
of Tulsas art deco treasures
might be the Boston Avenue
Methodist Church, 1301 S.
Boston Ave. You cant miss
its 258-foot (79-meter) tow-
er, holding court at the citys
southeastern edge. Somehow
the building, erected in 1929,
manages to look like a church
and a skyscraper all at once.
Straight down Boston Av-
enue from the church sits an-
other beauty: the Philtower
Building, 427 S. Boston Ave.,
which was commissioned
by prominent oilman Waite
Phillips and opened in 1928.
Look for the gargoyles above
the Boston Avenue entrance,
and look way up to see the
colorful tiled roof, a splash of
strange, almost lovably out-
dated hues that floats above
the city as a relic of the past.
Also worth a look are the
Atlas Life Building, 415 S.
Boston Ave.; the Mayo Hotel
(where you can book a room
or grab a gourmet meal), 115
W. Fifth St.; and the Philcade
building, 509 S. Boston Ave.
The building facades are only
the beginning: On a weekday
afternoon, its fun to wander
into the lobbies for stunning
views of ceilings and chande-
liers.
For more information, visit
www.tulsapreservationcom-
mission.org .
IN SEARCH OF FINE ART
In addition to its architec-
tural gems, Tulsa boasts two
wonderful major art muse-
ums.
Ten minutes northwest
from downtown, Gilcrease
Museum, 1400 N. Gilcrease
Museum Road, houses an ex-
pansive collection of art from
the American West (the larg-
est worldwide, they say) and
an array of Native American
artifacts such as glass-bead-
ed moccasins, feather head-
dresses and leather clothing.
Grown out of the private col-
lection of Tulsa oilman Thomas
Gilcrease, the museum is now
home to more than 10,000
paintings, prints and sculptures
from prominent American art-
ists such as Frederic Remington
and Thomas Moran.
Meanwhile, 10 minutes
south of downtown, the Phil-
brook Museum of Art, 2727
S. Rockford Road, houses an
equally magnificent collec-
tion in what was once the
72-room private villa of Waite
Phillips family. Perhaps even
more impressive than the fine
artwork displayed at this re-
nowned Tulsa attraction is
the sprawling 23-acre (9-hect-
are) garden behind the mu-
seum. I attended a wedding
last summer that embodied
the romantic European spirit
of thisItalian-style estate.
SHOPPING, MUSIC AND FOOD
The shopping in Tulsa, like
everything else, can be fancy
or casual, depending on your
whim. I always like to browse
through the luxury home-
goods store T.A. Lorton, 1343
E. 15th St., on a bustling
street known locally as Cher-
ry Street. Its quite expensive,
but you are guaranteed to
find items youve never seen
before, from indulgent chil-
drens gifts to high-end linens
to unique lamps, tables and
dinnerware.
For a store with lower
prices and an edgier flair, I
recommend Dwelling Spac-
es, 119 S. Detroit Ave., in
the Blue Dome District. The
neighborhood, named after
the blue-painted dome of an
old gas station that originally
served motorists on historic
Route 66, is a small but bus-
tling corner of downtown
that attracts artists and oth-
ers with a bohemian bent.
Dwelling Spaces sells
quirky handmade items such
as T-shirts, decorative pil-
lows and posters that tend
to feature offbeat Oklahoma-
and Tulsa-centric designs. Its
where you can buy all your
Flaming Lips merchandise
(the world-famous rock band
started in Oklahoma) and the
latest copy of the popular
bimonthly broadsheet maga-
zine, This Land Press. Read
it over a freshly brewed cup
of Joe at the coffee bar.
My favorite casual spot for
eating is El Rio Verde, 38 N.
Trenton Ave., an authentic
Mexican restaurant in the
otherwise unassuming region
northeast of downtown. Like
many good hole-in-the-walls,
this place seems a bit shady
from the outside. But step in-
side and order a wet burrito
(served with sauce on top)
and a glass of horchata (a tra-
ditional rice drink) and you
wont care where you are.
For higher-end fare, Ive
been twice blown away by
the new but amazing Juni-
per Restaurant and Martini
Lounge downtown, 324 E.
Third St. Chef Justin Thomp-
son is getting a lot of buzz for
his local-focused, seasonal
menus featuring items such
as bison burgers and pork
belly eggs benedict. I like
the sweet carrot soup and
roasted vegetable and goat
cheese sandwich. And, while
Ive never had a Juniper cock-
tail myself, who wouldnt be
intrigued by concoctions us-
ing house-made green tea
and lemon vodka and roasted
peanut bourbon?
For a great non-alcoholic
pick-me-up, try the Coffee
House on Cherry Street (1502
E. 15th St.). A community oa-
sis for artists and musicians,
full of mismatched furniture
and a constant stream of regu-
lar customers, the cafe makes
all its own baked goods, in-
cluding gluten-free and vegan
items that look just as entic-
ing as their bad-for-you coun-
terparts. I never leave Tulsa
without a slice of peanut but-
ter pie from CHOCS (as the
locals call it).
Tulsa is home to a great mu-
sic scene as well. The historic
Cains Ballroom, built in 1924
and known as the regular per-
forming venue of Bob Wills,
the King of Western Swing,
now draws a steady stream of
big acts across all genres, 423
N. Main St., or bradytheater.
com/. The Brady Theater,
likewise, has been around
since the early 1900s 105
W. Brady St., bradytheater.
com/ and continues to
draw the hottest performers.
MARTZ TOURS
Now you can purchase Martz Tours online!
821-3855 or 1-800-432-8069 www.martztours.com
NYC CURBSIDE EXPRESS
CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL
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March 23 ($70) The Park
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Martz Curbside Express
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April 12-14 ($553) Reserved
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Also Sightseeing Tours and
Odyssey III Pink Dinner
Cruise on the Potomac.
By HILLARY SPEED
The Associated Press
AP PHOTOS
Philbrook Museum of Art is about 10 minutes south of downtown Tulsa, Okla. The museums collection of ne art is housed in what
was once the 72-room private villa of oilman Waite Phillips family. The grounds include a magnicent 23-acre garden.
The Philtower Building is one
of a number of notable Art
Deco treasures in Tulsa mostly
built in the 1920s during an
oil boom. The Philtower was
commissioned by oilman Waite
Phillips and is known for its
colorful tiled roof.
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Apple Vacations Night
Thursday, March 14, 2013, 6:30pm - 8:30pm
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Contact or visit us within Boscovs Department Store.
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Sports SECTI ON C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Rob Jacobs watches Valley Wests Colin Vest dive on Satur-
day morning at the Wyoming Valley West pool. Jacobs has
been coaching the Valley West and Holy Redeemer divers this
season.
They describe Rob Jacobs as
demanding as a drill sargeant,
as a tough task master, as a gru-
eling guru of the diving boards.
He admits he may be all of
those.
But hes also as likeable to the
kids he coaches as the sound of
a Mr. Softee truck.
Im tough on them, Jacobs
says from the deck of the Wyo-
ming Valley West pool. But
I reward these kids. We have
pizza nights, movie nights with
food, their families come over
my house. Once were outside
of here, we have a good time.
I make my point. Im tough at
practice, but yet, Im there for
them.
Hell be there again one last
time this week, taking four div-
ers - two from Wyoming Valley
West and two more from Holy
Redeemer - to the PIAA Swim-
ming and Diving champion-
ships at Bucknell Universitys
Kinney Natatorium.
Then, after sculpting near-
expert divers for nine years as
Valley Wests head diving coach
H I G H S C H O O L S W I M M I N G
Coach diving into his grand nale
Rob Jacobs will be make his
last trip to states, taking
divers from two schools.
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
See DIVING, Page 8C
P I A A G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L
PI AA BOYS BASKETBAL L
FRED ADAMS/THE TIMES LEADER
Meyers Ryan Krawczeniuk covers his head with a towel in the nal seconds of his teams loss to Trinity
Saturday afternoon at Kings College.
WILKES-BARRE The begin-
ning was so promising Saturday af-
ternoon. Big guns Ryan Krawczeni-
uk and Rasheed Moore scored quick
baskets. Even Dominic Pittman, a
newcomer to the starting lineup,
nailed in a three-pointer.
The ride in the rst round of the
PIAA Class 2A boys basketball play-
offs was certainly going smoothly.
Much more than
the merry-go-
round Trinity was
on prior to the
game.
Then Trinity
found some direc-
tion and Meyers found its season
systematically coming to an end
with a 57-47 loss at Kings College.
District 3 runner-up Trinity (19-
7) advanced to the second round
Wednesday and will play District 12
fourth seed Sayre (18-9). District 2
runner-up Meyers ended its season
at 23-4, losing consecutive games
in a season for the rst time since
dropping two around Christmas in
2009.
Krawczeniuk and Moore, two
players who broke into the starting
lineup as freshmen, nished their
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
Trinity ends Mohawks season
See MEYERS, Page 6C
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Holy Redeemers Alexis Lewis (right) em-
braces teammate Lydia Lawson as Lawson
heads to the foul line for free throws in the
closing seconds of the 4th quarter during
Saturdays PIAA Class 3A state play-
off against Athens at Williamsport High
School.
See GIRLS, Page 6C
Royals hold
on for win
vs. Athens
By JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
WILLIAMSPORT There was a stretch
or two where its youth showed, but Holy
Redeemer showed veteran poise in crunch
time.
Freshman Lydia Law-
son sank three crucial free
throws in the nal 80 sec-
onds.
Sophomore Alexis Lewis
stole the ball from Athens
Danielle Stopper and made
a layup with 32 seconds left.
And after Stopper missed a potential
game-tying layup, sophomore Alana Wil-
son pulled down the biggest rebound of her
young career with 1 second remaining.
Wilsons work on the glass preserved the
Royals 40-38 victory over the District 4
champs in the PIAA Class 3A girls basketball
40
REDEEMER
38
ATHENS
57
TRINITY
47
MEYERS
4
PENGUINS
3
PIRATES
PORTLAND, Maine The
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Pen-
guins nally managed to get
over the two-goal hump.
The timely spike in offense
was just enough as the Penguins
knocked off the Portland Pirates
4-3 in overtime on Saturday
night at the Cumberland County
Civic Center.
Chad Kolarik scored his sec-
ond of the
game on a pow-
er-play goal 38
seconds into
the extra frame
to lift the Pen-
guins to the
victory.
The game
marked the
rst in nine
that the Pen-
guins managed
to score more
than twice.
Zach Sill
lifted the Pen-
guins into a 3-3
tie in the third
period when
he was credited with a goal after
jamming the puck into the net
after it appeared as if Portland
goaltender Mike Lee had the
puck smothered.
The goal came less than two
minutes after Portland gained
its rst lead of the game. Chris
Brown netted his second goal
of the game in the opening two
minutes of the third on a break-
away. Brown stripped the puck
from Penguins defenseman
Joey Mormina at the Portland
blue line and beat Brad Thies-
sen with a wrister to the blocker
side to push the Pirates to a 3-2
advantage.
The Penguins had drawn rst
blood with a power-play goal
less than eight minutes into the
game. An offensive zone face-
off win by Brian Gibbons sent
the puck back to Dylan Reese,
who played across to Joe Mor-
row. The Penguins defenseman
moved in and beat Lee with a
quick wrist shot to give the visi-
tors a 1-0 lead.
Two minutes later the Pen-
guins made it 2-0. Alex Grant
started the play with a shot from
high in the slot. Lee kicked out
a big rebound to Kolarik and his
shot was tipped home by Jayson
Megna as he was angled into the
Portland goaltender by a Pirates
defender.
Portland got back on even
terms in the latter stages of the
second period when it scored
Kolarik
leads Pens
to OT win
By MARK JEANNERET
For the Times Leader
A H L
See PENS, Page 6C
P I A A W R E S T L I N G
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Three stellar careers come to a close
See CLASS 3A, Page 6C
HERSHEY Two losses Sat-
urday morning in the seminals
of the PIAA Class 3A Champi-
onships meant the Wyoming
Valley Conference would be
left without a state champion
for a sixth straight season since
Hazleton Areas Nate Eachus
and Lake-Lehmans Scott Davis
walked away with golds in 2007.
But that didnt mean Wyo-
ming Valley Wests Kyle Krasav-
age and Coughlins Brad Emer-
ick were going to conclude their
careers that easily.
Both seniors rebounded from
those devastating losses nicely
as they each won their consola-
tion match later in the morning
to solidify themselves a better
state medal. They were joined
by Crestwoods Matt Hammer-
stone as the three state medal-
ists from the WVC.
Emerick and Krasavage
brought home fourth-place med-
als while Hammerstone took
eighth place.
Krasavage, a 126-pounder, fell
to Tyler Walker fromNorth Hills
8-4 in the third-place match. He
still ends his stellar career with
a record of 41-2 on the season
and with 134 career wins, the
most in school history. His state
performance comes after just
one other appearance in the
tournament as a freshman when
he didnt medal. So not many in
the state expected this type of
performance.
But the nal loss was still
hard to take because his goal
this season was to nish in thew
ED BOARDMAN/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Coughlins Brad Emerick (left) battled back after a loss in the
Class 3A 285-pound state seminals, ultimately nishing in
fourth place in Hershey.
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
cluding college showcase. Prere-
gister impactpanther16u@ya-
hoo.com
Mountain Top Youth Soccer Associ-
ation will hold its first player
registration for the fall soccer
season on Saturday, Mar. 23, from
9 a.m. Noon at the Crestwood
High School cafeteria. Additional
registrations will be held on
Wednesday, April 3 from 6 9 p.m.
and on Saturday, April 6, 9 a.m. -
Noon. Eligible players must be
from 4 to 18 years of age, as of
July 31. Registration forms can be
printed in advance from the
Handouts link on the MYSA web
site: www.eteamz.com/mttopysa.
For more information, contact
registrar Kelly Leicht by email at
kelly_leicht@hotmail.com
Plains Yankees Football and Cheer-
leading Organization will have
registrations March 20 from 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. at the Plains American
Legion, 101 E. Carey St., Plains. The
cost is $60 for one child or $75
per family, with additional uniform
fees for first-time players. Bring a
recent picture of your child along
with a copy of his or her birth
certificate.
South Valley Softball will hold
practice and sign ups at Luzerne
county community college gym
today, March 17 and 24 from 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m.
Sunday Softball League begins
Sunday, April 4. Teams may regis-
ter by contacting John Leighton at
430-8437. Deadline for entry will
be March 31st. All Games are
played Sunday mornings and early
afternoon. Teams will play double-
headers each Sunday.
Swoyersville Slow Pitch Girls Soft-
ball will hold sign-ups every Tues-
day and Saturday through March,
Tuesday sign ups are from 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m., Saturday signups are
from 9 a.m. to noon. All signups
will be at the softball field on Tripp
Street. The league is for those
ages seven and up and costs $45
per child and $10 for each addition-
al child. For more information, call
Richard Harned at 991-1415.
UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER
Freeland YMCA will have a 6th grade
boys tournament March 8 10. The
cost is $150 per team and each
team is guaranteed three games.
The deadline for entry is Tuesday
March 5. For more information, call
the YMCA at 636-3640, visit
freelandymca.com or email free-
landymca@verizon.net.
Philadelphia University will have an
After The Madness Tournament
for high school teams March 29
and 30. There will be two divisions
including the red division (24
teams) for next season players and
green division (25 teams) for
current players. To register, visit
www.keystone-blazers.org. The
registration deadline is March 20
at midnight.
Wilkes University Womens Soccer
head coach John Sumoski has
announced that registration for
the first Futsal Fever soccer tour-
nament at Wilkes is now open.
Interested high school girls teams
can register by completing the
application and sending a check
made out to Wilkes University to
Wilkes University, c/o John Su-
moski, 84 West South St., Wilkes-
Barre, Pa., 18766. The tournament
is Sunday, Mar. 10, at 10 a.m. The
games will be played at Wilkes
Universitys UCOM Building located
at 169 South Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
The fee is $150 per team and
additional teams from the same
high school are $125. There is no
limit on roster sizes. Each roster
may have two guest players from
out of district. Futsal is 5 on 5 (4
and a keeper). For more informa-
tion, contact John Sumoski at
408-4017 or john.sumos-
ki@wilkes.edu.
Wyoming Valley Chapter of Credit
Unions is holding its 27th annual
Golf Outing and Buffet June 7.
Format is captain and crew with a
10 a.m. shotgun start. The event
will feature prizes in four flights
with a special award to the tourna-
ment champion. All donations are
appreciated. Registration is $95
per person and includes cart,
green fees and prizes. Registration
is $110 after May 7. All registrations
received before May 7 will receive
a free raffle ticket. If paying by
check, make check payable to
Wyoming Valley Chapter of Credit
Unions. For more information, call
Bob Alescyk at 823-6151, John
Hayduk at 693-0500 or Debbie
Peters at 457-8899.
Wyoming Seminary will have its
second annual Wyoming Seminary
Rusty Flack Open Golf Tournament
and Dinner Party Monday, May 20
at the Huntsville Golf Club, Leh-
man. The tournament will begin at
1 p.m. The event will end with a
dinner. Proceeds will benefit the
Wyoming Seminary Opportunities
Fund, the Alumni Scholarship Fund
and the Rusty Flack Fund. Regis-
tration and lunch will begin at
noon. To register for the tourna-
ment or for more information on
sponsorship opportunities, call
Julie McCarthy Strzeletz at 270-
2142.
CAMPS/CLINICS
Anthracite Curling Club will hold
two Learn to Curl clinics on March
19 and 26 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at
The Ice Rink at Coal St. Park. For
more information, call Joshua
Sophy, President of the Anthracite
Curling Club at 266-7978.
Kingston Recreation Center will
have golf lessons for adults and
children ages 10-17 on consecutive
Sundays beginning March 4. Chil-
drens lessons are from 7-7:45 p.m.
Adults lessons run from 7:45-8:30
p.m. The cost for members is $40,
while the cost for non-members is
$50. Space is limited. For more
information, call the Kingston
Recreation Center at 287-1106.
Sandlot Little League will have a
camp for boys and girls from ages
8-12 from1 p.m. to 3 p.m. March 10,
17, 24 and April 7. The cost is $100.
There will also be a beginner camp
for boys and girls ages 4-7 from
3:15 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. on the same
days. The cost is $50. Both camps
include hitting, pitching, fielding
and agilities. For more information
or to register, call 445-1155 or email
CDD027@aol.com.
Wilkes University will have a youth
field hockey clinic for girls in
grades 1-8 (beginners are welcome)
on Sunday, April 28, from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. at the University Center on
Main (UCOM). The focus of the
clinic will be skill instruction and
game tactics and will include skill
drills and small game play. The
clinic will be held at the indoor
facility in the UCOM building on
the corner of South and Main in
Wilkes-Barre. The cost is $40 per
person, which includes instruction
and a Wilkes field hockey t-shirt.
Registration runs from now
through April 18 and is limited to
40 players. For more information,
call head field hockey coach Mollie
Reichard at 408-4018 or email the
coach at mollie.rei-
chard@wilkes.edu.
MEETINGS
Coughlin Baseball Booster Club will
be holding its monthly meeting
Monday Mar. 11 at 6:30 p.m. at the
PAV Club located on Oak Street in
Hudson. Parents are asked to
attend. For more info call Mario at
479-4389 after 5:30 p.m.
Checkerboard Inn Golf League will
hold an organizational meeting,
Monday, March 11 , at 7 p.m. at the
Checkerboard Inn in Trucksville. All
members must attend or contact
the league. 2012 dues will be col-
lected & the starting date will be
April 9th. Any questions can be
directed to Frank at 675-7532.
Wilkes Barre Mini Mohawks will be
holding their monthly meeting this
Monday March 11 at 7 p.m. at Cris
Nics in Wilkes Barre. All future
meetings will be held the 2nd
Monday of the month at this
location.
Wyoming Area Boys Soccer Team
Parents will meet Monday, March
18 at 6 pm at the secondary center.
All parents are invited to attend.
Wyoming Valley Chapter of PIAA
Baseball Officials Mandatory
Rules Interpretation Meeting will
be held today at 6:30p.m. in Room
106 of Breiseth Hall on the Wilkes
University campus. The mandatory
rules interpretation meeting is
open to PIAA baseball umpires and
coaches. The chapter extends the
invitation to all PIAA baseball
coaches of any level of interscho-
lastic competition and any PIAA
baseball umpire regardless of
chapter in need of fulfilling their
mandatory meeting requirements.
For directions to Breiseth Hall view
the campus map on the Wilkes
University website at http://
www.wilkes.edu/pages/201.asp.
Wyoming Valley West Baseball
Booster Club will meet Monday,
March 11 at 7 p.m. at Keeleys Ale-
house 199 Division St. Parents of
all players are encouraged to
attend.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Brews Bros Co-Ed Softball Leagues
have openings on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Sunday.
County Line Girls Softball League is
looking for towns/teams/orga-
nizations to join a girls fastpitch
REC league. CLGSL is comprised of
both Lackawanna and Luzerne
counties. If interested call Bob
Cappelloni at 881-8744. CLGSL will
meet on Thursday march 14th at
6:30 p.m. in the Dupont Borough
building to discuss upcoming
season.
Hanover Area Little League will
have its final 2013 registrations at
the Hanover Area Jr/Sr High
School in the Cafeteria. Regis-
tration is open for all children ages
4 as of April 30, 2013 to 16 no later
than April 30, 2013 who reside in
Hanover Township, Sugar Notch,
Warrior Run and Ashley and New-
town. Bring a copy of your childs
birth certificate as well as 3 proofs
of residency on Saturday, March 9
from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Little League
girls softball registration is also
available for girls ages 8-16 will
also take place at the above listed
dates and times.
Impactpanthers 16U N.E.P.A. Travel
Team is holding a pitcher tryout
for one final spot on the team
today and Sun March 17 from1 3
p.m. at Alliance Aux Bld 360 S.
Keyser Ave. Taylor, PA, 18517
Scheduled 8 tournaments in-
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
World Baseball Classic
JAPAN ( 7.0 ) Netherlands
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
THUNDER 10.5 Celtics
LAKERS 5.5 Bulls
RAPTORS 5.5 Cavaliers
HEAT 7 Pacers
76ers 2.5 MAGIC
Mavericks 6 TWOLVES
Blazers 1.5 HORNETS
KINGS PK Bucks
CLIPPERS 14 Pistons
College Basketball
Favorite Points Underdog
Wisconsin 9 PENN ST
Virginia Comm 1 TEMPLE
OHIO ST 10 Illinois
WAKE FOREST 6.5 Virginia Tech
MICHIGAN 1.5 Indiana
VIRGINIA 7 Maryland
MICHIGAN ST 19.5 Northwestern
Summit League Conference Tournament
Oakland 2.5 Ipfw
N Dakota St 16 Umkc
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
Rangers -$125/
+$105
CAPITALS
RED WINGS -$200/
+$170
Blue Jackets
Canadiens -$145/
+$125
PANTHERS
PENGUINS -$210/
+$175
Islanders
BLACKHAWKS -$230/
+$190
Oilers
DEVILS -$135/
+$115
Jets
FLYERS -$150/
+$130
Sabres
DUCKS -$140/
+$120
Blues
Canucks -$120/
even
WILD
AVALANCHE -$125/
+$105
Sharks
AME RI C A S L I NE
BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH
BOXING REPORT: In the WBC welterweight title fight on May 4 in Las Vegas,
Nevada, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is -$950 vs. Robert Guerrero at +$650. For the latest
odds & scores, check us out at www.americasline.com.
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY'S EVENTS
COLLEGE BASEBALL
LCCC at Rutgers-Camden JV, 11:30 a.m.
Scranton at Kings, DH, noon
Wilkes at Immaculata, DH, noon
WOMEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Rutgers-Camden at Wilkes, 1 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH11
No Events
TUESDAY, MARCH12
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Misericordia at Neumann, 3:30 p.m.
Wilkes at Marywood, 3:30 p.m.
PSU Hazleton at Kings, DH, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Lycoming at Kings, DH, 3 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Misericordia at Alvernia, 7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH13
HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING
PIAA Championships, at Kinney Natatorium, Lewis-
burg, 8 a.m.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
PSU Worthington at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 3 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Marywood at Misericordia, DH, 3 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Hood at Misericordia, 4 p.m.
Marywood at Kings, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH14
HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING
PIAA Championships, at Kinney Natatorium, Lewis-
burg, 8 a.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Kings at Muhlenberg, DH, 3 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
LACROSSE
Misericordia at Immaculata, 4 p.m.
Cedar Crest at Wilkes, 4:30 p.m.
Brockport at Kings, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY, MARCH15
HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING
PIAA Championships, at Kinney Natatorium, Lewis-
burg, 8 a.m.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Misericordia at DeSales, 3:30 p.m.
Wilkes at Kings, 3:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, MARCH16
HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING
PIAA Championships, at Kinney Natatorium, Lewis-
burg, 8 a.m.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Kings at Wilkes, DH, noon
Misericordia at LCCC, noon
DeSales at Misericordia, DH, 1 p.m.
PSU Wilkes-Barre at PSU Worthington, TBA
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Misericordia at DeSales, DH, 1 p.m.
Wilkes at Kings, DH, 1 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Alvernia at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Kings at Cazenovia, 1 p.m.
Wilkes at PSU Abington, 2 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE TENNIS
Lebanon Valley at Kings, 1 p.m.
W H A T S O N T V
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, KOBALT Tools 400,
at Las Vegas
BASEBALL
6 a.m.
MLB World Baseball Classic, second round, Ja-
pan vs. Netherlands, at Tokyo
12:30 p.m.
MLB World Baseball Classic, first round, Spain
vs. Venezuela, at San Juan, Puerto Rico
4 p.m.
MLB World Baseball Classic, first round, United
States vs. Canada, at Phoenix
7:30 p.m.
ESPN World Baseball Classic, first round, Do-
minican Republic vs. Puerto Rico, at San Juan,
Puerto Rico
MLB World Baseball Classic, first round, Domin-
ican Republic vs. Puerto Rico, at San Juan, Puerto
Rico
COLLEGE WRESTLING
2:30 p.m.
BTN Big Ten Championships
CYCLING
10:30 p.m.
NBCSN Paris-Nice, final stage, Nice to Col
dEze, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour-WGC, Cadillac Championship,
final round, at Miami
3 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour-WGC, Cadillac Championship,
final round, at Miami
7:30 p.m.
TGCPGATour, PuertoRicoOpen, final round, at
Rio Grande, Puerto Rico (same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
BTN Wisconsin at Penn State
CBS VCU at Temple
ESPN2 Big South Conference, championship,
teams TBD, at Myrtle Beach, S.C.
12:30 p.m.
ESPN Teams TBA
2 p.m.
CBS Missouri Valley Conference, champion-
ship, teams TBD, at St. Louis
NBCSN Colonial Athletic Association, semifinal,
teams TBD, at Richmond, Va.
WQMY Virginia Tech at Wake Forest
4 p.m.
CBS Indiana at Michigan
4:30 p.m.
NBCSN Colonial Athletic Association, semifinal,
teams TBD, at Richmond, Va.
6 p.m.
BTN Northwestern at Michigan State
ESPNU Maryland at Virginia
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m.
ABC Boston at Oklahoma City
3:30 p.m.
ABC Chicago at L.A. Lakers
6 p.m.
CSN Philadelphia at Orlando
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC N.Y. Rangers at Washington
7 p.m.
MSG Winnipeg at New Jersey
PLUS, ROOT N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN Buffalo at Philadelphia
SOCCER
10 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, New York at San Jose
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
1 p.m.
PLUS, ROOT Big 12 Tournament, semifinal,
teams TBD
2 p.m.
ESPN2 Atlantic Coast Conference, champion-
ship, teams TBD, at Greensboro, N.C.
3:30 p.m.
PLUS, ROOT Big 12 Tournament, semifinal,
teams TBD
4 p.m.
ESPN2 Big Ten Conference, championship,
teams TBD, at Hoffman Estates, Ill.
6 p.m.
ESPN2 Southeastern Conference, champion-
ship, teams TBD, at Duluth, Ga.
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Pac-12 Conference, championship,
teams TBD, at Seattle
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
KANSASCITYROYALSAssigned CManuel Pi-
na and OF Luis Durango to their minor league
camp.
NEW YORK YANKEES Announced the retire-
ment of RHPMariano Rivera, effective at the end of
the season.
OAKLANDATHLETICSReassignedRHPBruce
Billings, RHP Sonny Gray and LHP Justin Thomas
to their minor league camp.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS Agreed to terms with CB Leo-
dis McKelvin.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CALGARY FLAMES Activated C Mikael Back-
lund from injured reserve. Assigned LW Sven
Baertschi to Abbotsford (AHL).
SAN JOSE SHARKS Recalled G Alex Stalock
and F Matt Pelech from Worcester (AHL). Reas-
signedGThomas Heemskerk toWorcester. Activa-
ted F Tommy Wingles frominjured reserve. Placed
F Marty Havlat on injured reserve.
American Hockey League
PROVIDENCE BRUINS Reassigned F Justin
Courtnall to South Carolina (ECHL).
SPRINGFIELD FALCONS Recalled C Nathan
Moon from Evansville (ECHL).
ECHL
READING ROYALS Signed D Nathan Martine.
Released F Jeff Corey.
COLLEGE
NEW JERSEY CITY Named Justin McGhee,
Connor Medler and Dan Perrine assistant baseball
coaches.
TOWSON Announced it is discontinuing the
mens soccer program effective immediately, and
baseball programeffective at the end of the season
and will reinstate the mens tennis program.
B A S K E T B A L L
National Basketball
Association
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York ....................... 37 22 .627
Brooklyn......................... 36 26 .581 2
1
2
Boston ............................ 34 27 .557 4
Toronto........................... 24 39 .381 15
Philadelphia................... 23 38 .377 15
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-Miami ......................... 46 14 .767
Atlanta........................... 34 27 .557 12
1
2
Washington.................. 19 41 .317 27
Orlando ......................... 17 46 .270 30
1
2
Charlotte....................... 13 49 .210 34
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana............................ 39 23 .629
Chicago.......................... 35 27 .565 4
Milwaukee...................... 30 29 .508 7
1
2
Detroit ............................. 23 41 .359 17
Cleveland ....................... 21 41 .339 18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio.................. 48 15 .762
Memphis....................... 41 19 .683 5
1
2
Houston ........................ 34 29 .540 14
Dallas ............................ 28 33 .459 19
New Orleans ................ 21 41 .339 26
1
2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City ............. 46 16 .742
Denver .......................... 41 22 .651 5
1
2
Utah............................... 32 30 .516 14
Portland......................... 29 32 .475 16
1
2
Minnesota..................... 21 37 .362 23
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers................. 44 20 .688
Golden State ................ 35 28 .556 8
1
2
L.A. Lakers ................... 32 31 .508 11
1
2
Sacramento.................. 22 42 .344 22
Phoenix......................... 21 41 .339 22
x-clinched playoff spot
Friday's Games
Oklahoma City 116, Charlotte 94
Indiana 115, Orlando 86
Memphis 103, Cleveland 92
Brooklyn 95, Washington 78
Dallas 102, Detroit 99
Chicago 89, Utah 88
Boston 107, Atlanta 102, OT
Miami 102, Philadelphia 93
Portland 136, San Antonio 106
Sacramento 121, Phoenix 112
Houston 94, Golden State 88
L.A. Lakers 118, Toronto 116, OT
Saturday's Games
Brooklyn 93, Atlanta 80
New York 113, Utah 84
New Orleans at Memphis, late
Charlotte at Washington, late
Minnesota at Denver, late
Houston at Phoenix, late
Milwaukee at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Boston at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m.
Chicago at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Portland at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Brooklyn at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
New York at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
H O C K E Y
National Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh...................... 24 16 8 0 32 86 71
New Jersey ................... 24 11 8 5 27 59 67
N.Y. Rangers ................ 23 12 9 2 26 59 57
N.Y. Islanders ............... 25 11 11 3 25 76 82
Philadelphia .................. 26 11 14 1 23 72 80
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston............................ 22 16 3 3 35 67 48
Montreal......................... 24 15 5 4 34 75 61
Ottawa............................ 25 13 8 4 30 59 51
Toronto .......................... 25 15 10 0 30 75 65
Buffalo............................ 25 9 13 3 21 65 80
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina ......................... 23 13 9 1 27 69 66
Winnipeg ....................... 24 12 11 1 25 61 71
Tampa Bay .................... 24 10 13 1 21 82 75
Washington................... 23 10 12 1 21 68 68
Florida............................ 25 7 12 6 20 62 93
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago ......................... 25 21 1 3 45 80 52
Detroit ............................ 25 12 9 4 28 66 63
St. Louis......................... 24 13 9 2 28 74 73
Nashville........................ 24 10 9 5 25 53 59
Columbus...................... 25 9 12 4 22 58 70
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver ..................... 23 11 6 6 28 64 63
Minnesota...................... 22 11 9 2 24 52 56
Calgary .......................... 22 9 9 4 22 61 73
Colorado........................ 23 9 10 4 22 59 67
Edmonton...................... 24 8 11 5 21 54 71
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim........................ 23 17 3 3 37 81 60
San Jose........................ 23 11 7 5 27 54 54
Dallas............................. 23 12 9 2 26 66 65
Los Angeles .................. 22 12 8 2 26 62 57
Phoenix.......................... 24 11 10 3 25 70 71
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Saturday's Games
Boston 3, Philadelphia 0
N.Y. Islanders 5, Washington 2
Columbus 3, Detroit 0
St. Louis 4, San Jose 3, OT
Pittsburgh at Toronto, late
New Jersey at Carolina, late
Montreal at Tampa Bay, late
Minnesota at Nashville, late
Dallas at Phoenix, late
Calgary at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 6 p.m.
Winnipeg at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
H.S. GIRLS BASKETBALL
PIAA STATE PLAYOFF
GLANCE
Numbers in parentheses are district and seed-
ing followed by record. District 2 teams are in
bold.
CLASS 4A
FIRST ROUND
Friday's results
Archbishop Carroll 54, Upper Dublin 43
Cardinal OHara 46, Methacton 34
Central Dauphin 57, Boyertown 39
Central Dauphin East 48, Central Bucks West 46
Chartiers Valley 70, Allderdice 41
Cumberland Valley 35, Mount St. Joseph 34
Dover 54, West Chester Rustin 53
Gateway 50, Erie McDowell 49
Manheim Township 61, Philadelphia Central 20
Mount Lebanon 37, Bethel Park 34
Nazareth 41, Pennsbury 28
North Penn 44, Pocono Mountain West 38
Penn-Trafford 50, Hollidaysburg 41
Spring-Ford 59, Hershey 41
Wallenpaupack 43, Parkland 40
Wilson 41, Garnet Valley 34
SECOND ROUND
Tuesday's games
(Sites & times TBA)
Spring-Ford (1-1, 28-2) vs. Wallenpaupack (2-1,
21-4)
Dover (3-4, 26-3) vs. Nazareth (11-1, 24-4)
Cardinal OHara (12-1, 22-5) vs. Central Dauphin
East (3-3, 21-6)
Archbishop Carroll (12-3, 20-6) vs. Central Dauphin
(3-2, 21-6)
Wilson (3-1, 27-2) vs. North Penn (1-6, 23-5)
Cumberland Valley (3-5, 23-6) vs. Manheim Twp.
(3-6, 23-5)
Mount Lebanon (7-4, 23-3) vs. Penn-Trafford (7-5,
21-6)
Chartiers Valley (7-2, 19-7) vs. Gateway (7-3, 21-5)
CLASS 3A
FIRST ROUND
Saturday's results
Prep Charter 79, Eastern York 51
Gettysburg 45, Merion Mercy 36
BethlehemCatholic 60, ArchbishopPrendergast 43
Honesdale 44, Danville 30
Palmyra 68, Freire Charter 37
Scranton Prep 60, Southern Lehigh 57
Holy Redeemer 40, Athens 38
Villa Maria Academy 52, West York 40
Lancaster Catholic 89, Susquehannock 79 2OT
Archbishop Wood 60, Pope John Paul II 39
Forest Hills 46, Hampton 43
Blackhawk 86, Bradford 46
South Park 71, Hickory 44
Hopewell 45, Villa Maria 28
Elizabeth Forward 51, Central Valley 44
Franklin 66, Ligonier Valley 46
SECOND ROUND
Wednesday's games
(Sites & times TBA)
Prep Charter (12-1, 19-2) vs. Gettysburg (3-3, 22-6)
Bethlehem Catholic (11-1, 25-2) vs. Honesdale
(2-1, 24-3)
Palmyra (3-1, 29-0) vs. Scranton Prep (2-2, 26-2)
Holy Redeemer (2-3, 21-7) vs. Villa Maria Acade-
my (1-1, 22-5)
Lancaster Catholic (3-5, 29-1) vs. ArchbishopWood
(12-2, 18-9)
Forest Hills (6-1, 20-4) vs. Blackhawk (7-4, 25-1)
South Park (7-1, 24-2) vs. Hopewell (7-3, 22-4)
Elizabeth Forward (7-2, 23-3) vs. Franklin (10-1,
25-1)
CLASS 2A
FIRST ROUND
Friday's results
Bishop Canevin 51, Westmont Hilltop 37
Burrell 65, Bellwood-Antis 46
Delone Catholic 72, Holy Cross 48
Dunmore 44, Muncy 32
General McLane 51, Jeannette 34
Greensburg Central Catholic 58, Blairsville 39
Mohawk 52, Everett 44
Mount Carmel 80, GAR 70
Neumann-Goretti 76, Annville-Cleona 37
North East 59, McGuffey 49
Notre Dame-Green Pond 58, Southern Columbia
36
Pine Grove 49, Imhotep Charter 37
Seton-LaSalle 67, Kane Area 16
Sharpsville 38, Brookville 32
St. Basil 69, High School of the Future 29
York Catholic 72, Parkway Center City 30
SECOND ROUND
Tuesday's games
(Sites & times TBA)
Neumann-Goretti (12-1, 14-11) vs. Notre Dame-
Green Pond (11-1, 21-5)
DeloneCatholic (3-2, 20-7) vs. Saint Basil (1-1, 18-8)
York Catholic (3-1, 26-2) vs. Dunmore (2-1, 21-6)
Pine Grove (11-2, 23-4) vs. Mount Carmel (4-1,
23-4)
Bishop Canevin (7-1, 23-4) vs. General McLane
(10-2, 23-3)
Burrell (7-3, 23-3) vs. Sharpsville (10-3, 18-8)
Greensburg Central Catholic (7-6, 18-7) vs. Seton-
La Salle (7-2, 25-2)
Mohawk (7-5, 18-7) vs. McGuffey (7-7, 21-3)
CLASS A
FIRST ROUND
Saturday's results
Steelton-Highspire 91, Northeast Bradford 51
Jenkintown 58, Paul Robeson 27
Old Forge 60, High Point Baptist 26
Tri-Valley 52, Sayre 27
Lourdes Regional 51, Upper Dauphin 29
Girard College 35, Notre Dame-East Stroudsburg
33
Halifax 68, Motivation 25
Southern Fulton 63, Juniata Valley 30
Vincentian 58, Keystone 31
BerlinBrothersvalley 50, Portage 47
Port Allegany 52, Penns Manor 45
Kennedy Catholic 45, North Catholic 36
Bishop Guilfoyle 47, Johnsonburg 26
Serra Catholic 67, Cochranton 43
Conemaugh Twp. 49, Quigley Catholic 44
Clarion 52, Winchester Thurston 30
SECOND ROUND
Wednesday's games
(Sites & times TBA)
Steelton-Highspire (3-1, 24-4) vs. Jenkintown (1-2,
22-6)
Old Forge (2-1, 25-0) vs. Tri-Valley (11-1, 24-3)
Lourdes Regional (4-1, 21-5) vs. Girard College
(1-1, 21-4)
Halifax (3-2, 17-10) vs. Southern Fulton (5-2, 24-3)
Vincentian (7-1, 26-1) vs. BerlinBrothersvalley (5-3,
23-4)
Port Allegany (9-2, 22-4) vs. Kennedy Catholic
(10-1, 23-2)
Bishop Guilfoyle (6-1, 25-2) vs. Serra Catholic (7-2,
24-3)
Conemaugh Twp. (5-1, 22-4) vs. Clarion (9-1, 24-3)
H.S. BOYS BASKETBALL
PIAA STATE PLAYOFF
GLANCE
Numbers in parentheses are district and seed-
ing followed by record. District 2 teams are in
bold.
CLASS 4A
FIRST ROUND
Saturday's results
Chester 74, Cumberland Valley 43
Williamsport 62, Bethlehem Liberty 60
Great Valley 39, Wilson 32
Parkland 63, Ridley 53
Norristown 79, Roman Catholic 66
Coatesville 52, Lancaster McCaskey 51
St. Josephs Prep 48, Abington 33
York 67, Methacton 63
Harrisburg 87, Central Bucks South 41
Upper Darby 47, Bethlehem Freedom 45
Lower Merion 77, Carlisle 36
Martin Luther King 71, Reading 61
New Castle 63, Gateway 43
North Allegheny 84, State College 76
Hampton 50, Perry Traditional 41
Erie Cathedral Prep 79, Seneca Valley 54
SECOND ROUND
Wednesday's games
(Sites & times TBA)
Chester (1-1, 25-3) vs. Williamsport (4-1, 23-2)
Great Valley (1-4, 27-3) vs. Parkland (11-1, 22-7)
Norristown (1-9, 24-4) vs. Coatesville (1-5, 23-7)
St. Josephs Prep (12-3, 22-5) vs. York (3-2, 27-3)
Harrisburg (3-1, 27-2) vs. Upper Darby (1-6, 19-9)
Lower Merion (1-2, 26-3) vs. Martin Luther King
(12-2, 24-4)
New Castle (7-1, 27-0) vs. North Allegheny (7-4,
22-4)
Hampton (7-2, 22-5) vs. Erie Cathedral Prep (10-1,
22-2)
CLASS 3A
FIRST ROUND
Friday's results
Abington Heights 67, Shikellamy 37
Allentown Central Catholic 64, Northeastern 51
Archbishop Carroll 47, Berks Catholic 42
Beaver Area 60, Bradford 46
Chartiers Valley 71, Erie Strong Vincent 54
Donegal 64, GAR 44
General McLane 67, Thomas Jefferson 42
Girard 66, Mars 62
Johnstown 49, Lancaster Catholic 43
Imhotep Charter 79, Salisbury 34
Montour 52, South Fayette 43
Neumann-Goretti 81, Harrisburg Bishop McDevitt
54
Philadelphia Electrical 48, Palmyra 44
Pope John Paul II 59, Bethlehem Catholic 56
Scranton Prep 69, Milton 32
Susquehanna Township 62, Upper Moreland 42
SECOND ROUND
Tuesday's games
(Sites & times TBA)
Neumann-Goretti (12-1, 22-5) vs. Scranton Prep
(2-3, 19-8)
Donegal (3-3, 27-2) vs. Allentown Central Catholic
(11-1, 24-3)
Abington Heights (2-1, 26-2) vs. Philadelphia
Electrical (12-3, 16-11)
Imhotep Charter (12-2, 24-5) vs. Susquehanna
Twp. (3-4, 25-4)
Archbishop Carroll (12-4, 20-6) vs. Pope John Paul
II (1-2, 16-10)
Johnstown (6-1, 16-7) vs. Chartiers Valley (7-2,
23-4)
Montour (7-1, 23-4) vs. Girard (10-2, 21-5)
Beaver Area (7-4, 20-4) vs. General McLane (10-1,
21-5)
CLASS 2A
PLAY-IN
Thursday's result
Conemaugh Township 55, Westinghouse 44
FIRST ROUND
Saturday's results
Communications Tech 68, Camp Hill 43
Loyalsock 63, Mid Valley 54
William Sayre 56, New Hope-Solebury 54
Camp Hill Trinity 57, Meyers 47
Holy Cross 60, Lewisburg 55
Del-Val Charter 63, Conwell-Egan 59
Delone Catholic 63, Wellsboro 47
Constitution 66, Notre Dame-Green Pond 28
Beaver Falls 92, Bald Eagle Area 48
Mercyhurst Prep 56, Brockway 46
Greensburg Central Catholic 66, Penn Cambria 56
Lakeview 44, Quaker Valley 40
Conemaugh Twp. 53, Brentwood 49
Northern Cambria 58, Apollo-Ridge 53
Bishop McCort 62, Burrell 43
West Middlesex 55, Jeannette 50
SECOND ROUND
Wednesday's games
(Sites & times TBA)
Communications Tech (12-1, 20-7 vs. Loyalsock
(4-1, 25-3)
WilliamSayre (12-4, 18-9) vs. Camp Hill Trinity (3-2,
19-7)
Holy Cross (2-1, 24-5) vs. Del-Val Charter (12-5,
10-15)
Delone Catholic (3-1, 18-9) vs. Constitution (12-3,
17-9)
Beaver Falls (7-1, 24-3) vs. Mercyhurst Prep (10-3,
18-8)
Greensburg Central Catholic (7-6, 23-2) vs. Lake-
view (10-2, 22-4)
Conemaugh Twp. (5-1, 24-3) vs. Northern Cambria
(6-2, 22-5)
Bishop McCort (6-3, 19-8) vs. West Middlesex
(10-1, 23-3)
CLASS A
FIRST ROUND
Friday's results
Bishop Carroll 58, Shanksville-Stoneycreek 32
Church Farm School 58, New Hope Academy
Charter 44
Clairton 76, Cochranton 48
Johnsonburg 62, Eisenhower 30
Lincoln Park Charter 54, Kennedy Catholic 45
Mahanoy Area 58, Muncy 44
Neumann 84, Harrisburg Christian 38
Philadelphia MC&S 86, Gospel of Grace 41
Pius X 50, Old Forge 47
Ridgway 63, Homer-Center 39
Sankofa Freedom 54, Lebanon Catholic 41
Shade 75, Pittsburgh North Catholic 47
Smethport 62, Bishop Guilfoyle 56
Sullivan County 56, Greenwood 32
Vaux 63, Delco Christian 42
Vincentian Academy 82, North Clarion 47
SECOND ROUND
Tuesday's games
Sankofa Freedom (12-3, 15-11) vs. Pius X (11-2,
21-3)
Phila. MC&S (12-2, 24-2) vs. St. John Neumann
(4-1, 24-2)
Church Farm (1-1, 22-6) vs. Mahanoy Area (11-1,
22-5)
Sullivan County (4-2, 23-3) vs. Vaux (12-1, 20-8)
Vincentian (7-1, 26-1) vs. Bishop Carroll (6-2, 22-5)
Ridgway (9-2, 23-5) vs. Lincoln Park (7-4, 20-6)
Smethport (9-4, 23-3) vs. Clairton (7-2, 17-7)
Shade (5-1, 26-1) vs. Johnsonburg (9-1, 27-2)
A U T O R A C I N G
NASCAR
Nationwide-Sam's Town 300
Results
Saturday
At Las Vegas Motor Speedway
Las Vegas, Nev.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (7) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200 laps, 145.6 rating,
48 points, $98,520.
2. (23) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 117.1, 0, $60,600.
3. (1) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 200, 127.4, 42,
$45,750.
4. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 106, 41, $39,350.
5. (15) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 103.5, 39,
$34,850.
6. (4) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 111.5, 39,
$34,350.
7. (12) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 102.7, 38,
$23,900.
8. (18) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 200, 92.2, 36,
$30,425.
9. (3) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 100.2, 35,
$27,735.
10. (31) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 200, 79.6, 34,
$28,350.
11. (5) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 92, 0, $26,625.
12. (17) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 200, 79.9, 32,
$26,075.
13. (11) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 81.7, 31,
$25,525.
14. (32) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 85, 0,
$19,015.
15. (10) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 199, 81.4, 29,
$25,330.
16. (9) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 198, 70.8, 28,
$24,545.
17. (20) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 198, 59.7, 27, $24,360.
18. (21) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 198, 67, 0, $24,425.
19. (27) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 198, 64.3, 25,
$24,515.
20. (40) Scott Lagasse Jr., Chevrolet, 198, 58, 24,
$24,680.
21. (22) Blake Koch, Toyota, 198, 64.2, 23,
$23,895.
22. (36) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 197, 49.2, 22,
$17,760.
23. (37) Dexter Stacey, Ford, 197, 50, 21, $17,625.
24. (14) Hal Martin, Toyota, 197, 52.6, 20, $23,515.
25. (26) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 195, 45.5, 19,
$23,515.
26. (34) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 195, 57.1, 19,
$23,545.
27. (16) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 194, 55.1, 17,
$23,085.
28. (30) Juan Carlos Blum, Ford, 193, 36.8, 16,
$22,940.
29. (29) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, 192,
34.6, 15, $22,790.
30. (8) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 189, 72.7, 14,
$22,955.
31. (25) Daryl Harr, Chevrolet, 189, 32.7, 13,
$22,525.
32. (13) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, accident, 182,
65.9, 13, $22,415.
33. (38) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, accident, 181, 36.3,
11, $22,300.
34. (19) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 167, 46.3, 10,
$22,189.
35. (28) JasonWhite, Toyota, 156, 40.3, 9, $22,080.
36. (35) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, engine, 153,
33.8, 0, $14,820.
37. (6) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 144, 92.4, 0,
$14,775.
38. (33) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 16, 33.1, 6,
$14,740.
39. (39) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, vibration, 5, 30.2,
5, $14,490.
40. (24) Eric McClure, Toyota, oil pump, 2, 28.7, 4,
$20,455.
SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAge 3C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com W W W . T I M E S L E A D E R . C O M / S P O R T S
PENGUINS SUNDAY
My Hometown
John Hynes
Planning a beach vacation this summer
but cant decide between New Jersey or
Delaware? Try Rhode Island.
If John Hynes wasnt a hockey coach,
hed make a great tourism director for his
home state. Hynes grew up in Warwick, a
city in the middle of Rhode Island known
for its coastline and beaches. And as a
native son, Hynes knows all the places a
visitor to the area needs to see. There are
lighthouses, beaches, marinas with mon-
strous sailboats and yachts, and plenty of
seafood.
Hynes can tell you where to see it all,
and its a big reason why he and his fam-
ily return to the beaches of home every
summer.
Sports are also an important part of
Warwick. The city has produced three ma-
jor league baseball players, an NHL goalie
that paved the way for Martin Brodeur and
another who was a medal-winning Olym-
pian for the U.S. womens ice hockey team.
Now, Hynes can add his name to the list as
a professional ice hockey coach.
This Friday the Penguins played in
nearby Providence, making it a tting time
for Hynes to tell us about growing up in
Warwick.
Penguins head coach John Hynes
Hometown: Warwick, R.I.
Type: Coastal city
Population: 86,672 (2010 Census)
Distance from Wilkes-Barre: 292 miles
Considering Rhode Island is the small-
est state in the country, the same cant
be said of Warwick, can it? Its pretty
big. Its the second-largest city in the state
and there are four public high schools and
two Catholic high schools. Its right in the
middle of the state near Providence and
Narragansett.
Theres quite a few famous sports
gures from Warwick, including a few
pro baseball and hockey players. I
knew Billy Almon (MLB player 1974-1988)
because hes from a big family in Rhode
Island. Rocco Baldelli (MLB player from
2003-2010) was an up-and-coming player
when I was in high school and college.
Sara DaCosta (two-time Olympic medalist
with the womens ice hockey team) went
to the same high school I did, three years
after me. She was one of the rst female
goalies to play D-I high school hockey in
Rhode Island. Shes denitely well-known.
And Chris Terreri (goaltender with the New
Jersey Devils, Sharks, Blackhawks and
Islanders, 1987-2001), when we were grow-
ing up he was a name everyone knew.
Is the 39 miles of coastline a major
feature of Warwick? Yes. We have a
lot of beaches and marinas where the
yachts come in. Lighthouses and plenty of
seafood, too.
Whats the best seafood place that
only the locals know about? Aunt Car-
ries is the place. Clamcakes and chowder.
Thats one theyre known for and thats
where the locals go.
I imagine Warwick has spectacular
scenery along the coast? Its impres-
sive. Just the whole area. You have
Narragansett, Newport, Jamestown - its a
beautiful area in the summer and theres
a lot of lighthouses, such as Point Judith
and Newport. In Jamestown and Newport
you have the tall ships that come in from
all over the world. Theres just a lot to do
and see in the summer and its all acces-
sible. You can take one road and go to the
beaches, the shops in the small towns and
the seafood places.
What did you do outside of hockey
while growing up in Warwick? My family
was big into the beach. We had a beach-
house that wed rent out through our
family and everyone would go there all
summer. We still do that to this day, every
July.
Is Warwick a place youd like to move
back to at some point? Theres always
a possibility because you have family
and friends. Whether we have a chance
to reside there or not, its somewhere we
will always go back to visit. Especially in
the summer. We enjoy it as a family to go
back and have our daughters experience
the beach, seafood and whole eastern
seaboard. Its denitely somewhere wed
visit every year.
STANDINGS
Samuelssons style of play a family tradition
Just like dad
T
he last name and number on the jersey are the same, as is the style
of play. Despite the similarities, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins
defenseman Philip Samuelsson said he is different than his father,
former NHL-great Ulf Samuelsson. To a degree.
By TOMVENESKY | tvenesky@timesleader.com
NEXT F I VE GAMES
March 10
at Manchester
5 p.m.
March 13
at Worcester
7 p.m.
March 15
at Worcester
7:30 p.m.
March 16
at Portland
7 p.m.
March 20
at Syracuse
7 p.m.
L AST F I VE GAMES
Feb. 27
Norfolk
L, 2-1
March 1
Hershey
L, 3-2
March 2
Albany
W, 2-1
March 8
at Providence
L, 2-0
March 9
at Portland
(n)
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins defenseman Philip Samuelsson is the son of Ulf Samuelsson, who cultivated his
reputation as a erce defenseman on the Pittsburgh Penguins two Stanley Cup teams.
I have some of my dad in me for
sure, but I dont think its quite up to
his level, Samuelsson said. He was
a little more aggressive. Im a little
bit of a toned-down, modernized
version of him because you cant get
away with as much as you could back
then.
The elder Samuelsson spent 16
seasons in the NHL and posted 2,453
penalty minutes in 1,080 games.
He was the face of the Pittsburgh
Penguins defense, playing there for
fve seasons, including both Stanley
Cup championship teams in the early
1990s.
But what Ulf Samuelsson is
remembered for most is his physical
play -- a style that created fear in op-
ponents and plenty of controversy.
Some may say Philip Samuelsson
is headed down the same path. Like
his father, physical play is the key to
his game, but its not the only focus.
Now in his second AHL season,
Samuelsson headed into this week-
ends road trip as the teams leader
in plus-minus with a plus-10. Its
evidence that Samuelsson has made
great strides in his defensive play
since last years rookie season when
he often found himself a healthy
scratch.
He spent the summer working on
his strength and foot speed, and the
improvement has translated into
better play this season, Samuelsson
said. Hes also worked to add a bit of
an offensive element to his game and
has shown a willingness to shoot the
puck that may not have been appar-
ent last season.
But the biggest improvement,
Samuelsson said, has come from
within.
In this organization there are
a lot of good players up and down
the depth chart, and you cant get
frustrated with where youre at, he
said. For me, the main thing is to
keep positive and keep the same even
keel.
Thats not to say physical play is
taking a back seat in Samuelssons
game. He understands its the key to
reaching the NHL and Samuelssons
ability to crunch an opponent may
be what sets him apart from other
blueliners.
Its an attribute that his father
warned him not to stray away from.
Hes always talking to me about
not losing that part of my game. I
know I have to have a sound defen-
sive game, but at the same time I
dont want to be glued on the blue-
line and not do anything. The main
thing is for me to be physical and
solid defensively.
Head coach John Hynes is glad
that Samuelsson is aware that his
physicality is the key to his game.
He acknowledged that being a well-
rounded player is also important, but
not at the expense of giving up the
one attribute that sets a player apart.
To make it to the NHL you better
play to what your strengths are,
Hynes said. In Philips case its
defending and being tough to play
against. Being a well-rounded player
is important, but there has to be one
element in your game thats desirable
at the NHL level.
Having physical play as a strength
can be tricky for a young player.
Avoiding the dirty hits is imperative,
but there has to be enough of an edge
to still create a bit of fear.
Its a line that the elder Samu-
elsson crossed at times, but there
was always plenty of fear when an
opponent ventured into his defensive
zone.
You have to be right on that edge
of clean and dirty without getting
caught or putting someone else in
danger, the younger Samuelsson
said. My dad thinks Ive come a long
way since last year, and I have to
agree with him.
Its been 18 years since a Samu-
elsson nameplate with the number
fve graced the back of a Pittsburgh
Jersey. Philip hopes his turn to renew
the family tradition is on the horizon.
Its always been my dream to carry
it to the NHL, and for that to be in
Pittsburgh would be very special, he
said. Im looking forward to having
that happen someday soon.
American Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Providence 57 34 18 0 5 73 161 145
Portland 57 33 20 2 2 70 167 169
Manchester 58 28 24 3 3 62 170 158
Worcester 55 26 23 1 5 58 135 153
St. Johns 59 23 31 1 4 51 142 184
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Syracuse 59 35 17 3 4 77 201 160
Binghamton 57 34 17 1 5 74 171 142
Hershey 58 28 22 3 5 64 152 146
PENGUINS 58 30 25 2 1 63 132 131
Norfolk 57 26 26 4 1 57 140 158
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Springfeld 56 34 15 4 3 75 179 132
Connecticut 59 27 24 5 3 62 168 179
Albany 55 24 20 1 10 59 147 157
Bridgeport 57 24 24 5 4 57 170 192
Adirondack 56 22 30 2 2 48 132 164
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Grand Rapids 56 33 19 2 2 70 185 155
Chicago 54 28 19 4 3 63 148 142
Rockford 57 29 26 1 1 60 175 169
Milwaukee 57 27 24 3 3 60 144 168
Peoria 57 25 25 4 3 57 142 170
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto 55 30 19 2 4 66 174 148
Rochester 55 30 22 2 1 63 180 157
Lake Erie 60 27 24 2 7 63 170 176
Abbotsford 60 27 25 3 5 62 127 146
Hamilton 57 23 28 1 5 52 122 167
South Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Texas 59 33 16 4 6 76 173 152
Charlotte 58 34 19 2 3 73 179 149
Houston 57 29 21 4 3 65 154 149
Oklahoma City 56 27 21 2 6 62 176 184
San Antonio 56 26 25 1 4 57 147 161
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an
overtime or shootout loss.
Fridays Games
Syracuse 3, St. Johns 2, SO
Manchester 4, Portland 3, OT
Adirondack 2, Springfeld 1
Bridgeport 4, Albany 2
Grand Rapids 2, Hamilton 1
Binghamton 3, Connecticut 0
Rochester 5, Abbotsford 0
Providence 2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 0
Norfolk 5, Hershey 1
Rockford 4, Oklahoma City 3, SO
Milwaukee 4, Chicago 3
San Antonio 5, Texas 4, SO
Saturdays Games
Abbotsford at Toronto, (n)
Springfeld at Albany, (n)
Syracuse at St. Johns, (n)
Houston at Charlotte, (n)
Connecticut at Adirondack, (n)
Providence at Worcester, (n)
Peoria at Hamilton, (n)
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Portland, (n)
Lake Erie at Grand Rapids, (n)
Rochester at Binghamton, (n)
Hershey at Norfolk, (n)
Rockford at Oklahoma City, (n)
Milwaukee at Chicago, (n)
Sundays Games
Portland at Worcester, 3 p.m.
Houston at Charlotte, 3 p.m.
Peoria at Toronto, 3 p.m.
Adirondack at Albany, 3 p.m.
Connecticut at Providence, 3:05 p.m.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Manchester, 5 p.m.
Binghamton at Hershey, 5 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Hamilton, 5 p.m.
Rockford at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Abbotsford at Rochester, 5:05 p.m.
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
ECHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Reading 61 38 17 3 3 82 208 165
Elmira 61 33 21 3 4 73 209 186
Wheeling 60 26 23 3 8 63 159 178
Trenton 62 25 29 4 4 58 183 215
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Cincinnati 63 39 17 5 2 85 203 166
Toledo 61 31 21 5 4 71 191 166
Kalamazoo 60 29 26 4 1 63 174 175
Fort Wayne 61 29 29 1 2 61 170 203
Evansville 61 22 34 2 3 49 176 229
South Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Gwinnett 64 36 25 2 1 75 186 174
Florida 61 31 20 4 6 72 216 214
South Carolina 63 32 24 4 3 71 170 156
Greenville 61 32 23 2 4 70 197 184
Orlando 60 26 29 2 3 57 166 202
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Mountain Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
x-Alaska 63 45 12 2 4 96 202 147
x-Idaho 62 39 16 1 6 85 238 176
x-Colorado 61 30 26 2 3 65 208 191
Utah 61 23 29 4 5 55 176 241
Pacifc Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
x-Ontario 62 41 15 3 3 88 221 170
x-Stockton 63 31 23 5 4 71 198 193
x-Las Vegas 61 30 26 2 3 65 172 169
San Francisco 61 21 33 1 6 49 162 217
Bakersfeld 63 19 39 2 3 43 155 223
x-Clinched Playoff Berth
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an
overtime or shootout loss.
Fridays Games
Reading 3, Orlando 0
Wheeling 5, Trenton 2
South Carolina 3, Greenville 2
Kalamazoo 6, Evansville 3
Cincinnati 3, Toledo 0
Florida 6, Fort Wayne 3
Colorado 4, Utah 3, OT
Idaho 5, Gwinnett 3
Bakersfeld 4, Ontario 2
Alaska 3, San Francisco 2
Stockton 4, Las Vegas 3
Saturdays Games
Orlando at Elmira, (n)
Wheeling at Reading, (n)
Greenville at South Carolina, (n)
Toledo at Kalamazoo, (n)
Florida at Fort Wayne, (n)
Evansville at Cincinnati, (n)
Colorado at Utah, (n)
Gwinnett at Idaho, (n)
Ontario at Bakersfeld, (n)
Alaska at San Francisco, (n)
Las Vegas at Stockton, (n)
Sundays Games
Florida at Kalamazoo, 3 p.m.
Orlando at Trenton, 3:05 p.m.
Reading at Elmira, 4:05 p.m.
Greenville at South Carolina, 5:05 p.m.
Las Vegas at San Francisco, 5:15 p.m.
Colorado at Utah, 6:05 p.m.
Ontario at Stockton, 7 p.m.
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6,000 SF facility
2.6 acres
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Wilkes-Barre Area
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3-bay garage with offce
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4,800 SF 2-story offce building
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1110 Hanover Street
Hanover Industrial Estates
Hanover Township, PA
10,046 Sq. Ft. to 133,000 Sq. Ft.
15.64 acres
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30 to 336 clear ceilings
20 loading doors
1 drive-in door
Wet sprinkler system
600 Baltimore Drive
East Mountain Corporate Center
Plains Township, PA
2,773 Sq. Ft. available
Second foor, Class-A offce space with
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Located (1) mile from I-81
Parcel 8, Alberigi Drive
Jessup Small Business Center
Jessup, PA
96,000 Sq. Ft. fex facility
10.02 acres
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306 to 336 ceilings
14 loading doors, 1 drive-in door
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Abundant parking
400 Stewart Road
Hanover Industrial Estates
Hanover Township, PA
53,040 Sq. Ft. available

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SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 Page 5C TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
WO M E N S R O U N D U P
Griner leads Baylor
to win over Texas
The Associated Press
DALLAS (AP) Brittney
Griner had 19 points, 13 re-
bounds and a career best nine
assists, and No. 1 Baylor built a
quick 25-point lead in an 80-47
victory against Kansas State in
the quarternals of the Big 12
womens tournament Saturday.
Griners effort came ve days
after she scored a Big 12-record
50 points in a win over the Wild-
cats in her nal regular-season
home game.
Kansas State (15-17) was
within three well into the sec-
ond half of last weekends loss in
Waco, Texas, but this time the
Wildcats were down 21-3 just 7
minutes in when coach Deb Pat-
terson called her third timeout.
Destiny Williams had 20
points to lead the Lady Bears
(30-1), who clinched their third
straight season with at least 30
wins.
Brittany Chambers led Kan-
sas State with 21 points.
Patterson ended up using all
four 30-second timeouts in the
rst 11 minutes.
Duke 72, Florida State 66
GREENSBORO, N.C.
Haley Peters had 17 points and
13 rebounds including the
go-ahead basket with 4:06 left
to help sixth-ranked Duke
beat No. 23 Florida State in
the Atlantic Coast Conference
tournament seminals.
Tricia Liston also scored 17
for the top-seeded Blue Devils
(29-2), who never trailed yet
had a tough ght all day with
the fourth-seeded Seminoles
(22-9). The teams were tied
with about 5 minutes left before
Peters basket started Dukes
go-ahead push.
Peters, a 6-foot-3 junior, had a
huge performance after manag-
ing just ve points and three
rebounds in Fridays quarter-
nals against North Carolina
State. She nished 8-for-14 from
the oor and had six offensive
rebounds.
Chelsea Davis scored 17
points to lead Florida State,
which was in the seminals for
only the third time in program
history. All three runs have
ended with losses to Duke.
North Carolina 72,
Maryland 65
GREENSBORO, N.C.
Latifah Coleman scored 15 of
her career-high 17 points in the
nal 6-plus minutes and No.
15 North Carolina beat No. 10
Maryland in an Atlantic Coast
Conference seminal.
Tierra Rufn-Pratt added 20
points for the third-seeded Tar
Heels (28-5).
They rallied from a 14-point
halftime decit the second-
biggest comeback in the history
of the tournament by shoot-
ing 50 percent in the second
half and will face No. 6 Duke in
the title game Sunday.
Alyssa Thomas had 26 points,
12 rebounds and nished three
assists shy of a second straight
triple-double for the second-
seeded Terrapins (24-7), and
Katie Rutans 3-pointer with
2:45 left tied it at 60.
Coleman responded by hit-
ting jumpers on the next two
possessions, and Rufn-Pratt
followed with four straight free
throws to propel the Tar Heels
to their league-record 18th
berth in the title game but rst
since 2008.
Dayton 74,
George Washington 49
PHILADELPHIA Andrea
Hoover scored 15 points and
grabbed nine rebounds as No.
11 Dayton breezed to a victory
over George Washington in the
quarternals of the Atlantic 10
Conference tournament.
The top-seeded Flyers (27-1),
who were unbeaten in confer-
ence play this season, shot 60
percent (18 of 30) in the rst
half for a 43-21 lead over the
Colonials (14-16), who de-
feated Richmond in the opening
round.
Hoover scored 11 points in
the rst half and Samantha
MacKay had 10 of her 12 points
for the Flyers, who beat George
Washington 80-52 in their only
regular-season meeting. Dayton
took control with a 12-0 run
that gave the Flyers a 23-11 lead
10:25 before halftime.
Kelley Austria scored 13
points for the Flyers and sank
3 of 4 from 3-point range, and
Jodie Cornelie blocked ve
shots.
Tara Booker scored 12 points
and Shi-Heria Shipp 11 for
George Washington.
Green Bay 80,
Milwaukee 56
MILWAUKEE Lydia Bauer
scored 22 points and No. 20
Green Bay completed an unde-
feated Horizon League season,
defeating Milwaukee.
Adrian Ritchie had 19 points
and seven rebounds, Stephanie
Sension scored 11 and Brean-
nah Ranger nished with 10
points for the Phoenix (26-2,
16-0), who have won 21 in a
row. They have now had six
unbeaten regular seasons in
the Horizon League. Green Bay
will host the league tournament
beginning Wednesday.
Green Bay never trailed and
used a 14-0 run to take a 28-11
lead. Milwaukee couldnt close
the gap to single digits after
that point.
Ashley Greene, with 20
points, was the only player in
double gures for the Panthers
(9-19, 5-11). Green Bay has
won 17 in a row in the series
between the in-state rivals.
M E N S R O U N D U P
Georgetown claims 1st in Big East
WASHINGTON On an
afternoon that Otto Porter Jr.
didnt make a eld goal until
the second half, No. 5 George-
town used stiing defense
to close its Big East rivalry
against No. 17 Syracuse with
a 61-39 victory Saturday that
gave the Hoyas the regular-
season conference title.
Georgetown sent Syracuse
off to the Atlantic Coast
Conference with the Oranges
lowest-scoring Big East game.
Porter nished with 10
points, but the national player
of the year candidate contrib-
uted in plenty of other ways, as
usual, with eight rebounds and
seven assists.
Markel Starks scored 19, and
freshman DVauntes Smith-
Rivera had 15 points, ve re-
bounds and ve assists for the
Hoyas (24-5, 14-4), who will be
the No. 1 seed at the Big East
tournament next week in New
York.
Syracuse (23-8, 11-7) was led
by Michael Carter-Williams 17
points.
Memphis 86, UAB 71
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Joe
Jackson had 17 points, 10 as-
sists and nine rebounds on Sat-
urday to help No. 25 Memphis
complete an undefeated season
in Conference USA with a vic-
tory over UAB.
Chris Crawford led Memphis
scorers with 20 points, hitting
5 of 10 shots beyond the arc,
while Geron Johnson had 19
points.
Miami 62, Clemson 49
CORAL GABLES, Fla.
Down to its third try and last
chance, Miami came through.
Kenny Kadji scored a
season-high 23 points to help
the sixth-ranked Hurricanes
win the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence championship outright
by beating Clemson 62-49 on
Saturday.
Louisville 73,
Notre Dame 57
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Gorgui
Dieng had 20 points, 11 re-
bounds and ve blocks to help
No. 8 Louisville earn a share
of the Big East Conference
title with a victory over No. 24
Notre Dame.
Peyton Siva added 13 points
and ve assists in his nal
home game for the Cardinals
(26-5, 14-4 Big East), who
nished tied for rst place with
Georgetown and Marquette.
Louisville receives a bye into
Thursdays quarternals at the
Big East tournament, where
coach Rick Pitinos team will
defend its 2012 title.
Dieng and Siva were hon-
ored before the game as part of
Louisvilles senior day fes-
tivities. Dieng, a junior center
from Senegal, is expected to
enter the NBA draft after the
season.
Garrick Sherman led Notre
Dame (23-8, 11-7) with 14
points. The Fighting Irish
will next play Wednesday in
the conference tournament at
Madison Square Garden.
Louisville shot 67 percent
(16 of 24) for its best rst half
of the season. But Notre Dame
held the Cardinals without a
eld goal for nearly six min-
utes early in the second half
to cut the lead to 45-40 on Pat
Connaughtons 3-pointer with
12:56 left.
Oklahoma State 76,
Kansas St. 70
STILLWATER, Okla.
LeBryan Nash scored 24
points, Marcus Smart added
21 and No. 13 Oklahoma State
hurt No. 9 Kansas States
chances to win the Big 12
championship by beating the
Wildcats 76-70 on Saturday.
The Wildcats (25-6, 14-4 Big
12) came into the day tied with
rival Kansas for the conference
lead, but were left needing the
Jayhawks to lose on the road at
Baylor later Saturday to come
away with their rst confer-
ence title since 1977 in the Big
Eight.
Kentucky 61, Florida 57
LEXINGTON, Ky. Julius
Mays two free throws with
9.4 seconds remaining capped
Kentuckys comeback from a
seven-point decit for a upset
of No. 11 Florida that revived
its NCAA tournament pros-
pects.
Archie Goodwins 16 points
led the way in a game that
Wildcats coach John Calipari
described Friday as do or
die for his defending national
champions. Kentucky needed
a signature win to maintain
its hopes for an NCAA tourna-
ment bid.
Marquette 69,
St. Johns 67
NEW YORK Vander
Blues driving shot fell through
the rim as the overtime buzzer
sounded, giving No. 15 Mar-
quette a victory over St. Johns
at Madison Square Garden,
and a share of the Big East
regular season championship,
their rst title since joining the
conference in 2005-06.
Blue had 16 points, includ-
ing four of Marquettes six in
overtime, for the Golden Ea-
gles (23-7, 14-4 Big East), who
nished second in the Big East
last season and were picked
seventh in the preseason con-
ference poll in November. This
was their fourth straight win
and sixth in seven games and
the Golden Eagles get a bye to
the quarternals on Thursday.
Saint Louis 78, La Salle 54
ST. LOUIS Dwayne Evans
had 16 points and 17 rebounds
and No. 16 Saint Louis hit 17
of its 20 shots in a pull-away
second half, clinching a share
of the Atlantic 10 title with a
victory over La Salle.
Kwamain Mitchell had 19
points and six assists on Senior
Day for Saint Louis (24-6,
13-3 A-10), which won its rst
conference title since 1970-71
in the Missouri Valley. Rob Loe
matched his career best with
20 points, hitting all seven
shots and the Billikens shot
58 percent overall, one game
after shooting a season-worst
30 percent in an overtime loss
at Xavier.
Saint Louis has won 12 of 13
and can take the title outright
if VCU loses at Temple on
Sunday.
Tyrone Garland had 15
points off the bench for La
Salle (21-8, 11-5).
Arizona 73, Arizona St. 58
TUCSON, Ariz. Nick
Johnson scored 17 points,
Solomon Hill added 12 in his
nal home game and No. 18
Arizona earned a rst-round
bye in next weeks Pac-12 tour-
nament with a rout over rival
Arizona State.
A late-season slide left
Arizona (24-6, 12-6 Pac-12)
needing a win or some help to
avoid playing next Wednesday
in the conference tournament.
The Wildcats took care of it
themselves, building a 15-point
lead in the rst half and an-
swering a big second-half run
by the Sun Devils with one of
their own.
Utah 72, Oregon 62
SALT LAKE CITY Ja-
son Washburn had 20 points
and 13 rebounds, and Jarred
DuBois added 15 points and
several key baskets down the
stretch to propel Utah past No.
19 Oregon.
Jordan Loveridge and
Brandon Taylor chipped in 14
points apiece for the Utes (13-
17, 5-13), who won consecutive
Pac-12 games for the rst time
since joining the league. It also
marked the rst time Utah beat
a ranked Pac-12 opponent in
league play.
Pittsburgh 81, DePaul 66
ROSEMONT, Ill. J.J.
Moore scored 21 points off the
bench and No. 20 Pittsburgh
shot a school-record 72 percent
to beat DePaul in the Panthers
last Big East regular-season
game.
The next stop for surging
Pittsburgh is its nal Big East
tournament, which begins
Tuesday at Madison Square
Garden in New York. The
Panthers (24-7, 12-6), who will
move into the Atlantic Coast
Conference next season, have
won 11 of their last 14 games
and six of eight on the road.
UCLA 61, Washington 54
SEATTLE Shabazz
Muhammad scored 21 points,
Larry Drew II came up with
another huge shot against
Washington, and No. 23 UCLA
clinched the Pac-12 Conference
regular season title with a win
over the Huskies.
UCLA earned its third regu-
lar-season crown under coach
Ben Howland. The Bruins won
the title outright after Oregon
was upset at Utah.
Memphis 86, UAB 71
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Joe
Jackson had 17 points, 10 as-
sists and nine rebounds to help
No. 25 Memphis complete an
undefeated season in Confer-
ence USA with a victory over
UAB.
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Georgetown guard Markel Starks cuts down the net after
Georgetown beat Syracuse 61-39 in an NCAA basketball game
to win the Big East Conference regular-season title on Saturday
in Washington.
ANN ARBOR, Mich. It
began on the last day of De-
cember, when Michigan State
showed up at Minnesotas
Williams Arena on a six-game
winning streak and left with a
13-point loss.
Along the way, Tyler Griffey
slipped past Indiana, Ben Brust
stunned Michigan and Trey
Burke stole the show against
Michigan State.
Each week brought new dra-
ma, and now, one of the most
exhilarating Big Ten races in
recent memory will nally end
in a most appropriate way.
Indiana can clinch an out-
right championship on Sunday
with a win at Michigan, but if
the Wolverines prevail, as many
as four teams could share the
title.
It will be a tting conclu-
sion after the Big Tens heavy-
weights went through 2
months of emotional peaks and
valleys to reach this last day.
Do I reect on how fortu-
nate I am to coach at this level
against these type of players?
Yes. Its an opportunity that ev-
ery coach would like to have,
Michigan coach John Beilein
said. I do try to take a moment
in the games, and just look up
at the top of the stadium and
see how its packed to the last
row.
The Big Ten had three teams
in the APs preseason top ve.
Nowthere are four in the top 14
and 14th-ranked Ohio State
has a chance to move up after
beating No. 2 Indiana on Tues-
day night.
Despite that loss, the Hoo-
siers still lead the league by a
game over Michigan, Michi-
gan State and Ohio State. That
means the Spartans and Buck-
eyes are both in an unusual
situation: They need to hope
Michigan wins.
Its my dream that this pro-
gram is to the point where
every year in the last week
we still have a mathematical
chance to win a championship,
Michigan State coach Tom Izzo
said after his team stayed in
the race Thursday night with
a win over Wisconsin. What
happens, happens. I mean that
because we had our chance to
do it.
If it werent for Wisconsins
home loss to Purdue last week-
end, an unbelievable ve-way
tie at the top would be a possi-
bility but the four teams still
in the hunt can also look back
on a slip-up or two that could
have perhaps been avoided.
Michigan lost to Penn State
late last month it was the
rst conference win of the
season for the Nittany Lions.
Indiana let Griffey sneak in for
a last-second layup in Illinois
74-72 win over the Hoosiers in
early February.
Ohio State was blown out by
that same Illinois team. Michi-
gan State was in an early hole
because of that 76-63 loss at
Minnesota.
But all four teams were able
to recover. Burkes steal and
dunk in the nal minute lifted
Michigan over Michigan State.
The fearless point guard has
carried the Wolverines at times,
emerging as one of the front-
runners for national player of
the year. His main competition
may be another Big Ten star
Indianas Victor Oladipo.
The race for Big Ten player of
the year may be down to those
two, but theres little doubt
about who made the shot of the
year. Wisconsin trailed Michi-
gan by three on Feb. 9 when
Brust sent the game into over-
time with a buzzer-beater from
near midcourt. The Badgers
went on to win.
Wisconsin fell out of the
race Thursday, losing 58-43 at
Michigan State. Now the Spar-
tans (23-7, 12-5 Big Ten) need
to hope Michigan beats Indiana
on Sunday.
If that happens, No. 10 Mich-
igan State can tie for the title
by beating Northwestern in a
game that starts at 6 p.m. local
time.
Ohio State (22-7, 12-5) hosts
Illinois at 12:30. Indiana and
Michigan start at 4.
I just want to play well on
Sunday. That is where our fo-
cus is completely, Ohio State
coach Thad Matta said. We
have one more game to play to
end the regular season and that
is the only thing that is on my
mind and hopefully the only
thing on our players minds.
The seventh-ranked Wolver-
ines (25-5, 12-5) rallied past
Purdue on Wednesday night.
They now carry not only
their own title hopes, but those
of the rival Buckeyes and Spar-
tans.
B1G nish: Still 4 teams alive for Big Ten title
By NOAH TRISTER
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
Baylor head coach Kim Mulkey shouts instructions to her team
during the second half of an NCAA basketball game against
Kansas State in the Big 12 Conference tournament Saturday in
Dallas. Baylor won 80-47.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 6C SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 S P O R T S
Meyers careers by scoring 13
points each.
When I think back to what
these two boys have done,
Meyers coach Pat Toole said.
Rasheed and Ryan, youre talk-
ing about two kids that won
90 games in their high school
careers, didnt lose a league
game in four years, both scored
over 1,000 points. Ive been re-
ally lucky to coach them for four
years.
Moore drained a pair of free
throws for a 9-2 lead less than
three minutes into the game.
Trinity, though, regrouped and
outscored the Mohawks 29-15
the rest of the rst half for a 31-
24 lead at the break.
We were trying to get our
legs. We got a little bit de-
layed, said Trinity coach Larry
Kostelac, whose team had to
endure a bus ride of over 2 1/2
hours. Then when we got here,
we were trying to nd out where
to unload the bus. We drove
around 10 minutes around that
damn block. No one was around,
theres no parking lot.
Finally, I told the guy Youre
in a one-lane lane, a one-way
road, just pull over to the left,
were walking in.
The Shamrocks stepped on
the gas early in the third quar-
ter, using a 6-0 burst for their
rst double-digit lead of the
game. The run came after Kraw-
czeniuk recorded a three-point
play to start the quarter, moving
Meyers within 31-27.
The Mohawks chopped the
decit to single digits three
times, but Trinity responded to
each to pump its advantage to
10 or more.
You expend so much energy
just getting to that, Toole said.
Even when we trapped them,
its hard to ask with our limited
bench for the guys to play with
that much energy.
Meyers was within 51-43 with
1:26 to play when Krawczeniuk
hit a free throw. But he fouled
out on his second attempt, and
four consecutive free throws by
Trinity sealed the victory.
Trinity was paced by Domi-
nick Antonelli, whose father was
a basketball star at Nanticoke.
Antonelli scored a game-high 22
points, one of three Shamrocks
in double gures. The victory
also moved Kostelac one shy
of 600 for his coaching career.
Trinity was also strong on the
boards with a 33-22 rebounding
edge.
TRINITY (57): Brad Wesner 1-8 2-2 4,
Dominick Antonelli 8-15 2-2 22, Brandon
Kuntz 4-7 3-5 11, Josh Trumpy 3-4 1-1 7, Jay
Agnew 1-4 0-0 2, Dylan DeFrankk 3-7 2-4
10, Mike Gagliardi 0-0 0-0 0, Jack Vukelich
0-0 0-0 0, Chris Rozman 0-0 0-0 0, Brenden
Latimore 0-0 0-0 0, Michael Hayes 0-0 0-0 0,
Kline Patrick 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 20-45 10-14 57.
MEYERS (47): Matt DeMarco 1-4 0-0 3, CJ
Szafran 5-8 0-1 11, Ryan Krawczeniuk 5-12
3-5 13, Rasheed Moore 5-10 3-4 13, Dominic
Pittman 3-7 0-1 7, Simran Mangat 0-0 0-0 0,
Michael Kendra 0-0 0-0 0, Tyler Smallcomb
0-0 0-0 0, Anthony Havard 0-0 0-0 0, Ryan
Wasley 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 19-41 6-11 47.
Trinity 11 20 17 9 57
Meyers 11 13 12 11 47
Three-point FGS: TRI 6-15 (Antonelli 4,
DeFrank 2); MEY 3-12 (DeMarco, Szafran,
Pittman).
Rebounds: TRI 33 (Kuntz 8, Trumpy 8);
MEY 22 (Moore 9).
MEYERS
Continued from Page 1C
PI AA WRESTL I NG
ED BOARDMAN/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wyoming Areas Andy Schutz (rear) competes in a seminal bout in Hershey Saturday.
Schutz ends career on winning note
Lake-Lehmans Austin Harry took a fourth-place medal.
HERSHEY If a wrestler
wins the last match of his ca-
reer, he will have lasting good
memories.
So even though Andy
Schutz didnt reach the ulti-
mate goal of a state gold over
the weekend at the PIAA Class
2A Championships, he left
with a very good consolation
prize: a victory in his nal en-
counter.
The Wyoming Area
126-pounder won his seventh-
place match on Saturday af-
ternoon at the Giant Center
defeating Saegertowns Nick
Monico, 3-0 in the nal bout of
his career.
That was the objective,
said Schutz, who plans on
wrestling in college but hasnt
made any commitments yet.
Its hard to wrestleback, but I
denitely didnt want to go out
with a loss so gured I might
as well nish while Im here.
Schutz had a rivalry over
the last few years with Lake-
Lehmans Austin Harry, who
was the only other District
2 wrestler in Class 2A to
claim a state medal. Harry, a
132-pounder, placed fourth,
losing to Hanovers Ian Brown
5-0 in the third-place match.
Schutz got his points work-
ing the tilt in the second pe-
riod and getting three for the
nearfall. He rode out Monico
the rest of the period. And in
the third period he ended in
the bottom position not be-
ing able to escape, but didnt
get turned either. He became
the rst state medalist at Wyo-
ming Area since 1996 when
Don Morgan also won the
nal match of his career tak-
ing third. Schutz also ends his
career with the most wins in
school history with 125.
I guess the hard work is
just paying off, Schutz said.
I know thats my answer for
everything but thats all I can
really say about it.
Harry meanwhile, dropped
the nal match of his junior
season. But he did improve on
last years eighth-place show-
ing after not medaling as a
freshman. He was hampered
by an ankle injury he reaggre-
vated during his match with
Brown after being taken down
in the rst period. He couldnt
escape from the bottom posi-
tion in the second period, then
allowed an escape and another
takedown in the third period.
Denitely not what I
wanted, but fourth place is
denitely better than eighth
and denitely better than not
placing at all, said Harry,
who is Lehmans rst consecu-
tive state medalist since Matt
Dragon in 2004 and 2005. So
Im improving each year and
hopefully next year it will be
even better.
Working in Harrys favor for
next season is that Keystone
Oaks Nick Zanetta, who has
been Harrys nemesis over the
last two seasons with victo-
ries in the quarters, will have
graduated. Zanetta nished
second on Saturday, losing to
now two-time state champ Ja-
son Nolf from Kittaning. Nolf
and Brown, though, are un-
derclassmen and will be back
next season.
I just have to work harder
than them over the summer
to improve, the Black Knight
said. The goal is to nish odd
(rst, third, fth, seventh) but
Im top four in the state and
I cant really complain about
that. A lot of people cant say
theyve ever done that. I still
have another year and fourth
place is pretty good.
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
rst round Saturday at William-
sport High.
We took a couple of steps
late in the game, Royals coach
Chris Parker said. When we
needed a stop, we got it. After
they shot, we got the rebound.
We didnt give them second-
chance opportunities. And Alex-
is Lewis had that huge steal to
give us the lead.
We didnt play our best game,
but we gutted it out.
With the win, Holy Redeemer
(21-7) advances to the second
round Wednesday against Dis-
trict 1 champion Villa Maria,
at a site and time to be deter-
mined. Athens ends its season
21-5, though the Wildcats put a
scare into the Royals.
But the nish wasnt without
drama and a ashback to
nightmares past.
It was like the game against
Nanticoke in our league, Wil-
son said. They hit a three-point-
er with one second left to send
that game (Jan. 30) to overtime
(which Redeemer won).
There was no need for extra
time Saturday, even though
there were ve ties and seven
lead changes most of them in
the nal quarter.
But when Wilson grabbed the
nal rebound, the Royals came
off the bench to celebrate their
victory. The ofcials, however,
had awarded a timeout to Park-
er with one second left, forcing
Redeemer to run an inbounds
play.
Coach had told us not to foul,
and denitely not to give them
an and-one opportunity, Wilson
said of the nal shot by Athens.
He also said to make sure they
didnt get off a three.
After a slow start by both
teams, the Royals rattled off
nine consecutive points for an
early 9-2 edge. Included in that
run was two fouls against Ath-
ens top defender, Rachel Don-
nelly, sending her to the bench
for the rest of the half.
But the Wildcats clawed back,
using uncontested threes to
knot the game at 11 in the sec-
ond quarter. Athens enjoyed a
couple of other easy baskets to
stay within a shot, 18-16, at half-
time.
A quicksand pace continued
into the second half, where for
all their efforts, the Royals could
not put Athens away. Wilson hit
a three, Sara Altemose made
a jumper from the corner and
Lewis converted a couple of la-
yups to give Redeemer a 25-18
lead three minutes into the sec-
ond half. Athens then lulled the
Royals to sleep with its deliber-
ate pace and posted 12 of the
next 15 points to take the lead
30-28 a minute into the fourth.
Weve been consistently re-
minding them that basketball
is a game of runs, Parker said.
Youve got to be able to ght
through the down times and re-
group. We did tonight.
The teams traded buckets un-
til Lewis steal with 34 seconds
left. She got her right hand be-
tween the ball and Stoppers
hand mid-dribble, took one drib-
ble herself and put up an uncon-
tested layup to give Redeemer a
39-38 lead. Royals junior Alyssa
Platko then batted a pass by
Athens Christin Dunkling to
Lawson, who was fouled with
12 seconds remaining.
Lewis had 17 points, 12 re-
bounds and six steals for Re-
deemer. Platko had six rebounds
and Lawson posted a game-high
ve assists. The Royals forced
23 turnovers, 14 via steals, and
held a 32-27 rebounding edge.
Winning at states, this feels
really good, Wilson said. Espe-
cially with our team play, every-
one was a part of this.
Dunkling led Athens with six
boards.
HOLY REDEEMER (40):Alexis Lewis 6 5-5
17, Alana Wilson 2 0-0 6, Alyssa Platko 3 1-4 7,
Lydia Lawson 0 3-4 3, Sara Altemose 1 0-0 2,
Chelsea Skrepenak 1 0-0 2, Sara Warnagiris 1
1-1 3, Brianne Frascella 0 0-0 0. Totals 14 10-
14 40.
ATHENS (38): Rachel Donnelly 0 0-0 0,
Danielle Stopper 3 0-2 6, Monica Dougherty
6 2-2 17, Danielle Dougherty 1 0-0 3, Christin
Dunkling 4 2-2 10, Mackenzie Warner 0 0-0 0,
Mackenzie Hafer 0 0-0 0, Jensen Dunkling 1 0-2
2. Totals 15 4-8 38.
Holy Redeemer 11 7 10 12 40
Athens 8 8 12 10 38
Three-point goals: HR 2 (Wilson 2), ATH 4
(M. Dougherty 3, D. Dougherty).
GIRLS
Continued from Page 1C
top three in the state, and even
brought emotions out of head
coach Drew Feldman.
He wanted top three at states
for four years now. I wanted him
to achieve every goal, and to be
four points away, its hard to ac-
cept right now, Feldman said.
Its (the emotions are) a com-
bination (of joy and sorrow). Im
a little disappointed he leaves. It
was such a great ride but I re-
ally wanted him to get top three
for his sake.
Im so proud of him. He set
every record in our school, so
no complaints.
Emerick also wrestled in the
third-place bout going against
Kiski Areas Shane Kuhn in a re-
match of a bout held in the con-
solation round last season. The
Crusaders 285-pounder, who
would have loved becoming the
rst state champion in school
history, settled for fourth place.
He concludes his season with
a record of 39-3 and 108 career
wins after the 3-0 loss to Kuhn.
Its been a good (career). Ive
been wrestling well throughout
my high school career. Cant ask
for anything else, Emerick said.
I wish I placed a little higher.
But you cant dwell on that thats
water under the bridge right
now. Now Im just looking for-
ward to taking a little break and
get back lifting to make sure I
get stronger and denitely look
forward to college.
Krasavage was hit with his
rst loss of the season Saturday
morning dropping a 7-3 deci-
sion to two-time champion and
three-time state nalist Connor
Schram from Canon-McMillan
in the semis. But losing to the
state champion softened the
blow. Krasavage couldnt get
anything going in the loss trail-
ing 5-0 in the second period be-
fore getting an escape. He also
got an escape point in the third
period to go along with a point
for a stalling called on Schram.
My experience of losing
in the semis and going out, I
wasnt going to let that happen
to him since third was so close
within reach, Feldman said.
Emerick couldnt overcome
Erie Central Techs Andrew
Welton in the semis, losing 3-0.
He was in the down position in
the second period, was held to
the mat the entire period and
wasnt the same after that. The
match was scoreless after two
periods and in the third Welton
managed an escape and a take-
down for the win.
Hammerstone, Crestwoods
145-pounder, dropped his third-
round consolation match Satur-
day morning to fall into the sev-
enth-place match. In that bout,
he lost 3-2 to Mason Bentzel from
Spring Grove and took eighth.
The senior almost pulled off
another dramatic victory with
a takedown at the end of the
match, but it wasnt awarded.
He became the rst medalist at
Crestwood since Jake OHara in
2009. Hammerstones season
concludes with a mark of 34-9
and 108 career wins.
I was on the wrong end of
that one nally, Hammerstone
said about the near victory. I
gave it my last shot at the end.
I thought it was close. But Ive
always been taught not to let it
come down to that. Not to let it
in the refs hands. Its only my
fault that happened, but what
are you gonna do?
It was a great experience.
Eighth place isnt exactly where
I wanted to be here, but Ill take
it and Ill take it in stride and
move on and try to reach bigger
and better things in college.
CLASS 3A
Continued from Page 1A
ED BOARDMAN/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Kyle Krasavage earned a fourth-place medal in the Class 3A
126-pound bracket at the state championships on Saturday.
He leaves Wyoming Valley West with the most wins in program
history.
H o w T H E Y FA R E D
Heres how the local wrestlers
competing in the PIAA Champi-
onships fared on Saturday
Class 2A
Matt Welliver, Northwest Area
(Benton 120): Third-place match:
Against Nathan Reckner from
South Side Beaver, he won 5-1;
Place: Third
Andy Schutz, Wyoming Area
(126): Seventh-place match:
Defeated Nick Monico from Sae-
gertown, 3-0; Place: Seventh
Austin Harry, Lake-Lehman
(132): Third-Place match: Lost to
Hanovers Ian Brown 5-0; Place:
Fourth
Class 3A
Kyle Krasavage, Wyoming Val-
ley West (126): Seminals: Lost
to Connor Schram from Canon-
McMillan 7-3; Fourth round con-
solations: Defeated Dallastowns
Rodney Sunday, 4-2; Third-Place
match: Lost to North Hills Tyler
Walker, 8-4; Place: Fourth
Jalen Palmer, Delaware Valley
(132): Third round consolations:
Dropped a 1-0 decision to Robert
Rizzolino from Easton; Seventh-
place match: Against Drew
Walker from North Hills, he lost
10-0; Place: Eighth
Matt Hammerstone, Crestwood
(145): Third round consolations:
Lost 7-0 to Manheim Townships
Adam Smith; Seventh-place
match: Versus Mason Bentzel of
Spring Grove, he lost 3-2; Place:
Eighth
Martin Strenk, Delaware Valley
(182): Third round consolations:
Beat Gordon Bolig from Owen J.
Roberts, 3-2; Fourth round conso-
lations: Pinned in 1:20 by Marcus
Johnson from Governor Mifin;
Fifth-place match: Lost to Adam
Nickelson from Belle Vernon
Area, 12-2; Place: Fifth
Brad Emerick, Coughlin (285):
Seminals: beaten by Central
Techs Andrew Welton, 3-0;
Fourth round consolations: Beat
Warwicks Tom Devenney, 3-2;
Third-place match: Against Kiski
Areas Shane Kuhn, he lost 3-0;
Place: Fourth
twice in quick succession. Chris
Conner struck rst during a
4-on-4 situation when he beat
Thiessen on a rebound with less
than six minutes left in the pe-
riod. Just 1:27 later, Brown con-
nected on the power play when
he took a pass from behind the
net and roofed a shot just under
the crossbar to tie the game at
2-2.
NOTES
D Cody Wild, RW Chris Mi-
nella, C Phil Dupuis, RW Steve
Macintyre were scratched for
the Penguins.
Brian Dumoulin was in the
starting lineup for his rst pro
game in his home state. The
Penguins defenseman was born
and raised in Biddeford, which
is located less than 20 miles
from Portland.
PENS
Continued from Page 1C
Times Leader Staff
The Wilkes softball team fell
just short in extra innings of
a doubleheader on Saturday,
dropping a pair of games at the
Sea Gull Classic at Salisbury
University.
Wilkes lost 2-0 to Allegheny
before falling 4-3 in eight in-
nings to Randolph-Macon.
Brooke Chapin pitched all
seven innings in the rst game,
allowing seven hits while
striking out three for the Lady
Colonels.
Jessalyn Paveletz led the
Lady Colonels in the second
game, nishing 3-for-3 with one
RBI and one run scored. Laykin
Hughes took the loss in the
circle going seven innings al-
lowing eight hits and four runs
(three earned) striking out one.
Wilkes will face rival Kings
at the Betzler Fields complex
next Saturday to open Freedom
Conference play.
WOMENS LACROSSE
Albright 18, Kings 8
Host Albright opened a 11-4
halftime lead en route to a 10-
goal victory over Kings.
Krystina Villarreal led the
Lady Monarchs with two goals
while Amanda Harney added
one goal and one assist. Alisa
Marino made 12 saves in net.
Two tough losses for Wilkes softball
Miller leads
Whitecaps
The Associated Press
VANCOUVER, British Co-
lumbia Kenny Miller scored
in the 57th minute and the
Vancouver Whitecaps remained
undefeated with a 2-1 victory
over the Columbus Crew on
Saturday night.
The Crew dropped to 1-1 af-
ter winning their season opener.
Daigo Kobayashi also scored
for Vancouver, while Jairo Ar-
rieta replied for Columbus.
Miller stole the ball from
Columbus defender Glauber,
rushed toward the goal and
red a shot past goalkeeper
Andy Gruenebaum from just
inside the 18-yard box to put
Vancouver ahead 2-1.
DC UNITED 1,
REAL SALT LAKE 0
WASHINGTON Lionard
Pajoy scored on an opportunis-
tic header in the 60th minute
to lift D.C. United to victory in
their home opener.
United (1-1-0) stretched
their home unbeaten run to
17 matches (13-0-4) with the
win. Their last home loss came
in last years season opener
against Kansas City.
TORONTO FC 2,
SPORTS KANSAS CITY 1
TORONTO Robert Earn-
shaw scored twice in the rst
half and Toronto FC snapped a
15-game MLS winless streak by
beating Sporting Kansas City.
The second half was a differ-
ent story.
M L S
TAMPA, Fla. Saying he
made the decision before arriv-
ing at spring training, Mariano
Rivera announced Saturday that
he will retire at the end of the
season and hopes to cap his re-
cord-setting career by winning
another World Series with the
New York Yankees.
Rivera was surrounded by
family and teammates when he
made the announcement during
a news conference at the teams
complex.
The 43-year-old has a clear vi-
sion of how he wants his career
to end.
The last game I hope will be
throwing the last pitch in the
World Series, he said. Win-
ning the World Series, that
would be my ambition.
With the entire Yankees team
looking on including long-
time teammates Derek Jeter
and Andy Pettitte Rivera said
he knew the time was right for
his decision.
I have just a few bullets left,
he said.
He then made his rst game
appearance since April 30,
throwing a 1-2-3 fth inning
against Atlanta. Looking like his
overpowering self of old, Rivera
retired Dan Uggla on a popup to
second, then threw called third
strikes past Juan Francisco and
Chris Johnson.
Rivera holds the career saves
record with 608 and has helped
the Yankees win ve World Se-
ries titles. He is regarded as
the greatest closer of all time,
whether hes throwing his cut
fastball in the regular season or
postseason.
We just have a special rela-
tionship, Pettitte said. I dont
know how to explain it. Obvi-
ously, when you spent as much
time together after as many
years as weve been together,
you just kind of grow a little
closer to one another than you
would with other teammates.
Hes always been there for me.
Rivera missed most of last
year after tearing his right knee
while shagging yballs during
batting practice in early May.
Rivera said he would have re-
tired at the end of last season if
he had not gotten hurt.
I didnt want to leave like
that, he said. I felt like I want-
ed to give everything.
He also said he wanted to give
Yankees fans around the major
leagues a chance to see him one
more time, knowing this will be
the end.
Im actually appreciative
that we get to enjoy him for one
more year, Yankees manager
Joe Girardi said. I think hes
prepared to go 100 percent. I
think hell have a good year. Its
been a real treat for me. I was
relaxed when he came into the
game as a catcher, and Im re-
laxed when he comes into the
game as a manager, so thats
probably about the highest com-
pliment you can pay a closer.
Riveras wife and two children
were by his side for the news
conference. He began by play-
fully thanking the Yankees for
giving him a new contract for
two additional years through
2015 which would break a
team policy of not negotiating
new deals before the old ones
expire.
Its not too easy when you
come to a decision like this, Ri-
vera said, turning serious. Af-
ter this year, I will be retired.
Now youre hearing it from me.
Its ofcial now.
While others have proclaimed
him the best closer in baseball
history, Rivera wouldnt put that
label on himself.
I dont feel myself, the great-
est of all time. Im a team play-
er, he said. I would love to be
remembered as a player who
was always there for others.
Yankees general Brian Cash-
man said he knew Riveras in-
tention was to retire last season.
Hes irreplaceable, Cash-
man said. He is the greatest of
all-time. Ive known him since
he was in the minor leagues,
and hes never changed once.
You see a lot of players that get
a lot of money, become famous
and change over time. He hasnt
changed a bit. Ive got more re-
spect for him as a player and
person because of that.
Hall of Fame reliever Goose
Gossage, a Yankees guest in-
structor, called Rivera not only
a great pitcher, but as great a
person. Gossage noted that
the role of closer has gone from
multiple innings to basically a
one-inning job.
Mo is as good as anybody
thats ever done it, Gossage
said. The last thing I want to
do is take anything away from
this guy, he is great. But I would
throw out the challenge that, do
what we did and well compare
apples to apples. We didnt get
to pitch just one inning, but I
believe today is the way they
should be used.
Former Yankees catcher Jorge
Posada said there is only one
Mariano Rivera.
There wont be another per-
son who will come along and do
what he did, Posada said in a
statement. Im so happy he is
going out on his terms. Now ev-
ery time he steps into a ballpark
this year, teams and fans can
celebrate and appreciate what
he has meant to this great game
we play.
SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAge 7C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com B A S E B A L L
Yankees closer Rivera says this is nal season
AP PHOTO
Yankees front ofce, coaches and teammates listen as New York
Yankees pitcher Mariano Rivera, far right announces his plans to
retire at the end of the season during a news conference Satur-
day in Tampa, Fla.
By MARK DIDTLER
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
The New York Mets Ike Davis runs in to score during an exhibition game against the Houston Astros on Saturday in Port St.
Lucie, Fla.
CLEARWATER, Fla.
Sean Rodriguez and Shelley
Duncan homered Saturday
and the Tampa Bay Rays beat
the Philadelphia Phillies 15-7.
Ryan Howard hit his fourth
spring homer for the Phillies.
Ben Revere and Humberto
Quintero each added three
hits.
Rays starter Jeff Niemann
allowed one run and four hits
in 3 2-3 innings.
Phillies starter John Lannan
gave up four runs in the third,
including a two-run homer by
Rodriguez.
The Rays scored four times
in the seventh and six more in
the eighth, battering reliev-
ers Antonio Bastardo and B.J.
Rosenberg.
Cardinals 2, Marlins (ss) 0
JUPITER, Fla. Adam
Wainwright struck out six in
4 2-3 innings and the St. Louis
Cardinals blanked a Miami
Marlins split squad.
Wainwright gave up three
hits and walked one. He had
allowed eight hits and four
earned runs over three innings
in his previous spring outing.
Braves 2, Yankees 1
TAMPA, Fla. Derek Jeter
and Mariano Rivera returned
from injuries to make their
2013 spring training debuts in
the New York Yankees loss to
the Atlanta Braves.
The 38-year-old Jeter was a
designated hitter and singled
sharply to left eld on his rst
pitch since breaking his left
ankle on Oct. 13 in the AL
championship series opener.
Jeter, who missed New Yorks
rst 13 spring training games,
grounded out to third base in
his only other at-bat.
Hours after announcing
this will be his nal season,
the 43-year-old Rivera made
his rst game appearance
since April 30, throwing a
1-2-3 fth inning. Looking like
his overpowering self of old,
Rivera retired Dan Uggla on a
popup to second, then threw
called third strikes past Juan
Francisco and Chris Johnson.
Jays 4, Tigers 2
DUNEDIN, Fla. Jose
Bautista hit a two-run homer,
doubled and scored twice for
the Toronto Blue Jays in a vic-
tory over the Detroit Tigers.
Bautista homered in the rst
inning off Doug Fister. The
Toronto star doubled in his
next at-bat, and the Blue Jays
chased Fister with two more
runs before the right-hander
could record an out in the
fourth.
Twins 5, Pirates 4
BRADENTON, Fla. A.J.
Burnett prepared for his
opening-day start by allowing
two runs and two hits in 4
2-3 innings in the Pittsburgh
Pirates loss to the Minnesota
Twins.
Cole De Vries made his
second start and fourth ap-
pearance of spring training for
Minnesota and gave up one
run not earned and one
hit in three innings.
Mets 9, Astros 6
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla.
Lucas Duda and John Buck
drove in two runs each and Ike
Davis scored three times as
the New York Mets beat the
Houston Astros.
Duda went 3 for 3 with a
double, while Buck had two
hits and increased his spring
training RBIs total to seven.
Davis was 2 for 2 with a walk,
stolen base and a RBI.
Houstons Carlos Pena hit a
two-run homer in the fourth.
Rockies 8, Angels 6
TEMPE, Ariz. Albert Pu-
jols hit his rst spring training
home run, a third-inning drive
off Juan Nicasio on during the
Los Angeles Angels loss to the
Colorado Rockies.
Pujols, coming off right
knee surgery during the
offseason, was 0 for 3 Tues-
day against Cincinnati in his
spring training debut. The
three-time MVP again was
the designated hitter against
Colorado and went 1 for 3.
Royals 13, Giants 2
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.
Johnny Giavotella and Brett
Hayes each drove in four runs,
Yordano Ventura pitched three
hitless innings and the Kansas
City Royals beat the San Fran-
cisco Giants.
Billy Butler and David
Lough each added three hits.
The Royals nished with 20
hits, including nine in 1 2-3
innings against Giants starter
Yusmeiro Petit.
Indians 9, Cubs 2
MESA, Ariz. Jason
Kipnis hit his rst home run of
the spring and Cedric Hunter
also connected, leading the
Cleveland Indians over the
Chicago Cubs.
Kipnis came into the game
hitting .227 with two RBIs. He
led off the fourth with a home
run against reliever Brooks
Raley.
Dodgers 3, Mariners 2
GLENDALE, Ariz. Alex
Castellanos hit a two-run
homer in the seventh inning,
lifting the Los Angeles Dodg-
ers over the Seattle Mariners.
Castellanos hit his third
homer this spring, connecting
against Yoervis Medina.
Rangers (ss) 5, Padres 2
PEORIA, Ariz. Texas
starter Matt Harrison was
scratched because of an
inamed toe on his left foot,
missing a Rangers split
squads win over the San
Diego Padres.
Neil Ramirez and Tan-
ner Scheppers both pitched
scoreless innings, starting a
nine-pitcher six-hitter.
Rangers (ss) 4, Athletics 3
SURPRISE, Ariz. Brad
Snyder homered and Leonys
Martin added an RBI single to
help the Texas Rangers beat
the Oakland Athletics.
Shane Petersons two-run
single gave Oakland a 3-2 lead
in the seventh, but Snyder
homered off Ryan Cook in the
bottom half and pinch-hitter
Jorge Alfaro singled home Ed-
win Garcia with the go-ahead
run.
Diamondbacks 11,
White Sox 9
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.
Adam Eaton had four hits and
Aaron Hill had three, helping
the Arizona Diamondbacks
defeat the Chicago White Sox.
Rodriguez, Duncan homer as Rays beat Phillies
The Associated Press
Fierce brawl
mars WBC
victory for
Canadians
PHOENIX A erce brawl
that saw Alfredo Aceves and
several players throw nasty
punches erupted Saturday in
the ninth inning of Canadas
10-3 romp over Mexico in the
World Baseball Classic in a
melee that also involved fans.
The ghts broke out after
Canadas Rene Tosoni was hit
by a pitch from Arnold Leon
with Canada leading 9-3 at
Chase Field, home of the Ari-
zona Diamondbacks. It turned
into a wild scene, as chaotic as
any on a major league eld in
recent years.
Even when the sticuffs
ended, a full water bottle
thrown from the crowd struck
the face of a Canadian coach.
Canada shortstop Cale Iorg
angrily threw the bottle back
into the crowd.
Several police ofcers came
onto the eld trying to restore
order, and there were a few
skirmishes in the seats. Seven
players were ejected.
There had already been
several hard plays on the bases
when things got out of hand.
Shortly before Tosoni was a hit,
a bunt single by Canada seemed
to heighten the tension a
tiebreaker in the WBC relies
heavily on scoring runs, and the
Canadians were trying to pad
their margin.
Adrian Gonzalez, Justin
Morneau and Joey Votto were
among the big-name, high-
priced stars playing in the
game. The ght was exactly the
kind of thing that must have
made major league managers
and general managers cringe at
the thought of one of their play-
ers getting hurt in such a fracas.
Dominican Republic 6,
Spain 3
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
Carlos Santana homered, Robin-
son Cano had three hits and the
Dominican Republic beat Spain
at the World Baseball Classic.
The Dominican team
improved to 2-0 in Group C
and will advance to the second
round in Miami if Puerto Rico
beats Venezuela later Saturday.
Cuba 14, Taiwan 0
TOKYO Yasmany Tomas
hit a three-run homer in the
fourth inning as Cuba routed
Taiwan in the second round of
the World Baseball Classic.
Tomas second home run of
the tournament gave Cuba a
commanding 6-0 lead at Tokyo
Dome, and the 2006 runner-up
added eight runs in the sixth
before the game was ended
under the mercy rule.
The Associated Press
More bad
news for
Santana
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. The
New York Mets hoped Johan
Santana might pitch in a spring
training game next week, which
would have given him an out-
side chance to start on Opening
Day as originally planned. But
after Santana felt fatigue in his
shoulder Saturday, he did not
participate in workouts with
the rest of the team, yet another
sign that the two-time Cy Young
Award winner could begin the
season on the disabled list.
Due to the fact hes been
throwing and throwing, there
might be a little fatigue in there,
and thats why I told him today
stay in there and make sure to
do some stuff to work on your
shoulder, manager Terry Col-
lins said.
Collins said Santana felt no
new discomfort in his shoulder.
But while the rest of his team-
mates participated in workouts
outdoors, Santana spent the day
indoors to do shoulder exercises
to bolster strength and exibil-
ity. Pitching coach Dan Warthen
said he approached Santana
about taking charge of his own
rehab schedule so long as he
agreed not to risk a major set-
back by rushing the process.
I nally went to him and
said you know, if were pushing
things, then lets go ahead and
go at your pace, Warthen said.
Dont look at my chart. You
tell me what you want.
The grind of pitching 117 in-
nings before his shutdown last
season prompted Santana to
cut back on his offseason throw-
ing. After devoting his previ-
ous winters enduring rigorous
rehab, the two-time Cy Young
Award winner hoped the time
off would serve his body well.
Instead, Santana surprised
team ofcials when he arrived
at camp unprepared to begin
normal workouts. After two
bullpen sessions, in which
Santana lacked strength in his
shoulder, the Mets halted his
throwing program and then
questioned the change in his off-
season routine.
The comments last week
irked Santana, who threw an
unscheduled bullpen session
last Sunday, his attempt to quell
any doubts about his physical
condition. Warthen said San-
tana bounced back strong from
the mound session, which the
followed with a light throwing
session on Wednesday. Santana,
who has yet to address the situ-
ation publicly, had also contin-
ued a long toss program.
Until Saturday, all of his work
appeared to put him in line for
game action.
By MARC CRAIG
Newsday
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 8C SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 S P O R T S
and this past year in a dual
role while also coaching Holy
Redeemers divers, Jacobs will
oat off into retirement.
Well, not exactly.
Jacobs still plans to conduct
his summer diving program at
the Valley West pool - which at-
tracts athletes fromgrade school
to high school from throughout
Northeastern Pennsylvania and
beyond. And if some school
should call him to give a strug-
gling diver some advice, Ill be
glad to, Jacobs said.
But for the most part, Jacobs
will leave behind all the success
hes had coaching divers in the
high school pool for nearly two
decades as a head coach and as-
sistant and watch his son, Rob-
bie Jacobs, begin competing as
a swimmer at the college level
next year.
Its been a long ride. Ive en-
joyed it, Jacobs, 45, said. Im
going to miss it, but I know its
time. Ive missed a lot of things
with my own son. Ive raised
everybodys sons except my
own. Fortunately, Ive been able
to see him swim here in high
school. But his T-ball games, his
(Kingston) Huskies (mini) foot-
ball games, I wasnt able to be
there. Because I was here.
His collegiate meets, I dont
want to miss those things.
The Spartans will surely miss
Jacobs.
Its sad to see that hes leav-
ing after so many years, said
Valley West senior Collin Vest,
a District 2 record-holder and
four-time district champ who
will compete in his fourth
straight state tournament under
Jacobs this week. He denitely
has inuenced me the most
out of anybody in my diving
career, even in life in general.
He doesnt sugar-coat anything.
And life isnt going to sugar-coat
anything.
Hes taught me to deal with
things, push through them and
give my best at all times.
Vest isnt the only diver whos
made dramatic strides following
the directions of Jacobs.
Five years ago, Billy Williams
broke the Valley West diving
record Jacobs held for 23 years.
Vests sister, Vanessa, also won a
district championship for Valley
West. And even divers from oth-
er schools, such as current Rut-
gers gymnast and former Dallas
diving star Sara Skammer - who
nished sixth in the state as a
freshman - came through the
summer programJacobs runs to
nd immedate high school suc-
cess.
Hes had a lot of success,
period, Valley West swimming
coach Frank Tribendis said.
Kelsey Williams thinks she
knows why.
He knows how the mind of
a diver thinks, Williams said.
Theres a lot of psychological
things to overcome to be a diver.
He knows how to help you over-
come your fears.
The Redeemer senior got an
extended stint of rst-hand ex-
perience with that this year.
When Holy Redeemer lost its
former diving coach to a college
job before the start of the 2012-
13 season, Jacobs didnt hesitate
to lend a helping hand with the
approval of Royals coach Maura
Pawlenok.
I said to Maura, Well all
practice together, well work
together as a team, as one,
Jacobs said. They pushed each
other, theyre like a family.
Guided by Jacobs, Kelsey Wil-
liams pushed to the forefront
during her senior year, setting
new school and pool records
almost weekly throughout the
season, then winning the Dis-
trict 2 Class 2A girls diving
championship while earning her
rst trip to the state champion-
ships.
But she needed some help to
get there.
Oh yes, agreed Kelsey Wil-
liams, who will be joined at
states by her sophomore sister-
a third-place nisher at districts.
There were many dives I was
terried of, like the 2 1/2-front
somersault. I had problems with
it in the past. I was just really,
really afraid of it. He (Jacobs)
taught me the only way out is
through, to get over your fears.
I couldnt have done nearly
as good had he not been my
coach.
Most of the divers who will
give Jacobs his nal ride to
states echo that sentiment.
I dont think Id be the diver
I am without him, said Valley
Wests District 2 Class 3A girls
champion Karina Zabresky. He
was a really good coach. He
taught me not to give up.
Jacobs did that with tough
love.
He wants you to do your best
and he wants you to do the dives
right, Zabresky said.
He pushes so hard, said Col-
lin Vest, who pushed aside the
district diving record as a junior
last season with a score of 534.
He doesnt let you take it easy
at practice at all. If he believes
you can do a dive, hes going to
push you.
Hes probably one of the
hardest coaches around.
Jacobs admits that.
But for him, and his divers,
the reward comes when they
walk up to the medal stand at
districts and states.
Thats my job as a coach,
Jacobs said. Im not here to be
a buddy. There were days when
every single one of them cant
stand me. But Im here to take
you to things you dont expect
to get.
They will get up on the diving
board one more time at states
this week, hoping to take their in-
structor on a nal, magical ride.
Im just pushing as hard as I
can to do my best, Collin Vest
said, to make sure he enjoys it
and I enjoy it.
DIVING
Continued from Page 1C
AP PHOTO
Tiger Woods has recorded 24 birdies a career-best through
three rounds to lead the eld at the Cadillac Championship
golf tournament on Saturday in Doral, Fla.
DORAL, Fla. Tiger Woods
hit a tee shot that got stuck in a
palm tree. Thats about the only
thing that didnt fall his way Sat-
urday in the Cadillac Champion-
ship.
Woods made seven more
birdies on the Blue Monster at
Doral, the last one from 15 feet
on the 18th hole that gave him a
5-under 67 and a four-shot lead
over Graeme McDowell head-
ing into the nal round.
Woods has made 24 birdies
and taken only 74 putts through
three rounds, both personal
bests in his PGA Tour career.
It put him in great position to
win his 17th career World Golf
Championship, and his rst
since 2009.
He has a 39-2 record when he
has the outright lead going into
the nal round on the PGATour.
The only time he has ever lost
a lead of more than two shots
was in 2010 against an 18-man
eld at the Chevron World Chal-
lenge, when McDowell beat him
in a playoff.
McDowell was six shots out
of the lead with three holes to
play when he tried to keep it
close. His drive on the 16th
nished just over the green,
and he chipped in for eagle. He
picked up another shot on the
17th when Woods tee shot em-
bedded high into the trunk of
a palm tree. Once his ball was
identied, he took a penalty
drop and made bogey.
The lead was down to three
shots, but not for long.
After I made birdie on 15, I
was looking pretty good with a
six-shot lead, and with a driv-
able par 4, Woods said. Two
holes later, its now cut down to
three. I piped a tee shot down
there, hit a little 9-iron there
and was able to pour that putt
in there.
Woods made birdie to reach
18-under 198, and McDowell
did well to stay only four shots
behind with a two-putt from 85
feet away. That gave him a 69,
and another date with Woods in
the nal group at Doral.
Phil Mickelson, who badly
wanted to get into the nal
group, overcame a three-putt
from 4 feet for double bogey
on the third hole by making
four birdies the rest of the way.
He had a 69, along with Steve
Stricker, and both were ve
shots behind.
I threw away ve or six shots
on the greens and around the
greens, and I feel like I dont
have to play too much differ-
ent, Mickelson said. I just
cant afford to give away those
shots. Im going to have to play
a round like I played at Pebble
last year, something in the low
60s.
A year ago, Mickelson shot
64 in the nal round to win at
Pebble Beach while playing in
the same group with Woods.
Rory McIlroy, the worlds No.
1 player, had a rough start until
rallying on the back nine with
ve birdies in a six-hole stretch
that carried him to a 71. He was
15 shots behind.
Woods used to own these
WGC events, winning 16 of the
rst 30 that he played. He has
gone 0-for-10 since Firestone in
August 2009, though the odds
were stacked in his favor at the
Cadillac Championship. He al-
ready is a three-time winner at
Doral, and he has been putting
well ever since Stricker gave
him a tip on the eve of the tour-
nament.
You know what kind of clos-
er he is, Stricker said. When
he gets the lead in a golf tourna-
ment, its tough. He doesnt let
too many guys in usually when
he gets the lead. Weve all got
our work cut out for us. Were
going to have to go out and try
to make birdies on a difcult
golf course, which is hard to
do.
Its even tougher with
Woods playing like this. He has
matched the low round of the
tournament all three days.
For nine holes, McDowell
threw his best golf at Woods,
and Woods counterpunched in
a magnicent display on the
breezy Blue Monster.
McDowell opened with a 20-
foot eagle, Woods with back-to-
back birdies. McDowell hit his
approach to 10 feet on the third
hole, and Woods followed with
a shot 6 inches inside as both
made birdie.
McDowell nally tied him for
the lead with a 20-foot putt on
the sixth hole, and he had a 10-
foot birdie attempt on the sev-
enth for the outright lead. The
stroke was tentative, and the
ball dipped on the low side.
And that was as close as Mc-
Dowell could get.
Woods stretches lead
on the Blue Monster
P R O G O L F
By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
N A S C A R
AP PHOTO
Sam Hornish Jr. does a burnout after winning the NASCAR Nationwide race on Saturday in Las Vegas.
LAS VEGAS Sam Hornish
Jr. didnt know the name of Sat-
urdays race until he went to the
drivers meeting for the Sams
Town 300.
Thats a pretty good one for
me to win, he thought to him-
self. Already got my name on
the trophy.
Hornish survived two re-
starts in the nal 15 laps and
held off Kyle Busch to win the
Nationwide Series race at the
Las Vegas Motor Speedway.
Hornish led 114 laps in his
second career Nationwide vic-
tory, but needed a strong nish
to outrun Busch, the hometown
driver who won the Nationwide
race last week in Phoenix.
Hornish credited the win to
his dominant car, all the more
impressive since the drivers
got almost no practice on the
1.5-mile tri-oval due to Fridays
rain.
You dream about having
cars like this, Hornish said. I
think I used more energy cele-
brating than I did actually driv-
ing the car today.
Hornish and Busch both
went aggressively after the -
nal restart with seven laps to
go, with Busch briey nudg-
ing ahead before Hornish re-
claimed the lead with ve laps
left. Hornish got clear of Busch
and nished comfortably in a
caution-lled race.
With his third top-10 nish in
three races this season, Horn-
ish moved atop the points race
and gave owner Roger Penske
his rst victory at Las Vegas
in any NASCAR series and
Penskes rst win since moving
from Dodge to Ford in the off-
season.
Hornish also snapped a 36-
race winless streak in his Ford
in his 69th Nationwide race
overall.
Hornish hadnt won since
November 2011 at Phoenix. His
crewchief, Greg Erwin, won his
rst Nationwide race.
Busch dominated last weeks
race, but his Toyota couldnt
catch up to Hornish despite
plenty of cagey racing. Hornish
had nearly a three-second lead
over Busch before the rst of
the nal two cautions.
Sam was just that much
faster than us, said Busch,
who nished in the top 10 for
just the second time in 10 races
in Las Vegas. He was beating
us a little bit everywhere, all
the way around the race track.
Certainly, when he stepped on
the gas, that thing would go
forward in a hurry. Us two were
the class of the eld, but he was
the class of everybody.
Pole sitter Brian Vickers n-
ished third, with Trevor Bayne
fourth despite an early brush
against the wall and Elliott
Sadler fth. Travis Pastrana
came in 10th, four spots ahead
of Dale Earnhardt Jr.
Vickers echoed Buschs praise
of Hornishs superior car.
I couldnt move around
much, said Vickers, a top-10
nisher three times in six Vegas
races. The car would get out
from under me. Seemed like
Samcould not only get through
the bumps, but he could run
top through bottom.
We just ended up getting too
loose. We killed the car on the
last run. It was a valiant effort,
trying to go for the win.
Hornish regained his early
lead on the 145th lap, but Scott
Lagasse Jr.s late spin and an
even later wreck forced him to
be resourceful out of restarts.
Shortly after Lagasses spin,
rookie Kyle Larsons car ended
up in ames after a big collision
with Joey Gase and Ryan Sieg.
Larson, who also hit the wall on
the 87th lap, emerged from his
car unharmed.
Larson, a 20-year-old from
the Sacramento area, survived
a frightening crash on the nal
lap of the Nationwide race two
weeks ago at Daytona, where
his car sailed into the fence
and peppered the crowd with
debris, including a tire, injuring
more than two dozen fans.
Hornish leads the Nation-
wide points standings by 19
points over Justin Allgaier.
Hornish hits the jackpot in Vegas
By GREG BEACHAM
AP Sports Writer
Hamlin could be red up for Sprint Cup race
By GREG BEACHAM
AP Sports Writer
LAS VEGAS Maybe Den-
ny Hamlin can channel his fury
over his $25,000 ne fromNAS-
CAR into a fast nish at the Las
Vegas Motor Speedway.
Hamlin got docked for his
pessimistic comments about
the new Gen-6 car, and his an-
ger over the decision overshad-
owed the week leading up to
NASCARs third race in an al-
ready interesting season.
While Hamlin stewed and
refused to pay the ne, most
drivers think Sunday is their
rst real chance to test their
new rides on the intermediate
tracks theyre built to race.
The Vegas race is a bit too
early in the season for gam-
bling, however. While most
teams are still brimming with
optimismafter the rst two rac-
es of the season at Daytona and
Phoenix, some drivers think its
not too early to start worrying
about the overall standings.
Its so important to get that
momentumand the points base
established, Clint Bowyer
said.
Brad Keselowski was award-
ed the Vegas pole after rain
scrubbed Fridays qualifying
session, putting him in prime
position for his rst top-10 n-
ish in Vegas.
The way our car has been
running the last two weeks,
and off of what I saw in prac-
tice, I feel like were in position
to hopefully keep (rst place)
for a very long time in this race,
and hopefully close it out, Kes-
elowski said.
After coming in third in
Phoenix, Hamlin clearly knows
what hes doing in the new car,
despite his worries about the
cars development. But so does
Jimmie Johnson, the four-time
Las Vegas champion who fol-
lowed up his Daytona 500 vic-
tory with a second-place nish
last week.
One-one would be domi-
nant, said Johnson, the only
active driver averaging a top-
10 nish in Vegas. One-two is
competitive.
Theres no shortage of star
power in Las Vegas. Defending
champion Tony Stewart could
use a strong effort after a slow
start in the rst two races, while
Danica Patrick will start 37th.
Dale Earnhardt Jr. will hope
to continue two solid streaks:
Two top-ve nishes already
this season and 10 straight top-
10 nishes on 1.5-mile tracks.
Last weeks race in Phoenix
got mixed reviews, with many
drivers and fans bored by the
single-le racing and relative
lack of passing action.
But several drivers found the
race compelling and competi-
tive, particularly since theyre
still guring out what their new
cars can do and Vegas bump-
lled tri-oval should maximize
the Gen-6 cars strengths.
SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAge 9C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com S P O R T S
KRANJSKA GORA, Slove-
nia Ted Ligety of the United
States won his fth giant sla-
lom of the sea-
son Saturday
to clinch the
World Cup
discipline title
with a race to
spare.
Its his fourth
GS title after
winning in 2008
and 2010-11. He also successfully
defended his GS title at the world
championships last month.
To win here again is a super
cool feeling, said Ligety, who
has won in Kranjska Gora ve
times and been on the podium
every year since 2008. I am re-
ally proud of that.
Ligety held his rst-run lead to
win in 2 minutes, 35.43 seconds
for his 16th career victory, all
in GS. He established an insur-
mountable 125-point lead over
Austrias Marcel Hirscher, who
was 0.45 behind in second.
Its a big weight off my
shoulders, Ligety said. I had
an awesome, awesome season
but Hirscher was there all the
time. Even if I beat him by three
seconds, he was still in second
place. That makes it tough going
for the title. It becomes kind of a
head game when he is so close all
the time. So I am pretty psyched
to have it locked up now.
Ligety has nished on the po-
dium in all seven GS races this
season and became the rst man
to achieve that feat since Mi-
chael von Gruenigen of Switzer-
land in 1995-96.
Alexis Pinturault of France
was third, 0.77 behind, and Fe-
lix Neureuther of Germany was
fourth, 0.81 off Ligetys time.
Ligety led Hirscher by 0.60 after
the opening run, in which the
Austrian placed fourth.
In the overall standings,
Hirscher extended his lead to 69
points over Norways Aksel Lund
Svindal, who nished sixth.
Rain made for difcult condi-
tions during the nal run on a
course that was soft by days of
mild temperatures.
Racing in the rain is not my
favorite thing, Ligety said.
I grew up in Park City, Utah,
where its usually warm and
sunny. These are totally different
conditions.
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Runners set off on Pittston Boulevard at the start of the annual Bear Creek 5k Run Saturday morning.
Moorhead, Dragwa post victories
Winners conserve energy for final hill inBear CreekRun
By ROBERT MINER
For The Times Leader
BEAR CREEK Two run-
ners, Mickey Moorhead and
Cathy Dragwa, who virtually
used the same strategy save
energy for the nal hill ran
to victories in the 18th running
of the Bear Creek 5K Run on
Saturday.
Moorhead, 18, of Wilkes-
Barre, led a eld of 112 run-
ners over the hilly course at
Messiah Primitive Methodist
Church, breaking the tape in
17 minutes, 34 seconds.
He outran second-place
nisher John Martino, 28, of
Dallas, by 26 seconds. Tony
Korch, 53, of Nanticoke, n-
ished third, 38 seconds behind
Martino.
I ran behind the leader
(Martino) until we reached the
turnaround, said Moorhead,
who graduated from Coughlin
High School in 2011 where he
was the Crusaders top runner.
Just after the turnaround
I made the pass. Once I took
control, I settled into a good
steady pace. I couldnt hear
(Martino) or see his shadow,
so I just stayed with my pace
and really pushed the nal hill
to the nish.
Dragwa, 41, of Mayeld,
won the female division in
20:48. She outran second-place
nisher Sherri Yelen, 41, of
Kingston, by 1:17. Emily Bil-
bow, 32, of Forty Fort, placed
third, 22 seconds behind Yelen.
I pulled in front a little be-
fore a quarter of a mile into the
race, Dragwa said. Hills are
my downfall. And I knew that
in this race you nish on an up-
hill. So I got into a nice pace
hoping to conserve energy for
that nal hill. When I got to
the nal hill, I pushed it with
all I had.
The strategy worked.
Notes: Moorhead is now
attending Drexel University.
Drexel doesnt have a running
program, so Moorhead runs for
the schools club team.
Dragwa starting running
when she was 20 when she
met her husband Dan, who is
a standout runner.
Thats when I really started
learning how to run, she said
with a smile.
Dragwas son, Dan, 10, won
the half-mile kids race.
Bear Creek 5K Run results
Top three male fnishers
1. Mickey Moorhead, 19, Wilkes-Barre, 17:34
2. John Martino,28, Dallas, 18:00
3. Tony Korch, 53, Nanticoke, 18:38
Age group winners: 12 & under: 1. Jeff
Mondulick, Bear Creek, 23:36; 2. W. Jacob
Reilly; 3. Cameron George. 13-16: 1. Tyler
Paulino, Jermyn, 23:02; 2. Tony Demark; 3.
Jamie Webb. 17-20: none. 21-29: 1. Dave
Houssock, Plymouth, 22:25; 2. Tony Pru-
denter; 3. Jon Milius. 30-39: 1. Glenn Zimmer-
man, Wilkes-Barre, 22:30; 2. Joe Dowd,; 3.
Charles Montagna. 40-49: 1. Jeremy Dormer,
Hazle Twp., 19:38; 2. Paul Manley; 3. Don
Shearer. 50-59: 1. Joe Stanitis, Plymouth,
23:32; 2. Jeff Baron; 3. Steve Meck. 60-69:
1. Ed Zindell, Jermyn, 22:31; 2. Len Sowinski;
3. Max Furick. 70-79: 1. Tony Cerminaro, Jer-
myn, 23:06; 2. Tom Berezich. 80 & over: 1. Ed
Livsey, Berwick, 42:13.
Top three female fnishers
1. Cathy Dragwa, 41 Mayfeld, 20:48
2. Sherri Yelen, 41, Kingston, 22:05
3. Emily Bilbow, Forty Fort, 22:28
Age group winners: 12 & under: 1. Mallory
George, Bear Creek, 33:50; 2. Rylee Marotto.
13-16: 1. Isabelle Updike, Bear Creek, 23:16;
2. Andrea Rockefeller; 3. Kelly Truchan. 17-
20: none. 21-29: 1. Alysa Coras, Dallas,
23:53; 2. Jillian Everette; 3. Mary Kasper. 30-
39: 1. Jen Stec, Mocanaqua, 22:34; 2. kristy
Rockefeller; 3. Tami Pease. 40-49: 1. Kim
Balok, Breinigsville, 25:51; 2. Darlene Reilly; 3.
Gretchen Bush. 50-59: 1. Patty Phillips, Ha-
nover Twp., 28:01; 2. Karen Kinney; 3. Deb
Lucarelli. 60-69: 1. Bev Tomasak, Edwarsviile,
26:40; 2. Wilma Schlegel. 70-79: none. 80 &
over: none. Field: 112 fnishers.
5K race walk winner: Diane Zindell, 59, Jer-
myn, 47:13. Field: 14.
Half Mile Kids Race: First boy: Dan Dragwa,
10, Mayfeld. frst girl: Mya Pyke, 8, Mountain
Top. Field: 21.
Schedule
Sunday, March 17: Wyoming Valley Striders
33rd annual Winters End (4.5-mile) Run at
Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Lehman Twp. at 11
a.m. info: Vince Wojnar, 474-5363.
Mickey Moorhead, 19, of
Wilkes-Barre, was the rst
male runner to cross the n-
ish line Saturday.
Cathy Dragwa, 41, of May-
eld, led all women in the
event, nishing with a time of
20:48.
L O C A L R U N N I N g
N F L R O U N D U P
Steelers release LB James Harrison in cap move
PITTSBURGH James Har-
risons snarling tenacity made
the Pittsburgh Steelers line-
backer one of the NFLs most
intimidating players for nearly
a decade.
Big hits some legal, some
not so much also turned the
outspoken ve-time Pro Bowler
into focal point for a league-
wide crackdown on helmet-to-
helmet contact.
Harrisons outlaw image
made him beloved in Pittsburgh
but reviled elsewhere. His
onerous contract, however, no
longer worked for a team with
serious salary cap issues. The
Steelers released the former De-
fensive Player
of the Year
on Saturday
when the two
sides could
not agree on
a more cap-
friendly deal.
Its been a
great run but all good things
must come to a end, Harrison
posted on his Twitter account
Saturday afternoon. Thank
you Steelers Nation I will miss
you all!
Pittsburgh general manager
Kevin Colbert and Harrisons
agent Bill Parise had spent the
last few days trying to iron out
a new deal but couldnt reach
any common ground. Harrison
was entering the nal two years
of a $51-million extension he
signed in 2009 and was sched-
uled to make $6.57 million in
2013.
Instead, Harrison who
turns 35 in May will nd
himself looking for work for
the rst time since he became a
xture on the right side of Pitts-
burghs 3-4 defense in 2006.
James has been an integral
part of our success during his
years in Pittsburgh and has
helped us win two Lombardi
trophies during that time, Col-
bert said in a statement. We
appreciate all of his efforts and
wish him the best.
Harrison is the rst cap move
by the Steelers this offseason as
they try to get under the $123
million salary cap by Tuesday,
when the new league year be-
gins. Quarterback Ben Roethlis-
berger and linebacker Lawrence
Timmons have restructured
their contracts to help get Pitts-
burgh under the cap number but
Colbert told reporters after the
Steelers nished a disappoint-
ing 8-8 in 2012 terminations
would also be necessary.
Sooner or later you have
to pay the debt and you never
want to get to a point where
you have to gut your team and
start over because we have to
compete for a championship
every year, Colbert said in
January.
Bills agree to re-sign CB
McKelvin to 4-year deal
BUFFALO, N.Y. Cor-
nerback Leodis McKelvin is
staying in Buffalo after the Bills
reached an agreement to re-
sign their 2008 rst-round draft
pick on Saturday.
A person familiar with the
negotiations said McKelvin
agreed to a four-year contract
worth a little over $20 million.
The person spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because the
Bills did not reveal the contract
terms in announcing the agree-
ment with McKelvin.
Falcons, safety William
Moore agree to 5-year pact
ATLANTA The Atlanta
Falcons have agreed to terms
with safety William Moore on a
ve-year contract.
Moore was a Pro Bowl alter-
nate with Atlanta last season,
when he had four interceptions
and 105 tackles. He was one of
the top names on the teams list
of unrestricted free agents.
Moore, a second-round draft
pick from Missouri in 2009, has
made 38 starts in four seasons
with the Falcons. He was
limited by a hamstring injury to
12 games last season. He set a
career high with ve intercep-
tions in 2010.
The Associated Press
Harrison
C YC L I N g
NICE, France Sylvain
Chavanel of France has won a
bunch sprint to take the sixth
stage of the Paris-Nice race on
Saturday, while Richie Porte
of Australia retains the leaders
yellow jersey.
Chavanel edged out Philippe
Gilbert of Belgium to com-
plete the 136-mile trek from
Manosque to Nice in 5 hours, 14
minutes, 23 seconds.
Porte leads the overall
standings, 32 seconds ahead of
Andrew Talansky of the United
States ahead of Sundays nal
stage, and is looking to become
the rst Australian to win the
weeklong race.
The Sky team controlled
much of the race to protect
Portes lead. Egor Silin and
Eduard Vorganov of Russia
broke away from the pack in the
opening miles and were joined
by nine riders. The small group
built a lead that reached nearly
four minutes after 54 miles, but
was reeled in 22 miles from the
nish.
Froome wins tough 4th
stage of Tirreno-Adriatico
PRATI DI TIVO, Italy Tour
de France runner-up Chris
Froome has won the difcult
uphill nish of stage four of the
weeklong Tirreno-Adriatico race
Saturday.
After his Sky teammates
led him up most of the climb,
Froome attacked in the nal
mile and nished 6 seconds
ahead of Mauro Santambrogio
of Italy. Defending champion
Vincenzo Nibali was third.
Polish rider Mikhal Kwiat-
kowski nished fourth and took
the overall lead from Omega
Pharma-Quick Step teammate
Mark Cavendish, a sprinter who
nished far back.
In the overall, Kwiatkowski
has a 4-second lead on Froome,
with Nibali third. Alberto Con-
tador, who nished sixth in the
stage after several attacks in the
nal miles, is fourth overall, 30
seconds back.
AP PHOTO
American Andrew Talansky
poses for photographers wear-
ing the best young riders
jersey after the sixth leg of
the Paris-Nice cycling race in
France on Saturday.
Chavanel
wins 6th
stage of
Paris-Nice
The Associated Press
Ligety wins
World Cup
GS crown
S K I I N g
By ERIC WILLEMSEN
Associated Press
Ligety
ANCHORAGE, Alaska Four-time
champion Martin Buser held on to the
lead Saturday in Alaskas Iditarod Trail
Sled Dog Race, hoping to be only the
second musher to ever claim a fth title
in the races 40-year-history.
But plenty of competitors were hot in
pursuit in the 1,000-mile race, and gain-
ing on the 54-year-old veteran from Big
Lake, Alaska. Teams have been traveling
in deep snowfollowed by deep overows
in a trail deteriorated by above-freezing
temperatures. Some stretches also were
marked by glare ice.
On the seventh day of the race, Buser
was rst out of the checkpoint at Eagle
Island, where a single cabin is the only
dwelling in the otherwise uninhabited
stretch of trail. Buser dropped two dogs
there and left with 11 dogs at 2:41 a.m.
Saturday to begin the 60-mile run to the
next checkpoint at Kaltag, which is 346
miles from the races nishing point in
Nome.
Last years runner-up, Aliy Zirkle, left
Eagle Island with 13 dogs more than
three hours later. The Two Rivers vet-
eran was followed 29 minutes later by
2004 winner Mitch Seavey of Seward
and his 12-dog team. According to sled
positioning trackers, Zirkle, Seavey and
other teams out of Eagle Island were
traveling at faster speeds than Busers
team and many had more dogs.
Zirkle and Seavey were especially
close to Buser on the Kaltag approach
early Saturday afternoon, with Zirkle
running 9 miles behind him and Seavey
a mile behind Zirkle. The front-runners
are expected to reach the Nome nish
line early next week.
The Anchorage Daily News reported
Saturday that a badly ailing dog had been
taken from Eagle Island to Kaltag, where
it was being treated and could be own
out. A race judge said she didnt know
whose team the dog belonged to. Idi-
tarod ofcials could not immediately be
reached for further information, but many
mushers left dogs behind at Eagle Island.
By RACHEL DORO
Associated Press
Iditarod front-runner Martin Buser hopes to claim fth victory
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 10C SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 S P O R T S
N AT I O N A L H O C K E Y L E A G U E
Blackhawks
down?
Not quite
Chicago ready to move on
after having record streak
stopped on Friday night.
The Associated Press
DENVER The Chicago
Blackhawks arent about to
mourn the end of their streak.
Were proud of it, but itll be
nice to move on now, defense-
man Duncan Keith said after the
Blackhawks 6-2 loss to the Colo-
rado Avalanche on Friday night.
The loss was Chicagos rst in
regulation this season and ended
a remarkable run in which they
earned at least one point in their
rst 24 games, an NHL record.
Its hockey. Weve lost games
before in our lives. Its not like
were going to sit here and cry,
Keith said.
Instead, theyll sit back
and celebrate, said coach Joel
Quenneville, who told his team
afterward that they should be
very proud of what they accom-
plished. They found different
ways to win, night in and night
out, and everyone contributed
to something that hadnt been
done. Its a great feather in our
cap, but lets move forward here
and try to get better. Certainly it
was a lot of fun up to today.
So, they left the ice without
a point for once but also with
their heads held high.
The Blackhawks (21-1-3)
hadnt lost in regulation since a
6-1 rout by Nashville on March
25, 2012, and their last loss in
regulation on the road came more
than a year ago, with a 5-1 defeat
at St. Louis on March 6, 2012.
Dating to last years regular
season, the streak was 30 games.
Thats just mind-boggling,
Avalanche center Paul Stastny
said. Thats two full months
without losing. Hats off to them.
But to be the team that was
able to stop them we had a
chance last time and didnt do
it but the way our schedule
was we knew we had back-to-
back games and would have two
chances to stop it. And thats
what we wanted to do, stop their
streak and get one going for us.
Chicagos overall points streak
was the second-longest in NHL
history. The 1979-80 Philadel-
phia Flyers set the league re-
cord with a staggering 35-game
unbeaten streak that included
25 wins and 10 ties all in the
same season.
Its special, said Matt Duch-
ene, who had a goal and a career-
best three assists. Its obviously
something no one had done yet.
But what a run by them. I mean,
rst of all, congratulations to
them. What a run they had. I
dont think theyre going to slow
down because of this. But its
pretty special. Its a good feeling
in here. Were pretty happy.
Ryan OReilly got his rst goal
since his contract dispute was
resolved more than a week ago
and assisted on another score in
a four-goal onslaught in the sec-
ond period that turned a 1-1 tie
into a laugher. Stastny collected
three points.
Duchene, John Mitchell and Ja-
mie McGinn also put pucks past
Corey Crawford in the second pe-
riod for the Avalanche, who had
lost six of their previous seven,
including a 3-2 heartbreaker at
Chicago 48 hours earlier.
Crawford (11-1-3) allowed ve
goals on 19 shots before being
replaced in net by Ray Emery to
start the third period.
I didnt have it tonight,
Crawford said. Didnt give our
guys a chance.
Semyon Varlamov had 30
saves for Colorado.
The Avalanche nearly ended
the spectacular streak in Chi-
cago on Wednesday night before
the Blackhawks pulled out the
win when Daniel Carcillo scored
the tiebreaking goal with 49.3
seconds left. Chicago was skat-
ing without three key forwards
and playing its second game in
two nights then.
There was no such comeback
Friday night at the Pepsi Center
for Chicago, which hadnt al-
lowed more than four goals in a
game this season or even trailed
by more than two goals until the
Avs spectacular second period.
AP PHOTO
The Boston Bruins Daniel Paille (20) skates between the Philadelphia Flyers Kimmo Timonen,
left, and Maxime Talbot (25) during the second period of an NHL game in Boston on Saturday.
Bruins shut out Flyers
BOSTON Tyler Seguin
scored his third goal in two
games and the Boston Bruins
added two more in a span of
just over 2 minutes in a 3-0
win over the Philadelphia Fly-
ers on Saturday.
Tuukka Rask made 23 saves
in his second shutout of the
season as the Bruins won the
rst of three meetings with
Philadelphia.
Goals scored by Seguin,
Chris Kelly and Daniel Paille
in the rst period were all
Boston needed against the
slumping Flyers.
One week after reaching
.500 for the rst time this sea-
son, the Flyers lost their third
straight.
Ilya Bryzgalov stopped
just three of the six shots he
faced in the rst period, but
regained his composure and
was the primary reason the
game didnt turn into a rout.
Bryzgalov kept Philadelphia
within reach with saves on
some great scoring chances for
the Bruins, who outshot the
Flyers 28-23.
The three-goal cushion has
not always been good for the
Bruins, who led 3-0 Tuesday
at Washington and ended up
losing 4-3 in overtime. Boston
avoided any chance of blowing
this one with tight defense,
forcing the Flyers into mostly
shots from the outside that
were easy saves for Rask.
The Bruins scored on their
rst power play when Milan
Lucic backhanded a pass
across the crease to Seguin,
who hit the open net and put
Boston up 1-0 with 8:07 left in
the rst period. It was Seguins
eight goal of the season.
Kelly got free in the slot for
another wrister with 6:32 left
for his 99th career goal and it
took less than a minute for the
Bruins to strike again. Shawn
Thornton forced a turnover at
the blue line and set up Pailles
breakaway goal with 5:49 left
in the rst that put Boston up
3-0.
Islanders 5, Capitals 2
UNIONDALE, N.Y. John
Tavares scored two power-play
goals in the third period to lift
the New York Islanders to a 5-2
win over Washington, ending
the Capitals three-game win-
ning streak.
Tavares scored his 15th
goal at 12:13 and his team-
leading 16th the 100th of
his career 30 seconds later,
and Evgeni Nabokov made 22
saves for the Islanders. Josh
Bailey, Casey Cizikas and
Frans Nielsen also scored for
the Islanders, who won for the
third time in four games and
improved to 11-11-3.
Tavares rst goal came as
Washingtons Mike Ribeiro
was serving a four-minute
penalty for high sticking and
unsportsmanlike conduct.
His second came with Jeff
Schultz in the box also for
a double-minor as Tavares
beat Washingtons Philipp
Grubauer, who faced 45 shots
in his rst NHL start.
Mathieu Perreault and
Nicklas Backstrom scored for
the Capitals, who came in with
eight wins in 11 games since
starting the season 2-8-1 under
rst-year coach Adam Oates.
Blue Jackets 3, Red Wings 0
COLUMBUS, Ohio Sergei
Bobrovsky had 29 saves in his
rst career shutout, and Cam
Atkinson and Nick Foligno
took advantage of Detroit give-
aways to score goals in leading
the suddenly hot Columbus
Blue Jackets to a victory over
the Red Wings.
Jack Johnson also picked up
a power-play goal for the Blue
Jackets, who have won four
in a row and earned points in
their last six.
Blues 4, Sharks 3
SAN JOSE, Calif. Vladi-
mir Sobotka recorded his rst
career hat trick and Patrik
Berglund scored 72 seconds
into overtime to lift the St.
Louis Blues past the San Jose
Sharks.
Berglunds team-leading
12th goal of the season came
after the Blues rallied from
two goals down in the third
period. Sobotka, who is riding
the best streak of his career,
had both scores to tie it before
Berglunds game-winner.
Scott Gomez had a goal and
assist for San Jose, which has
lost nine of its last 11 against
St. Louis.
Hurricanes 6, Devils 3
RALEIGH, N.C. Jiri
Tlusty had two goals, and the
surging Carolina Hurricanes
built an early lead and carried
it through to a victory over the
slumping New Jersey Devils.
Alexander Semin and Jay
Harrison scored 28 seconds
apart in the rst period, and
Jeff Skinner and Chris Terry
in his NHL debut added
goals for the Hurricanes, who
won for the fth time in six
games. Dan Ellis made 31
saves in the victory.
Tlustys second goal was
into an empty net with 1:14
remaining.
New Jersey got two goals
from Ilya Kovalchuk, includ-
ing a short-handed tally, and
one from Patrik Elias but that
wasnt enough for the Devils
to avoid their seventh loss in
eight games without top goalie
Martin Brodeur.
Canadiens 4, Lightning 3
TAMPA, Fla. Brendan
Gallagher broke a tie with
Montreals third goal of the
third period, and the Eastern
Conference-leading Canadiens
rallied to beat the Tampa Bay
Lightning 4-3 on Saturday
night.
The Canadiens pulled
within 3-2 on Brian Giontas
power-play goal 3:49 into the
third, and Alexei Emelin tied it
at 7:33. Gallagher then put the
puck past Cedrick Desjardins
from in-close to give Montreal
a 4-3 lead with 7:57 to play.
Montreal also got a goal
from Tomas Plekanec and two
assists.
Penguins 5, Maple Leafs 4
TORONTO Sidney
Crosby and James Neal scored
shootout goals, and the
Pittsburgh Penguins beat the
Toronto Maple Leafs for their
NHL-leading 11th road win.
Neal opened the shootout
with a goal against James Re-
imer before Crosby sealed the
win on Pittsburghs second at-
tempt after Marc-Andre Fleury
stopped Torontos Tyler Bozak
and Nazem Kadri.
Phil Kessel forced overtime
for the Maple Leafs with his
seventh of the season at 15:40
of the third.
Neal, Crosby, Beau Bennett
and Pascal Dupuis scored in
regulation for Pittsburgh (17-
8-0), which outshot Toronto
41-26. Crosby scored in his
rst game in Toronto in over
three years to extend his point
streak to a season-high seven
games (ve goals, 10 assists).
Canadiens 4, Lightning 3
TAMPA, Fla. Brendan
Gallagher broke a tie with
Montreals third goal of the
third period, and the Eastern
Conference-leading Canadiens
rallied to beat the Tampa Bay
Lightning.
The Canadiens pulled
within 3-2 on Brian Giontas
power-play goal 3:49 into the
third, and Alexei Emelin tied it
at 7:33. Gallagher then put the
puck past Cedrick Desjardins
from in-close to give Montreal
a 4-3 lead with 7:57 to play.
Montreal also got a goal
from Tomas Plekanec and two
assists from Michael Ryder.
The Associated Press
ATLANTA Brook Lopez
and Andray Blatche each
scored 18 points, Deron
Williams added 17 and the
Brooklyn Nets won their
third straight game with a
93-80 victory over the Atlanta
Hawks on Saturday night.
Al Horford nished with
15 points and 12 rebounds
for the Hawks, who seemed
lethargic after losing in
overtime at Boston on Friday.
Atlanta has lost two straight
and ve of six.
Brooklyn had a better
performance coming off its
17-point home victory over
Washington on Friday in
which Williams set the NBA
record with nine 3-pointers
in a half and scored a season-
high 42 points.
Lopez, who nished with
nine rebounds, scored 14
points in the third, including a
runner that gave Brooklyn its
rst 20-point lead.
The Nets took their rst
double-digit lead midway
through the second quar-
ter when Mirza Teletovics
3-pointer made it 39-29. It
only got worse in the second
half for Atlanta, which trailed
by 23 early in the fourth on
a couple of long jumpers by
Blatche.
Wizards 104, Bobcats 87
WASHINGTON The
Washington Wizards, one of
the few NBA teams who can
actually call the Charlotte
Bobcats a nemesis, did their
bit to rectify that notion
Saturday night, with Trevor
Ariza scoring a season-high 26
points in a victory.
The Wizards never trailed
and shot 50 percent as they
handed the league-worst Bob-
cats their 10th straight loss,
most of which havent been
competitive. Charlotte has
been outscored by an average
of 21.5 points during the skid.
But the Wizards had been
0-2 against the Bobcats,
dropping both games back in
November when Charlotte
was actually toying with the
idea of a respectable season.
Washington has remained
near the bottom of the league
as well, sitting 13th in the 15-
team Eastern Conference.
Knicks 113, Jazz 84
NEW YORK J.R. Smith
scored 24 points and the New
York Knicks shook off the
absence of Carmelo Anthony
and the shock of Amare Stou-
demire needing more knee
surgery to rout the slumping
Utah Jazz.
The Knicks learned earlier
Saturday that Stoudemire will
have right knee surgery that
will sideline him approximate-
ly six weeks. But they still
have plenty of scoring off the
bench, with Steve Novak add-
ing a season-high 20 points.
Alec Burks scored 14 points
and Gordon Hayward had 13
for the Jazz, who completed
a 0-4 road trip that dropped
them into a tie with the Los
Angeles Lakers for the eighth
and nal playoff spot in the
Western Conference.
Grizzlies 96, Hornets 85
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Mike
Conley scored 22 points,
seven Memphis players
nished in double gures and
the Grizzlies won their fourth
straight with a victory over
the New Orleans Hornets.
Tony Allen had 14 points,
while Tayshaun Prince and
Quincy Pondexter scored 13
points apiece. Ed Davis had
12 points, nine rebounds and
matched his career best with
ve blocks as Memphis won
its 12th game in the last 13.
Jerryd Bayless and Marc
Gasol scored 10 points apiece,
although Gasol missed all
four of his shots in the second
half.
Anthony Davis led the
Hornets with 20 points and 18
rebounds, while Ryan Ander-
son scored 17 points. Greivis
Vasquez added 12 points and
eight assists, and Eric Gordon
had 11 points.
The Hornets lost their third
straight and have dropped ve
of six.
N B A
Lopez, Blatchelead
Nets past Atlanta
The Associated Press
SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAge 11C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com W W W . T I M E S L E A D E R . C O M / S P O R T S
At Play
Dallas ninth-graders complete strong season
The Dallas freshman girls basketball team completed a successful season in the Wyo-
ming Valley Conference in Division I play. The team had a conference record of 10-2 and
an overall record of 13-3. Pictured are team members: First row, from left: Samantha
Pollick, Lauren Dotter, Talia Kosierowski, Breezy Coolbaugh, Marian Bednar. Second row:
Courtney Devens, Paige Evans, Maddie Kelley, Sara Lojewski, Catherine Dillon and coach
Johnna Schickram.
Shelp gets 2nd degree black belt
The Hapkido Taekwondo Institute of Kingston held a
promotion test. Promoted to second degree black belt in
the North American Hapkdio Taekwondo Federation was
Pete Shelp. Shelp had been afliated with the school for
four years. He resides in Forty Fort with his family and is a
branch manager with Janney Montgomery Scott in their
Kingston ofce. Pictured are Master Pete Canavan, Shelp
and Master Vince Sperduto.
SixMountaineersheadedtostates
The Dallas swim and dive team will send ve swimmers
and one diver to Bucknell University to participate in the
PIAA Class 2A Diving and Swimming Championships. Pat-
rick Madaya will make his rst appearance at states after
capturing third place in the District 2 Class 2A Boys 1-Me-
ter Diving Championships. The boys swim team brought
home its fourth consecutive District 2 2A championship
title. Marcus Wagner and Brian Stepniak won gold medals,
while Jack Matusiak captured bronze. All three will com-
pete in individual events at states. Patrick Gelso will join
the trio in the 200 and 400 freestyle relay. Grant Luksic
will serve as an alternate on the relay team. Pictured are:
First row, from the left: Matt Nonnenberg, diving coach;
Gelso, Madaya, Luksic, Jenn Swiderski, assistant swim
coach. Second row: Matusiak, Stepniak, Wagner, and Ro-
mayne Mosier, head swim coach.
Nanticoke team wins Freeland/YMCA tournament
The Nanticoke girls eighth grade team, sponsored by the Nanticoke Eagles Aerie
834, recently competed and won the Freeland/YMCA Basketball tournament going
undefeated in tournament play. Pictured are team members. First row, from left: Cassie
Novakowski, Micheala Buckley, Miranda Dunn and Lisa Radziak. Standing: Coach Rentko,
Kiera Brown, Kayla Auero, Jenna Lipowski, Riley Klepadlo, Janine Levandowski, Alexis
Pyzia and Coach Goodman.
Sowinski headed to Holy Cross
Holy Redeemer senior Rachel Sowinski will continue her
academic and track and eld careers at the College of the
Holy Cross. Pictured: First row, from left: Marisa Sowinski,
mother; Rachel Sowinski; Thomas Sowinski, father. Sec-
ond row: Mrs. Anita M. Sirak, Principal; Mr. J.P. Aquilina,
athletic director.
Altemose picks East Stroudsburg
Holy Redeemer senior Sara Altemose will continue her
academic and eld hockey careers at East Stroudsburg
University. Pictured: First row, from left: Juliann DeFalco,
Holy Redeemer eld hockey head coach; Rachel Alte-
mose, mother; Sara Altemose; Gary Altemose, father. Sec-
ond row: Abe Simon, vice principal; J.P. Aquilina, athletic
director.
Malacari chooses West Chester
Holy Redeemer senior Alexandria Malacari will continue
her academic and eld hockey careers at West Chester
University. Pictured, rst row from left: Juliann DeFalco,
Holy Redeemer eld hockey coach; Marie Malacari, moth-
er; Alexandria Malacari; Vito Malacari, father. Second row:
Abe Simon, vice principal; J.P. Aquilina, athletic director.
GAR 8th-grade girls take division
GAR girls eighth grade basketball team recently won
the B division in its league. Pictured are team members.
First row, from left: Miranda Brazinski, Destiny Yeomans,
Cheyenne Taylor, Cierra Taylor, Ruby Saez. Second row:
Referee Mike Monaghan, Zoe Phillips, Erica Merth, Taylor
Woods, Iyanna Chalmers, coach Don Lott and referee Bill
Flanley.
The Wyoming Valley West freshman girls basketball
team recently completed a perfect 21-0 season, capturing
the Wyoming Valley Conference Division I title. Pictured
are team members. First row, from left: Gianna Jannuzzi.
Second row: Haley Sartin, Madison Korey, Maya Kornfeld,
Rebecca Podskoch, Erin Gibbons. Third row: Head coach
Gary Ferenchick, Alacia Edwards, Gabby Smicherko, Col-
leen Cwalina, Brittany Hebda, Jordan Reilly, and assistant
coach Jim Smicherk.
Spartans freshmen undefeated
Trojans freshman squad ends season at 21-1
The Nanticoke freshman girls basketball team completed its 2012-13 season with an
overall record of 21-1. Pictured are team memebrs. First row, from left: Coach Rentko,
Kiera Brown, Alexis Pyzia, Riley Klepadlo, Jenna Lipowski, Miranda Dunn, Coach Good-
man. Second Row: Meghan Armstrong, Katie Butczynski, Cassie Novakowski, Janine
Levandowski, Kayla Auero, Michaela Buckley, Miranda Bohn, Lisa Radziak and Taylor
Brown.
AT P L AY P O L I C Y
The Times Leader will accept
photos, standings and stories
from readers about youth
and adult recreation activi-
ties. Were also encouraging
anyone in a league darts,
pool, Frisbee, etc. to submit
standings and results to us.
E-mailed photos should be sent
in a jpeg format. Those that
are not in a jpeg format might
not be published. All submit-
ted items should have contact
information as well to ensure
publication.
Items will not be accepted
over the telephone. They
may be e-mailed to tlsports@
timesleader.com with At Play
in the subject, faxed to 831-
7319, dropped off at the Times
Leader or mailed to Times
Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-
0250.
SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAge 12C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com W W W . T I M E S L E A D E R . C O M / S P O R T S
Outdoors
Mystery not
that much of a
puzzle after all
I
t was a mystery at rst
A reader recently emailed a pic-
ture of a creature that he said was
shot by a neighbor as it attacked his
dogs in the Mountain Top area.
He said the animal hopped and had
hooves and fangs, and had a picture to
back it up. I eagerly hit the download
button and saw the proof. The animal
appeared to be some sort of canine
with long back legs, pointy ears and
was basically hairless aside from a
thin, fuzzy coat.
Odd.
The animal was shot on Feb. 22 and,
according to the person who sent the
email, the Game Commission was
called, came in and took the dead ani-
mal away without an explanation.
Really odd.
But at least I had a place to start. I
called the PGC region ofce in Dallas
and they had no report of the incident.
I studied the picture again, and the
mysterious creature began to take
shape.
Pointy, black-tipped ears. A coating
of thin, black fur on the legs. A snout
like a dog and a somehwat elongated
neck.
What really threw me off was the ab-
sence of a coat and a hairless, thin tail.
Still, I had a hunch and I asked a
biologist friend for a second opinion.
Turns out the creature is a red fox
with an extreme case of mange. It was
basically hairless, which would explain
why the back legs looked unusually
long and why the ears and tail were
noticeably pointy.
And the black on the tips of the
ears and legs were clear evidence of a
red fox, the biologist pointed out. But
what about the hooves, fangs and the
tendency for the animal to hop? The
fangs were canine teeth.
Hopping? Ive seen foxes plenty of
times bound through a eld, much
like a cat pouncing. Also, perhaps the
mange caused the animal such discom-
fort that it hopped rather than walked?
Who knows.
And the hooves well I had to zoom
in on the photo to clear that one up.
The paws look a bit swollen and dis-
gured, which could be a side-effect of
the mange. The swollen, black pads on
the foxs paws could certainly give its
feet a hoof-like appearance.
And because the fox was sick with
mange, I dont nd it unreasonable
that it would attack a couple of dogs.
A few days later the red fox theory was
further supported.
I spoke to a local Wildlife Conserva-
tion Ofcer whose district includes the
area where the mysterious creature
was shot. He said he had been seeing a
red fox in the vicinity with an extreme
case of mange and had the photos to
prove it. Sure enough, it matched up
with the animal that was shot while
attacking the dogs -- a hairless, skinny
red fox. In the end, what started out as
an oddball creature turned out to be a
mangy, hairless red fox.
It was an interesting nd, and an
example of just how debilitating and
serious a disease such as mange can be
on wildlife.
Saying good-bye
In many rural areas a place is dened
by the people who live there. One small
town in Wyoming County recently lost
a resident who was the face of the com-
munity. Barb Richter passed away on
March 1 at the age of 67.
She and her late husband, Chuck,
owned the Tombstone Inn in Lovelton
for 36 years and both were well-known
by the hunters and anglers who headed
up north every year. A day of bass
shing the farm ponds in Lovelton
wasnt complete without stopping at
the Tombstone for a burger and to say
hello to Barb. She loved seeing people
coming up to hunt and sh as much as
we enjoyed the mountains and ponds
that surround the town. Lovelton may
have lost a face of its community, but
Barb left a mark that will be remem-
bered for a long time.
State Rep. Gerald Mul-
lery, D-Nanticoke, will
host a town hall meeting
with the Pennsylvania
Fish and Boat Com-
mission on Thursday,
March 21 at the Luzerne
County Community
College Education Con-
ference Center from 7
to 9 p.m. A presentation
will be given by Fish and
Boat Commission staff
followed by a question
and answer period.
The Pennsylvania Fish
and Boat Commis-
sion (PFBC) is stocking
adult trout in a variety
of lakes and streams
that are open to public
angling throughout
Pennsylvania in 2013
and has posted where
and when those sh
will be released at www.
shandboat.com.
Anglers can easily search
the trout stocking
schedules for locations
and dates of interest.
To make the list, simply
go to www.shandboat.
com, click on the link
for 2013 Trout Stock-
ing Schedules, select a
county, and start and
end dates from the cal-
endars at the top of the
page. Then press Go.
The search results will pro-
vide each body of water
within a county that is
scheduled for stocking,
the section of water,
the date, the species of
trout, the meeting place
and time, the hatchery
stocking the section, the
regulations that apply,
and the latitude/longi-
tude number.
The PFBC annually stocks
approximately 3.2
million adult trout in
735 streams and 123
lakes open to public
angling. These gures
include approximately
1.84 million rainbow;
836,000 brown; and
509,000 brook trout. As
with past practice, the
average size of the trout
produced for stocking is
11 inches in length.
The PFBC plans to stock
about 8,500 trophy
golden rainbow trout
that weigh an average of
1.5 pounds and measure
at least 14 inches long.
About 52 percent of
the trout are stocked
prior to opening day; 43
percent are stocked be-
tween opening day and
the end of May; and the
remaining 5 percent are
stocked from October
through February of the
following year.
Also, cooperative nurser-
ies run by sportsmens
clubs across the state
will add another one
million trout to waters
close to them. The 2013
season will open March
30 with the regional
opening day of trout in
18 southeastern coun-
ties, including: Adams,
Berks, Bucks, Chester,
Cumberland, Dauphin,
Delaware, Franklin, Juni-
ata, Lancaster, Lebanon,
Lehigh, Montgomery,
Northampton, Perry,
Philadelphia, Schuylkill
and York counties.
For the rest of the state,
the regular opening
day of trout season is
April 13.
A Northeastern Pennsyl-
vania Forest Land-
owners Conference at
Keystone College will
be held on March 16
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Penn State Extension in
partnership with DCNR
Bureau of Forestry has
developed this one-day
program to help land-
owners make informed
decisions about the
management of their
forestlands. Topics
include: Utility Right-of-
Way Agreements, Insect
and Disease Forest Pest
Update, Invasive Spe-
cies Id and Control, Gas
Lease Wildlife Habitat
Restoration, Incentive
Programs for Landown-
ers, Prescribed Burns,
Utilizing Low Grade For-
est Products. For more
information contact
Luzerne County Exten-
sion at 825-1701.
B U L L e T I N
B O A R D
Bulletin Board items will
not be accepted over the
telephone. Items may be
faxed to 831-7319, dropped
off at The Times Leader or
mailed to Times Leader, c/o
Sports, 15 N. Main Street,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-
0250.
Capture anything interesting on
your handheld or trail camera? A
nice buck, bear, coyote or anything
unique? Wed love to see it. Each
week well run a photo from a
readers trail camera on the Sunday
Outdoors page. Email your photo,
along with date and area it was
taken (township is ne) and any
other details to tvenesky@times-
leader.com.
A trail camera captured this
coyote passing through the snow-
covered woods of Silvan Lake Farms
in Shickshinny at 4:21 a.m. on Jan.
Judging by the diameter of the tree
in front of the coyote, it appears
to be a rather large canine. The
photo was sent in by Tom Svetz of
Nanticoke.
Caught on camera
State rep wants to study combining of PGC, PFBC
TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO
Legislators are discussing the idea of merging the state Game and Fish and Boat commissions for cost-savings and to reduce
duplicate services between the two agencies.
Caution: Merging agencies ahead?
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
State Rep. Gerald Mullery, D-Nanticoke,
admits hes not a fan of blanket resolutions
that lack specics.
But when Mullery read the resolution
being drafted by state Rep. Martin Causer
of Potter County, he didnt hesitate to sign
on as a co-sponsor.
Causer, who is chairman of the House
Game and Fisheries Committee, is circu-
lating a resolution that would direct the
Legislative Budget and Finance Com-
mittee to study the nancial feasibility
and potential cost savings of merging the
Pennsylvania Game Commission and the
state Fish and Boat Commission.
In Causers memo, he cited the fact that
49 other states operate efciently with
merged sh and game agencies, and the
current nancial difculties faced by the
PGC and PFBC make the possibility of a
merger a timely topic to consider.
Mullery, who is a member of the Game
and Fisheries Committee, agrees.
I can support a study to look into com-
bining two agencies that, on face value,
are inter-related, he said, taking it a step
further.
I think the Game Commission and
Fish and Boat should be combined already
and realize the nancial gain. I anticipate
the study would reveal that a cost-savings
would be realized.
A similar study in 2003 did just that, in-
dicating such a merger would save money
by eliminating staff positions, consolidat-
ing regional ofces and reducing the mo-
tor vehicle pool required by two agencies.
The PFBC is already attempting to cut
costs by announcing the closures of two
state sh hatcheries and scaling back its
trout stocking program. The moves would
save the agency an estimated $2 million
of its $9 million budget shortfall projected
for 2017.
Still, a merger might not be the best
approach to cutting costs, said PFBC com-
missioner Norm Gavlick.
Combining agencies will lead to more
layers of bureaucracy, he said, which could
threaten the efency of services and pro-
grams already in place.
It changes not only the efciency, but
the timeliness in which things are done,
Gavlick said. By combining us together
and having to deal with all the major
programs -- deer, trout, Game Lands, the
rivers -- it could be an overload for just one
agency.
While Gavlick dosnt believe the PFBC
board or staff would support a merger,
he does understand why the issue would
come up now. The PFBC is hurting
nancially while the Game Commission
is realizing a revenue boost from royalties
generated by Marcellus Shale drilling. A
merger, he said, would be an easy way for
the legislture to funnel more cash to the
PFBC.
In the eyes of the legislators, there
might be more motivation this time to
support a merger, Gavlick said. Still, the
last time there was a study, it showed that
a merger was nancially feasible and it
still didnt get done.
Support for a merger is lacking from
the PGC, at least with commissioner Jay
Delaney. While the PGC board has yet
to discuss the matter, Delaney said the
system of two independent agencies has
worked for a long time.
Still, Delaney said he has no problem
with legislators looking at more cost-
effective ways to run government, he just
doesnt believe a merger falls under that
category.
Im condent if they were to do the
study, they would see youre not going
to save a lot of money by doing this,
Delaney said, adding that a merger could
compromise the level of services the agen-
cies perform for hunters and anglers.
He also said the Game Commission
really doesnt cost general taxpayers any-
thing because its funded by the less than
10 percent of the states population that
purchases hunting licenses.
The last time the legislature looked
at this in 2003 they saw there wasnt a
huge cost-savings factor and sportsmen
didnt support it, Delaney said. We have
independent agencies to hear from all of
the stakeholders and independent boards
to make the decision on whats best. Its
worked well that way for over 100 years.
Mullery said merged agencies might
benet hunters and anglers because they
would then have one outlet to turn to,
simplifying the process. A merger of the
PGC and PFBC would be similar to the
regionalization of police departments, he
said, that operate as one central unit with
various precincts within.
State Rep. Kevin Haggerty, D-Lacka-
wanna, is also a member of the House
Game and Fisheries Committee and, like
Mullery, he supports the plan to study the
cost-savings of a merger.
Haggerty said with the current eco-
nomic climate the time is right to look at
any way possible to cut costs while not
jeopardizing the quality of service.
If it doesnt affect the mission of both
agencies, Im for it, he said. Its extreme-
ly important that we maintain the integ-
rity of both agencies, and that would have
to be gured out before we move forward.
But youre really talking about two things
- hunting and shing, that arent all that
different.
Jay Delaney (left),
vice president of
the Pennsylvania
Game Commission
board of commis-
sioners, shown here
with Ross Piazza of
Pheasants Forever,
does not support
the idea of merging
his agency with the
Pennsylvania Fish
and Boat Commis-
sion.
DON CAREY FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER
TOM VENESKY
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SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAge 13C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com
Rape case of 2 Ohio football players set to begin
By ANDREWWELSH-HUGGINS
AP Legal Affairs Writer
COLUMBUS, Ohio Two
high school football players
go on trial this coming week
on charges of raping a nearly
passed-out-drunk 16-year-old
girl during a night of partying
in Steubenville. Around the
football-powerhouse city, some
are demanding to know why at
least three other teens arent fac-
ing charges, too.
After the athletes arrest last
summer, one of the many ru-
mors that swirled around town
proved all too true: Three boys,
two of them members of Steu-
benville Highs celebrated Big
Red team, saw something hap-
pening that night and didnt try
to stop it. Instead, two pulled
out their cellphones and took
video and a photo.
The allegations shocked and
roiled the city of 18,000, but
prosecutors brought no charges
against the witnesses, fueling
months of furious online accu-
sations of a cover-up to protect
the team something law en-
forcement authorities have ve-
hemently denied.
Anyone that they can show
had rsthand knowledge and
was partly in some way respon-
sible for the event, the rape,
they should be charged, said
Jackie Hillyer, president of the
Ohio chapter of the National Or-
ganization for Women.
Longtime Steubenville resi-
dent Willa Wade said: I feel per-
sonally that if they were there,
they knewit had happened, they
did not report it or stop it, then
they ought to be brought up on
the same charges as anybody
else.
The Ohio attorney generals
ofce, however, told the three
witnesses in a letter last fall that
while they may not have con-
ducted themselves in a respon-
sible or appropriate manner,
their behavior did not rise to
the level of criminal conduct,
and they would not be charged.
Legal experts said it is clear
prosecutors sorely need the wit-
nesses testimony to make their
rape case.
This prosecutor more than
anything else wants to get a
conviction of the culprits and he
does not want to jeopardize that
single-minded goal, said Chris-
to Lassiter, a University of Cin-
cinnati criminal law professor.
MaLik Richmond, 16, and
Trent Mays, 17, go on trial
Wednesday in juvenile court in
Steubenville. They are charged
with digitally penetrating the
girl, rst in the back seat of a
moving car after a mostly under-
age, alcohol-fueled party Aug.
11, and then in the basement
of a house. Witnesses said the
girl was so drunk she threw up
at least twice and had trouble
walking and speaking. She was
also photographed being carried
by the two young men.
If convicted, they could be
held in a juvenile jail until they
turn 21. They have denied any
wrongdoing.
National attention has hit
Steubenville and has led to
accusations of a cover-up.
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SECTI ON D
timesleader.com
How would
you feel if Mom and
dad became your
roommates?
For some fami-
lies, its a reality as
they give shelter to
nancially struggling
parents or ill parents who can no
longer care for themselves.
But as much as you may want to
repay your parents for their care of
you, you have to look at the nancial
and emotional ramications of taking
them in.
Parents are in the habit of tak-
ing care of their children, said Rick
Salmeron, certied nancial planner
at the Salmeron Financial Network.
The ow of wealth from older to
younger generation feels natural to
many.
But changing demographics is mak-
ing the reverse more common.
we are living so much longer
now, Salmeron said. The older
generation may be running out of
savings, or may be mentally or physi-
cally unable to tend for themselves.
The younger generation had better
do more thinking about possible new
roommates their parents and
how they might prepare themselves.
Here are the areas you need to look
at:
THE COSTS
when considering having a parent
come live with you, there are direct
costs and indirect costs, said Tom
Murphy, certied nancial planner at
Murphy & Sylvestin dallas.
direct costs include groceries,
household supplies and dining out.
Indirect costs can include increased
utility bills, higher auto insurance
rates if the parent is still driving, and
more laundry, hobby or activity costs
of the parent, he said.
Adding one person to a home
with two will increase these variable
expenses by an average of 23 percent,
according to u.S. census gures,
Murphy said.
For example, if you and your
spouse spend $2,000 a month for
food, utilities and other non-xed ex-
penses and one parent comes to live
with you, you can expect your costs
to increase to about $2,460, Murphy
said.
Having both parents live with you
increases costs by about 42 percent,
he said.
Neither situation includes in-
creased health care costs unique to
an elderly parent, nor do they include
assisted living costs in the home.
SHARING THE BURDEN
Parents, if nancially feasible, may
want to contribute to the household,
said Jean Keener, certied nancial
planner at Keener Financial Planning
in Keller, Texas. discussing arrange-
ments to help with utilities or other
costs helps facilitate this.
After deb Sears bought a home
in 1995, it was more than what she
wanted to care for by herself, so she
moved her elderly parents in with
her.
It was a good opportunity for me
to get them in a better place because
their business had closed and I
wanted the help, said Sears, 53, of
Flower Mound, Texas.
The transition wasnt nancially
difcult for her because within a year,
Sears got a promotion and big pay
raise.
I was making enough money
and they were starting to get Social
Security, she said. I was able to help
them retire so they didnt have to go
and nd other jobs.
Today, things are different. Sears
father has died, and she was laid off
from her job as an information tech-
nology manager in 2004.
Sears and her 81-year-old mother
now are moving from their home to a
two-bedroom apartment to ease the
burdens of a house payment and the
upkeep of the home.
we greatly have reduced our
spending, said Sears, whos living off
of her savings and investments.
IMPACT ON BENEFITS
Having your parents move in with
you wont affect their Medicare or
Social Security benets. However,
other benets, such as Supplemental
Making room
for Mom, Dad
in your home
personal finance
pamela yi p
I FINd MySelF
shopping at the Bon-
Ton and donating
to Goodwill Indus-
tries several times
a year. This month
Ill be doing both but
only having to visit
one place.
The two are partnering for the
semi-annual Bon-Ton Goodwill Sale,
which will take place from March
13-30.
Throughout the sales period, those
who bring in lightly used clothing
and soft home goods to The Bon-Ton
will receive a discount coupon that
can be used online or at any Bon-Ton
on nearly everything in the store such
as womens, mens and childrens
apparel, shoes, handbags and acces-
sories at a 25 percent discount, home
store merchandise at a 20 percent
discount and cosmetics, fragrances,
furniture, and small electrics at a 15
percent discount.
The items you donate will be sold
at Goodwill stores.
Consumers are also invited to visit
millionactsofgoodwill.com to register
to play the Closet Clean-out Give-
away Instant-win Game to receive a
25 percent off coupon to use in-store
or online and be entered into the
sweepstakes. The grand prize win-
ner of the sweepstakes will have the
Bon-Ton credit card purchases made
between March 4-30, paid off (up to
$2,500). By entering, consumers will
also have a chance to instantly win
Bon-Ton gift cards.
The annual wilkes-Barre St.
Patricks day Parade steps off Satur-
day and its always a good time for
families.
If you bring the kids to town and
are looking to grab a bite, head to
Cork Bar &Restaurant, 463 Madi-
son St., wilkes-Barre. owner Ruth
Corcoran is serving up lots of yummy
Irish food and drink specials and if
youre there from 3 to 5 p.m., there
will be free kids meals.
with the party holiday upon us,
the kitchens throughout the valley
will be smelling like corn beef and
cabbage over the next few week
(Some smell this way year round).
If youre gonna be cooking some
classic Irish food fare, Weis has an
essential ingredient, cabbage, for 29
cents a pound.
Price Choppers circular has a
coupon that will get you Shannon
Farms regular or low salt corned beef
at cut brisket for $2.99 a pound up
to eight pounds. No coupon needed
for the same cut of beef at Shur Save
for the same price of $2.99 per pound.
Shur Save also has a loaf of Irish soda
bread for $2.99.
If point cut brisket is your choice,
Thomas Foodtown has it for $1.99
per pound and also features one of
my favorites, Kerrygold Irish swiss
cheese for $6.99 per pound.
whats a party without some party
supplies? Not much of one, I suppose.
So head over to Party City today
with this coupon: http://tinyurl.
com/akor38b and get 40 percent off
one regularly-priced item.
Im often thinking Arbys. even
more so with this coupon offer for a
free small drink and small fries with
the purchase of the yummy new
Reuben: http://www.arbys.com/cou-
pons/march-2013.html
If you missed out on the virtually
free jelly beans at CVS last week, fret
not. A similar deal is in effect this
week. Buy a 7 ounce bag of Gold Em-
blemjelly beans 99 cents and when
you use your CVS extraCare Card,
youll get the full purchase price back
by way of a coupon printed on your
receipt for a future store purchase.
irish and every one elses eyes will be smiling this week
AndrewM. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If
you knowof any local steals or deals, email
themto aseder@timesleader.comand follow
himon Twitter @TLAndrewSeder
Facebook showed off a redesign
of its News Feed on Thursday that
features bigger pictures, a cleaner
look and a series of optional feeds
that will let users focus on photos,
music or other specialized topics.
The newdesigneventually could
let Facebook show users more ad-
vertisements in the stream of up-
dates and posts that users view, ac-
cording to Ceo Mark Zuckerberg,
but he suggested the change will
be gradual.
while the main News Feed page
will still rank posts according to
Facebooks formula for calculating
what users want to see based on
their past likes and those of their
friends Zuckerberg said users
also will be able to switch to a spe-
cialized stream showing only pho-
tos or just music and concert news.
If they wish, users also can switch
to a stream that shows every post
from all their friends, or from the
commercial pages and businesses
that a user has liked.
Those specialized feeds will be
like the sections of a newspaper,
Zuckerberg said. we view our-
selves as a medium for all kinds of
information and other content that
Facebook users want to share, he
added.
The new design represents the
biggest change to Facebooks News
Feed in nearly two years. Previous
revisions have sparked a backlash
from users who did not like chang-
ing from what they were used to.
But Facebook executives said the
company believes the new design
responds to users requests. They
add that it will be introduced grad-
ually to waves of users, so the com-
pany can take their feedback into
account.
Facebook executive Chris Cox
said the design is also intended
to look the same on all kinds of
screens, from desktop computers
to tablets and smartphones.
executives said Facebook is re-
moving much of the clutter that
now appears on side colum`ns of
the News Feed page on desktop
computers. while they did not say
how this affects advertising, which
is now often displayed on the right
side of desktop screens, experts say
it likely means Facebook will put
more emphasis on inserting ads or
sponsored stories into the main
streamof updates.
facebook
getting a
new look
By BRANDON BAILEY
San Jose Mercury News
AP PHOTO
Facebook vice president of
product Chris Cox speaks
about the rms redesign of
its News Feed that features
bigger pictures, a cleaner look
and a series of optional feeds.
Nearly 40 local employers will be
at The woodlands Inn and Resort on
Tuesday looking to ll hundreds of
jobs.
The annual Spring Career Fair,
sponsored by The Times leader
and Monster.com, starts at 10 a.m.
and runs through 5 p.m. and gives
jobseekers the convenience of apply-
ing for multiple jobs at one location.
Some companies will be doing inter-
views on the spot, including Sallie
Mae, and others will just be acecpting
applications or resumes.
For a region that registered a sea-
sonally adjusted unemployment rate
of 9.5 percent in december, the most
recently available data the depart-
ment of labor has, these sorts of op-
portunities are important to both the
unemployed, or the under employed,
said Christine M. Jensen, the admin-
istrator for the PA Careerlink ofce
in wilkes-Barre.
Career Fairs are a great opportu-
nity for job seekers to actually meet
with a representative from a com-
pany with which they are interested
in working. with so many employers
using on-line application processes, it
is not often that you get to speak with
someone in person unless you are
granted an interview, Jensen said.
It allows the job seeker a few min-
utes to make an impression on that
(human resources) manager. If the
impression is a positive one, when
that HR manager gets back to the of-
ce and begins reviewing the dozens
and perhaps hundreds of resumes
they received at the job fair, those
that made a positive impression have
a better chance at being chosen for an
interview.
Nine of the companies sending
reprsentatives to the event are new
to the fair, which has been an annual
event for more than two decades and
has been held at the woodlands the
past ve years. Previously, the event
has been held at the Arena at Casey
Plaza, the Pittston Convention Cen-
ter, and Genettis Hotel and Conven-
tion Center.
Among the newcomers is Moun-
tain Top Foam/Sealy Components,
which is looking to ll about 10 ma-
chine operator poisitions. The com-
pany is growing and has already lled
ve positions.
This job fair was very timely as
were trying to hire people for the
near future, said Joe Pail, human re-
sources manager at the weight Town-
ship facility.
He said companies looking to nd
employees have so many avenues at
their disposal from newspapers to
websites to Careerlink and more
that sometimes its overwhelming for
jobskeekers to access all of those pos-
sibilities. The job fairs give employers
the ability to reach lots of different
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Avrian Mack of Wilkes-Barre seeks out job postings by potential employers on CareerLink computers in Wilkes-
Barre on March 8.
Ready those Resumes
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
BROADCASTING JOBS
Residents in Northeast Pennsylvania
and the Central Susquehanna Val-
ley interested in job opportunities in
electronic
media are invited to the Northeast
Broadcasting Employment Fair, Monday,
March 25 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the WVIA
Public Media Studios located at 100
WVIA Way in Jenkins Township.
There will be representatives from area
radio and television stations present
to talk with attendees and accept their
resumes. The employment fair is free
and open to all.
See JOB FAIR, Page 2
See FINANCE, Page 3
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 S U N D A Y B U S I N E S S
BUSINESS AGENDA
Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation
ofcials will present information
on economic impacts with a focus
on what the natural gas industry
means to local business at the
March Wyoming County Cham-
ber of Commerce Educational
Luncheon.
George Stark, director of exter-
nal affairs at Cabot Oil & Gas Cor-
poration, will address chamber
members on Wednesday at Twigs
Cafe in Tunkhannock from 1 1:45
a.m. to 1 p.m.
The presentation will feature
Cabots perspective on the suc-
cess of the natural gas industry
and the impact it is having on a
variety of local businesses - from
water recycling businesses and
environmental consulting rms
to landscapers, hardware stores,
insurance companies, real estate
brokers, community organizations
and many more. The positive
economic progress is also giving
rise to new businesses and entre-
preneurs who are nding creative
ways of providing services to the
natural gas industry and its grow-
ing workforce.
To reserve seats, contact Debo-
rah at 875-8325 or by email at
Deborah@wyccc.com. Seating will
be limited to one representative
per business. Request for ad-
ditional representatives as well as
non-members will be wait-listed
until all members have been ac-
commodated.
The Northeast Pennsylvania
Manufacturers and Employers
Association announces its Su-
pervisory Development Training
Series will begin Friday.
The series, which will take place
at the Top of the 80s in West
Hazleton, will be broken into four
classes. They include Supervisory
Development I & II, Psychology
in the Workplace and Effective
Communications & Interpersonal
Relations.
Each of the four trainings is a
stand-alone class and will cost
$300 for members and $600
for non-members. Register for
all four classes and receive
a reduced price of $275 per
member per class for a total
of $1,100. There is no discount
for non-member participants.
Participants that complete the
entire series will be recognized
by NAM (National Association
of Manufacturers) and PMA
(Pennsylvania Manufacturers
Association).
To learn more about this train-
ing or to sign up, call 622-0992
or email Chris Robbins at crob-
bins@maea.biz.
Marywood University will host
the 11th Annual Forum and Con-
ference on Ethical Leadership
and Corporate Social Respon-
sibility, Out-behaving Your
Competition, on March 18, from
9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
The conference will take place
in the Latour Room, Nazareth
Student Center, at Marywood Uni-
versity. The conference is open to
the public.
At 7 p.m., there will be a keynote
address by Attorney Jane Carlo-
nas of Oliver, Price & Rhodes, fol-
lowed by a Q & A and a network-
ing reception.
For additional information,
contact Gale Jaeger, program
coordinator, at galejaeger@gmail.
com or 348-6274.
A Human Resources Rount-
able will be held from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. on March 20 at the Top
of the 80s, West Hazleton. The
event, sponsored by The North-
east Pennsylvania Manufacturers
and Employers Association, will
include discussion on regional
and statewide labor market
information. Tim McElhinny, eco-
nomic research, customer service
and outreach manager for the
Center for Workforce Information
& Analysis, will present. He will
discuss high priority occupations,
industries of interest, PA UC Ac-
tivity, top employers in the state,
and fun facts.
The cost to register, which in-
cludes lunch, is $37 for members
and $74 for non-members. To
register, email Gina Whalen at
gwhalen@maea.biz, or call 622-
0992.
U.S. Sen.Patrick Toomey, R-
Zionsville, will be the featured
guest of the Greater Hazleton
Chamber of Commerce Red Car-
pet Breakfast program on March
22 at Genettis, 1341 N. Church St.
The program will begin at 8:45
a.m. and conclude at 10 a.m.
Toomeys comments will focus
on economic issues, specically
how to improve the job climate,
encourage economic growth and
reduce regulation. A question-
and-answer period will follow the
senators comments.
A full breakfast will be served
and the program costs $20 per
person for chamber members
and $25 for guests. Chamber
members and guests who would
like to attend should contact the
chamber ofce by March 18th
at 455-1509 to make a reserva-
tion or by emailing Julie Ferry at
jferry@hazletonchamber.org.
Q: After working at an amuse-
ment park for three years, I am
hoping for a promotion to su-
pervisor. My last attempt, how-
ever, was a asco.
When my supervisor quit, I
told our manager, Bob, that I
was interested in the position.
Bob gave me an application and
said he would keep me in mind.
Two weeks later, before going
on vacation, I reminded Bob of
my interest in the supervisory
job.
When I returned, a co-worker
informed me that an outside ap-
plicant had been hired. I imme-
diately asked Bob why I had not
been given an interview. Bob
initially said that he forgot I was
interested, but probably would
have given me the job if he had
remembered. When I reminded
him about our previous conver-
sations, he said he vaguely re-
called them, but that the other
applicant was more qualied.
Implanning to send a written
complaint to the general man-
ager, because I dont want to be
overlooked again. Do you think
this will help?
A: Despite the fact that your
bumbling boss cant keep his
own story straight, complaining
is not a wise move. Your objec-
tive is not to overturn the pre-
vious decision, but to inuence
the next one. Sounding resent-
ful or dissatised might actually
keep you from being promoted,
so lets consider a different
strategy.
Since Bobs opinion is im-
portant, arrange a meeting
with him to discuss your career
goals. Without mentioning his
previous blunder, ask what he
looks for in a supervisor, request
suggestions for strengthening
your qualications, and express
appreciation for his advice.
Follow up with a thank-you
email and copy the general
manager. For example: Bob, I
just wanted to thank you for tak-
ing time to talk with me about
my career. Your advice was very
helpful. I have enjoyed working
at the park for the past three
years and would certainly like
to be considered if a superviso-
ry position becomes available.
This approach has several
benets. You can remind Bob
of your interest in a promotion,
learn more about how he evalu-
ates candidates, and gain some
good will by sharing a compli-
ment with his boss. At the same
time, you are tactfully advising
the general manager of your de-
sire to move up.
Q: Beth and Marcia both
work for me. R
ecently, I made the mistake of
telling Beth that I was unhappy
with Marcias performance. She
repeated my comments, and
now Marcia is justiably angry.
How can I recover from this
screw-up?
A: First, kudos to you for re-
conizing that managers should
never discuss one employee
with another. But if you also
failed to tell Marcia about these
issues directly, then you owe her
both an apology and some feed-
back. For example: Marcia, I
want to apologize for discussing
my concerns about your project
with Beth instead of talking to
you. That was inexcusable, and
it wont happen again. However,
we do need to gure out why
this project is behind schedule.
Your lapse in judgment, while
unfortunate, does not exempt
Marcia from having a necessary
performance discussion.
ABOUT THE WRITERMarie G.
McIntyre is a workplace coach and
the author of Secrets to Winning
at Ofce Politics. Send in questions
and get free coaching tips at www.
yourofcecoach.com, or followher on
Twitter @ofcecoach.
OFFICE COACH
Complaints wont get you the promotion you want
By MArie G. Mcintyre
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Wyoming Valley Golf Club
The Wyoming Valley Country Club
has been selected as a recipient of
the 5 Star PlatinumPrivate Club
of America Award.
This award was established by the
Club Leaders Forum, an organiza-
tion that promotes excellence in
Private Club leadership to over
3,000 Private Clubs nationwide.
One hundred private clubs are
selected nationally, and The Wyo-
ming Valley Country Club in Ha-
nover Township was the only golf
club in the Northeast region to be
awarded this prestigious award.
Other Pennsylvania clubs that also
achieved Platinumstatus include
Oakmont Country Club, Lehigh
Country Club, Philadelphia Coun-
try Club, Philadelphia Cricket Club
and Merion Golf Club.
The Wyoming Valley Country
Club is the fth oldest golf club in
Pennsylvania and the 45th oldest
in the country.
Lewith and Freeman Real
Estate
Top ve producers for the year
and long time employees were
honored at a recent ceremony.
The top ve producers were Ani-
ta Reber (top producers award),
Terry Donnelly, Joan Matusiak,
Rae Dziak, and Lisa Joseph.
Long-time sales professionals
recognized for years of service
included Nancy Palumbo and
Corine Sworen for 20-years of
service. James Graham, Patricia
Genetti, Marcie Petrucelli, Geri
Wisnewski and Terry Nelson were
honored for 15-years of service.
HONORS & AWARDS
The Wyoming Valley Country Club is honored with Platinuim
Status. Accepting the award, from left to right, front row:
Joseph Butcher, Randy Park, Vince Tassitano and George
Fredmonski. From left to right, back row, Paul Eyerman, Marty
Behm, Gary Slusser, Brian Balutis, Atty. Michael Kostelansky,
Robert Bull and Pete Korba
KINGS COLLEGE
Eileen Melone, real estate broker
and appraiser and owner of her
own Wilkes-Barre real estate
ofce, has
been named
chairperson of
the upcoming
Kings College
Commu-
nity Campaign.
Melone is
a veteran
volunteer for
the Community
Phase of the
Kings College Annual Fund. She
is currently a Kings part-time
evening student working toward
a bachelors degree in psychol-
ogy, and is the recipient of a
degree in nursing.
HOURIGAN, KLUGER & QUINN
Attorney Brian P. Stahl has
been named a partner in the law
rm. Stahl, who practices in the
rms Kingston ofce, has been
an associate with the rm since
2008. He earned a Bachelor
of Science
degree in Busi-
ness Admin-
istration from
the University
of Pittsburgh
and his law
degree from
the Dickinson
School of Law.
CHAN
HEALTHCARE
Scot Murphy, data analytics
audit manager, was recently
promoted to data analytics
audit senior manager for the St.
Louis-based company. Murphy
works out of his home ofce
in Mountain Top and holds a
Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration and Accounting
from Misericordia University; a
Master of Health Administration
(MHA) from Wilkes University;
he is a Certied Fraud Examiner
(CFE), Certied Internal Auditor
(CIA), and an ACL Certied Data
Analyst (ACDA).
Melone
Stahl
CORPORATE LADDER
people at one time, Pail said.
Its a good place to meet a lot
of prospects.
Linda Byrnes, the classied
sales manager for The Times
Leader and an event organizer,
said with companies downsiz-
ing, implementing hiring freez-
es or closing altogether, she
was sattised with the number
of businesses that signed up to
participate. More than half the
companies were at the fall job
fair the Times Leader hosted at
the 109th Field Artilary Armory
in Wilkes-Barre have signed up
for this fair, too.
Trucking, manufacturing and
warehousing companies will be
on hand but three sectors are
most notable on the lineup of
businesses in attendance.
The nancial and insurance
sectors are well represented
with First Financial Group,
MassMutal Financial Group,
Northwestern Mutual, Pruden-
tial, Robert C. Williams Insur-
ance Agency Inc., Sallie Mae
and Western and Southern Life
Insurance companies among
those with booths. The health-
care industry will also have a
large presecence with compa-
nies including Allied Services,
Bayada, Caregivers America,
Meadows Nursing & Rehabili-
tation Center, Pediatria Health
Care, Regional Hospital of
Scranton, Timber Ridge Health
Care, and TMG Health repre-
sented.
Sallie Mae plans to hire full-
time collectors and call center
representatives and currently
has about 100 openings for its
Hanover Township, according
to company spokeswoman Nik-
ki A. Lavoie, who said the com-
pany saw the job fair as a good
way to ll those jobs.
As one of the regions top em-
ployers, Sallie Mae is pleased to
participate in the job fair again
this year. At a time when nd-
ing a good job can be tough, this
event provides an important
service to jobseekers and the
community. Its also a great way
for Sallie Mae to reach and re-
cruit new candidates to join our
team of talented professionals,
Lavoie said.
In order to assist job seekers
prepare for the Times Leader
Career Fair, CareerLink held
a resume review session last
Tuesday. Jobseekers met one-
on-one with staff members
who reviewed their resume
and made suggestions for im-
provement.
We held this event to al-
low job seekers time to improve
upon their resume before the
job fair. We plan to hold another
resume review opportunity on
April 2, in advance of an employ-
ment expo being held on April
11, at the Mohegan Sun Arena,
Jensen said.
JOB FAIR
Continued from Page 1
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Avrian Mack of Wilkes-Barre seeks out job postings by potential
employers on CareerLink computers in Wilkes-Barre.
BETHLEHEM, Pa. Its
Easter morning. A boy rouses
his younger brother, and they
run to the living room to find
their baskets filled with -
what else? - Peeps.
Peeps are THE candy of
Easter, the excited boy tells
his wide-eyed sibling, who
pops a yellow marshmallow
chick in his mouth.
You can eat em, smash
em, microwave em, deep fry
em, roast em on a stick, the
boy explains. Thats not all.
You can make historically
accurate Peeps dioramas
Peeps pop art You can
make a Peeps topiary. On
he goes, all day and night.
Peeps jousting hide-and-
go Peeps Peepshi thats
sushi made out of Peeps.
As the storied candy brand
celebrates its 60th anniver-
sary this year, Peeps first
TV ad in a decade captures
an essential truth about the
spongy confection made of
sugar, corn syrup and gela-
tin: Love them or hate them,
people do all sorts of things
with Peeps, only some of
which involve giving them to
kids at Easter or eating them
straight from the box.
And theyre not shy about
sharing.
Everyone seems to have
a Peeps story, says Ross
Born, third-generation opera-
tor of Just Born Inc., which
hatches 5 million Peeps a day
at its plant 60 miles north of
Philadelphia (http://apne.
ws/12A8iCH ). And they are
free and willing to talk about
how they eat their Peeps,
how they cure them, how
they store them, how they
decorate with them. And
these are adults!
Just Born calls it the Peep-
sonality of consumers who
buy Peeps not only to eat, but
also to play around with.
If you had asked me about
this 25 years ago, I wouldve
been rather bewildered about
the whole thing, Born con-
fesses. We were candy mak-
ers.
Not that hes complaining.
Just Born had its best year fi-
nancially in 2012.
His grandfather, Russian
immigrant Sam Born, started
the candy company out of a
Brooklyn storefront 90 years
ago. Born advertised the
freshness of his product with
a sign that said Just Born.
The name stuck.
The burgeoning business
moved to Bethlehem and ac-
quired the Peeps brand with
its 1953 purchase of Rodda
Candy Co. of Lancaster. Best
known for its jelly beans,
Rodda had also introduced
a small line of marshmallow
chicks and bunnies, employ-
ing dozens of women who
hand-squeezed them out
of pastry bags. It was re-
ally very difficult, and these
women were strong, said
David Shaffer, Sam Borns
nephew and co-CEO along
with Ross Born.
Rosss father, Bob Born -
a physicist and engineer by
training - automated the pro-
cess in the mid-1950s, and
a version of the machine he
invented is still in use today,
extruding millions of those
familiar shapes on peak-Peep
production days.
The company, whose oth-
er brands are Hot Tamales,
Mike and Ike, and Golden-
bergs Peanut Chews, has
never suffered an unprofit-
able year. But its growth has
always been relatively slow,
steady and controlled, and a
few years ago, Born and Shaf-
fer decided they wanted to
accelerate it.
The longtime partners
brought in a new manage-
ment team, spent heavily on
marketing and broke back
into the chocolate business,
introducing chocolate-dipped
Peeps as well as Peepsters,
small chocolate candies filled
with marshmallow-flavored
cream. (New for this year is
a yellow chick nestled in a
hollow chocolate egg.) They
also focused on holiday sea-
sons other than Easter, par-
ticularly Christmas.
The result: Shaffer says
last year was off the charts.
While Just Born is privately
held and does not disclose
revenue, he says it posted
double-digit growth across
all brands. And Shaffer sees
more growth potential as
the confectioner works to
position its products in ware-
house clubs and convenience
stores.
Just Born certainly ben-
efits from being part of a $33
billion candy industry that is
seen as basically recession-
Hot chicks: At 60, Peeps more popular than ever
By MicHAeL rUBinKAM
Associated Press
AP PHOTOS
Roger Hildebeitel inspects Peeps as they move through the manufacturing process at the Just
Born factory in Bethlehem, Pa. With the storied candy brand celebrating its 60th anniversary
this year, a quirky new TV ad campaign talks about all the things people do with their Peeps.
See PEEPS, Page 5
MarketPulse
BUYBACK BINGE
Last month was by far the biggest
ever for stock buybacks.
Companies authorized $118
billion in repurchases, according
to Birinyi Associates. Thats $29
billion more than announced in
December 2007, the old record
holder. Repurchases can benefit
investors because fewer shares
outstanding mean remaining ones
get a bigger proportion of the
companys profits. Repurchases,
along with dividends, are ways
that companies can return some
of the cash that they hold to
shareholders. Now that tax rates
rose on dividend income for some
investors, buybacks may be a
more popular option.
BEST REBIRTH?
Many investors left Best Buy for dead last year. They worried that the
electronics retailer couldnt compete with online rivals, and its stock sank
49 percent. But Best Buy has found some believers among financial
analysts, and its stock
has crept back in 2013.
The retailer trimmed its
loss in the fourth quarter
after cutting costs,
beating analysts
expectations. Jefferies
analysts last week
upgraded its stock to
Buy on expectations that
its new management will
cut costs further. The
Jefferies analysts also say
that expectations are so
low that its easier for Best
Buy to surprise investors.
AP
GREECE DEMOTED
To investors, emerging markets often connote strong growth
and opportunities. Think of stocks from China or Indonesia.
Greece doesnt fit that description, after its economy shrank 6.9
percent in 2011 and another 6 percent last year. But Russell In-
dexes says it is one. Thats because Russell considers how
risky a countrys stocks are
when classifying it as either an
emerging or developed market.
Given Greeces debt woes in
recent years, Russell last week
said that Greece is too risky to
deserve developed market
status and demoted it to
emerging. The move will af-
fect mutual funds that bench-
mark themselves against ei-
ther the Russell Developed or
Russell Emerging Markets in-
dexes.
Best Buy (BBY)
Source: Birinyi Associates Source: FactSet
10
20
30
40
$50
13 12 11 10
Biggest February
buyback authorizations
Home Depot:
$17 billion
General Electric:
$10 billion
PepsiCo:
$10 billion
UPS:
$10 billion
Title: Co-manager of the
JPMorgan Emerging Economies
fund
What he suggests: Emerging
markets offer compelling
investment opportunities.
Answers edited for content and
clarity.
George Iwanicki
Its been a tough few years
for stocks from the worlds fastest-
growing economies. Mutual funds
specializing in emerging markets
stocks have posted average annual-
ized returns of about 5 percent over
the latest 3-year period, according
to Morningstar. Thats less than half
of the average gains for most U.S.
stock fund categories over the same
period. Even so, George Iwanicki of
the JPMorgan Emerging Economies
fund (JEEAX) sees an abundance of
investing opportunities in countries
such as China and Turkey. The
mutual fund has outperformed
nearly three-quarters of its emerging
markets peers over the latest
5-year period, posting an average
annualized return of 1.8 percent.
Emerging markets stocks took
a beating in 2011, and they went
through another rough stretch
last spring before rallying late
in the year. Why do see strong
opportunities now?
These stocks are priced inexpen-
sively relative to historic averages
and to what we think is a fair value.
Theyre not screamingly cheap,
but they look attractive. They were
hurt because corporate earnings
struggled in many developing
countries over the past couple
years. That was a consequence of
a slowdown in economic growth in
countries like China and India.
But its important to remember
that growth has remained much
stronger than it has in developed
countries like the U.S. or in Europe.
In the emerging markets, the
slowdown was largely the result
of central banks trying to contain
inflation by keeping economic
growth manageable.
Why is the situation turning
around?
In most of these countries, the
inflation fight looks like it has been
won for now. So central banks
have shifted their policies in recent
months, and theyre now trying to
encourage growth. So this is the
year when earnings are likely to
begin improving.
Which countries and regions offer
the greatest investment potential?
Stocks in China have become con-
siderably cheaper after that market
experienced a nearly two-year bear
market that ended last fall. We also
like Turkey. The demographics
there are favorable, with a relatively
young population that will fuel long-
term economic growth. One of the
fund holdings that we particularly
like is Turkiye Garanti Bankasi. Its
the second-largest private bank in
Turkey. Its well run, and enjoying
strong credit growth. Weve warmed
up to financial stocks generally in
the emerging markets, and the fund
invests in banks in China and India.
What about India?
Indias economy is rebounding
from a hard landing. Its a very
good growth story, and India has
good corporate management. But
stocks arent cheap, because the
Indian stock market began rallying
last year well before the economy
turned around. So were not loading
into that market.
Emerging
opportunities
InsiderQ&A
AP
Sources:FactSet; Investment Company Institute; S&P Capital IQ
* based on trailing 12 months results Data through March 8
BEST STOCK
Wyndham Worldwide
(WYN) has soared
1,950 percent in the last
four years, making it the
top performer in the
S&P 500. The hotel and
time-share company is turning things around,
moving from a loss of $1.07 billion in 2008 to
a profit of $400 million in 2012.
WORST STOCK
First Solar (FSLR) sits at
the bottom of the S&P
500 over the last four
years. Worries about a
glut of supply of solar
panels have sent stocks
careening across the
solar industry. First Solar is down 76 percent.
DOUBLED DOWN
More than two thirds of all the
stocks in the S&P 500 have
doubled in the last four years
344 of them. Only 13 have
fallen since March 9, 2009.
P/E RATIO
for S&P 500*
CONSUMER
CONFIDENCE INDEX
(healthy economy = 90)
March
2009
Now
(Feb. 13)
March 9,
2009
Now
March
2009
Now
(Jan. 13)
March
2009
Now
(Feb. 13)
26
-$15.9
$18.6
26.9
8
298
69.6
15
DIVIDEND INCREASES,
monthly
U.S. STOCK MUTUAL
FUNDS
(net investment
in billions)
M
The Standard & Poors 500 index is less than 1 percent shy of its record high. It has been a remarkable
run to 1,551, from a bottom of 676 on March 9, 2009. Small- and mid-sized stock indexes have already
reached record highs. And the blue chip stocks of the Dow Jones industrial average have set a new
all-time high for four straight days. The economys in better shape too, though growing only modestly.
Stan Choe; J. Paschke AP
Up fromthe bottom
Then
now &
Dow Nasdaq S&P 500
Then Then Then Now Now Now
676
1,551
1,268
3,224
14,397
6,547
INDEXES
time-share compan
moving from a loss g
a profit of $400 mill
Air Products APD 76.11 8 92.79 89.10 2.76 3.2 s s 6.0 +1.83 4 2.6 19 2.9
Amer Water Works AWK 32.75 0 40.69 40.11 0.54 1.4 s s 8.0+21.35 226.2a 20 2.5
Amerigas Part LP APU 37.00 8 45.57 43.80 -0.19 -0.4 s s 13.1 +3.52 3 13.4 \>99 7.3
Aqua America Inc WTR 21.52 0 30.33 29.89 0.81 2.8 s s 17.6+38.77 1 12.4 21 2.3
Arch Dan Mid ADM 24.38 9 33.98 32.54 0.57 1.8 s s 18.8 +6.89 3 -4.6 15 2.3
AutoZone Inc AZO 341.98 8399.10 385.25 7.11 1.9 t s 8.7 -+1.25 4 27.8 15 ...
Bank of America BAC 6.72 0 12.42 12.07 0.73 6.4 s s 4.0+50.25 1-17.7 46 0.3
Bk of NY Mellon BK 19.30 0 28.45 28.52 1.32 4.9 s s 11.0+29.99 2 -6.5 13 1.8
Bon Ton Store BONT 3.50 8 14.99 11.79 1.06 9.9 s s -3.0+46.12 1 18.7 ... 1.7
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 43.08 0 52.77 52.28 0.72 1.4 s s 8.1+17.21 2 7.0 17 1.7
Cigna Corp CI 39.01 9 62.22 59.66 1.44 2.5 t s 11.6+35.31 1 6.9 11 0.1
CocaCola Co KO 34.25 8 41.25 39.22 0.52 1.3 s s 8.2+16.18 2 8.2 20 2.9
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 28.09 0 42.00 41.00 0.97 2.4 s s 9.7+40.61 1 17.0 18 1.9
Community Bk Sys CBU 25.38 0 29.50 29.24 0.40 1.4 s s 6.9+12.31 3 8.8 15 3.7
Community Hlth Sys CYH 20.71 0 42.98 42.91 0.90 2.1 s s 39.6+83.82 1 6.8 14 ...
Energy Transfer Eqty ETE 34.00 0 57.26 57.93 3.88 7.2 s s 27.4+40.72 1 16.7 47 4.4
Entercom Comm ETM 4.74 9 8.42 7.92 0.32 4.2 t s 13.5+22.60 2 -4.0 13 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 11.14 8 15.75 14.51 0.51 3.6 t s 0.8 +8.12 3 5.6 63 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 3.06 5 5.15 4.07 -0.02 -0.5 t t -4.9 +2.29 4 -5.7 31 9.8
Genpact Ltd G 13.06 0 18.25 18.01 0.30 1.7 s s 16.2+31.75 2 9.2 22 1.0
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 5.14 6 9.81 7.74 0.30 4.0 s s 31.2 5.50 4 -9.8 ... 4.4
Heinz HNZ 51.91 0 72.70 72.52 0.05 0.1 s s 25.7+40.73 1 13.2 24 2.8
Hershey Company HSY 59.43 0 85.50 84.32 0.87 1.0 s s 16.8+44.26 1 21.0 29 2.0
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 39.98 39.31 0.93 2.4 s s 10.7+36.00 1 13.2 23 1.6
M&T Bank MTB 76.92 0105.90 103.96 1.30 1.3 t s 5.6+32.34 1 8.8 14 2.7
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 9100.44 98.71 3.03 3.2 s s 11.9 -+4.84 3 16.1 18 3.1
Mondelez Intl MDLZ 24.05 0 28.68 28.58 0.77 2.8 s s 12.3+17.98 2 10.0 33 1.8
NBT Bncp NBTB 18.92 8 22.89 21.80 1.36 6.7 s s 7.5 +6.15 3 6.5 13 3.7
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 6.00 0 17.44 16.99 1.62 10.5 s s 60.4+104.91 1 21.3 20 2.8
PNC Financial PNC 53.36 9 67.89 65.02 2.24 3.6 s s 11.5+13.43 3 3.8 12 2.5
PPL Corp PPL 26.68 9 31.35 30.64 0.19 0.6 s s 7.0+14.27 3 -3.7 12 4.8
Penna REIT PEI 11.81 0 19.29 19.27 0.52 2.8 s s 9.2+41.35 1 -0.2 ... 3.7
PepsiCo PEP 62.15 0 77.17 77.20 1.27 1.7 s s 12.8+26.05 2 4.6 20 2.8
Philip Morris Intl PM 81.10 8 94.13 91.11 -0.33 -0.4 s s 8.9 +11.50 325.2a 18 3.7
Procter & Gamble PG 59.07 0 77.77 77.18 0.69 0.9 s s 13.7+18.73 2 5.7 20 2.9
Prudential Fncl PRU 44.47 8 65.17 59.60 4.62 8.4 s s 11.8 .45 4 -1.1 63 2.7
SLM Corp SLM 12.85 9 20.13 19.07 -0.70 -3.5 s s 11.3+21.26 2 1.7 10 3.1
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 42.35 9 60.00 57.99 1.23 2.2 s s 9.4 ... 0.0 ... 3.4
TJX Cos TJX 36.68 9 46.67 44.91 -0.07 -0.2 t s 5.8+20.22 2 24.4 18 1.0
UGI Corp UGI 26.30 0 36.59 36.79 0.98 2.7 s s 12.5+35.12 1 9.8 19 2.9
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 0 48.77 47.96 1.24 2.7 s s 10.8+27.46 2 11.9 \>99 4.3
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 8 77.60 73.03 1.76 2.5 s s 7.0+24.97 2 9.9 15 2.6
Weis Mkts WMK 37.65 4 45.96 40.63 -0.33 -0.8 t s 3.7 3.10 4 8.1 13 3.0
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
Target hunting
StockScreener
*1=buy; 2=hold; 3=sell **based on trailing 12 months results Data through March 6 Source: FactSet
Grand Canyon Education (LOPE) $23.73 $16 $27 39.7% 1.1 15
Spirit Airlines (SAVE) 23.31 16 25 24.4 1.1 16
Thor Industries (THO) 38.44 26 46 24.5 1.2 16
Towers Watson (TW) 67.22 50 68 6.2 1.2 18
Mattress Firm Holding (MFRM) 28.02 23 48 -20.2 1.3 17
Magellan Health Services (MGLN) 53.16 40 57 13.3 1.3 10
Crane (CR) 54.21 35 55 16.1 1.3 16
Teradyne (TER) 17.15 13 18 8.5 1.3 18
C&J Energy Services (CJES) 22.85 16 25 22.2 1.4 7
Steven Madden (SHOO) 44.86 31 48 5.7 1.4 17
LOW HIGH P/E RATIO**
1-YR STOCK
CHANGE
AVG. BROKER
RATING* CLOSE
52-WEEK
COMPANY
Big buyouts are coming back.
H.J. Heinz, Dell and American Airlines have all
announced multi-billion dollar deals so far in 2013. Its
lucrative to be a shareholder in such a company before the
deal is made: Heinz stock jumped 19.9 percent the day it
said it would sell itself to Berkshire Hathaway and 3G
Capital. Dell jumped 13 percent in one day during January
when a report said that a buyout deal was brewing.
Some investors try to sniff out which companies are next
to be bought in hopes of finding a big payday. Its a
notoriously difficult task, but one side benefit is that
screening for buyout targets is similar to screening for
high-quality companies, says Citi strategist Scott Chronert.
Buyout firms are looking for companies with low debt
whose businesses generate lots of cash, which they can
use to pay down the debt they rack up to buy the company.
This screen from Citi shows small companies that have
low debt relative to their size and earnings, which also
generate strong cash flows per share. Each also has a
Buy rating from Citi analysts.
American Funds BalA m ABALX 21.65 +.32 +1.8 +13.6/A +6.5/A
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.82 -.08 -.1 +3.6/D +4.2/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 54.73 +.44 +.7 +11.1/A +3.7/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 39.35 +.67 +1.7 +14.7/B +2.4/C
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 42.87 +.72 +.6 +11.0/C +1.4/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 44.14 +1.02 +2.4 +16.0/B +4.5/D
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 37.03 +.82 +2.0 +16.2/A +4.5/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 18.98 +.22 +1.8 +13.1/A +6.2/B
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 32.40 +.59 +2.1 +14.1/D +4.5/D
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 33.36 +.66 +1.6 +15.8/A +4.5/B
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 33.79 +.69 +3.3 +15.2/D +5.6/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX 20.66 +.29 +1.1 +6.8/C +3.8/C
DFA EmMktValI x DFEVX 30.41 +.59 +1.8 +1.9/D +1.5/B
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.86 -.06 +4.9/C +7.0/B
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 36.61 +.91 +1.2 +14.7/A +1.7/A
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 134.61 +3.86 +3.0 +22.2/A +4.4/C
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 82.94 +1.72 +2.1 +13.1/B +6.2/B
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 100.70 +2.73 +2.7 +10.1/C +8.7/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 42.44 +.81 +1.4 +14.1/D +8.3/B
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg FUSVX 55.15 +1.20 +2.4 +16.1/B +6.0/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX 2.30 +.03 +1.4 +13.3/A +6.5/A
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX 2.32 +.03 +1.3 +12.6/A +6.0/B
FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX 22.40 +.54 +2.5 +15.7/A +3.0/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX 13.58 +.10 +1.3 +9.5/A +9.0/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 13.54 +.10 +1.4 +9.8/A +9.3/A
Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX 64.33 +.95 +1.2 +9.2/D +1.7/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 12.70 +.02 +.2 +9.5/B +7.0/A
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.47 -.03 +.2 +4.4/A +4.4/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 11.19 -.05 +.2 +6.8/A +7.4/A
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 11.19 -.05 +.2 +6.9/A +7.6/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 11.19 -.05 +.2 +7.2/A +7.9/A
PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX 11.19 -.05 +.2 +6.9/A +7.6/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 29.03 +.65 +3.1 +19.0/A +5.8/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 40.62 +.83 +2.1 +11.9/B +7.2/B
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 7.11 +.04 +1.6 +12.7/B +10.6/A
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 62.48 +1.78 +2.9 +13.5/B +9.8/A
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.75 -.06 +4.0/C +6.2/C
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 143.50 +3.12 +2.4 +16.1/B +6.1/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 143.47 +3.12 +2.4 +16.0/B +6.0/B
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 10.81 -.07 -.1 +1.7/C +5.8/A
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 142.57 +3.10 +2.4 +16.1/B +6.1/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 142.58 +3.10 +2.4 +16.2/B +6.1/B
Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 35.39 +.82 +2.5 +16.5/B +6.9/A
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 14.32 -.11 -.4 +4.2/B +5.5/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.82 -.02 +3.3/B +3.8/B
Vanguard TgtRe2015 VTXVX 13.90 +.12 +1.0 +9.1/B +5.6/A
Vanguard TgtRe2020 VTWNX 24.93 +.27 +1.2 +10.0/B +5.5/A
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 14.31 +.19 +1.3 +10.9/C +5.3/A
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 10.95 -.09 -.3 +2.6/E +5.6/C
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 10.95 -.09 -.3 +2.7/D +5.6/C
Vanguard TotIntl VGTSX 15.53 +.23 +.9 +9.3/D -.1/B
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 39.08 +.91 +2.4 +16.4/B +6.8/A
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 39.08 +.90 +2.4 +16.4/B +6.8/A
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 39.06 +.91 +2.4 +16.3/B +6.7/A
Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX 60.10 +.05 +1.1 +10.0/A +8.4/A
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 35.88 +.47 +1.8 +12.7/A +6.7/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 61.98 +.82 +1.8 +12.8/A +6.8/A
Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX 56.66 +1.34 +2.1 +16.6/C +5.6/B
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 31.92 +.75 +2.1 +16.5/C +5.5/B
Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX 13.27 +.13 +1.3 +9.4/ +4.8/
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
+2.2%
+2.9%
Nasdaq
+2.4%
+1.6%
S&P 500
+2.2%
+2.2%
Russell 2000
+3.0%
+3.2%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+9.9%
+7.5%
+8.8%
+11.0%
Rates, yields rise
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note jumped
back above the 2 percent level last week following
stronger-than-expected reports on the economy.
Higher Treasury yields tend to pull up rates on
various consumer loans, and the average rate on
a 30-year fixed mortgage inched up to 3.52 per-
cent from 3.51 percent. However it remains below
where it was a year earlier: 3.88 percent.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxablenational avg 0.01
Davis Govt MMF/Cl A 0.20 $ 1,000 min (800) 279-0279
Tax-exemptnational avg 0.01
Invesco Tax-Exempt Cash Fund/Cl A0.09$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Broad market Lehman 1.93 0.09 s s -0.20 2.35 1.56
Triple-A corporate Moodys 3.96 0.12 s s 0.10 4.18 3.22
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 2.81 0.07 r s -0.52 3.51 2.64
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 4.12 0.09 s s -0.49 4.68 3.89
U.S. high yield Barclays 5.62 -0.16 t t -1.64 8.15 5.61
Treasury Barclays 1.16 0.12 s s 0.06 1.34 0.80
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.09 -0.01 s s 0.02 0.12 0.01
1-year T-Bill 0.17 0.00 r t -0.04 0.25 0.16
6-month T-Bill 0.11 -0.01 s t -0.02 0.15 0.09
2-year T-Note 0.25 0.01 r s -0.06 0.40 0.21
5-year T-Note 0.89 0.15 s s 0.01 1.20 0.54
10-year T-Note 2.04 0.20 s s 0.02 2.38 1.39
30-year T-Bond 3.25 0.20 s s 0.08 3.48 2.45
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Funds letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 B U S I N E S S PAGE 3D
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SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAge 5B TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com S U N D A Y B U S I N E S S
Security Income, could be af-
fected, Salmeron said.
SSI is a federal income
supplement program that
helps low-income aged, blind
and disabled people pay for
basic needs.
Unless the parent is paying
rent, if that parent is getting
SSI benets, those benets will
be reduced, Salmeron said.
Thats because SSI treats free
room and board as in-kind sup-
port and maintenance, which
reduces the SSI benet.
In Texas, SSI recipients
are automatically enrolled in
Medicaid, the federal-state
program that helps pay for
health care for the poor.
Texans whose SSI benets
are reduced would still have
Medicaid, but if they lose
their SSI benets completely,
they would also lose Med-
icaid, said Linda Edwards
Gockel, spokeswoman for
the Texas Health and Human
Services Commission.
Food stamps also could be
affected because eligibility
and benet levels are based
on household, not individual,
circumstances, according to the
U.S. Department of Agriculture.
TAX IMPLICATIONS
Under certain limited cir-
cumstances, you may be able to
claim your parents as depen-
dents on your tax return, said
James Smith, CPA at Smith,
Jackson, Boyer & Bovard in
Dallas. You may be able to
deduct medical expenses that
you paid for your parents.
If you charge your parents
rent, you would have to
recognize the rent as income
in your tax return, but then
you could claim a depreciation
deduction for a portion of the
cost of your home, as well as a
portion of the utilities and any
general repairs to the prop-
erty, Smith said.
If you dont charge your par-
ents rent, the free room and
board would be treated as a
gift, but because the total rent
value probably would not ex-
ceed the annual gift exclusion
$14,000 for 2013 you
wouldnt have to report the
gift to the Internal Revenue
Service, he said.
DOCUMENT CHECK
Are your parents estate
planning documents in order?
This includes more than just
a will.
As parents age, adult
children may need to take on
the role of making medical or
nancial decisions, Keener
said. Having an up-to-date
general durable power of
attorney will facilitate man-
aging a parents affairs with
their nancial institutions.
For medical issues, having
a current medical directive,
medical power of attorney,
and HIPAA release (to allow
sharing of your health infor-
mation) is important.
Having access to your par-
ents main bank account also
might be a good idea, Keener
said.
Depending on the parents
ability to manage their nancial
affairs and the relationship be-
tween parent and adult child, it
can sometimes be really helpful
to make the child a joint signer
on the primary bill-paying
checking account, she said.
EMOTIONAL RESPONSE
Are you prepared to deal
with the emotional aspects?
Be prepared to adjust your
expectations of what they re-
member and what they dont
remember, Sears said. Dont
get mad because they forget
things; just be patient.
FINANCE
Continued from Page 1
Pamela Yip is a personal nance
columnist for the Dallas Morning News.
Readers may send her email at pyip@
dallasnews.com; she cannot make
individual replies.
proof, offering an inexpen-
sive indulgence during tough
economic times.
Candy did not seem to
take the hit that some other
industries faced in recent
years. We think a big reason
for that is candys place in
our hearts and minds, says
Susan Whiteside of the Na-
tional Confectioners Associa-
tion, a trade group.
Long associated with Eas-
ter, Peeps have penetrated
the pop-culture conscious-
ness in a way that other can-
dy brands have not.
Aficionados send chicks
into battle in a microwave
sport known as Peeps joust-
ing. They enter Peeps art
contests, dozens of which are
held around the country this
time of year. They innovate
recipes like Peepza, a des-
ert pizza. They write cheeky
blog entries with titles like
101 Fun Ways to Torture a
Peep.
Hoping to capitalize, Just
Born recently opened three
Peeps & Company retail
stores in Pennsylvania, Mary-
land and Minnesota.
While the company churns
out more than 1 billion Peeps
this Easter season - a record
- it sees the 60th anniversary
as another marketing oppor-
tunity and a chance to con-
nect with its fans via social
media. In addition to the TV
ad campaign, its promoting
a Facebook survey that asks
knowing questions like this
one: Do you like your Peeps
fresh, frozen, or aged to per-
fection?
So which is it, Ross Born?
Fresh or stale?
Hes happy to address that
perennial Peeps debate. Just
dont ask him to take sides.
Theres a lot of gray area
here, Born says diplomati-
cally. There are people who
tell me they put a one-inch
slice in the film (that seals
the box), and theyll lay it on
top of their refrigerator for
two days. No more, no less.
Then they are PERFECT to
eat.
So its not necessarily
stale, its just a little firmer.
All right? Its just like poli-
tics, says Just Borns com-
mander-in-Peep. Youve got
people way on one side, and
way on the other side, but
there are a whole lot of peo-
ple in the middle.
PEEPS
Continued from Page 3
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Sunday, March 10, 2013 S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 8 1 Page 6D
Editorial
Social networks growup: Its like getting pimples again
SOCIAL Networking
makes teenagers of us all.
Lots of my ridiculously
successful friends
some of whom appear
regularly on television,
give TED talks and are
the kind of people who
get harassed in restaurants by their fans
(while my fans remain remarkably good-
mannered and never, ever come over to
introduce themselves or say a word)
will still not permit themselves to have a
Facebook account because the thought of
people unfriending them is terrifying.
One of these women you would
recognize her in a heartbeat briey had
a Facebook account. But then she started
getting pop-up ads, maybe through email,
that sneered, Three people have unfriend-
ed you. Find out more.
First of all, when did unfriend become
a verb? Was it around the time parent-
ing or scrapbooking, which was after
partying but before vocalizing, which
is now the word my students use instead
of employing the word say as ordinary
speakers of English might, umm, say.
Anyway, this friend of mine was plagued
(good noun-to-verb usage) by the thought
that three people didnt like her. She was
awake at night at the thought of being
dismissed from a vague network of people
who she might never know. This, perhaps,
could be the new denition of insane,
dont you think? The idea that youre afraid
people that you dont know might not like
you? I mean, if you had somebody youd
never met come up to you on the street,
grab you by the collar shout Did you
unfriend me? wouldnt your instinct be to
call a cop?
Yet having the experience of people who
dare to unfriend you is a nothing compared
to the recent gang-shaming experience
provided by Linked-In. They sent out mes-
sages congratulating folks for being at
the top of their searches. A relative was the
rst to forward me one with self-effacing
pride. He emailed me a note where the
subject line read: Guess Im not too shab-
by after all. And in the body of the email
was a notice that his name was in the top 5
percent of last years Linked-In searches.
Ill admit I was impressed. I wrote him
back an effusive letter telling him that it
was clear from this recognition that his
hard work as a freelancer had nally paid
off. I actually wrote the words, Thats
some pretty exclusive club, the top 5 per-
cent. He answered with blushing thanks
and was clearly what the English would
have called, chuffed.
Imagine my surprise, then, when two
days later I got a notice saying that my
name had come up in the top 10 percent
of Linked-In searches. Ive never won a
prize for self-effacement but even I was
skeptical. I turned to Facebook to air my
questions. Anybody else get into the top
10 percent? I asked.
Turns out that all of them, even those
from Pluto and North Dakota, were at the
top of LinkedIn searches. It was sort of like
nding out that a cute boy had written,
Youre the most adorable creature ever
on everybodys yearbook page when all the
time youd been secretly cherishing the
idea that you, and you alone (or at least
you among only the top 10 percent) were
chosen only to discover that what you
thought was a unique signature was pretty
much a rubber stamp.
And this is what I mean about making
you feel like youre back in high school.
Social networking sites from Face-
book to Pinterest to StumbleUpon are
very much like high school: As conducive
as they are to the creation of community,
they are simultaneously the cause of
anxiety, bizarre competitions and weirdly
contorted denitions of success.
How is getting an ad saying youve been
unfriended different from the experience
of having a person youve never met before
come up to you between algebra and gym
and whisper in your ear I hear a certain
person doesnt like you anymore before
scuttling, crab-like, back to their locker?
So what can we do about this? How can
we stop feeling adolescent as soon as we
face the screen?
Maybe we should screen the screen:
The word once meant to divide, protect,
separate. Maybe we should remember
that and not use it as a mirror.
Gina Barreca is an English professor at the
University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who
has written eight books, and a columnist for the
Hartford Courant. She can be reached through
her website at www.ginabarreca.com.
COMMENTARY
G E N A B A R R E C A
Editorial Board
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO / Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President / Executive Editor
I
F YOU NEED to see some-
thing to bolster the notion
that government can some-
times do things right, con-
sider going online to visit the
Luzerne County Manager link
at luzernecounty.org.
As noted in a Saturday article
in The Times Leader, one of the
fundamental problems with the
new elected council/appointed
manager form of government
is that said manager -- currently
Robert Lawton -- can conduct a
great deal of business out of the
public eye.
Under the new government
charter approved by voters in
2010 and implemented at the
start of last year, many actions
that previously required a public
vote by the three county com-
missioners under the old form
of government now rest in the
hands of the appointed manager.
The idea was simple: Take such
decisions out of the hands of pol-
iticians and put them in the do-
main of a professional manager.
While this made some sense,
it means the public does not see
elected ofcials voting on many
contracts and personnel actions,
which in turn means such ac-
tions could get buried in the
managers ofce. To Lawtons
credit -- and to the credit of the
11-member council -- that has
not happened.
Lawton has begun using the
countys website to post a wide
array of information. Want to
read contracts he approveed?
They are a few mouse clicks
away. Want to know who was
hired, promoted, moved to a
new position, got laid off, re-
signed or retired? Its all there.
You can even dive into the
arcane world of budget trans-
fers, the common yet obscure
practice of shifting money from
one budget area to another.
Lawton has posted the budget
transfer requests, including an
explanation of the reason.
While much of this was tech-
nically public under the old
three-commissioner systerm be-
cause it had to be voted on at a
public meeting, it was often un-
explained and rarely, if ever, ac-
cessible outside those meetings
or outside the courthouse. Quite
the contrary, it routinely seemed
as if county commissioners and
other ofcials -- with a few ex-
ceptions -- had to be dragged
reluctantly into the Internet age.
Lawtons efforts are not per-
fect. The information is not al-
ways posted as quickly as one
would like, and some data would
be better presented in different
formats (spreadsheets would be
handy for les wiht many col-
umns of numbers).
But the effort is commend-
able, and council should encour-
age such web access throughout
the courthouse. Municipalities
and school districts that dont al-
ready post copious information
online should emulate Lawtons
efforts. Considering how heav-
ily tarnished the county was in
the federal corruption probe, it
is well past time the county be-
came a leader in transparency.
For too long, area politicians
have cloaked themselves behind
the claim that it was voted on
at a public meeting, without
making the it readily available
to the public through the web.
True accountability requires
more than public meetings. It
requires public access.
Our OpiniOn: aCCEss tO rECOrds
Kudos to county
for public access
Now is the time for a sports hero to speak up, exit closet
NOW IS the time
Martin Luther King,
Aug. 28, 1963.
Brendon Ayanbadejo is
wrong. It is painful to say
that. Ayanbadejos heart
is in a good place and the
advice he gave last week
on MSNBCs The Ed Show was practical
and well intentioned. But mainly, yes, it
was wrong.
Heres the back story. It seems NFL
prospect Nick Kasa recently told ESPN
Radio that he was asked in an interview
with a team he wont specify whether he is
married, if he has a girlfriend and whether
he likes girls. It was a spectacularly stupid
line of inquiry for two reasons.
One: It has nothing to do with his abili-
ties as a football player.
Two: Its fresh evidence of the NFLs es-
trangement from the 21st century, coming
as it does in the wake of Chris Culliver of
the San Francisco 49ers repeat: the San
Francisco 49ers dismissing the notion
of a gay player by saying, Cant be with
that sweet stuff. Nah, cant be in the locker
room.
Enter Ayanbadejo, a Baltimore Ravens
linebacker and outspoken proponent of
gay rights. What, he was asked, should a
prospective player do if he is gay and some
team asks if he likes girls? Ayanbadejos
advice? Lie.
I think players need to say that theyre
straight right now, he said. You need to
get drafted as high as you can get drafted,
get the money while you can.
Maybe later, he added, once you
establish yourself and when we break down
some of these walls in the NFL, then play-
ers will be more comfortable to really be
who they are. Eventually, he said, perhaps
football will see our Jackie Robinson, our
pioneer for gay rights and equality.
But the thing is, Jackie Robinson did not
come along after the walls had been broken
down. He was the one swinging the sledge-
hammer. The idea that progress must wait
for an opportune time, that a trailblazer
should defer trailblazing till he makes some
money, reects a misunderstanding of what
social change is and how it is made.
Truth is, the timing is never right in
the view of those whose prerogatives and
prejudices are challenged. Martin Luther
King once said hed never participated in
a campaign that someone didnt consider
ill-timed.
So that closeted gay football star, that
closeted basketball, hockey or baseball
player still trying to prove he likes girls,
ought to be guided less by the words of
Brendon Ayanbadejo than by the words of
an old childrens singsong:
Come out, come out, wherever you are.
That is, yes, a very easy thing to say
if youre not the one being asked to risk
money, career, ostracism, family, maybe
even physical intimidation. But if heroism
were without risk, everybody would be a
hero.
And that is exactly what the active player
in one of the four major sports who comes
out of the closet right now will be. He will
debunk the bassackward thinking of the
Chris Cullivers of the world and become a
beacon for every high school quarterback,
two guard and rst baseman now living
alone and scared in the prison of a secret
sexuality. He might even save that childs
life.
In his rst speech as leader of the Mont-
gomery bus boycott, Martin Luther King
said, There comes a time when people
get tired He could not speak again for
20 seconds. At that simple statement, his
audience erupted, overwhelming him with
shouts and cries releasing the pent-up frus-
tration and swallowed-down rage of people
whod nally had their ll of the everyday
indignities and petty humiliations of their
lives.
What we are waiting on, then, is not
some mythical moment when the timing
is right for a gay athlete. Rather, what we
are waiting on is an athlete who has gotten
tired. Tired enough to take a risk, tired
enough to be brave.
Because when people get that tired,
change comes. And then the timing takes
care of itself.
Leonard Pitts Jr. is a columnist for the Miami
Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33132. Readers
may write to him via email at lpitts@miamiherald.
com.
COMMENTARY
L E O N A R D P I T T S J R .
W
OMEN HAVE won
the right to serve
alongside men on
the front lines of
Americas wars. That has caused
some people to ask: Shouldnt
women have to register for the
draft, just like the men they
serve next to? A better question:
Isnt it time to end the Selective
Service altogether?
The United States once con-
sidered it the duty of every male
citizen to serve in a national
emergency. Young men were
conscripted into the military
during the Civil War, World War
I, World War II and the conicts
in Korea and Vietnam.
The draft ended in 1973, and
draft registration stopped in
1975. The Selective Service,
but not the draft, was reinstated
in 1980 to show American re-
solve after the 1979 Soviet in-
vasion of Afghanistan.
Today, every man between
the ages of 18 and 25 must reg-
ister with the Selective Service.
Young men who dont register
are denied federal loans and are
barred in most states from en-
tering state universities. Failure
to register for the nonexistent
draft is a felony that can destroy
careers.
For what? To perpetuate an
unnecessary federal agency, pro-
tect 130 jobs and shield lawmak-
ers from appearing to be weak
on national security.
Times have changed. There is
no shortage of recruits for Amer-
icas volunteer military, despite
protracted U.S. engagements in
Afghanistan and Iraq.
Registration and the draft are
archaic remnants of a time when
huge armies fought wars along
delineated battle fronts. Todays
military more often consists of
small, specialized strike forces,
air strikes and, increasingly,
targeted attacks by unmanned
drones.
Maintaining the Selective
Service system costs taxpayers
$24 million a year. Thats a tiny
amount in the federal budget,
but still a potential savings.
Americas all-volunteer mili-
tary has been a resounding
success. Ending the Selective
Service system would merely
recognize that reality.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
OthEr OpiniOn: thE draft
Time to deselect
Selective Service
quOtE Of thE daY
Its very important people know
what kind of information is out there
and the stuff they are doing drops
digital footprints they dont know
about. That information can be used in
ways people dont want.
Jonathan Weber
The computer security expert from Marathon Studios, Inc. explained how eas-
ily information posted online through social media websites can be used with
criminal intent.
SEQUESTRA-
TION is not
the best time
to be doling
out foreign
aid, an un-
popular item
in the federal
budget. Especially when the
recipient is President Mohamed
Morsi of Egypt.
Morsi is intent on getting the
release of Omar Abdel-Rahman
(the Blind Sheik), serving a life
sentence for masterminding the
1993 World Trade Center attack
that killed six and wounded
more than a thousand. Morsis
Muslim Brotherhood is openly
anti-Christian, anti-Semitic
and intolerant. Just three years
ago, Morsi called on Egyptians
to nurse their children and
grandchildren on hatred for
Jews, whom he has called the
descendants of apes and pigs.
Not exactly Albert Sch-
weitzer. Or even Anwar Sadat.
Which left a bad taste when
Secretary of State John Kerry,
traveling to Cairo, handed
Morsi a cool $250 million.
Nonetheless, we should not
cut off aid to Egypt. Its not that
we must blindly support un-
friendly regimes. It is perfectly
reasonable to cut off aid to
governments that are intrinsi-
cally hostile and beyond our
inuence.
But Egypt is not an enemy,
certainly not yet. It may no
longer be our strongest Arab
ally, but it is still in play. The
Brotherhood aims to establish
an Islamist dictatorship. Yet it
remains a considerable distance
from having done so.
Precisely why we should
remain engaged, which means
using our economic leverage.
Morsi has signicant opposi-
tion. Six weeks ago, powerful
anti-Brotherhood demonstra-
tions broke out in major cities
and have continued sporadi-
cally ever since. The presiden-
tial election that Morsi won was
decided quite narrowly, despite
the Brotherhoods advantage
of superior organization and a
history of social service.
Moreover, having forever
been in opposition, the Is-
lamists escaped blame for the
state of the country. Now in
power, they bear responsibility
for Egypts miserable conditions
a collapsing economy, rising
crime, social instability. Their
aura is dissipating.
There is nothing inevitable
about Brotherhood rule. The
problem is that the secular
democratic parties are fractured
and lacking in leadership. And
are repressed by the increas-
ingly authoritarian Morsi.
His partisans have attacked
demonstrators in Cairo. His
security forces killed more than
40 in Port Said. Hes been ha-
rassing journalists, suppressing
freedom of speech, inltrating
the military and trying to sub-
jugate the courts. Hes already
rammed through an Islamist
constitution. He is trying to
tilt parliamentary elections to
the point that the opposition
called for a boycott and a court
suspended of the vote.
Any foreign aid should be
contingent upon a reversal of
this repression and a granting
of space to secular, democratic,
pro-Western elements.
Thats where Kerry commit-
ted his mistake. Not in trying to
use dollar diplomacy to lever-
age Egyptian behavior, but by
exercising that leverage almost
exclusively for economic, rather
than political, reform.
Kerrys major objective was
getting Morsi to apply for
a $4.8 billion loan from the
International Monetary Fund.
Considering that some of this
$4.8 billion ultimately comes
from us, theres a certain comic
circularity to this demand.
What kind of concession is it
when a foreign government is
coerced into taking yet more
of our money?
We have no particular stake
in Egypts economy. Our stake
is in its politics. Yes, we would
like to see a strong economy.
But in a country ruled by the
Muslim Brotherhood?
Our interest is in a non-
Islamist, nonrepressive,
nonsectarian Egypt, ruled as
democratically as possible.
Why should we want a vibrant
economy that maintains the
Brotherhood in power?
If were going to give foreign
aid, it should be for political
concessions on unfettered
speech, on an opposition free of
repression, on alterations to the
Islamist constitution, on open
and fair elections.
We give foreign aid for two
reasons: (a) to support allies
who share our values and our
interests, and (b) to extract
from less-than-friendly regimes
concessions that either bring
their policies more in line with
ours or strengthen competing
actors more favorably inclined
toward American objectives.
Thats the point of foreign
aid. Its particularly important
in countries like Egypt whose
fate is in the balance. But it will
only work if we remain clear-
eyed about why we give all that
money in the rst place.
Charles Krauthammers email
address is letters@charleskrautham-
mer.com.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, March 10, 2013 F ORUM Page 7D
Treasure hunt in New Mexico is one mans legacy
WHEN WAS the last time
you went treasure hunt-
ing? At summer camp?
Digging through a Cracker
Jack box?
This past week, thou-
sands of budding treasure
seekers were so inspired,
they crashed the website of a multimillion-
aire art dealer from New Mexico. His name
is Forrest Fenn. He is 82. And he claims to
have hidden a chest lled with millions of
dollars worth of gold coins and gems.
The chest is buried somewhere in New
Mexico. The clues are in a poem. The poem
can be found in Fenns self-published book.
The book is available primarily through one
New Mexico bookstore. And thanks to
an appearance on the Today show that
book was in the top 100 on Amazon.com
last week.
Which may be the rst time a treasure
map made more money than the treasure.
If I have a motive in this, Fenn told
me Friday, its to get kids off the couch
and away from their game machines and to
smell the sun and have a little fun out in
the trees.
He doesnt want fame. He has no plans to
reclaim the chest. He simply wants Ameri-
cans moving, exploring, seeing the beauty
of the environment.
And maybe digging it up.
I think Fenn is fascinating. A self-admit-
ted thrill seeker, he joined the Air Force,
ew missions in Vietnam, stayed in the
service for 20 years and later became a suc-
cessful art dealer. He also survived a cancer
scare. They gave him a 20 percent chance
to live.
After that, I thought, Ive had so much
fun in the last 75 years nding things, if Ive
got to go, let me leave a heritage for other
people to do as I did, he said.
And so Fenn, a lifelong collector of things
precious and quirky said he stuffed a
chest with gold and jewels, carried it to a se-
cret destination and hid it forever. He hopes
others have as much fun searching the land
as he has had.
Now. I can hear you screaming. GIVE
US SOME CLUES! Well, rst of all, I have
read Fenns poem, and if you think, based
on that, you can spot a location in the fth
biggest state in the country (nearly 122,000
square miles) good luck. Heres a sample:
Begin it where warm waters halt
And take it in the canyon down,
Not far, but too far to walk.
Put in below the home of Brown.
From there its no place for the meek,
The end is ever drawing nigh;
Therell be no paddle up your creek,
Just heavy loads and water high.
Got that?
See you there tomorrow!
Ive gotten 8,300 e-mails, Fenn said.
What do most of them want? I asked.
More clues.
Its funny. Most people hide treasure to
keep it from someone. Fenn really wants
someone to nd his but only after many
have trekked to look for it.
They didnt nd the Rosetta Stone for
2,000 years, he pointed out.
Admittedly, this is a unique way to moti-
vate outdoor living. On the one hand, you
get all these people in the mountains and
streams. On the other hand, as soon as they
nd the treasure, they might buy a mansion
and never come out except to adjust the
satellite TV.
But Fenn calls his book The Thrill of
the Chase and to me, thats where the real
value of a hidden treasure lies.
Think about the word search. Whats
the rst thing that comes to mind today?
Google, right? A computer screen. A key-
board.
But once upon a time, search was a loft-
ier word. It implied going somewhere, mak-
ing an effort or a journey. You know. Like
Lord of the Rings. They didnt commence
their epic quest by punching in keywords.
Some think Fenn is making this whole
thing up. I dont. But I can tell you this: If
the worst that happens is a few thousand
people traipse around the natural splendor
of New Mexico, its not so bad. They might
even nd that the hunt for one thing led
them to something else.
A pretty famous Bible quote suggests for
where your treasure is, there your heart will
be also. My guess is that Fenn is hoping
the seekers of his treasure have their hearts
distracted by something else, the joy of the
pursuit and the beauty of the landscape.
Thats worth its weight in gold.
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the Detroit
Free Press. Readers may write to him at: Detroit
Free Press, 600 West Fort Street, Detroit, Mich.
48226, or via email at malbomfreepress.com.
.
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
MAIL BAG | LETTERS FROM READERS
Caution advised
for contraceptive
E
llaOne is said to be an
emergency contraceptive
(taken just days after love-
making). Jill Staneck in On
the Path to Over-The-Counter
Abortions, says that, ellaOne
operates similarly to RU486 or
the abortion pill.
EllaOne and RU486 are con-
sidered progesterone blockers.
A progesterone blocker stops
progesterone from arriving at
the uterus. When it is blocked,
the lining of the uterus and
the baby die. EllaOne causes
an abortion in the same way
as a drug that is admittedly
an abortion drug or an aborti-
facient. So why call it emer-
gency contraception?
Pro-abortion folks say
pregnant women should move
rapidly and take ellaOne after
unprotected intercourse. Why
rush matters and make a deci-
sion, as it might revisit you
throughout your life? It doesnt
matter if you kill a life up to
5 days (ellaOnes prescription
information) or up to 49 days
after the rst day of a womans
period (RU486 prescription
information). Killing a child at
any point is not an unhindered
opportunity.
Mae Morrow
Wilkes Barre
Reader adds more
to abortion debate
I
didnt see or read Mr. So-
rensons letter referred to by
John W. Mihalchik, Jr., on Feb.
8, 2013. I do want to respond
to Mr. Mihalchiks letter.
Mr. Mihalchik took excep-
tion to Mr. Sorensons urging
President Obama to stop
ignoring God. Apparently Mr.
Mihalchick is unaware the
president has ignored God by
virtue of his condoning and
supporting the murder (abor-
tion) of innocent babies in the
mothers womb and partially
out of the womb.
Throughout the presidents
political life he has been
supporting the evil Planned
Parenthood.
You see, Mr. Mihalchick, Sa-
tan is the epitome of evil, while
God is the epitome of love.
God created the world, you
and I, and everything we have.
Isnt that reason to know him
and love him?
You stated you couldnt
escape God/Jesus/Yahweh if
you wanted to. Why would you
want to, John?
You stated if Thomas Jef-
ferson came back, he would be
outraged. How do you know?
I believe he would be elated
that such adversity of minds by
the grace of God established
the greatest nation in world
history.
You asked the readers what
they were doing personally to
prevent school shootings, writ-
ing congressmen to ban assault
ries, helping the handicapped,
donating money or sitting wait-
ing for God to do it.
Noticeably, absent was not
telling the readers what you
were doing. Why?
God bless you and America.
Jim Walsh
Wilkes-Barre
Stronger response
for animal cruelty
I
t is very difcult for me to
imagine anyone capable of
abusing an animal.
On Thursday, Feb. 7 there
were published reports about a
dog tied to the back bumper of
a car and dragged over a mile.
He was just four months old.
I believe the punishment for
mistreating an animal is not
harsh enough; perhaps if the
punishment was severe people
would stop abusing animals.
This puppy had a nearly sev-
ered ear, a severe head wound
and other injuries. He had to
have his ear removed. Now
there is a possibility the owner
who did this terrible thing
might be getting him back.
He should not be allowed
to have this puppy returned to
him.
Joyce Ann Perez
Mountain Top
This EPA nominee
deserves vote
W
ith the prevalence of
bipartisan bickering in
Washington, Gina McCarthy is
an excellent choice to lead the
U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA).
Before joining the Obama ad-
ministration, McCarthy worked
for ve Republican governors
and has a history of working
with all stakeholders to develop
pragmatic and cost-effective
safeguards to protect public
health and reduce pollution.
McCarthys nomination rein-
forces President Obamas inten-
tion to adopt scientic, rather
than ideological, solutions to
environmental, public health,
and climate issues.
The Senate easily conrmed
McCarthy by a voice vote in
2009 to head the clean air divi-
sion of the EPA. Her experi-
ence with the development of
historic clean air protections
makes her well equipped to
lead the agency that not only
protects our air, but also our
water and climate. She de-
serves the support of senators
on both sides of the aisle so
she can get to the important
work that needs to be done.
Pam Fendrock
PennFuture
Wilkes-Barre
Just say whoa to
meat on the menu
L
ast week, food safety of-
cials in United Kingdom,
France, and Sweden found
traces of horse meat in ground
beef sold across Europe. Mas-
sive recalls and lawsuits are
ensuing.
Can it happen here? Horse
slaughter for human consump-
tion was banned in the U.S. be-
tween 2007 and 2011. But now,
a New Mexico slaughterhouse
is getting approved by U.S.
authorities to slaughter horses
for human consumption, and
a Philadelphia restaurant has
already announced plans to
serve horse meat.
I marvel at our hypocrisy of
rejecting the notion of horse
or dog meat on our dinner
plates, while condemning
cows, pigs, and chickens to the
same fate. Obviously, we have
established special relation-
ships with horses and dogs as
our companions, protectors,
and sports protagonists, rather
than as food. But where is the
ethical and logical distinction,
given that all these animals
are endowed by individuality,
sentience, and an ability to
experience the same feelings
of joy, affections, sadness, and
fear that we do?
Fortunately, our health
food industry has spared us
from having to choose which
animals to pet and which ones
to eat. Their delicious soy and
grain-based meat alternatives
are available in every super-
market.
Trenton Lloyd
Wilkes Barre
Foreign aid owing to Egypt
requires serious returns
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Photo by Pete G. Wilcox
Words by Mark Guydish
ANOTHER VIEW
Sometimes, nature helps ll the biggest shoes with small wonders
If I have a motive in this, Fenn told me
Friday, its to get kids off the couch
and away from their game machines and
to smell the sun and have a little fun out
in the trees.
What goes up, still
must come down
W
hen I heard of this saying
as a kid, I immediately
thought of a rock being thrown
in the air.
As many of you probably
know, the U.S. Post Ofce in-
creased mailing rates. Most
customers know that the price of
a rst class stamp and a postcard
stamp increased by one penny.
What many of you dont know is
the postal service increased rates
across the board. Express Mail
rates over one dollar, priority
mail increased 45 cents, certied
mail was hiked 15 cents, and
post ofce box rent in Wilkes-
Barre rose one dollar.
You may ask what went
down? That part is easy. Just
walk into the Wilkes-Barre Post
Ofce or some of its branches
and you will see customer
service sank to all time lows.
I dont mean the clerk behind
the counter is not providing
the service, it is the number of
clerks that sticks out. For those
of you that know me from visit-
ing Wilkes-Barre I am one of
the few left behind the counter.
The postal service offered an
early out incentive to post ofce
employees, but didnt bother to
replace the full-time employees
who decided to take them up on
their offer.
The Wilkes-Barre service
counter was once manned by
six clerks. This past week, I
was one of only three clerks to
work the service counter, being
by myself for the most part of
Friday and Saturday.
As president of the local
employee union, I warned man-
agement in Wilkes-Barre and
in Harrisburg that come Jan.
31 there would not be enough
clerks to serve the public.
They didnt care then, and it is
obvious they dont care about
customer service now. If you
frequent the Wilkes-Barre Post
Ofce you know the average
wait time to be served is close
to 30 minutes. The funny part
to this whole stafng issue is
the post ofce has a mandatory
requirement of no more than a
ve minute wait in line.
Who suffers? Everybody!
Customers are forced to long
wait times while the employee
is ridiculed by irate customers.
Customers who have service-
related problems cannot talk
to a customer service supervi-
sor. Clerks are told to take the
customer name and phone
number and tell the customer
that someone will get back
to them. Why cant customer
service supervisors take care of
customer problems? Supervi-
sors are performing work on the
workroom oor and delivering
express mail because there are
not enough clerks staffed in
Wilkes-Barre. Customers have
complained they have left mes-
sages for passport appointments
but never get a call back and
when calling for mailing issues
nobody answers. Now could
they when they are out on the
road?
It is only going to get worse
before it gets better. With the
planned consolidation of mail
processing from the Scranton
Post Ofce to the Lehigh Valley
Post Ofce this month, we are
expecting a delay in mail service
to your mailbox. Please contact
your local political leaders,
mayor, congressmen, senators,
and representatives and demand
that since rates went up, the bull
crap must come down!
John Kishel
President
Wilkes-Barre Area Local 175 APWU
THERE IS
good reason
for Americas
love-hate
relationship
with the
liberal arts in
college. For
many years, the intellectual
elite and the pragmatists have
squared off against one another
inside and outside of academe
about the value of the liberal
arts. It now appears that those
who believe a college education
should provide practical and
employable skills have popular
opinion with them. The current
employment rate and rising
college debt are enhancing the
argument for a practical college
education. Finding a good rst
job is of great concern to those
graduating from college. The
thought of doing so without
requisite employable skills is
freighting for many.
For students who choose
to major in one of the liberal
arts, the career rewards are
usually not allocated based
on the major itself, but rather
the intellectual rigor in apply-
ing the analytical framework
of the discipline in practical
areas such as business. These
undergraduate degrees also
provide an outstanding plat-
form for critical thinking and
the foundation for graduate
work in a specic discipline or
in a professional eld, such as
medicine or law.
Perhaps there is still too
much being made of the trade-
offs between a four-year liberal
arts degree and a career-focused
one. The benets of a good
liberal arts education can be
effectively combined with
practical career orientation and
a well-designed curriculum.
That is the case at Misericordia
University.
Based on the tradition of
graduating students who serve
humankind, the University has
educated high-skilled nurses
since l944. Misericordias
tradition in the health sciences
was expanded in 1973 with
the introduction of one of the
countrys only medical imag-
ing programs at a four-year
college, Our commitment to
the health sciences increased
with the introduction of
undergraduate-plus-masters
(ve-year) programs in occupa-
tional therapy, physical therapy,
speech-language pathology, and
physician assistant. All of these
elds require a masters degree
before a graduate can practice,
and now a 6-year clinical doc-
torate in physical therapy.
Driven signicantly by an
outstanding reputation of high
board pass rates and graduate
success in the health and medi-
cal sciences elds, Misericor-
dias enrollment has grown in
the last 14 years from a little
more than 1,000 students to
more than 1,900 full-time
students and 1,200 part-time
students.
This growth occurred
despite wavering and declining
enrollment trends at similar
institutions. Last year, when
many institutions experi-
enced decreased enrollment,
Misericordias freshman class
increased from 370 students to
510.
Entering SAT and ACT
scores also continue to in-
crease, while the institutions
discount rate has remained
moderate relative to that of
competing institutions. Reten-
tion rates have been among the
best of any similarly sized in-
stitution. The result has been a
signicant increase in reserves,
resulting in scal stability not
shared by many others.
Does rapid growth in the
health sciences mean that the
liberal arts have been aban-
doned? No. All Misericordia
students are required to com-
plete a core curriculum which
includes courses in philosophy,
history, religion, science, math-
ematics, English, and other
traditional subjects. The result
is a well-rounded undergradu-
ate experience.
The result of this mixture of
liberal arts and professionally
focused curriculum is a gradu-
ate who is not only employable,
but exible. Misericordia gradu-
ates often assume well-paying
jobs as practitioners in the
health sciences and many other
elds. Because of their strong
liberal arts background, they
are rapidly elevated to manage-
ment positions in hospitals,
rehabilitation facilities, and
related for-prot and non-prot
businesses.
Of course, maintaining viable
liberal arts departments for
the health science majors and
the 55 percent of Misericordia
students enrolled in other ma-
jors is not an easy task. Good
faculty in the liberal arts and
sciences need to maintain and
grow the number of students in
their own departments as well.
One way Misericordia has
accomplished this goal is to
continue to expand its Division
III and intercollegiate sports
programs. The University
made the strategic decision
to bring football to campus in
2010 because, as NCAA data
showed, many Division III
football players choose to study
subjects other than the health
and medical sciences. The
result has been an increase in
majors such as English, history,
communications, biology, and
other liberal arts and sciences
at Misericordia.
The decision to emphasize
the health sciences at Miseri-
cordia was made 12 years ago.
We believed it made good
strategic sense to make a well-
focused effort in the rapidly
growing health and medical
sciences elds. American demo-
graphics were on our side.
Baby Boomers provide a
plethora of patients for health
and medical science profession-
als. The rapidly growing cost
of medical care, along with the
shortage of M.D.s and D.O.s,
and the hesitancy of private
insurance and Medicare to con-
tinue to fund physician services
for routine procedures, created
a growing niche for a small
university to produce quality
health care professionals.
The downside of the health
and medical science focus is
the expense of these programs.
These nationally accredited
programs are limited in enroll-
ment by their accrediting asso-
ciations. Salaries for faculty and
other professionals are high.
However, the programs attract
excellent students who are will-
ing to stay at Misericordia for
an undergraduate and graduate
degree, creating the enviable
enrollment patterns.
Perhaps most satisfying is
that health science and liberal
arts faculty have worked coop-
eratively to create a solid liberal
arts core as the foundation for
all Misericordia students, in-
cluding of course the health
and medical science majors.
Can a good core curriculum
of 50-plus hours provide all that
is necessary to be considered
liberally educated? The answer
is probably no. If, on the other
hand, the purpose of a liberal
arts education is to provide
students with a solid struc-
ture for what a well-educated
person should know, and instill
in them a spirit of inquiry
and the willingness to be a
lifelong learner, then the basic
liberal arts education has been
achieved. The result is gradu-
ates who are able to reect,
reason well and critically, and
have the passion to continue to
learn. After all, isnt that what a
good college education should
be about?
Michael A. MacDowell is president
of Misericordia University in Dallas
Township, Pa.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, March 10, 2013 P E RS P E C T I V E S PAGE 8D
Finding the balance between practical and liberal arts education
COMMENTARY
M I C H A E L
M A C D O W E L L
MAIL BAG | LETTERS FROM READERS TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 1E
MARKETPLACE
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
*Tax and tags extra. Includes Conquest, Loyalty and Trade-In Assistance. **Tax and tags extra.
www.BerwickChevy.com
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RT. 11
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HOURS: Mon.-Tue. 9-8; Wed. 9-5; Thur.-Fri. 9-8, Sat. 9-3 12th & Pine Streets, Berwick, PA
(570)
#B2319
2012 Buick LaCrosse
4-Cyl., FWD, PW, PL, Tilt, Cruise,
Remote Start, XM, OnStar
MSRP
$32,115
* SALE
PRICE
#B3086
2013 Buick Verano
4-Cyl., PW, PL, Tilt, Cruise,
Remote Start, Sunroof
MSRP
$26,545
* SALE
PRICE
#G3102
2013 GMC Terrain SLE1 AWD
4-Cyl., PW, PL, Tilt, Cruise,
Rear Camera, XM Radio
MSRP
$29,375
* SALE
PRICE
#G2220
2012 GMC Acadia SLE AWD
V-6, 7 Passenger, Remote Start,
Rear Park Assist
MSRP
$38,180
* SALE
PRICE
#G2185
2012 GMC Sierra SLE Crew
Powertech Pkg., Remote Start, Rear Park
Assist, Power Drivers Seat
MSRP
$39,650
* SALE
PRICE
#G2229
2012 GMC Sierra 2500 Crew
6.0L V-8, Remote Start, Rear Camera,
Snow Plow Prep Pkg., HD Trailering
MSRP
$45,470
* SALE
PRICE
PRE-OWNED SPECIALS! PRE-OWNED SPECIALS! PRE-OWNED SPECIALS!
#P3111A
2006 Dodge Dakota Quad
SLT 4x4, V-8, PW, PL, Tilt, Cruise,
AM/FM CD, ONLY 55K MILES
#T2090B
2011 GMC Sierra Denali AWD
6.2L V-8, Heated/Cooled Leather Seats,
20 Wheels, P. Sunroof, Chrome Boards
** SALE
PRICE
#G3095A
2011 GMC Terrain SLE AWD
4-Cyl., PW, PL, Tilt, Cruise, Rear Camera,
1 Owner, Bought Here New!
** SALE
PRICE
#G3021A
2011 Chevy Silverado Z71 4x4
EXT. CAB, 5.3L V-8, Z71 Pkg., Remote Start,
Tow Pkg., 37K Miles
** SALE
PRICE
#G2308A
2008 GMC Envoy SLT 4x4
V-6, Heated Leather Seats, Nav., Sunroof,
Chrome Wheels, One Owner, Bought Here New!
** SALE
PRICE
2006 Chevy Malibu Maxx
V-6, AM/FM Stereo CD, Remote Start,
FWD, ONLY 59K MILES
** SALE
PRICE
Chevy Runs Deep Mon.-Thurs 9am-7:30pm
Fri. 9am-5pm
Sat. 9am-3pm
Sunday Browsing
Family Owned & Operated for Over 40 Years
1609 MAIN AVE. PECKVILLE EXIT 190 OFF 1-81
(Right At the Light Go 4 Miles to Our Door)
570-489-7586 www.sylvesterchevrolet.com
2008 CHEVY
IMPALA LT
V-6, Auto, Air, PW, PL, 38,000 Miles
$10,995
*
2012 CHEVY
MALIBU LS
4 Cyl., Auto, PW, PD, CD, 14K
$15,695
*
2011 CHEVY
SILVERADO Z41 4X4
8 Cyl., Auto, PW, PL, Air, 8K, Certied
$25,495
*
2009 CHEVY
EQUINOX LT
V-6, Auto, Sunroof, PW, PD, 38,000 Miles
$16,495
*
2010 CHEVY
AVALANCHE Z71 4X4
V-8, Auto, Leather, Sunroof, 25K
$32,495
*
2007 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER
6 Cyl., Auto, Air, PW, PD, 74,000 Miles
$9,995
*
Disclaimer: *All prices plus tax and tags. All Applicable Rebates included. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Good thru 4/1/13.
8
0
4
1
9
7
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags. **See dealer for details.
2001 Oldsmobile
Silhouette
$
2,995
*
Perfect Running, Clean, Right Price!
2003 Ford
F-150 V6
$
4,500
*
Runs Great, Auto, 4x4, Great Truck!
2004 Saturn Ion
$
4,995
*
Very Nice Condition,
Runs 100% Clean
1999 Ford F-150
Ext. Cab
$
3,895
*
Runs Great, V8, 4x4
1999 Mazda
Millenium
$
4,295
*
Loaded, Low Mileage, 4 Dr, Sunroof,
Leather, H. Seats, 1 Owner, Very Clean
2003 Suzuki
Grand Vitara
$
5,995
*
Tax Time is THE Time
at Motor Twins Auto Mart
JER-DONS
S A NS S OUC IA UT O M A RT
W E SA Y YES W HEN OTHERS SA Y N O
100% Gua ra n te e d
Cre d itA pprova l
TA X
REFUN D TIM E
M A NY C A RS FO R
Y O U TO C HO O SE FRO M
JER-DONS
S A NS S OUC IA UT O M A RT
(SansSouci P kw y N ext to N im rod H aven)
H anover Tw p., P A 18706
270-3434
A llV ehicles Safety C hecked & Inspected
W arranty - G ap Insurance A vailable on A llV ehicles
LO W DO W N PA Y M ENTS
FLEXIBLE RA TES / PA Y M ENTS
N e e d A N e w Ca r?
STK# 121127D
2011 DODGE JOURNEY
MAINSTREET AWD
NOW
$20,500
ALL WHEEL
DRIVE
2011 DODGE
GRAND
CARAVAN R/T
STK#130131N
NOW
$22,800
Prices are Plus Tax, Registration Fees and Documentation Fees. All payments are for 72 months to qualied buyers with excellent credit @ 6.99 APR. Your rate may
Vary depending on credit rating status. $2499 down payment or trade equity. In addition to tax and registration, doc fees. Must take delivery by 3/15/13
2012 FORD F-550
SUPERCREW FLATBED
4X4 DIESEL
NOW
$43,700
WE HAND PICK THE BEST NEW CAR TRADE-INS & LEASE TURN-INS &
SELL THEM RIGHT HERE IN TUNKHANNOCK AT A FRACTION OF THEIR
ORIGINAL PRICE. THEY DRIVE LIKE NEW BUT COST THOUSANDS LESS.
www.TunkAutoMart.com
07 FORD MUSTANG PREMIUM
Only 26,683 Miles, 6 Cylinder Automatic, Shaker
Audio System, 6 Disc CD................................. NOW$13,900
08 PONTIAC G6 SEDAN
Only 57,492 Miles, Superb Condition, Sport Package,
Alloy Wheels, Remote Keyless Entry............ NOW$11,500
11 DODGE CALIBER MAINSTREET
Former Chrysler Executive Vehicle. Style,
Safety and Carfax Certied!........................... NOW$15,700
10 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4
Local Trade, Priced $1,400 below KBB, 5 Star
Driver Front Crash Rating, Fuel Efcient
26 MPG HWY..................................................... NOW$16,800
10 MAZDA 3I TOURING
Only 23,630 Miles, Graphite Mica Exterior,
Bluetooth, iPod/MP3 Input, Automatic,
1-Owners...................................................................... $16,900
12 JEEP PATRIOT 4X4
2 to choose from One is blue one is black
Both have Pwr. Windows and Locks, Keyless Entry, Pwr. Heated
Mirrors, Automatic Transmission, Supplemental
Front Seat Side Airbags.................................. NOW$19,400
12 FIAT 500 SPORT
Only 4,300 Miles on this Spotless 500.
Equipped with Sunroof, Bluetooth, Premium
Sound System, 38 MPG HYW......................... NOW$14,900
12 DODGE AVENGER SE
Bright Silver Metallic Ext., 18 Aluminum
Chrome Clad Wheels,
Security Alarm, 4 cyl., Automatic.................. NOW$16,900
12 DODGE JOURNEY SXT AWD
3rd Row Seat, Rear Air and Heat, 18,530 miles, Pwr.
Drivers Seat, Featured in a
Storm Gray Exterior ......................................... NOW$22,500
11 DODGE JOURNEY MAINSTREET AWD
Only 21,731 Miles, 3rd Row Seat, Rear Air and Heat, Remote
Proximity Keyless Entry, Fog Lamps,
6 cylinder, All wheel Drive ............................. NOW$20,500
10 MAZDA 6I TOURING
1-Owner, Low Miles, Automatic,
Keyless Entry, 30 MPG Hwy,
Ebony Black Exterior ....................................... NOW$16,900
12 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CREW
Heated First and Second Row Seats, Rear DVD,
Bluetooth Streaming Audio, Remote Start,
Rear Backup Camera, Power Liftgate.......... NOW$23,400
11 CHRYSLER 300C AWD
All Wheel Drive, Dual Pane Sunroof,
GPS Navigation, Safety Tec Package,
Former Chrysler Group Company Vehicle.... NOW$30,900
12 DODGE AVENGER SXT PLUS
SUPER LOW MILES 8,589Power Sunroof,
Unique Black Seats With Red Seat Inserts
& Stitching, Rear Spoiler, V-6......................... NOW$19,400
08 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB STX 4X4
V8, Automatic, 1-Owner, Local Trade, Priced
$2,000 below KBB retail .................................. NOW$15,900
08 KIA AMANTI
Leather Seating, Power Sunroof, 6-Disc CD,
Innity Sound System, 57,338 Miles............... NOW$11,900
12 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING CONVERTIBLE
29 MPG HWY, Only 10,942 miles, Former Florida Car,
Pwr. Convertible Top, Pwr. Front Seats,
Sirius Satellite Radio ....................................... NOW$17,900
12 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT 4X4
HEMI V8, Automatic, Pwr. Windows & Locks,
Mineral Gray Ext............................................... NOW$24,900
13 FORD FUSION HYBRID SE
Go Green With This New Body Style, Gets Between 41 & 47 MPG,
Local New 4 Door Wrangler Trade In With Only 3,600 miles....NOW$26,500
12 DODGE CHARGER SXT AWD
All Wheel Drive, Power Sunroof, Former Chrysler Company
Vehicle, Leather Heated Seats, Heated Steering Wheel,
GPS Navigation, Bluetooth Streaming Audio......NOW$28,900
12 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING CONVERTIBLE
Only 10,770 Miles on this Convertible from Florida.
Equipped with Black Power Top and
Blackberry Exterior, 6 Cyl., Automatic .....................$20,900
12 KIA SPORTAGE LX AWD
All Wheel Drive, Automatic, 4 Cylinder, Great on
Gas!, Power Windows & Locks,
Keyless Entry .................................................... NOW$21,400
11 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN R/T
Sportier Version Of A Minivan. This Is A Former Chrysler Executive
Vehicle. Leather Seating, Front And Secondary Heated Seats, Blind
Spot and Cross Path Detection, Blue Tooth
Streaming Audio, Rear Back Up Camera....................$22,800
12 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING L
Leather Seating, Rear DVD w/ 2 Screens,
Safety Tech Pkg., Saphire Blue Exterior
17,034 miles...................................................... NOW$23,900
12 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT
Pwr. Sunroof, Rear Decklid Spoiler, Remote Start,
Alloy Wheels, Spacious Cabin and
Comfortable Ride..........................................................$17,900
11 CADILLAC CTS AWD
Only 24,138 miles, All Wheel Drive, Leather Seating, Available
Satellite Radio, OnStar Onboard
Communication System..............................................$27,400
13 DODGE CHARGER RALLYE AWD
Featured in Jazz Blue. This All Wheel Drive Charger is a former
Chrysler Company Car. Never Titled. 8 Speed
Automatic Transmission, Power Sunroof ................$29,400
12 CHRYSLER 300S AWD
Former Chrysler Executive Vehicle, Gloss Black Exterior,
Panoramic Sunroof, Garmin Navigation System, Safety Tech
System, HEMI V8 w/ Fuel Saving MDS,
All Wheel Drive.............................................................$33,900
12 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA LTZ AWD
All Wheel Drive, Silver Ice Exterior, Heated Leather Seats, Power
Sunroof, Backup Camera, 6 cylinder,
Automatic, Remote Start..............................................$24,400
12 FIAT 500 ABARTH
Former Chrysler Group Company Vehicle, Only 7,677 Miles, Turbo
Charged Engine, Premium Sound System, Bluetooth, Aluminum
Wheels, Small can be cool!
Great Gas Mileage 34 MPG........................................$23,400
11 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB BIGHORN 4X4
1-Owner, Only 29,345 Miles, HEMI V8, Front Bucket Seats, Rear
Cargo Bedliner and Tonneau Cover,
20 Chrome Clad Wheels............................................ $25,400
11 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SAHARA 4X4
4 Door Featured in Mango Tango w/ Matching Hardtop,
Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats,
Former Chrysler Exec. Vehicle...................................$30,600
13 DODGE DART SXT
Only 5,208 Miles, One Owner, Power Sunroof,
Automatic transmission, 36 MPG HWY....................$19,800
12 DODGE DURANGO R/T AWD
This Hot Rod Version of a Dodge Durango
has a HEMI V-8, Leather Seating, Navigation,
ALL Wheel Drive...........................................................$34,800
Clearance Priced
For Quick Sale!
More Values...
Hand Picked Just for You!
DONT RISK PAYINGTOO MUCH SOMEWHERE ELSE!
Tunkhannock Auto Mart
www.tunkautomart.com
888-323-6924
OPEN FRIDAYS
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Jeep

2012 KIA
SPORTAGE LX
AWD
STK#CEA43169
NOW
$21,400
NOW
$23,600
2012 JEEP
WRANGLER 4X4
STK#130131P
2012 DODGE
JOURNEY HERO
AWD
NOW
$20,900
NOW
$20,900
NOW
$15,600
2012 FIAT
500 SPORT
STK#130218J
2011 JEEP WRANGLER
4 DR SAHARA 4X4
STK#121127I
NOW
$30,600
2013 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA
LIMITED 4X4
STK#130109B
STK#130131L
NOW
$26,500
2013 FORD FUSION
HYBRID
STK#130204B
2012 JEEP PATRIOT
4X4
STK#13011Q
NOW
$19,400
AS LOWAS
$288
2008 PONTIAC G6
STK#130216D
NOW
$11,500
STK#21206C
2012 CHRYSLER
300S V8 AWD
STK#130131S
NOW
$33,900
NOW
$24,600
HEMI
V8
2012 MITSUBISHI
OUTLANDER GT AWD
NOW
$25,900
SUPERB
CONDITION
STK# 121229A
2012 CHRYSLER
200 TOURING
CONVERTIBLE
NOW
$20,900
2012 CHRYSLER
200 TOURING
CONVERTIBLE
STK#130218F
NOW
$20,700
STK#130218G
2012 FIAT 500
ABARTH TURBO
STK#130218H
NOW
$23,400
ONLY 882
MILES
LEATHER
NAV
2010 BMW 328I
XDRIVE AWD
STK#130107B
STK# 130109D
NOW
$23,500
STK#130109C
2012 KIA SEOL+
NOW
$16,900
AS LOWAS
$245
NOW
$15,900
2012 CHEVROLET
SONIC LT
STK#130219C
AUTOMATIC
All Wheel
Drive
47MPG
ONLY
7,688
MILES
NOW
$12,700
ONLY
32,235
MILES
2012 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
STK#130131M
NOW
$19,500
LEATHER
2012 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN CREW
REAR
DVD
ALL WHEEL
DRIVE
HARDTOP
2010 SCION xB 7.0
STK#130213B
AS LOWAS
$173
ONLY
7,115
MILES
ONLY
13,679
MILES
ONLY
10,778
MILES
ONLY
12,296
MILES
POWERSTROKE
DIESEL
AS LOWAS
$289
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
4under$200
*2013 Tiguan 2.0T S, auto transmission. $199 per month lease. MSRP $25,835. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,999 due at signing. $750 regular VCI bonus enhancement. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Passat 2.5L S with appear-
ance, auto transmission. MSRP $23,740. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,349 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Jetta 2.0L S, manual transmission. MSRP $17,470. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $159
per month with $1,999 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Beetle 2.5L, manual transmission. MSRP $20,790. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,349 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW
credit approval. Offer expires 04/01/2013. The Volkswagen Carefree Maintenance Program covers the vehicles scheduled maintenance for three years or 36,000 miles, whichever occurs first, on all new 2009 or newer models. Coverage is during the term of new vehicle warranty at no additional charge. Some limitations
apply. The Toureg 2 TDI program covers the vehicles 5k, 15k, 25k and 35k AdBlue refills. The Routan program covers 6k, 12k, 18k, 24k, 30k, and 36k scheduled maintenance. Does not include routine wear and tear on parts such as breaks, tires, wipers, blades, light bulbs, etc.
See dealer or vehicle maintenance program booklet for details.***All MPG estimates are EPA highway estimates.
Wyoming Valley Motors
126 Narrows Rd. Larksville, PA
570-288-7411
wyomingvalleymotorsvw.com
#3VW1K7AJ4DM256656 #3VWJP7AT1DM618526
26
MPG
***
The 2013Volkswagen Tiguan 2.0TS
2
# WVGAV3AX6DW597950
Lease for Only
$199*
PER
MONTH
34
MPG
***
The 2013Volkswagen Jetta2.0L S
4
Lease for Only
$159*
PER
MONTH
32
MPG
***
The 2013Volkswagen Passat 2.5L S
3
#1VWAP7A38DC058490
Lease for Only
$199*
PER
MONTH
31
MPG
***
The 2013Volkswagen Beetle 2.5L
5
Lease for Only
$199*
PER
MONTH
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 3E
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA **
*Sa le Pric es plu s ta x & ta gs . N o tres po ns ib le fo rtypo gra phic a l erro rs . **B a s ed o n N is s a ns 2 0 12 N is s a ns Sa les To ta ls . O ffers end 3 /3 1/13 .
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
STK# N23014
M O DEL# 12113
V IN# 637506
M SRP $19,090
*$209 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 36 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $11454; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @
T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0.
B U Y FOR
$
16,575
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E FOR
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
$
20 9
*
P ER
M O.
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, Prem . Clo th S ea ts , Cru is e Co n tro l, T iltW heel, S ecu rity, F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
2013N IS S A N S E N TRA 1.8S V
STK# N22839
M O DEL# 13113
V IN# 454268
M SRP $23,880
*$249 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 36 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14566.80; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @
T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0.
B U Y FOR
$
20 ,295
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E FOR
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
$
249
*
P ER
M O.
4 Cyl, CVT , Pw rS ea t, PW , PDL , Cru is e, In telligen tK ey, Rem o te S ta rt, F lo o rM a ts , & M u ch M o re!
2013N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S S DN
STK# N23232
M O DEL# 20213
V IN# 215496
M SRP $23,050
*$269 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $13138.50; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @
T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0.
B U Y FOR
$
19,999
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E FOR
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
$
269
*
P ER
M O.
4 Cyl T u rb o , CVT ,
A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys , S p la s h
Gu a rd s , F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re
2013N IS S A N JUK E S A W D
STK# N22923
M O DEL# 25013
V IN# 609089
M SRP $30,895
*$349 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18537; m u s tb e a p p ro ved
thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0.
B U Y FOR
$
28 ,495
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E FOR
$
349
*
P ER
M O.
V6, CVT , A/ C, Allo ys , 7 Pa s s S ea tin g, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt& M u ch, M u ch, M u ch M o re!
2013N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R S 4X4
LEA SE @
0 DO W N
SA VE $2500 O R M O R E O N A LL
NEW 2013 SENTR A S IN STO C K
LEA SE @
0 DO W N
SA VE $3500 O R M O R E O N A LL
NEW 2013 A LTIM A S IN STO C K
SA VE $3000 O R M O R E O N A LL
NEW 2013 JU KES IN STO C K
LEA SE @
0 DO W N
LEA SE @
0 DO W N
SA VE $2400 O R M O R E O N A LL NEW
2013 P A TH FINDER S IN STO C K
STK# N22724
M O DEL# 22213
V IN# 602805
M SRP $24,820
*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $13899.20; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e
@ d elivery= $0. $1100 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $500 Cu s to m erBo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed .
B U Y FOR
$
20 ,320
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E FOR
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $50 0 CU S T. B ON U S CAS H
$
259
*
P ER
M O.
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, AM / F M / CD S tereo , S p la s h Gu a rd s , F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
2013N IS S A N ROGUE S A W D
LEA SE @
0 DO W N
SA VE $4500 O N A LL NEW
2013 R O G U ES IN STO C K
STK# N21674
M O DEL# 23212
V IN# 218284
M SRP $32,850
*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18067.50; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @
d elivery= $0. $1500 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed & $1000 Cu s to m erBo n u s Ca s h.
B U Y FOR
$
27,8 50
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E FOR
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 CU S TOM ER B ON U S CAS H & 0 % FOR 70 M OS .
$
299
*
P ER
M O.
V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Blu eto o th, F lo o rM a ts , S p la s h Gu a rd s & M u ch M o re!
2012N IS S A N M URA N O S A W D
$5000 O FF M SR P & 0% FO R 72 M O NTH S!!!
O N A LL 2012 M U R A NO S IN STO C K
LEA SE @
0 DO W N
STK# N22368
M O DEL# 16112
V IN# 861635
M SRP $34,435
*$319 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18,939.25; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @
d elivery= $0. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed & $500 Cu s to m erBo n u s .
B U Y FOR
$
25,435
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E FOR
W / $40 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $50 0 CU S TOM ER B ON U S
$
319
*
P ER
M O.
V6, CVT , M o o n ro o f, Pw rS ea t, L td E d t. Pkg, Allo ys , F lo o rM a ts , S p la s h Gu a rd s & M u ch M o re!
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A 3.5S L IM ITE D E DT.
LEA SE @
0 DO W N
SA VE $9,000 O FF M SR P O N A LL
NEW 2012 M A XIM A S IN STO C K
STK# N22792
M O DEL# 26212
V IN# 621342
M SRP $46,695
$
34,695
*
+ T/T
W / $60 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $10 0 0 CU S TOM ER B ON U S CAS H
V8, Au to , A/ C, AM / F M / CD, All Po w erRea r
Ca m era , Allo ys , F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
2012N IS S A N A RM A DA S V 4X4
B U Y
FOR
*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs .
2 @ TH IS
P R IC E! LA ST
2 LEFT!
SA VE $12,000 O FF
M SR P O N A LL NEW 2012
A R M A DA S IN STO C K
I
S
H
E
R
E
!
(Y O U K N O W W E C A N T S A Y M A D N E S S !)
STK# N21428
M O DEL# 36412
V IN# 309111
M SRP $45,135
*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs .
B U Y
FOR
$
35,135
*
+ T/T
W / $40 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $1350 VTP B ON U S CAS H
V8, Au to , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys , Na vi,
DVD, & M u ch, M u ch
M o re! M o o n ro o f
2012N IS S A N TITA N S V CC 4X4
O NLY 8 2012
TITA NS R EM A IN
EXEC U TIVE DEM O S
SA VE $10,000 O FF M SR P
STK# N21737
M O DEL# 55412
V IN# 039686
M SRP $44,890
*$489 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $21996.10; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0. $1425 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed & $500 Cu s t. Bo n u s Ca s h.
B U Y FOR
$
34,8 90
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E FOR
W / $30 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE & $50 0 CU S T. B ON U S CAS H
$
48 9
*
P ER
M O.
V6, CVT , Na viga tio n , DVD, Po w erDo o rs & Ha tch, Clim Co n tro l,
Blu eto o th, L ea ther, Hea ted S ea ts , M u ch, M u ch M o re!!
2012N IS S A N QUE S T L E V A N
LEA SE @
0 DO W N
EXEC U TIVE DEM O S
LA ST O NE @ TH IS P R IC E
SA VE $10,000 O FF M SR P
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
O NLY 4
2012
M A XIM A S
R EM A IN
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
12 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
The Kia 10-year/100,000-mile warranty program includes various warranties and roadside assistance. Warranties include power train and basic. All warranties and roadside assistance are limited. See retailer for details or go to kia.com. *24-hour Roadside Assistance
is a service plan provided by Kia Motors America, Inc. **Plus tax and tag. Picture may not represent exact trim level. Plus tax & tag, 12k miles per year with 1,500 down & fees due at signing. Kia Soul payment based on 39 month lease with approved credit. Sorento,
Optima and Sportage based on 36 month lease with approved credit.*** Must be a documented deal. Dealer reserves right to buy that vehicle.
WE WILL BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE ONANEW
KIAGUARANTEEDOR WE WILL PAY YOU$1,000!
***
2014 KIASorentoLX
2013 KIA Soul
2013 KIAOptimaLX
2013 KIASportageLX
#K3187
* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
#K3193
* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
#K3199
* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
#K4000
* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
$186
Per
Month
*
$21,360
**
OR
/utomatic
/M/FM CD
Satllit Racio
Plutooth & iPoc Racy
Traction Control
Powr Vincows
6 /irbags
Kylss Entry
Cruis Control
/lloy Vhls
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS
0%
35
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
$259
Per
Month
*
$24,455
**
OR
/ll Vhl Driv
/M/FM/CD
Satllit Racio
Plutooth & iPoc Racy
7 /lloy Vhls
Rar Packup Camra
UVO Systm
Kylss Entry
6 /irbags
Cooling Glv Pox
6 Spc /uto Transmission
$139
Per
Month
*
$16,990
**
OR
/utomatic
5 Door
Powr Packag
/M/FM/CD
USP //uxiliary Jack
/PS
String Vhl Mountc
/ucio Controls
Kylss Entry
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS
1.9%
30
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS
0.9%
$259
Per
Month
*
$25,975
*
OR
/ll Vhl Driv
/lloy Vhls
6 /irbags
Satllit Racio w. Plutooth
Kylss Entry
Cruis Control
/ntilock Praks
Traction Control
6 Spc /uto Transmission
24
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
WYOMINGVALLEY MOTORS KIA
560 Pierce Street , Kingston, PA
570-714-9924
www.wyomingvalleykia.com
- l0-year/l00,000-mlle llmlted power traln warranty
- 5-year/60,000-mlle llmlted baslc warranty
- 5-year/l00,000-mlle llmlted antl-perforatlon
- 5-year/60,000-mlle 24-hour roadslde asslstance`
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS
1.9%
27
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
Our shelves are restocked! We have the cars and we have the deals!
HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR TRADES! COME IN TODAY!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 5E
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
8
0
6
8
5
2
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
W Weekend S eekend Special pecial
$13.95 $13.95 for a Large Plain
Pie & a Dozen Wings
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday.
One coupon per party/table.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Home of the Original O-Bar Pizza
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
472 Auto Services
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Dont Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Mention this ad
when you call!
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
310 Attorney
Services
ATTORNEY
MICHAEL KELLY
For aggressive
affordable repre-
sentation in the fol-
lowing matters:
Divorce, Child cus-
tody, Child support,
PFA, Unemployment
hearing, DUI, (no
matter how many
offenses) Credit
card lawsuits, Prop-
erty tax assess-
ment, Landlord/ten-
ant issues, and all
Criminal matters.
Law office of
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
www.michaelp
kellylaw.com
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
120 Found
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
civitasmedia.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
Line up a place to live
in classified!
150 Special Notices
ADOPTION
WOULD LOVE TO
ADOPT YOUR
BABY!
Will provide a lov-
ing, warm, nurtur-
ing, secure home.
Extended family &
lifetime of opportu-
nities await.
Expenses paid.
1-800-261-8330
ADOPTION: A safe,
secure life filled with
forever love awaits
your baby. Wendy
888-959-7660
Expenses paid.
As Stations
wedding menus
become the
growing trend,
check out the
Oyster Wedding
Stations menu,
sure to impress
each guest!
bridezella.net
IF YOU USED the
Mirena IUD bet.
2001-present and
suffered perforation
or embedment in
the uterus requiring
surgical removal, or
had a child born
with birth defects
you may be entitled
to compensation.
Call Johnson law &
speak with female
staff members
1-800-535-5727
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Mention this ad
when you call!
310 Attorney
Services
ATTORNEY
MICHAEL KELLY
For aggressive
affordable repre-
sentation in the fol-
lowing matters:
Divorce, Child cus-
tody, Child support,
PFA, Unemployment
hearing, DUI, (no
matter how many
offenses) Credit
card lawsuits, Prop-
erty tax assess-
ment, Landlord/ten-
ant issues, and all
Criminal matters.
Law office of
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
www.michaelp
kellylaw.com
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice,
*Hospitality. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV authorized.
Call 888-220-3984
www.Centura
Online.com
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
CAMEO
HOUSE
BUS TOURS
___________________
NEW YORK
CITY
SAT. MAR., 23
___________________
12 TH ANNUAL
ARCHITECTURAL
DIGEST SHOW AT
THE PIER
Shop. Be Inspired.
Celebrate Design
With Latest In
Home Furnishings
-------------------------
F.I.T. EXHIBIT
SHOES - SHOES -
An Obsession
BOOTS - BOOTS -
Height of Fashion
A MUST FOR
SHOE LOVERS!!
-----------------------
UNION SQUARE
------------------------
for more info
570-655-3420
Anne.Cameo
@verizon.net
VISIT US
FUN GETAWAYS!
PHILADELPHIA
FLOWER SHOW
March 9th
Theme: Brilliant
THE PASSION
PLAY
March 23
WASHINGTON
CHERRY
BLOSSOM
3 Day, April 12-14
Includes: Dinner
cruise, parade
seating, sightsee-
ing & much more!
SENECA LAKE
Wine & Cheese
Weekend
Apr. 27 & 28
YANKEES
Call for Schedule
1-800-432-8069
380 Travel
Mackinac
Island,
Michigan
Board the high
speed Hydro-Jet
Ferry for a fun
ride to the
Island. Have
breakfast at the
Grand Hotel,
take a horse
drawn carriage
for a narrated
tour & much
more!
June 22-28
Israel:
The Holy Land
Includes high-
lights such as:
Bethlehem,
Jerusalem &
walking the Way
of the Cross by
Our Lord on His
Way to the
Crucifixion
October 9-17
Call Theresa
654-2967
NYC BUS $36
Wed. & Sat.
NYC
ST. PATRICKS
DAY PARADE
3/16
CINDERELLA
JERSEY BOYS
3/16, 3/23
$99-$125
MALTIDA 6/29
ORCH. $155
WICKED 4/17
Orch. $142
Only 8 open
RAINBOW
TOURS
570-489-4761
LEAVE FROM
PARK & RIDE
Rt. 309 or Rt.
315
SPEND THE 4TH OF
JULY IN BOSTON
on board
Cunards Queen
Mary II
Travel from NY to
Canada and Boston
July 1 to July 6,
2013
From only $1099.
per person
ALSO OTHER CRUISE
SPECIALS:
Carnival Splendor
from $682. per
person - 8 nights
Royal Caribbeans
Explorer of Seas
from $642.
per person - 7night
Please Call Now!
First come, first
served!
All rates are per
person, based on
two sharing one
cabin.
First come, first
served!
570-288-8747
1-800-545-7099
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
409 Autos under
$5000
CHEVY 00 BLAZER
4 door, 4 x4 LT
Power windows
& locks. Auto,
2 owners.
Not a Nicer One!
$3,995
409 Autos under
$5000
LEOS AUTO SALES
93 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY 98
BLAZER
4 door, 6 cylinder,
auto, 4WD.
Leather, sunroof,
all power.
$2,150
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
DODGE 03
CARAVAN SE
103,000 miles.
Silver. New
Inspection.
1 Year Warranty
$4,895
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
FORD 97 ESCORT
4 door. 77,000
original miles.
Extra Clean,
No Rust
$3,495
HONDA 97 CIVIC
Hatchback, 5
speed. All stock
except for rims.
Looks nice, runs
well, $3200 OBO.
Call or text:
570-407-4541
JEEP 99 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4X4 LAREDO
Small V-8, 182K
highway miles, very
clean. All power,
sunroof, alloy
wheels, runs excel-
lent. $4995
570-696-1896
MERCURY 02
SABLE LS
Leather, moon
roof, 103,000
miles. New
Inspection &
1 Year Warranty.
$3,995
SUZUKI 03
GRAND VITARA 4X4
93,000 original
miles. Absolutely
Impeccable
Condition!
$5,495
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK `97 LESABRE
Excellent running
condition, mainte-
nance free. $3,200.
570-287-0600
FORD `09 FOCUS SE
Excellent condition,
blue, 28,000 miles,
one owner. New
tires, Sirius, CD, all
power, air, great
gas milage. $10,500
570-407-0910
FORD 08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$7200 negotiable.
570-578-9222
FORD 08 FOCUS
SES Coupe. 57,000
miles, AC, leather,
moonroof, sync, 6
disc cd, cruise, tilt,
power group, 1
owner. Very nice
$9900
570-574-0960
FORD RANGER XCAB94
4x4, 5-speed
$3,495
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT
silver, V6, 50k miles
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
blue, auto, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
06 FORD FUSION SEL
red
06 AUDI A8L
grey, blue leather,
navigation AWD
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
silver
05 AUDI A6
All Road. Green
2 tone, leather
AWD
05 VW JETTA GLS
grey, black leather,
sunroof, alloys
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 SUZUKI AERO
Silver, 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914
green & black, 5
spd, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
09 DODGE JOURNEY
RT black.
3rd seat, leather,
navigation AWD
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT
SILVER, V6, 4X4
07 GMC YUKON 4X4
DENALI black, 3rd
seat, Navigation
07 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT green,
4 door, 7 pass
mini van
06 CHEVY 1500
SILVERADO REG CAB
truck red, 4x4
06 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
ULTRA white, tan
leather, 3rd seat,
AWD
06 GMC ENVOY XL
silver, 3rd seat
4x4
06 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
06 CHRYSLER
PACIFICA TOURING
silver, grey leather,
navigation, 3rd
seat, AWD
06 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
gold, V6 4x4
06 JEEP COMMANDER
black, 3rd seat,
entertainment
center, 4x4
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, gold,
3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT
black, 4 door, V8,
4x4 truck
06 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, Black,
V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
LX WHITE, V6, 4X4
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE silver 3rd seat
4x4
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Red, V6 4x4
05 SUZUKI XL7 EX
gold, V6, 4x4
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE
gold, 7 passenger
mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX
green auto, AWD
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE
green, 4 door 4x4
04 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT blue,
4 door, 4x4 truck
04 JEEP GRAND 4X4
CHEROKEE LAREDO
SPECIAL EDITION,
black/black leather
04 KIA SORENTO EX
blue, auto, V6 AWD
03 NISSAN XTERRA
silver, V6, 4x4
03 FORD F150 XLT
SUPERCREW 4x4
truck, gold
03 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN EL red,
4 door 7
passenger mini van
02 FORD EXPLORER
XLT white 4x4
02 TOYOTA TUNDRA
SR5 XCAB TRUCK
white 4x4
01 DODGE RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
SLT 5.9 liter,
brown, 8 box 4x4
truck
01 FORD RANGER XLT
red, super cab,
B6, 4x4 truck
00 JEEP WRANGLER
SPORT blue, 2
door, soft top,
4x4 5 speed
99 FORD F150 SUPER
CAB, silver 4x4
truck
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
HONDA ACCORD EXL 10
Leather and well
Equipped.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
JEEP `04 GRAND
CHEROKEE
Special Edition
Burgundy/tan
leather. Automatic,
AWD, all power, 95K
miles.Excellent con-
dition. $6,700 Call
Rich. 570-762-8165
JEEP WRANGLER 10
Sahara Unlimited,
4X4
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
412 Autos for Sale
VITOS
&
GINOS
Auto Sales
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
90 GMC Pickup
with Plow.
$1,995
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $8,995
94 Cadillac
Fleet- wood
Limo, excellent
condition, 40K.
$3,995
96 F150 Pickup.
auto, runs good.
$2,495
96 Pontiac
Grand Prix.
White, air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good,
106K.
96 Plymouth
Voyager, 81,000,
runs and looks
excellent,
$2,995
98 Buick
Lesabre, 4-door,
looks and runs
excellent,
$2,995.
01 Ford Taurus
SES
4 door, air, power
doors & win-
dows.
$2,995
04 Chevy Impala
4 door, air,
power windows.
$4,695
04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pass-
enger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $10,900
09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pass-
enger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$42,500
Buying
Junk Cars
Used Cars
&Trucks
Highest Prices Paid
574 -1275
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA 3 08
Extra clean. 5
speed. 41K miles
$12,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
NISSAN 11
ALTIMA 2.5S
Air, Auto, Power
Steering, Power
Brakes, ABS,
Cruise, Tilt, Power
Cloth Seats, CD.
MUCH MORE!
LIKE NEW!
SPECIAL $13,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title
Transfers
BENS AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegmans
570-822-7359
412 Autos for Sale
PONTIAC GRAND AM 02
$3,995
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
SUBARU OUTBACK 11
Station wagon,
AWD.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA 03 COROLLA LE
5 speed
$3,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `98 SIL-
VERADO 1500
EXTENDED CAB LS
Runs great! 211,000
miles, 4x4, new
windshield, alt-
ernator, front wheel
studs, spark plug
wires, ignition mod-
ule, brakes, throttle
body gasket, 3 oxy-
gen sensors, fuel
pump, tank, & filter.
New tires with alloy
rims. New transmis-
sion. $5,000, OBO.
570-793-5593
HONDA 09 CIVIC
Low miles, 4 door,
4 cylinder, auto.
$14,400
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVY 06
TRAILBLAZER
47K miles. Bur-
gundy 4 x 4, V6,
sunroof. Warranty.
$11,995
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
FORD 04 F150
4x2. Nice Truck!
$11,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
JEEP `12
LIBERTY SPORT
4 x 4. Silver.
14K miles.
Factory Warranty.
$19,895.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
JEEP 04 WRANGLER
6 cylinder. 5 speed
4x4
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
MERCEDES 01 BENZ
CLK 320
Coupe. Extra clean
& sharp. $10,999
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
600
FINANCIAL
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
AMISH BUGGY.
Authentic. Antique
wood style, light
grey. No yolk to
horse. Lights have
not been tested.
Moving must sell,
you must pick up no
delivery. $700
570-899-6434
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
ANTIQUES
One item or entire
contents of homes.
570-814-3371
570-328-4420
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
8
0
6
4
5
2
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2013 Honda
Civic LX Sedan
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualied
buyers for limited term.
2013 PILOT EX 4WD
MPG
17 City
24 HWY
**Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $18,823.90
Per Mo.
Lease
ase 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Per
LLea
* *
Model #YF4H4DEW 250-hp (SAE Net),
3.5-Liter, 24-Valve, SOHC i-VTEC

V-6 Engine
Variable Torque Management 4-Wheel Drive
System (VTM-4) 18-Inch Alloy Wheels
Power Windows/Locks Fog Lights
Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) i-MID with
8-inch WQVGA (480x320) Screen, Customizable
Feature Settings and Rearview Camera with
Guidelines Bluetooth HandsFreeLink

Tri-Zone Automatic Climate Control System


with Humidity Control and Air Filtration
Drivers Seat with 10-Way Power Adjustment,
Including Power Lumbar Support
229-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 7
Speakers, Including Subwoofer 2-GB CD
Library Bluetooth

Streaming Audio
USB Audio Interface
2013 ACCORD LX SEDAN
MPG
27 City
36 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $14,194.70
Model #CR2F3DEW
185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC

4-Cylinder
Engine with Direct Injection
Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA

)
with Traction Control Continu-
ously Variable Transmission (CVT)
16-Inch Alloy Wheels Dual-Zone
Automatic Climate Control with
Air-Filtration System Rearview
Camera with Guidelines Blu-
etooth

HandsFreeLink

Pandora

Internet Radio Compatibility USB


Audio Interface MP3/Auxiliary
Input Jack i-MID with 8-inch
WQVGA (480x320) Screen and
Customizable Feature Settings
2013 Honda CR-V LX
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 4/30/2013.
MATT BURNE HONDA PRE-OWNED CENTER
Call: 1-800-NEXTHONDA View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
S
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
ACCORDS
08 ACCORD EXL SDN Green, 70K.....................NOW $14,500
10 ACCORD EX SDN Silver, 74K.........................NOW $14,750
10 ACCORD LX SDN Red, 28K...........................NOW $15,950
10 ACCORD LX SDN Gold, 15K..........................NOW $16,950
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Red, 41K .......................NOW $17,500
10 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 20K..........................NOW $18,500
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Gray, 17K.......................NOW $17,950
11 ACCORD EXL SDN Navy, 20K.......................NOW $19,750
10 ACCORD LX SDN Black, 25K.........................NOW $16,750
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Black, 20K......................NOW $17,950
09 HONDA SXL V6 NAV SDN White, 43K......NOW $18,950
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Black, 24K......................NOW $19,500
1.9%
for 36 mos
CIVICS
10 CIVIC LX SDN Titanium, 60K ............................NOW $14,250
10 CIVIC LX SDN Titanium, 28K ............................NOW $15,250
10 CIVIC EX SDN Gray, 51K.................................NOW $15,250
10 CIVIC LX CPE Gray, 18K..................................NOW $15,950
10 CIVIC EX SDN Black, 31K................................NOW $15,950
12 CIVIC EXL Black, 6K..........................................NOW $20,500
11 CIVIC LX SDN Blue, 63K .................................NOW $13,750
11 CIVIC EX CPE Red, 20K..................................NOW $16,950
12 CIVIC LX SDN Black, 12K................................NOW $18,950
08 CIVIC LX SDN Gray, 28K.................................NOW $13,950
09 CIVIC LX SDN Black, 28K................................NOW $14,500
CRV 4WD
10 CRV EX Black, 40K...............................................NOW $20,750
10 CRV EX Silver, 40K...............................................NOW $20,750
10 CRV EXL NAVI Titanium, 49K ...........................NOW $20,950
11 CRV SE Sage, 29K ...............................................NOW $21,250
11 CRV SE White, 25K...............................................NOW $21,950
10 CRV EXL Black, 19K............................................NOW $22,900
11 CRV EXL-NAVI Black, 41K...............................NOW $23,500
10 CRV EXL Sage, 30K............................................NOW $22,500
11 CRV EXL Titanium, 21K ........................................NOW $24,950
11 CRV EXL White, 18K............................................NOW $24,950
12 CRV EX Titanium, 19K ...........................................NOW $23,950
Our Trade Ins Are
PARADING
In & Out Of Our Lot
PILOT 4WD
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 32K ........................................NOW $28,500
11 PILOT LX Navy, 23K ...........................................NOW $28,500
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 33K ........................................NOW $28,500
12 PILOT TOURING NAVI/RDVD Black, 31K ...NOW $34,500
10 PILOT EXL DVD Gray, 45K.............................NOW $27,250
11 PILOT EXL Silver, 31K .......................................NOW $29,500
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 11K.........................................NOW $30,500
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
*Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $12,445.65
Per Mo.
Lease
PPP r Per
LLea
*
Model #FB2F5DEW 140-hp (SAE Net), 1.8 Liter, 16 Valve, SOHC i-VTEC

4 Cylinder Engine 5 Speed Automatic Transmission Air


Conditioning with Air Filtration System i-MID with 5 inch LCD Screen and Customizable Feature Settings Rear View Camera with Guide-
lines Bluetooth

HandsFreeLink
3
SMS Text Message Function
4
Power Windows and Door Locks Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA

) with
Traction Control Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) Cruise Control Illuminated Steering Wheel Mounted Cruise, Audio, Phone and i-MID
Controls 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 4 Speakers Pandora

Internet Radio Compatibility


5
Bluetooth

Streaming Audio
3

USB Audio Interface


6
MP3/Auxiliary Input Jack Exterior Temperature Indicator Security System with Remote Entry and Trunk Release
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Per Mo.
Lease
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* **
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $15,856.00
Model #RM4H3DEW
185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC

4-Cylinder
Engine Automatic Transmission
Real Time AWD with Intelligent
Control System
TM
Vehicle Stability
AssistTM (VSA

) with Traction
Control Multi-Angle Rearview
Camera with Guidelines
Bluetooth

HandsFreeLink
USB Audio Interface
Remote Entry System
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio
System with 4 Speakers
Pandora

Radio Compatibility
Bluetooth

Streaming Audio
Per Mo.
Lease
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
*Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
1.9
%
for 36 mos. 2.9
%
for 60 mos.
On All Certied Hondas
*1.9% for 36 mos/ 2.9% for up to 60 mos on Certifed Hondas thru Am Honda Finance W.A.C.
Certifed Hondas have 1 yr - 12k, Basic Warranty & 7yr - 100k Powertrain from orig. inservice date.
FIT
10 HONDA FIT SPORT Red, 37K......................NOW $14,950
CRZ HYBRID
11 CRZ EX Frost, 5K.................................................NOW $17,500
ELEMENT 4WD
10 ELEMENT EX Gray, 25K...................................NOW $18,950
RIDGELINE 4WD
08 RIDGELINE RTX Red, 55K.............................NOW $18,500
Gray, 90K, Was $7,950
Now $5,995
05 DODGE
STRATUS CPE R/T
White, 53K, Was $10,950
Now $9,999
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LT SEDAN
Red, 23K, Was $14,950
Now $13,500
11 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SEDAN
Blue, 14K, Was $12,950
Now $11,500
08 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LX SDN
Gray, 38K, Was $15,750
Now $11,950
10 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS SDN
Red, 47K
Now $14,500
08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4WD
Blue 35K
Now $15,250
09 DODGE JOURNEY
SXT 4WD
10 BMW 328Xi AWD SDN
Navy, 41K
Now $22,500
HONDA CRV EX 4WD
06, Silver, 96K
$10,950
06, Black, 102K
$11,500
Navy, 25K
Now $10,950
07 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER LS 4WD
Black, 65K
Now $10,950
08 FORD FUSION
SEL SEDAN
Gold, 81K
Now $12,950
08 TOYOTA
RAV4 4WD
00 LEXUS
RX300 AWD
Gold, 103K
Now $8,750
Silver, 37K
Now $12,950
08 MITSUBISHI
ECLIPSE GS CPE
Blue, 40K
10 MAZDA 3i
TOURING SEDAN
Now $13,950
White, 87K
Now $7,750
99 HONDA
ACCORD EX SDN
Gray, 85K
Now $12,950
04 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER 4WD
HONDA CIVIC
COUPES
05 EX, Black, 106K $7,950
05 VP, Black, 88K $8,500
07 LX, Black, 67K $11,500
Blue, 68K
Now $11,950
06 HONDA
CIVIC LX SDN
Green, 46K
Now $13,500
JEEP
PATRIOT 4WD
Red, 92K
Now $7,750
02 HONDA CIVIC
LX SEDAN
Dk. Cherry, 103K
Now $8,950
00 MAZDA MIATA
SE CONV.
Silver, 14K
08 CHEVY
COBALT CPE
Now $10,950
Red, 50K
09 SUBARU IMPREZA
AWD SEDAN
Now $14,950
Gray, 29K
Now $18,950
11 SUBARU LEGACY
AWD SDN
Black, 89K
Now $8,950
00 HONDA ACCORD
EX COUPE
05, White, 68K $9,950
HONDA ACCORD
VP SEDAN
07, Silver, 86K $10,950
YOUR
NICE
TRADE
HERE
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 7E
PAGE 8E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 9E
PAGE 10E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
A.R.T. APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all
major brands.
Work guaranteed.
570-639-3001
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and
inexpensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money,
Let us take a look
at it first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION CO.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Kitchens and
Baths
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding
Carpentry
40 yrs experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan
570-881-1131
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
1024 Building &
Remodeling
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
BATHROOMS,
KITCHENS,
ROOFING, SID-
ING, DECKS,
WINDOWS, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates.
(570) 855-2506
(570) 332-7023
MARCH MADNESS
$200 cash off
any painting or
drywall job.
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
& LOCAL HOME
BUILDER
30 Years Exp.
Make Your Home
Beautiful Interior /
Exterior.
WE DO IT ALL!
Why pay more!
Pay when youre
pleased. All work
guaranteed.
FREE
ESTIMATES!
570-899-3123
PR BUILDERS
Any and all types of
remodeling from
windows to design
build renovations.
Licensed
Handyman
Services
also, Electric,
Plumbing,
Building.
PA license 048740
accepts Visa
call 570-826-0919
SEE OVER
100
VENDORS
AT THE
BUILDERS
EXPO
MARCH
1, 2 & 3
call 287-3331
FOR INFO
or go to
www.bianepa.com
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
CHRIS MOLESKY
CHIMNEY SPECIALIST
New, repair, rebuild,
liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete
& metal caps.
Licensed & Insured
570-328-6257
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
CLEANING WHIZ
GREEN PRODUCTS
For Special Deals
Contact Jaymee at
570-852-7497
Connies Cleaning
15 years experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
GIFT CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE!
570-430-3743 570-430-3743
Connie does the
cleaning!
DEB & PATS
CLEANING
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-371-3857
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
B.P. Home Repairs
570-825-4268
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Sidewalks,
Chimneys, Stucco.
New Installation &
Repairs
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
STESNEY
CONCRETE & MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drive, steps, stucco,
stone, chimneys and
repairs.
Lic. & Ins.
570-283-5254
1057Construction &
Building
FATHER & SON
CONSTRUCTION
Interior & Exterior
Remodeling
Jobs of All Sizes
570-814-4578
570-709-8826
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-675-3378
1084 Electrical
ECONOLECTRIC
No Job
Too Small.
Generator
Installs.
Residential &
Commercial
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
PA032422
(570) 602-7840
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1132 Handyman
Services
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
20 YEARS EXPERI ENCE
All types of home
repairs & alterations
Plumbing, Carpentry,
Electrical
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-256-3150
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, were
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-855-4588
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk &
Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 472-4321
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
APEX TREE AND
EARTH
TREE REMOVAL
Pruning, Stump
Grinding, Hazard
Tree Removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
570-550-4535
SPRING CLEAN UPS
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming,
Mulching
Landscaping
Services
25+ Years Exp.
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
570-287-4780
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
Winter Special
$100 + materials for
average size room.
18 years
experience.
570-820-7832
ART NEWTONS
PAINTING
& Drywall Repairs
Fully Insured
32 Yrs Experience
570-332-0882
JACOBOSKY PAINTING
NEPAs Finest
Painters
Int./Ext. Painting,
Building Restoration
Dont worry about
them running off
with your money,
get it done right
the first time!
Free Estimates
570-328-5083
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Spring & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Cant Lose!
570-822-3943
1213 Paving &
Excavating
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
HARTH & SONS
General
Contractor
15% off
with this ad.
570-815-8294
1252 Roofing &
Siding
SPRING ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured.
Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
GILROY
Construction
Your Roofing
Specialist
Free Estimates
No Payment
til Job is
100% Complete
570-829-0239
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW SNOW
PLOWING PLOWING
VITOS & GINOS
570-574-1275
Commercial
Industrial
Residential
Driveways
Sidewalks
Salting
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ATTENTION VENDORS
Accent items,
ceramics, baskets,
holiday items,
glasses, much
more. ALL EXCEL-
LENT PRICES AND
IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
570-675-5046
after 5:30 P.M.
BASEBALL, very
nice for a beginning
collector, 800-1991
Upper Deck base-
ball cards, $10. N.Y.
Yankees Baseball
cards, 165, $5. Bal-
timore Orioles
Cards, 200, $6.
570-313-5214 or
570-313-3859
Line up a place to live
in classified!
BOOKS, selling my
collection of Wars
and battles history
of the US, over 10
historical books
worth over $100. All
in good shape. Add
to your own private
home library. $25.
Jim 570-655-9474
DOOR, solid oak,
antique, 77 1/2x30x1
3/4. Has original
brass hardwood
leaded glass, dia-
mond pattern.
Round top. $300,
OBO. 570-824-6278
SEWING MACHINE,
Antique Singer, with
black metal base,
collectors item.
$30.
570-824-6278
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (30)
1928-2000. GAR -
(18)) 1937-2006,
MEYERS (15) 1953-
2003, PITTSTON (6)
1967-75, WVW (12),
1967-2000,
KINGSTON (11)
1932-52, HAZLE-
TON, (8) 1940-61,
PLAINS, (3) 1966-
68, HANOVER 1951-
74. Prices vary
depending on con-
dition. $20-$40
each. Call for further
details and addition-
al school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
710 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER.
GE 6300 btu, box
and spare filters inc.
$75, DEHUMIDIFIER,
GE, 65 pint, $50,
REFRIGERATOR,Frig
idaire Mini, $50
570-472-9167
DRYER, Magic Chief
heavy duty, gas,
super capacity plus
needs barrel gas-
ket, otherwise good
condition.$50.
570-852-1636 or
570-793-7412
DRYER, Sears Elec-
tric, Excellent condi-
tion. $75
570-829-0520
DRYER, White, GE,
very good condition.
$200. Moving, dont
need. Pick up ONLY
570-301-4744
MICROWAVE, 1000
watt, with nice cart.
$50. Bath seat, new
in the box, $25.
TOASTER, new in
the box, $10. CAN
OPENER, $5. Steam
Iron, $5. 333-7065
REFRIGERATOR, GE
18 cu ft, $150, DISH-
WASHER, GE, $75,
STOVE, Spectra,
$125. All 5 years old
and in great shape.
570-902-9805
STOVE. U43
Regency Propane
Gas. 38,000 BTU
with thermostat.
Black with gold trim
$500 OBO email
photos available .
570-477-2281
712 Baby Items
STROLLER. Baby
Trend. Full size, fold-
able, reclines com-
pletely. Print suit-
able for boy or girl.
Excellent condition
$35. 570-735-6527
716 Building
Materials
BLOWER ASSEM-
BLY, Utica DC
00402, new in box,
$50, PUMP, Flotec
Sump, new in box,
inc. 24 ft hose and
discharge kit, $100
570-472-9167
SAWMILLS from
only $3997.00 -
M A K E & S A V E
MONEY with your
own bandmill- cut
lumber any dimen-
sion. In stock ready
to ship. FREE
Info/DVD: www.Nor
woodSawmills.com
1-800-578-1363 Ext
300N
SINK, white cast
iron, double bowl.
Moen single lever
faucet. Good condi-
tion. $70
570-881-3929
SOLDER. Plumbers
4-1 lb rolls lead free.
Dutch Boy. $60
570-288-0691
724 Cellular Phones
CELL PHONE
Kyocera for Virgin
Mobile. C5155
Smartphone with
Android 4.0 Charg-
er, case extra
screen protector
and 2 gig SD card.
Fully functional. $65
570-825-6254
726 Clothing
COAT. Mens Camel
Hair. Size 40, $49.
570-283-2552
COATS, ladies, two,
black leather, new.
Size large. $60.
570-779-7658
COMMUNION
DRESS, size 8,
beautiful. Originally
$149. Asking $35.
570-902-9363
726 Clothing
LEATHER JACKET,
ladies petite, was
$250, selling for
$50. Handbag,
Dolce Gabbana,
$150. 654-4440
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
LAPTOP. GATEWAY
P4 XP. Good condi-
tion. $175.
570-283-2552
732 Exercise
Equipment
BOWFLEX. Power
Pro with attach-
ments. Like new.
$225. 826-1582
LEG EXTENSION
MACHINE Hammer
Strength ISO-Later-
al. 4 years old, plate
loaded, platinum
frame, navy uphol-
stery. New condi-
tion. $1000. SEATED
L E G C U R L
MACHINE, Ham-
mer Strength ISO-
Lateral. 4 years old,
plate loaded, plat-
inum frame, navy
upholstery, New
condition. $1000.
Call Jim
570-855-9172
T R A C T I O N
MACHINE, for cer-
vical spine by Saun-
ders Home Trac.
Complete with
instructional video
and caring case.
Excellent condition.
$125. 862-0245.
After 11 a.m.
734 Fireplace
Accessories
FIREPLACE TOOLS
4 pieces and stand,
bronze, old. $25
570-864-3587
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATER, electric by
Edison. 2 speeds.
$15. 570-851-4545.
HEATER: Dayton
portable kerosene
torpedo heater
70,000 btu model
3ve49b with ther-
mostat control,
brand new in box.
asking $150. obo
(570) 675-0005
TOTAL WOOD HEAT
Safe, clean, efficient
and comfortable
OUTDOOR WOOD
FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C
Outdoor Wood Fur-
naces LLC
570-477-56922
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BED queen size,
head & footboard
with side runners,
tubular steel $175.
Antique desk, brown
wood, 7 drawers
$300.
570-654-4440
BED/twin complete,
mirrored dresser,
nightstand, desk,
$550. 696-5204
BEDROOM SET -
double bed with
headboard, double
width dresser with
hutch mirror, 5
drawer hi-boy
dresser & night-
stand. Pecan wood
finish. Very good
condition. $400
OBO. Kathy @
570-654-7847
BEDROOM SUITE. 4
piece. Excellent
condition, real
wood. Queen bed
frame with mirror,
dresser with mirror,
dresser and night
stand. $600
570-788-5005
BEDROOM SUITE.
Queen/full head-
board, large dress-
er with attached
mirror, chest of
drawers, night-
stand. Good condi-
tion. $500
570-991-5300
QUEEN
BEDROOM Set
Beautiful 3 piece
set looks and feels
like new.
Guaranteed cost
875 sell for $95. In
plastic wrapper Will
deliver. Phone or
text 670 614 3877
CABINET, wooden,
46 high, 25 wide,
with a glass door
and two adjustable
shelves. Dark wood.
$50. (570)868-5066
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
CURIO, corner, oak.
Beautiful, must see,
mint condition.
$200. DRESSER,
American Drew,
mint condition.
$120. 570-825-4031
DESK, corner, com-
puter. Great shape.
OSullivan-Sauder.
Lots of storage and
shelves. $60 OBO
can email pics.
570-477-2281
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER, solid oak,
59 length, 54
height and 21
depth. Holds up to
32 television. Paid
over 1,000, selling
for $500 OBO.
570-824-6278
FURNITURE, 2 end
tables, coffee table,
television console.
Like new, one year
old. Paid $1,100,
selling for $700.
570-287-1150 or
570-709-8383
TABLE. Kitchen,
oak, round with Indi-
an tile. 4 chairs.
$175. 283-8420
744 Furniture &
Accessories
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $239
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
MATTRESS TOPPER
Very thick, brand
new, with gel &
feathers. Full size.
$60. FUTON, white
oak, well built, stick-
ley style, heavy duty
cushion. $300.
570-823-2709
TABLES, 2 end with
glass tops $20
each, Desk, Sauder
with hutch, $50,
China closet, glass
doors, $125.
570-793-1696
DALLAS
MIDDLE SCHOOL GYM
CONYGHAM AVE.
HUGE 4TH
RUMMAGE SALE!!!!!
Gift Basket Raffle
& Bake Sale
Hot breakfast and
lunch food available
all day!
New & Used Prom
Dress Section.
Sat. 3/9, 9-3
Sun., 3/10, 9-2
(1/2 price day for
Rummage Sale
items)
We Have Filled
The Whole Gym
and Cafeteria
With Treasures!!
Come Join The Fun
All Proceeds Go To
The Dallas High
School Lock-In
Follow The Bright
Green Signs!
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
$10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
756 Medical
Equipment
BED, Hospital semi-
electric. Good con-
dition, works like
new. $250 OBO
570-991-2797
STAIRWAY ELEVATOR
Chair gently used,
have manual.
$1,500, negotiable.
570-454-9813
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
Air conditioner, two
hanging racks, a
garden cart, leather
chair, standing fan,
several lamps, one
hand truck, car car-
rier, bed tray, a lot of
decorations. All for
$125. 570-417-4180
CANISTER SET, 3
piece vintage clear
glass, $25, ICE
BUCKET, ceramic,
$25, COMPRES-
SOR. farm master
$25, FENDERS,
inflatable boat 4)
$125, TABLE rattan,
$45, HEDGE TRIM-
MER, $20
570-639-1975
CHINA beautiful
Crown Ming
Princess. Service
for eight with
extras. $100.
570-735-7742
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
CARBIDE CANNON,
60 mm, made by
Conestoga Co.,
Bethlehem, Pa.,
Early 1960s. Origi-
nal box, paperwork,
excellent condition.
$70. CHAMPAGNE
BUCKET, table top,
by Onieda, Ornate
Handles and Rim.
$35. CANDLE
ABRAS, convert up
to five candles,
each hand crafted
and solid brass. $45
a pair. 862-0248.
after 11 a.m.
COINS, one roll of
war nickels, four
walking liberty
halves. $100.
570-287-4135
758 Miscellaneous
CLOTHES. Boys,
over 50 items, (lg-xl
14-16, $45,
NASCAR, Die cast
collectibles and
many various items,
25 pieces, $125.
T E C H D E C K S
(ramps & skate-
boards, over 50-
$35, DVDS, chil-
dren, various kids
shows, 12 for $25,
BOOKS, kids 25 for
$20, DVDs 12 for
$25, WWE DVDs 4
for $40, Skechers,
womens, size 9, 3
for $30 Call for
details 237-1583
COUNTERTOP
WARMER, Cretars
Brand for popcorn,
Nacho chips, etc.
Two racks, lighted
inside, slide doors
front and back. Very
good condition was
$1,700 new, asking
$675. 570-636-3151
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
DINNERWARE 64
piece dishwasher &
microwave safe
$35. Coffee urn,
Farberware 12-55
cups needs steam
$35. Wedding
bows, white satin,
new, $4 each.
570-654-4440
FLATWARE, 50
pieces, gold plated
from China. New in
original box. $50.
570-654-4440
FUTON, wood arms,
metal frame, gently
used. $300 neg.
WEDDI NG GOWN,
spring/summer,
sleeveless size 8.
Sequins & ruffles.
Must sell, pics avail,
$375, DVD, Core
rhythm exercise set.
new. $30
570-871-3052
GRILL, Char Broil,
two burner, gas,
with full propane
tank. Very good
condition, $85.
570-825-4031
IRISH PICTURE, of
the famous, Geor-
gian Doors of
Dublin, 2 by 3,
framed. $20.
570-788-0621
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
758 Miscellaneous
RADIO, Freeplay,
crank and plug-in.
12 volt, new. $40
BASEBALL, auto-
graphed by Ted-
Williams, excellent
condition. $200.
570-489-2675
To place your
ad call...829-7130
SNOW BLOWER,
John Deere 828D
8hp electric start
with light, 6 speed
forward, 2 reverse.
Like new. $500,
570-905-5442 after
4 PM
STOVE, Coal Burn-
ing, White Dickson.
$550. CANES &
WALKING sticks,
over 30, made from
slippery maple trees
$5 each. Christmas
& household items.
over 200 items,
includes trees,
lights, ornaments,
flowers, vases, bas-
kets, figurines, knic
knacs, cups
saucers, dishes,
slippers, 3 piece
luggage, samsonite
belt massager from
the 60s! much
more! all for $60!
570-735-2081
TABLE, dining room
with 1 leaf, 4 chairs.
Like new, $400. Din-
nerware, complete
set of 12. Rose Pat-
tern. $45. Chairs,
outdoor lounge
chairs with cush-
ions, set of 2, solid
medal, $50 each.
570-725-7619
TIRES (2) Winter-
force snow.
175/70R/13, mount-
ed on 92 Corolla
rims. Like new, $100
570-825-8438
TIRES. BF Goodrich,
M&S, (4)-265-70-
R17, $60 all.
Goodrich M&S (4)-
265-70-R17, $40. (1)
Goodrich, 235-55-
R-16, $20, (2)
Bridgestone 2-225-
55R17, $40
570-690-2721
WHEEL SET. Ford
Mustang. 17x7 fac-
tory wheels with tire
sensors. $425
570-696-2212
WIPER BLADES,
Rain-X. 18 2 for
$12. BOTTLE JACK
6 ton. $20. Blitz
Drain pan, 15 quart.
$5. Framed
Seascapes repro-
duced on canvas
board. Set of 2. Size
16 by 16. Both for
$15. (2) bed com-
forters identical.
yellow & green size
56 by 80. $7.50
each or (2) for $10.
570-851-4545.
762 Musical
Instruments
ACCORDION. Black
with musette bar
$500 OBO. Like new
570-822-3102
DRUM PAD, elec-
tronic.Akai profes-
sional mpd18 com-
pact pad controller
drum pad. Comes
with usb cord &
operating CD. $35.
570-852-1636 or
570-793-7412
GUITAR, Fender,
1983 USA Precision
Bass. Nice condi-
tion, plays well,
comes with original
case. $975.
570-457-4084
GUITAR, Gibson
Melody Maker, 2 PU
w/hardshell case,
$399, CABINET,
Ampeg 412 speaker,
$275, PEDAL, Proco
Road Kill distortion,
$29. 570-283-2552
SYNTHESIZER.
Roland Juno Stage
76 Keyboard. Mint
condition. New
$775, PIANO,
Roland SRX01 Con-
cert, sound expan-
sion board. $150.
570-881-3929
766 Office
Equipment
ATTACHE CASE
Aluminum. Hard -
Shell. 3 deep with
combination locks.
$25. 570-851-4545.
CABINET. Cole flat
files/artwork 38x25.
5 drawers. $350
570-822-2766
Don't need that
Guitar?
Sell it in the
Classified Section!
570-829-7130
770 Photo
Equipment
CAMERA Nikon 4
megapixel camera
$35. 570-855-3113
774 Restaurant
Equipment
SIX BURNER
STOVE, salamander,
3 radiant charbroil-
er, 4 flat top grill,
french fryer, 4 bain
Marie, 20 qt. mixer.
LP gas All new For
Sale. 570-620-2693
776 Sporting Goods
BATS aluminum
baseball bats, Little
League, Babe Ruth
& tee ball, all in
good condition. 11
bats for $30.
570-735-6638
776 Sporting Goods
GOLF BALLS. Used.
Very good, cleaned,
no scrapes or cuts.
Most major brands,
Pinnacle, Callaway,
Slazenger etc. $150
for all. Call for com-
plete details.
570-836-3778
GOLF CLUBS, set of
Dunlap Dyna, bag, 3
dozen unused balls,
putter, $125, PUT-
TER, brand new
Max FL, never used,
$20, DRIVER, Jack
Nicklaus, Titanium
Air Bear, $40. Call
for details
570-829-5410
GOLF CLUBS. All left
handed. Taylormade
R9 Super Tri Driver,
$50, Titleist Vokey
Wedges, (4) $40
each, Taylormade
Burner Hybrids, (2)
$30 each, (4) 2012
Muzno JPX Fli-Hi
Hybrids, $45 each.
Call for further
details. 881-1001
GOLF CLUBS. Ping,
Taylor and Maxfil.
Putter, bag, driver
and woods. Also
excellent starter
set. Call for all
details. $200
570-18644
GOLF EQUIPMENT:
3 bags ( 1 brand
new), King Cobra
Titanium and 5 more
drivers, 5 woods, 13
irons, 3 wedges, 2
putters, head cov-
ers. All for $75.
570-881-6160
MINI BIKE, Razor
inc. new charger,
needs repair, $15.
DRIFTER, Razor
Ground Force, $50
570-472-9167
YEARBOOKS,
Nascar hardcover.
1960s through
2004. 38 books
mint condition. $10
each. Firm
570-826-9049
778 Stereos/
Accessories
CD RECORDER &
RADIO CROSLEY
Record your vinyls
to CDs or cassettes
plus FREE 100 blank
CDs does every-
thing machine, used
once. $100.
570-740-7446
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TELEVISION, Sony,
27, works great,
$25. 570-735-7742.
TELEVISION. with
remote, 13 Cable
ready. $25
570-313-7590
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 19 COLOR
With remote and
DVD/VCR combo
player. $25.00 each
or $40.00 for both.
Call 570-814-9574
784 Tools
DRILL, $50, SAWZA-
LL, $30, THUMB-
NAIL kit, $15,
WRENCHES, $20,
VAC & MULCHER,
$25, HEDGE TRIM-
MERS, $20, LAWN
TRIMMER, $20,
LAWN Mower $20,
TABLE, $40. Call for
all details
570-639-1975
ROUTER Craftsman
1 1/2 hp, 25,000
RPM double insulat-
ed, like new $55.
SCROLL SAW
Craftsman one eight
HP 5 pin end blade,
speed-1725 $75.
570-288-9260
SNOW THROWER
24 cut, two stage,
electric start, tire
chains, $249.
570-636-3151
786 Toys & Games
BARBIE DREAM
Townhouse, new
box never opened-
fully furnished work-
ing elevator. Asking
$70. 570-735-1545
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
DART BOARD, Eng-
lish, includes cabi-
net and new darts.
$39. 570-636-3151
DOLL, Betsy Wetsy,
1950s, with a pink
dress and white
shoes, does not
have a bottle. Excel-
lent condition. $30.
862-0248 after 11
TRAIN SET, K-line,
1993,1st edition,
includes engine,
three cars, track,
caboose, trans-
former,original box,
catalogue, paper-
work. Only used
twice, good
condition. $125.
570-862-0248
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
VCR Panasonic 4
head. with universal
RCA remote. $15.
570-851-4545.
792 Video
Equipment
DVD players 2 Mag-
navox $10.00 each
570-855-3113
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
XBOX, 360 250GB
slim black console.
New $199, Erin at
570-762-3015
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VINYL RECORDS
Buying old rock &
roll albums & 45s.
50s, 60s & 70s
774-535-2268
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N, 1/ 2 mi l e
bef ore Mohegan
Sun Casi no
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
March 8 - $1,581.75
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CAT, FREE. Small
female declawed
and spayed orange
cat. 3 years old,
cannot keep. 570-
379-3771 anytime or
leave message.
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 11E
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
All prices plus tax and tags. Payments based on specied term with $1,995 cash down or equal trade. Payments may vary based on credit worthiness with approved credit. Plus tax and tags please see dealer for details.
Volvo Certied Pre - Owned
Intellichoice.coms Best Certied
Pre - Owned Award for 5 years in a row!
Volvo On Call Roadside Assistance
CARFAX Buyback Guarantee
SANTOVOLVO
7yr/100,000 MILE BUMPER TO BUMPER WARRANTY
No Deductible
130 Point Inspection
OR OR
2012 VOLVO XC90 AWD R DESIGN
$
43,890
$
629
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Ice White w/ Calcite
Leather, Navigation, Dual
Screen DVD, Reverse
Camera, Heated Seats,
7-Passenger, 20 Wheels,
1-Owner, Bought and
Serviced at Santo
OR
2013 VOLVO XC90 PLATINUM AWD
$
43,890
$
629
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Black w/ Sand Leather,
Moonroof, DVD,
Navigation, Reverse
Camera, 1-Owner, Only
8,200 Miles
OR
OR
2008 VOLVO V70 2.5T WAGON
$
20,990
$
296
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Titanium Grey w/ Off
Black Leather, Power
Moonroof, Heated Seats,
1-Owner, Low Low
Mileage, Bought and
Services at Santo
OR
2009 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
$
25,990
$
359
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Ice White w/ Sand
Leather, Power Glass
Moonroof, Heated Seats,
Built in Child Boosters,
Rear A/C, Blind Spot
Monitoring, Bought and
Serviced at Santo
207-8149
VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM
Montage Auto Mile, 3514 Birney Ave., Moosic
A) Pmt. based on 24 month closed end lease tax and fees not included with $1995 cash down or equal trade. No rst pmt or security deposit required. Bank Acquisition fee $695 due on delivery. 20,000 miles allowed. Balance due A= $2690 plus tax and tags. B) Pmt. based on 39 month closed end lease. $0 due on delivery. 32,500 miles allowed. No rst pmt or security deposit required. Balance due B=
$0. C,F,I) Pmt based on 72 month Buy at 1.9% APR with $1995 down plus tax and tags with approved credit. D) Pmt. based on 48 month closed end lease tax and fees not included with $1995 cash down or equal trade. No rst pmt or security deposit required. Bank Acquisition fee $695 due on delivery. 40,000 miles allowed. Balance due D= $2690 plus tax and tags. E) Pmt based on 48 month closed end
lease tax not included. $0 Cash down. No rst pmt. or security deposit required. 40,000 miles allowed. Balance due E= $0. G) Pmt. based on 39 month closed end lease tax and fees not included with $995 cash down or equal trade. No rst payment or security deposit required. Bank acquisition fee $695 due on delivery. 32,500 miles allowed. Balance due G= $2690 plus tax and tags. H) Pmt based on 48
month closed end lease tax not included. $0 Down Pmt. No rst pmt. or security deposit required. 40,000 miles allowed. Balance due H= $0. Expires 3-31-13
1.9%
APR
72
months
1.9%
APR
72
months
SANTOVOLVO
SALES EVENT
2013 VOLVO S60 T5
$
32,818
Heated Leather Seats, Power Glass Moonroof, Keyless Drive,
Dynamic Stability Traction Control, Premium Audio & More
1.9%
APR
72
months
LEASE FOR
$
249
Per
Month
24
Months
$1995
Down
A
$
349
$0 DOWN LEASE
Per
Month
39
Months
$0
Down B
BUY FOR
$
453
Per
Month
72
Months
$1995
Down C
List Price $36,095
Santo Discount -$2,277
Volvo/Saab Owner Loyalty-$1,000
JUST
2013 VOLVO XC60
$
31,999
3.2 Litre 6 Cylinder, City Safety, Dynamic Stability Traction
Control & More
LEASE FOR
$
329
Per
Month
48
Months
$1995
Down
$
409
$0 DOWN LEASE
Per
Month
48
Months
$0
Down
BUY FOR
$
441
Per
Month
72
Months
$1995
Down
List Price $35,095
Santo Discount -$2,096
Volvo/Saab Owner Loyalty-$1,000
JUST
2013 VOLVO XC90 AWD
$
38,990
7 Passenger, All Wheel Drive, Heated Leather Seats, Power
Glass Moonroof, Premium Audio & More
LEASE FOR
$
389
Per
Month
39
Months
$1995
Down
$
459
$0 DOWN LEASE
Per
Month
48
Months
$0
Down
BUY FOR
$
544
Per
Month
72
Months
$1995
Down
List Price $43,095
Santo Discount -$3,105
Volvo/Saab Owner Loyalty-$1,000
JUST
I E D F H G
2008 VOLVO XC70 3.2 AWD
$
21,990
$
317
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Willow Green w/ Sand
Leather, Power Glass
Moonroof, Keyless Drive,
Blind Spot Monitoring,
Built in Child Boosters,
Bought and Serviced at
Santo
OR
2010 VOLVO XC60 T6 AWD
$
29,990
$
419
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
One of A Kind Lime Grass
Green w/ Sand Leather,
Panoramic Vista Roof,
Keyless Drive, Blind Spot
Monitoring, 1-Owner,
Bought and Serviced at
Santo
OR
2008 VOLVO XC70 3.2 AWD
$
21,990
$
311
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Black w/ Sand Leather,
Power Glass Moonroof,
Leather Seats, Built in
Child Boosters, Blind Spot
Monitoring, Bought and
Serviced at Santo
OR
2010 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
$
28,990
$
399
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Ice White w/ Off Black
Leather, 7 Passenger,
Heated Seats, Built in
Child Booster, Power Glass
Moonroof, 1-Owner,
Bought and Serviced at
Santo
2009 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
$
26,990
$
374
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Silver Metallic w/ Off
Black Leather, 7 Passenger,
Power Glass Moonroof,
Heated Seats, Built in
Child Boosters, 1-Owner,
Bought and Serviced at
Santo
OR
2008 VOLVO S80 T6 AWD
$
19,990
$
279
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Black w/ Off Black
Leather, Power Glass
Moonroof, Heated Seats,
1-Owner, Serviced at
Santo
OR
2009 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
$
26,990
$
374
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Caper Green Metallic w/
Sand Leather, 7 Passenger,
Power Glass Moonroof,
Heated Seats, Built in
Child Boosters, 1-Owner,
Bought and Serviced at
Santo
OR
2007 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
$
19,990
$
279
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Shadow Blue w/ Sand
Leather, Power Glass
Moonroof, 7 Passenger,
Heated Seats, Built in
Child Boosters, 1-Ower,
Bought and Serviced at
Santo
OR
2007 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
$
18,990
$
265
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Silver Metallic w/ Off
Black Leather, Power Glass
Moonroof, 7 Passenger,
Heated Seats, Rear A/C,
1-Owner, Bought and
Serviced at Santo
OR
2007 VOLVO S80 3.2
$
12,990
$
172
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Shimmer Gold w/ Sand
Leather, Moonroof,
Heated Seats, Sport Pkg.,
1-Owner
8
0
6
7
4
9
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
815 Dogs
GREAT DANE PUPPIES
black and blue $800
Vet certified. Will be
ready on 5/1/13.
Deposit will hold.
570-262-1492
ROTTIES HUSKIES
Yorkies, Chihuahuas
Labs & More
Bloomsburg
389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
815 Dogs
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
FOR SALE
570-436-2762
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
840 Pet Services
SPRING INTO A
FRESH START
PUPPY & BASIC
OBEDIENCE
CLASSES
Starting 3/23
& Therapy Dog
Training starting
3/17
570-332-4095
for info
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
845 Pet Supplies
CAGE, parrot, large
size. Like new. $200
570-288-9940
DOG CRATE.
25x37x27. Good
condition. Plastic
with metal door. $40
570-574-4888
ELECTRIC CLIPPER.
Andis Dog groom-
ing. Hardly used,
Model MBG $20
570-675-0460
Find A NewFriend
In The Times Leader Classied
To place an ad call 829-7130
*2008 Pulse Research
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NNL NNNL NNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LLE LEEE LE DER D .
timesleader.com
What
DoYou
HaveTo
Sell
Today?
Over
47,000
people cite the
The Times
Leader as their
primary source
for shopping
information.
PAGE 12E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
1109 N. Church Street (Rt. 309) Hazle Twp., PA 18202
www.fairwaysubaru.com 570-455-7733
Mon.-Thurs. 8:30am-8pm Fri. 8:30am-6pm Sat. 8:30am-3pm Sun. Closed.
*Tax &Tags Extra. **Tax &Tags Extra, SubjectToVehicle Insurance & Availability With Approved Credit. Tier One Credit Approval Required. 2013 Impreza 2.0i Premium CVT 1 AtThis Price, 2013 Outback 2.5i CVT 1
AtThis Price. 2013 Forester 2.5X 4AT 1 AtThis Price, 2013 Legacy 2.5i CVT 1 AtThis Price. ***Tier One Credit Approval Required. Not Responsible ForTypographical Errors. Offer Ends 4/30/13.
2013 SUBARU
OUTBACK
2.5i CVT
$
259
**
OR BUY FOR
$
24,395
*
PlusTax &Tags.
DDB 01
$1,300 Down Payment
$0 Security Deposit
$259 First Months Lease Payment
$1,599Total Due at Lease Signing
PER MONTH LEASE/
10,000 MILES/YEAR
42 MONTHS
Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive
2012 IIHS Top Safety Pick
Splash Guards
All Weather Floor Mats
MSRP $25,961 D3270725
AUTOMATIC
,395
Tags.
2013 SUBARU
IMPREZA
2.0i PREMIUM CVT
$
259
**
OR BUY FOR
$
20,995
*
PlusTax &Tags.
DLD 02
$0 Down Payment
$0 Security Deposit
$259 First Months Lease Payment
$259Total Due At Lease Signing
PER MONTH LEASE/
10,000 MILES/YEAR
42 MONTHS
Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive
36 MPG Hwy
2013 IIHS Top Safety Pick
Seven Airbags Standard
All Weather Package:
Heated Front Seats, Windshield
Wiper, De-Icer, Heated Side
Mirrors
MSRP $22,065 DH811578
AUTOMATIC
2013 SUBARU
FORESTER
2.5X 4AT
$
219
**
OR BUY FOR
$
21,995
*
PlusTax &Tags.
DFB 21
$1,261 Down Payment
$0 Security Deposit
$219 First Months Lease Payment
$1,500Total Due at Lease Signing
PER MONTH LEASE/
10,000 MILES/YEAR
42 MONTHS
Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive
2012 IIHS Top Safety Pick
Luggage Compartment Cover
Alloy Wheel Package
All Weather Floor Mats
Rear Cargo Net
Splash Guard Kit
Rear Bumper Cover
MSRP $24,297 DH446115
Well
Qualied Buyers
Can Get As Low As
0%Financing
For Up To 63 Mos.
On New
2013 Forester
Models
***
2013 SUBARU
LEGACY
2.5i CVT
$
239
**
OR BUY FOR
$
21,395
*
PlusTax &Tags.
DAB 01
$0 Down Payment
$0 Security Deposit
$0 First Months Lease Payment
$0Total Due At Lease Signing
PER MONTH LEASE/
10,000 MILES/YEAR
42 MONTHS
Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive
2012 Top Safety Pick
Power Window, Locks & Mirrors
Splash Guards
All Weather Floor Mats
MSRP $22,579 D3016844
AUTOMATIC
AUTOMATIC
SIGN & DRIVE LEASE
KEN WALLACES
VALLEY CHEVROLET
601 KIDDER STREET, WILKES-BARRE, PA
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
SHOWROOM HOURS: MONDAY-THURSDAY 8:30-8:00pm; FRIDAY 8:30-7:00PM; SATURDAY 8:30-5:00pm
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
www.valleychevrolet.com
No Worries on a whole new level
2 YEARS or 30,000 MI.
Standard Maintenance
Including
OIL CHANGE TIRE ROTATION
MULTIPOINT INSPECTION
S
P
E
C
I
A
L
P
U
R
C
H
A
S
E
!
48,000 Miles
Bumper-to-Bumper
and
100,000 Mile
Powertrain Limited
Warranty
2012 Chevy Impalas
20
AVAILABLE
STARTING AS
LOWAS
ONLY:
$
13,999
*
Orig. MSRPWhenNew
$
27,525
WOW!
THATSHALFPRICE!
MOST
EQUIPPEDWITH:
3.6L SIDI V6 6 Speed
Automatic Transmission
Six-way power drivers seat
Six-way power passengers seat
Power Mirrors
Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation
Air Conditioning
Bluetooth
16 AluminumWheels
AM/FMStereo CDPlayer
w/ Auxillary Jack
Power Windows
Power Door Locks
Front &Rear Side Impact
Head/Side/Curtain Side Airbags
AVERAGE
ASLOWAS
8K
MILES
SOME
EQUIPPED
WITH:
Sunroof
Heated
Leather Seats
OR
BUY
FOR:
$
199
PER
MO.
*Price plus tax & tags. Impala #Z2926. Buy for payment is $199 per month for 72 months plus tax & tags; $1999 (cash or trade) due at signing, plus tax & tags @ 5.9% APR to qualied buyers. Pictures are for illustration only. Prior use daily rental. Not responsible for typographical errors.
8
0
6
4
6
2
www.TunkAutoMart.com
CHANGING YOUR CAR OR CHANGING YOUR OIL
GOOGLE..... TUNK AUTO MART
888-323-6926
Good Friends Are Hard To Find
But You Have One In The Car Business
Locally Owned
Locally Operated
Tunkhannock Auto Mart
*2008 Pulse Research
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NNL NNNL NNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LLE LE EE LE DER D .
timesleader.com
What
DoYou
HaveTo
Sell
Today?
Over
47,000
people cite the
The Times
Leader as their
primary source
for shopping
information.
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL L NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LEEEE DER.
timesleader.com
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 13E
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
Gaughan Auto Store
114 South Main St., Taylor 562-3088 www.gaughanautostore.com
CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF
THE GAUGHAN FAMILY EXPERIENCE
PUSH PULL DRAG SALE!
Guaranteed
Financing
OFFER EXTENDED!
$2,000
MINIMUM
TRADE*
*$2,000 Minimum on
Truck & SUV Purchases only.
DONT MISS THIS!
Over 120 In Stock RIGHT NOW!
C
E
R
T
IF
IE
D
D
E
A
L
E
R
OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY AT WWW.GAUGHANAUTOSTORE.COM
08 Chevy Cobalt
Sedan,
Auto,
Power
Options
$
7,988
08 Chevy Impala LS
P. Seat,
Auto,
Super
Clean
$
9,988
07 Chevy Monte Carlo LS
Coupe,
Power
Everything,
Sunroof, Only
48K Miles
$
10,988
08 Hyundai Tiburon GS
Coupe,
5 Speed,
Alloys,
Sporty
$
10,988
11 Toyota Yaris Sdn
Auto,
Power
Options, CD,
Great Fuel
Economy
$
11,988
07 Cadillac CTS
Leather,
Heated
Seats,
Sunroof,
Auto
$
12,988
09 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS
Auto,
Sunroof,
R. Spoiler,
Super
Sporty
$
14,988
07 BMW 328xi AWD
$
14,988
09 Dodge Journey SXT
Full
Power
Options,
Alloys
$
11,988
05 GMC Canyon
Crew Cab
PU
4x4
Auto
$
12,988
09 Nissan Frontier LE
4x4,
XCab,
Alloys,
Auto
$
13,988
08 Ford F150 XCAB
STX
4x4,
Auto,
V8
$
19,988
07 Dodge 1500 Crew Cab
4x4, 1 Owner,
Power Op-
tion, Match-
ing Cap
$
16,988
07 Dodge Dakota
Extra Power
Option, White
Beauty, 4x4,
1 Owner
$
7,988
Leather,
Sunroof,
Auto
08 Honda Pilot EX
AWD,
Alloys,
3rd Row
Seating
$
13,988
10 Dodge Nitro
4 Door,
Auto, Power
Options, 4x4,
White Beauty,
60K Only
$
13,988
05 Toyota 4Runner LTD
V8, 4X4,
Leather,
Sunroof,
Only 39K
$
16,988
10 Hyundai Veracruz
GLS,
AWD, 6 Cyl,
Alloys,
Wow
$
16,988
Guaranteed
Financing
Available!
Interest Rates
as low as
2.99%
WOW!
25th
YEAR!
*$2,000 Minimum Trade on Trucks and SUVs Only
of Scranton - NEPA
R.J. BURNE
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570) 342-0107 1-888-880-6537 www.rjburnecadillac.com
Mon-Thurs 9-8 Fri 9-5 Sat 9-4
*TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certied
1205 Wyoming Ave. RJ Burne Cadillac
From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton
Expressway 8 Blocks on
Wyoming Avenue
E
X
P
W
A
Y
WYOMING AVE.
8
1
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE OR NON GM VEHICLE THAT LEASE EXPIRES PRIOR TO DECEMBER 31, 2013
$
299
2.5L, Sunroof, Spoiler, Driver & Front Passenger
Heated Seats, XM, OnStar, Premium Car Care
Down Payment $999
Term 39 Months
Security Deposit $0
Lease price based on a Nicely Equipped 2013 ATS Sdn 2.5L $36,030 MSRP. $299 per month plus 9% sales tax total $326 per month. 39 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $12,714 $.25/mile penalty over
32,500 miles. $299 rst payment plus $995 down payment plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $1298 plus tax and tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER GM OR NON-GM VEHICLE. That Lease Expires Prior to
December 31, 2013. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear.Must take delivery by 3/31/2013. Requires ALLY Bank credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE OR NON GM VEHICLE THAT LEASE EXPIRES PRIOR TO DECEMBER 31, 2013
$
459
Cadillac User Experience (CUE), Rear Vision Camera,
Stabilitrac, Remote Start, 19 Wheels, 3.6 V6, XM, OnStar
Down Payment $0
Security Deposit $0
Term 36 Months
Down Payment $999
Security Deposit $0
Term 39 Months
2013 XTS Standard by Cadillac
Lease price based on a Nicely Equipped 2013 ATS Sdn 2.5L $36,030 MSRP. $299 per month plus 9% sales tax total $326 per month. 39 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $12,714 $.25/mile penalty over
32,500 miles. $299 rst payment plus $995 down payment plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $1298 plus tax and tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER GM OR NON-GM VEHICLE. That Lease Expires Prior to
December 31, 2013. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear.Must take delivery by 3/31/2013. Requires ALLY Bank credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
2013 SRX Luxury by Cadillac 2013 CTS AWD by Cadillac
Heated Seats, Memory Settings,
All Wheel Drive, XM, OnStar
$399
Lease price based on a 2013 CTS Sdn AWD Luxury $42,660 MSRP $399 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $435 per month. 39 month lease 10,000 miles per year. 38 Monthly
payments total $15,162 $.25/mile penalty over 32,500 miles. $399 rst payment plus $999 down payment plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $1398 plus tax and tag fees.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY,
VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE OR LESSEE MUST OWN OR LEASE A 1999 OR NEWER CADILLAC Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by
3/31/13. Requires US Bank Tier S & 1 credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE.
MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN,
INFITY, VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE OR LESSEE MUST OWN OR LEASE
A 1999 OR NEWER CADILLAC THAT LEASE EXPIRES PRIOR TO DECEMBER 31, 2013
2013 ATS Standard by Cadillac
w w w. r j b u r n e c a d i l l a c . c o m
Down Payment $1,999
Security Deposit $0
Term 36 Months
$429
Lease price based on a 2013 SRX Fwd Luxury Edition $44,360 MSRP. $429 per month plus 9% sales tax total $468 per month. 36 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 36 Monthly
payments total $15,444 $.25/mile penalty over 30,000 miles. $1999 down payment plus $429 rst payment plus tax and tags due at delivery, Total due at delivery $2428 plus
tax and tag fees. MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY,VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE OR LESSEE MUST OWN
OR LEASE A 1999 OR NEWER CADILLAC. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 3/31/2013. Requires ALLY Bank credit approval. Please see sales
person for complete details.
Leather, 3.6 Liter Engine,
Heated Seats, OnStar
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE.
MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN,
INFITY, VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE OR LESSEE MUST OWN OR LEASE
A 1999 OR NEWER CADILLAC THAT LEASE EXPIRES PRIOR TO DECEMBER 31, 2013
PAGE 14E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
*All Prices plus tax, tags, & fees. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. 3 Year/100,000 Miles Limited Powertrain Warranty on 2008 models and newer with less than
75,000 miles. 90 day/3,000 mile Limited Powertrain Warranty on 2004 models and newer with less than 100,000 miles. See sales dealer for complete warranty and sale details. Sale Ends 3/15/13.
1-800-223-1111
www.KenPollockCertifed.com
A FULL SERVICE DEALERSHIP
Hours: Monday-Friday 9-8pm ; Saturday 9-5pm
PLATI NUM CERTI FI ED HI GHLI NE
339 HIGHWAY 315
IN PITTSTON
3 YEAR/100,000 MILES WARRANTY ON*
2007Lexus ES350
Stk# P14870, Navigation,
Sunroof, Heated Leather,
Hid Headlights
$
18,999
*
2011Lexus CT 200HWagon
Stk# P14965, Hybrid,
Leather, Navigation,
Sunroof
$
28,599
*
2011 BMW328 AWD Sdn
Stk# P14868, X Drive
All Wheel Drive, Leather,
Sunroof, Automatic
$
28,999
*
2012 Mercedes 300 4Matic Sport Sdn
Stk# P14895, All Wheel Drive,
Leather, Sunroof,
Sport Package, Sharp!
$
32,999
*
2012 Mercedes 300 4Matic Luxury Sdn
Stk# P14942, All Wheel Drive,
Leather, Sunroof,
Luxury Package
$
33,399
*
2011 Escalade EXT Pickup AWD
Stk# P14949, Luxury Package,
Navigation w/Camera,
22 Wheels, Power Side Steps
$
54,999
*
2012 Nissan GT-R AWD Coupe
Stk# P15000, All Wheel Drive,
Twin Turbo Engine,
Automatic, A Must See!
$
83,799
*
VEHICLE VALUE OUTLET
2001 Dodge B1500 Cargo Van
Stk# P14970, 53K Miles,
Ladder Rack, Bin
Packages, Automatic
$
5,999
*
2006 Chevy Cobalt Sedan
Stk# P14864A, LS Package,
Automatic, A/C,
Great On Gas!
$
7,999
*
2004 Chevrolet Impala
Stk# P14915A, Leather,
Alloys, Power Windows
& Locks
$
7,999
*
2003 Honda Civic Sedan
Stk# P14866B, EX Package
with Sunroof, Automatic,
Only 36K Super LowMiles
$
8,699
*
2007 Saturn Vue AWD
Stk# P14746, All Wheel
Drive, Automatic, Power
Windows & Locks, CD
$
8,799
*
2009 Toyota Scion Coupe
Stk# S2252D, Alloy Wheels,
Power Windows & Locks,
Manual, Sporty
$
8,999
*
2007Hyundai Tucson4WD
Stk# P14912, Automatic,
Alloy Wheels, Power
Windows & Locks
$
9,999
*
PLATINUM CERTIFIED VEHICLES
2011 Hyundai
Accent Sedans $
10,699
*
Stk# P14893, Automatic,
AM/FM/CD/USB, Great Gas Mileage!
2010 Ford Focus
SE Sedan $
10,999
*
Stk# P14922, Automatic, Power
Windows & Locks, CD, A/C
2010 Kia Forte
Sedan $
11,399
*
Stk# P14858, Only 8K Miles, Manual
Transmission, Awesome Gas Mileage
2005 Jeep Wrangler
2Dr 4x4 $
11,399
*
Stk# P14935, Manual Transmission,
Soft Top, Ready For Some Trails
2009 Chevy
Cobalt Coupe $
11,499
*
Stk# P14840A, Only 19K Miles, Power
Windows & Locks, Automatic
2008 Pontiac G6
Sedan $
12,799
*
Stk# P14924, Only 28K Miles, Automatic,
Power Windows & Locks
2009 Nissan Altima
S Sedan $
13,799
*
Stk# P14896, Automatic, Power Windows
& Locks, Only 26K Miles
2011 Toyota Corolla
LE Sedan $
13,899
*
Stk# P14849, Automatic,
Power Windows & Locks, Great On Gas!
2007 Nissan Murano
SL AWD $
14,999
*
Stk# P14941, Heated Leather, Sunroof,
All Wheel Drive, Alloys, P. Seat
2010 Suzuki Kizashi
GTS AWD $
14,999
*
Stk# P14750A, All Wheel Drive,
Sunroof, P. Seat, Alloys, PW, PL
2012 Volkswagen
Passat SE Sedan $
15,999
*
Stk# P14877, Automatic,
Power Windows & Locks, CD
2012 Ford Focus
SEL Sedan $
16,299
*
Stk# P14856, Leather, Sunroof,
Alloy Wheels, Fog Lights, SYNC
2011 Mitsubishi
Endeavor 4WD $
17,299
*
Stk# P14842, Power Windows & Locks,
Automatic, CD, Alloy Wheels, 3 To Choose From
2009 Jeep Wrangler
2Dr 4x4 $
19,899
*
Stk# P14927, Automatic,
Alloy Wheels, Only 26K Miles, A/C
2012 Chevy
Traverse LT AWD $
23,599
*
Stk# P14845, 3rd Row Seating, All Wheel
Drive, Alloy Wheels, 8 Passenger
2012 Dodge Ram
1500 Quad Cab 4x4 $
24,599
*
Stk# P14829, SLT Package,
Power Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels
2012 Nissan
Pathfinder 4x4 $
24,999
*
Stk# P14952, SV Package, 3rd Row Seats,
Power Seat, Alloy Wheels
2010 Toyota Tacoma
Double Cab 4x4 $
25,999
*
Stk# P14865, SR5 Package,
Tow Package, Automatic, PW, PL
2010 Chevy
Suburban 4x4 $
28,799
*
Stk# P14890, Leather, 3rd Row Seats,
8 Passenger Seating, Power Seat
2013 Chevy Silverado
Ext Cab 4x4 $
29,999
*
Stk# P14880B, Z71 Package,
18 Alloys, Only 8K Miles
2009 Chevy HHR
Panel Wagon $
11,999
*
Stk# P14902, Rear Cargo Area, Roof Rack,
Automatic, Power Windows & Locks,
Stk# P14846,
Automatic,
Power Windows
& Locks, CD
Stk# P14906,
Lift Kit, Of Road
Tires, Alloy Wheels,
Automatic, Hardtop,
Already Built For You @
2012 Fiat 500 3Dr
2012 Jeep Wrangler 2Dr
Lifted4x4
$
13,599
*
$
28,999
*
2011 Dodge
Journey AWD $
19,999
*
Stk# P14873, Rear View Camera,
All Wheel Drive, Power Windows & Locks
2009 Saturn Astra
Sedan $
13,399
*
Stk# P14891A, Sunroof, Leather Seats,
Alloy Wheels, Automatic
WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
VALLEY CHEVROLET
601 KIDDER STREET, WILKES-BARRE, PA
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
SHOWROOM HOURS: MONDAY-THURSDAY 8:30-8:00pm; FRIDAY 8:30-7:00PM; SATURDAY 8:30-5:00pm
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
*Price plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select models.
#Z2887 Not responsible for typographical errors.
STARTING AT ONLY:
$
25,999
2011 CADILLAC
CTS All Wheel Drive
Remainder of Factory Warranty (Most Warranties Good Until 2016)
Most Carry Premium Care Maintenance
Cadillac Shield: the New Standard of Luxury Ownership
All Popular Colors
Off Lease
Vehicles
22
AVAILABLE
AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES***
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE!!
PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!!
DRAWINGTO BE HELD LAST DAY
OF EACH MONTH
www.wegotused.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
RTE 11, WEST NANTICOKE, PA
570-735-2034
WWW.MCGLYNNSAUTO.COM
AUTO
EXCHANGE
FAMILY OWNED FOR 83 YEARS
NOW
2005 SUZUKI
FORENZA S
$
5,995
4 Cyl, Auto, 4 Dr.,
Only 33K Miles, A/C, AM/FM
NOW
2006 VW
NEW BEETLE 2.5
4 Cyl, Auto, A/C, 3Dr.
Hatchback, FWD
$
7,995
06 Nissan Altima 4 Dr, 4 Cyl ..............
$
6,995
04 Chevy Trailblazer 4x4, Auto ......
$
8,995
05 Chrysler Town & Country Van.
$
9,995
02 Chevy Express 2500 Cargo
$
10,995
05 Mazda RX8 Coupe Nice..........
$
10,995
05 Chrysler 300 AWD...............
$
11,995
05 Subaru Forester XT AWD
$
12,995
Find A NewFriend
In The Times Leader Classied
To place an ad call 829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com PAGE 15E
www.lewith-freeman.com
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
Home Ownership is a Great Investment! Home
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Shavertown: 696.3801
Mountain Top: 474.9801
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
Dont be left behind! Call today.
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*
2 MARILYN DR.,
SHAVERTOWN
4BR home, fresh paint / new carpet
throughout, new roof, nished LL w/
re place, , deck, 1+ acre
$179,000 MLS#13-684
Directions: Rte 309 to L Hillside tp L
on Chase Rd to L on Cigarsky to L on
Mountain Rd to R on Marilyn.
1st home on R
Open House
1:00 2:30
Mountaintop Ofce
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
Jennifer Winn
Direct: 570.760.1622
jennifer.winn@ERA.com
2
6
3
4
9
0
Se Habla
Espanol
~
39 ANTRIM ROAD
YATESVILLE 12-3462
You will be attracted to
the bright and airy
ambiance of this
gracious 3 bedroom/ 2+
bath 2 - story. Features
include charming Great
Room, large eat-in
kitchen, formal dining
room, French doors to
deck, and much, much
more. Enjoy the very
comfortable lifestyle you deserve!
CALL JACK 878-6225 $299,000
DIR: Rt 315 to St. Josephs Oblate Seminary. Turn left on Yatesville
Rd, turn left into Willowview, continue straight on Antrim Rd. Home on
right.
Open House!
1
2
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0
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2
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P
M
13-749
A famous Realtor once
said, A good house smiles
from the street. This is
true of 1360 Lower
Demunds Road, and
therein lies its charm:
pleasing proportions with
its stunning Great Room,
stone fireplace and crafted
wooden walls. Modern
kitchen and baths, formal
dining room and family room, wraparound porch ... newly
constructed 3-car garage with guest quarters ... a historic
showcase of rural design, while meeting the needs of todays
modern family!
CALL CHARLES 430-8487 $450,000
New Listing!
D
a
lla
s
12-3580
Centrally located
adds to the
appeal of this
large 2-unit with
many amenities.
Invest or live in
one unit, and
rent the other.
Newer furnace
and roof, replacement windows and much more.
Owner says sell - MAKE AN OFFER!
CALL RON 817-1362 NEW PRICE: $99,000
Price Reduced!
S
h
a
v
e
rto
w
n
www.gordonlong.com
*Marvelous* 4 Bedroom
3 Bath Ranch - Great
open oor plan. Separate
apartment has own Bath
and Living area.
Asking $179,900
DIR: From Main st
Nanticoke take Kosciuszko
Street past school to left on
Washington home on Right
Listing #12-3193
Call Richard direct
570-406-2438
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-3PM
501 EAST WASHINGTON ST.
NANTICOKE - EAST DEVELOPMENT
Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 www.atlasrealtyinc.com
We Sell Happiness!
111 LAFLIN RD., LAFLIN
Nice 3 bedroom 1 1/2 bath split level wtih
hardwood foors, 1 car garage, large yard &
covered patio. VEry convenient location,
plenty of off street parking. MLS #12-2852.
Call Keri 885-5082. $129,900
Dir: Rt. 315 to light at Lafin Rd, home on
left.
24 FORDHAM RD., LAFLIN
Great split level home in Oakwood Park, 13
rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, 2 car ga-
rage and large corner lot. Lots of space for
the large or growing family. MLS #13-452.
Call Charlie 829-6200. $254,900
Dir: 315 North to Lafin Rd, take frst right
then bear right on Fordham, hom on left.
10 FAIRFIELD DR., LAFLIN
Exceptional and spacious custom built
cedar home with open foor plan, lovely
great room with gas freplace, 2 story
foyer, granite kitchen with eat in breakfast
area, huge fnished lower level with bar
and 2nd full kitchen, fve bedrooms, 2 car
garage, double lot. MLS #12-4063.
Call Keri 885-5082. $389,900
Dir: Rt. 115 to Lafin Rd, right into Oakwood
Park, right on Fordham, left on Fairfeld.
OPEN HOUSES TODAY
1
2
-2
1
2
-2
1
2
-1
:3
0
Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
#13-715 $89,900
DJ Wojciechowski 283-9100
Modular ranchhome with
attached2-car garage on13
acres. LRwithreplace, kitchen
withbreakfast bar. FRwith
skylights. Additional 60x72 new
butler style building with(3) 14
overheaddoors, plus additional
8x8 door andconcrete deck.
#13-712 $195,000
Carole Poggi 283-9100- x19
Renovated3bedroomhome in
move-inconditionandpricedto
sell! Openfloor plan, newcarpet,
freshpaint, updatedkitchenand
baths make this perfect for the
first time home buyer!
Attractive rancher, completely
remodeled. Newkitchenand
baths. Freshly nishedhardwood
oors. Built-ingarage plus family
roominbasement. Large rear
deck overlooking level rear yard.
Newheating systemandall
upgradedelectric.
#13-725 $194,900
Ted Poggi 283-9100 x25
#13-756 $73,700
Gail &Paul Pukatch696-6559
Nice, well maintained home.
Relax on the enclosed front
porch or the enclosed patio
with hot tub. Clean and neat
inside and ready to move-in.
3 bedrooms, 2 baths. Multiple
heat sources for comfort and
$aving$ in the winter.
Hanover Twp.-Nice Home!
MARCH IN BEFORE APRIL! We can tell you how!
Shavertown-Attractive! Kingston-Priced To Sell! Sweet Valley-Modular
2013 BRER Afliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Afliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and
its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential Equal Housing Opportunity.
NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING!
Hallmark Homes
Exclusive Builders
837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston
288-1401
565 OLD NEWPORT STREET,
NEWPORT TWP.
Unique, Deck House contemporary-
styled home with brick & redwood
exterior. 5 bedrooms & 3 baths.
Features: living room with freplace &
vaulted ceiling with exposed beans.
Modern cherry kitchen. Lower level
family room with freplace and kitch-
enette. Hardwood foors. All on 1 acre
in Wanamie section. MLS#12-3588
JOE MOORE $239,000
561 DEER HILL ROAD,
SHAVERTOWN
Extraordinary, cedar & stone, multi-level
Contemporary with open-foor plan. Ap-
prox. 5,000 sq.ft. of living features 10
rooms; 4 bedrooms; 3 1/2 baths; por-
celain/tile fooring; sunken Fam. Room
with vaulted ceilng & gas fp; ultra Kitch-
en w/granite counters; 800 sq.ft. Rec
Room w/granite wet bar & freplace; In-
home theater; lower level gym. Decks
w/pond view. 2 separate heating /air
cond. systems. MLS#12-2816
JOE MOORE $425,000
849 NANDY DRIVE, KINGSTON
Spacious 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath
home in popular Green Acres.
Good foor plan. Living room
with bay window; formal din-
ing room;kitchen with breakfast
room. 2nd foor laundry. Great
closets. Covered rear patio. 2
separate heating/air conditioning
systems.
JOE MOORE $249,000
N
E
W
P
R
IC
E
Charming Victorian home located in lovely Forty Fort
Photos and Story by Hartt Lang
Advertising Projects Writer
Built by descendants of the earliest
settlers of Forty Fort, this charming
Victorian home is located in a great
neighborhood; and it is minutes away
from downtown Kingston and Wilkes-
Barre, Interstates 81 and 309.
Listed by Jay Crossin of
Crossin Real Estate, this home is
priced at $199,900 and offers 2,730
square feet of space. Amenities
include a walk-up attic, cable
television, ceiling fans, screened
porch, and a toolshed.
The exterior home is vinyl
with light blue accents. Black accent
shutters are on the front facing
windows of the home. A sidewalk
leads to a large front porch with
wrap-around railing. Off-street
parking is in the rear and plenty of
street parking is also available.
Magnificent double doors
lead to the entry foyer. A unique
Dutch door opens to the front of the
home. A 25x13 living room is
adjacent to the foyer. Natural light
pours through large, high windows.
A gas fireplace, a focal point in the
room, surrounded with antique,
ceramic tiles is sure to be a place for
friends and family to gather.
Across from the living room
is a 13.5 x 13.5 formal dining room.
Large windows let light into the
room, along with a lovely hanging
light fixture. Sliding wooden pocket
doors provide privacy.
Next to the dining room is a
family room that measures
13.10x12.8. This cozy space has a
pellet stove; sure to keep you warm
through the chilly months of winter.
Further down the carpeted
hallway is a recently remodeled 24x14
kitchen. This room has ample
cupboard space for kitchen storage,
new countertops, recessed lighting
and a ceiling fan.
A shelved greenhouse
window is placed above the kitchen
sink. A grill is built into the
countertop adjacent to the stove.
Near the stove is a double oven that is
built into a wall. Cupboards are built
into the wall near the dining area,
bringing even more storage into the
room.
Near the kitchen is a tiled
7x3 half bathroom. Stairs in the
kitchen lead to a stone and concrete
dry basement.
A door in the kitchen leads
to a 3-season screened porch.
Continued, Page 2
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
Visit Our Website
Look no further than this 4 bedrooms, 4
bathrooms, 2 car garage, with a nished
basement and in ground pool all for
under $250k. Located in the community
of Barney Farms with abundant parks
and elds this modern contemporary is in
move-in condition and ready for spring.
With an open oor plan and hardwood
oors throughout, the kitchen has a
breakfast bar and four season sunroom.
Te large family room has HWF, a wood
burning replace and built-in shelves.
Te master bedroom has a master bath
with a Jacuzzi tub and WIC. Te nished
basement was recently updated. Te
home was freshly painted and has a large
deck and professional landscaping.
Call Darren Snyder for more details
570-825-2468
Asking $249,900
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
Darren G. Snyder
Broker/President
SUNDAY,MARCH 10 ,2013
PAGE 16E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
This screened porch has sliding screens that can be
opened for a breeze when the weather is right. Along
with a view of the backyard, the porch provides access
to the rear-parking area and toolshed.
Wooden stairs in the foyer lead to the
second floor of the home. A 16.X12.7 master
bedroom is atop the stairs. This room has hardwood
floors and ivory walls. A beautiful rectangular stained
glass window is in between two large windows,
bringing a warm glow into the room. A closet offers
space for storage.
A second bedroom is attached to the master
bedroom. It measures 14 x 13.8 and has hardwood
floors. This room has tan walls and a closet offers
room for storage. A 12x10 laundry room is next to
the second bedroom. This room is tiled throughout
and plumbed for a second bath.
A carpeted hallway leads to a third bedroom
which measures 16.6x 2.7. The room has 3 large
windows that bring light into the room. This room
has a ceiling fan and a large closet for storage.
Down the hall is the fourth bedroom, it
measures 13.7x13.10. This room is perfect for a home
office or study. A closet is available for storage.
Also on the second floor is a 12x7 full bath.
It is modern and tiled throughout. The floors have
large white tiles and the wall has floral print wallpaper
with brown and white tiles. A large countertop sits
underneath a mirror.
Near the second bedroom is a doorway that
leads to a walk-up attic. Spacious and bright, this
space has high ceilings and could easily be
transformed into an extra living space or a loft area.
This home has public water and sewer
systems. Heat fuel type is gas and heat type is hot
water baseboard. The first floor of this home was
recently rewired and this home has a 200 amp circuit
breaker.
For more information or to schedule a
showing please contact Jay Crossin of Crossin Real
Estate at (570) 288-0770.
Specifications:
Type of home: 2 Story/Victorian
Square footage: 2,730
Bedrooms: 4
Bathrooms: 2
Price: $199,900
Agent: Jay Crossin
Realtor: Crossin Real Estate
Phone: (570) 288-0770
Forty Fort
Continued from front page
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DALLAS
NEW LISTING
Freshly painted
ranch. Hardwood
floors, new roof, fin-
ished basement.
1st floor laundry
room, covered rear
patio. Level lot,
1 car garage plus
2 car carport.
MLS#13-557
$139,000
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
DALLAS
3 bedrooms, 2
baths, with
detached 2 car
heated garage
and nice apart-
ment. Move in
condition.
$144,500
570-675-0005
DALLAS
Nestled in the trees
on a 1.5 acre corner
lot. 4 bedroom, 2
bath home in Glen-
dalough.
MLS# 13-693
$249,900
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
DALLAS
Priced to sell on
West Center Hill Rd.
3 bedroom, 2 bath
home with finished
basement.
MLS 13-7770
$134,900
JOSEPH P. GILROY
Real Estate
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
DALLAS
Newberry Estate -
The Greens
4,000 sq. ft. condo
with view of ponds
& golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2
floors. 5 1/2 baths, 2
car garage & more.
$449,900.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS TWP.
OPEN HOUSE
Sun, March 10, 12-2
2691 Carpenter Rd.
Magnificent raised
ranch on estate set-
ting. Total finished
four bedroom, 2
bath home. This
house features
hardwood floors
throughout. Finished
basement with
working fireplace.
Large deck with
swimming pool, two
car detached
garage set on 2.4
acres.
MLS# 12-3158
$298,000
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
885-2693
Rubbico Real
Estate, Inc.
826-1600
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
DUPONT
424 Simpson St.
Good condition
Cape Cod. 3 bed-
room, 1 full bath in
quiet neighborhood.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4357
$72,000
Brian
Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
$339,900
316 Raspberry
Rd.
Blueberry Hills
Like new 2 story
home with first
floor master
bedroom and
bath. Inground
pool on nice
corner lot with
fenced in yard.
Sunroom, hard-
wood floors, 2
car garage, full
unfinished
basement
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-610
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
FORTY FORT
SINGLE HOME
3 bedroom.
Corner lot.
Carport & 1.5 car
detached garage.
Gas heat, vinyl
siding, 1.5 baths.
Enclosed side
porch. $79,900
570-779-5438
Leave Message.
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
$79,00
AFFORDABLE REN-
OVATED HOME!
Youll enjoy the
space of the living
room/dining room
open floor plan with
hardwood floors.
Large trendy
kitchen with new
appliances. Spa-
cious 2 bedrooms
and bath with tiled
jetted tub for relax-
ing. Peace of mind
with new furnace,
hot water heater &
electrical box. Plen-
ty of parking and
nice yard.
MLS 13-96
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
DURYEA
534 Phoenix St.
Reduced to
$79,900
Newer Handicap
accessible one
story home in great
location. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath on
double lot. Off
street parking.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4490
Call Tom
570-262-7716
DURYEA
76 Main St.
$69,900
Newly remod-
eled two bed-
room home.
Kitchen is very
nice with granite
counters and tile
floor, bathroom
is modern with
tub surround,
tile floor and
granite vanity.
New vinyl win-
dows through-
out. Off street
parking for 2
cars. MLS #12-
3966 For more
information and
photos visit
www. atlasreal-
t y i n c . c o m .
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
HUNLOCK CREEK
OWNER FINANCING
Newly remodeled
mobile home on
beautiful private
land. 2 bedroom
with a 30 x 10
addition. $4,990
Down, We Finance
Balance. Call
570-332-8922
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
89 MAIN STREET
$89,900
This home has it all.
4 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, fireplace in
family room, new
kitchen with appli-
ances, gas heat, 2
car garage. For
additional
photos and infor-
mation go to
www.atlasrealty.
com MLS 12-895
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
EXETER
$149,000
126 Mason St.
Charming 2 story
home with 2 bed-
rooms and 2 baths,
has it all! Profes-
sionally designed
and remodeled with
ultra modern
kitchen and baths
with granite, mar-
ble, hardwood,
stainless appli-
ances. Large lot
with detached
bonus cottage, gar-
den shed and off
street parking.
Everything is new
including plumbing,
electrical, furnace
and central air.
WWW.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4156
Angie
570-885-4896
Terry
570-885-3041
EXETER
$89,900
25 Washington
St.
Neat little Cape
Cod in nice
location. Very
well cared for 2
bedroom home
with gas heat,
good size lot
with driveway.
Beats a Town-
house any day
for this price.
www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 13-231
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
3 APARTMENTS
FULLY RENTED
Asking $77,500
Motivated Seller
570-656-2645
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
$89,900
19 Thomas St.
4 bedroom, 2 bath
with 2 car garage
on quiet street.
Super yard, home
needs TLC, being
sold AS IS.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
MLS 13-317
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
EXETER
$89,900
19 Thomas St.
4 bedroom, 2 bath
with 2 car garage
on quiet street.
Super yard, home
needs TLC, being
sold AS IS.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
MLS 13-317
Call Tom
570-262-7716
ATLAS REALTY,
INC.
570-829-7200
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Road
Stately brick 2 story,
with in ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3 car
attached garage
5 car detached
garage with
apartment above.
MLS# 11-1242 NEW
NEW PRICE
$549,000
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Road
Stately brick 2 story,
with in ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3 car
attached garage
5 car detached
garage with
apartment above.
MLS# 11-1242 NEW
NEW PRICE
$549,000
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
7 CONCORD DRIVE
$244,900
Two story, 1,800 sq.
ft., in Oakwood
Park. 8 rooms, cozy
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
large living room,
family room with
fireplace, dining
room, sunroom with
hardwood floors.
Two car garage,
central air. Lot 100
x 125. Move in
Condition. Call Ed at
570-655-4294 for
appointment.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1,460 sq. ft house.
2 or 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, gas heat.
Can convert to two
1 bedroom apart-
ments with sepa-
rate entrances.
MLS#13-472
$29,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1,460 sq. ft house.
2 or 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, gas heat.
Can convert to two
1 bedroom apart-
ments with sepa-
rate entrances.
MLS#13-472
$29,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
For Sale by
Owner, two rental
properties, side
by side, close to
schools & LCCC.
Great income
potential, currently
rented, recently
remodeled.
252 and 254 East
Grand Street.
Buy now, interest
rates low. Low
taxes. Must See!
$150,000 for both.
Contact Vince
570-258-2450
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
317 Kossack St.
First floor laundry,
new carpet, lami-
nate flooring and a
great 3 season
porch to entertain
in. Lots of potential!
MLS 12-4408
$72,500
Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
Line up a place to live
in classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 17E
MOUNTAINTOP Exquisite 4BR, 3 bath 2-story in Heritage Woods. Custom kitchen
offers granite countertops & SS appliances, 9ft ceilings & HW on 1st foor. Offce or
5th BR, FP in FR. Luxury Master Suite w/whirlpool bath. MLS# 12-3889
DONNA 788-7504 $379,900
KINGSTON NEW LISTING Inviting 4BR, 3.5 bath home w/huge LR w/
stone FP, display shelves lead to elegant offce. Kitchen & FR share
granite counters. Wonderful yard. MLS# 13-724
RHEA 696-6677 $325,000
SHAVERTOWN Woodbridge II - 2yrs old open
foor plan. HW foors, FR w/2story FP, LL fn-
ished w/wet bar, movie theatre, exercise
room. Breathtaking views. Upgraded land-
scaping with 3 waterfalls. MLS# 12-4215
GERI 696-0888 $599,000
437 WASHINGTON AVENUE
LARKSVILLE Larksville cutie with a large lot. Nice
kitchen, roomy living room. Well kept home. Great
home to call your own! MLS# 12-3707
BETH 696-0874 $49,900
DIR: Rt.11 toward Pymouth - Take a R onto Washing-
ton Ave. - Home on L.
82 CONGRESS ROAD
MOUNTAINTOP Spacious 4BR, 2.5 bath, 2-story
features tile kitchen & baths, DR, LR, FR, gas FP, 2
car garage. Must see. 1yr Home Warranty included.
MLS# 12-4640 EVELYN 715-9336 $239,900
DIR: From 309 south turn left onto Chruch Rd., then
an immediate right onto Independence Rd. Take sec-
ond left onto Colonial, then second right onto Con-
gress Rd. Home is on the left.
465 CAREY AVENUE
WILKES-BARRE Bring the whole family! Pride of
ownership shows in this modern 5BR, 3-story with
modern kitchen, large LR & OSP for 4-5cars. MLS#
12-4310 CHRISTINA 714-9235 $89,000
DIR: Main St, Wilkes-Barre, R onto Academy, R on
Carey, house on R.
579 WARREN AVENUE
KINGSTON Modern 4BR, 2.1 bath 2400SF home
with eat-in kitchen with all appliances, 1st foor FR;
MBR Suite; heated in-ground pool in lovely setting;
B-dry system; 8 year old furnace & windows; C/A; se-
curity system; private driveway; Lovely neighborhood.
MLS# 13-598 RAE 714-9234 $174,500
DIR: Wyoming Avenue to James Street, L on Warren,
home on R.
1941 GRAVEYARD HILL RD
HARVEYS LAKE REDUCED COUNTRY SETTING - Up-
dated 3BR ranch w/granite kit, stone FP, C/A, 2 sepa-
rate garages & more on almost 2acs. MLS# 13-153
KIM 585-0606 $174,000
DIR: From Back Mountain, Route 309 north to Beau-
mont, turn right at Nultons on Graveyard Hill Road, 1
mile to home on left.
SHAVERTOWN Windsor Farms - Fabu-
lous home with 4 or 5BRs, 4 baths,
cherry cabinetry with granite counters, 2
story great room w/foor to ceiling stone
FP, generous room sizes. MLS# 13-305
MARY D. 696-0729 or
RHEA 696-6677 $574,000
KINGSTON TWP. FIREWOOD FARMS - Cus-
tom Cedar home on 5acres in serene setting
captures wonderful views from huge windows,
expansive decks & patios - Large stone fre-
place in LR - Oversize Master Bedroom & bath
- Stunning new offce w/built-in desk, built-ins
& separate entry door. MLS# 13-243
RHEA 696-6677 $425,000
MOUNTAINTOP Beautifully maintained
modern Ranch. New roof, 1st foor laun-
dry, gorgeous sunroom off kitchen &
3BRs. Not a drive-by. MLS# 12-3440
CORINE 715-9331 $164,900
WEST PITTSTON Stately 3-story home
w/spacious rooms & all redone having
everything new! 6BRs, deep lot w/drive-
thru garage! MLS# 12-3833
LISA 715-9335 $199,500
DALLAS Pretty Ranch in quiet country
setting. Features hdwd foors, LR w/FP,
1st fr FR & offce, huge LL rec room.
MLS# 12-2918
ANN LEWIS 714-9245 $189,000
BEAR CREEK NEW LISTING Custom
designed NEW CONTRUCTION 4BR, 3.5
bath, ultra kitchen, open foor plan, LR
w/FP, DR, HW, beautiful tile baths. Many
upgrades! Close to Golf Course, I-80,
I-81 & Turnpike. MLS# 13-802
CLYDETTE 696-0897 $399,000
MOUNTAINTOP NEW LISTING Wonder-
ful features in this 4BR home in lovely
Greystone Manor! Flat lot on .77acres
having berry bashes & walking trails
nearby! MLS# 13-633
LISA 715-9335 $354,900
DALLAS NEW LISTING Condo time &
the living is easy - no grass to mow, no
snow to shovel. Attention to detail shows
throughout this 2BR, 2 bath Ranch.
MLS# 13-683
KATHY M. 696-0870 $189,900
SHAVERTOWN NEW LISTING 3BR
Ranch situated on level double lot. Open
LR/DR, eat-in kitchen, MBR with 3/4
bath. Quiet neighborhood. Convenient
location! MLS# 13-685
CLYDETTE 696-0897 $154,900
TRUCKSVILLE Charming 3BR Ranch on
large corner lot offers large MBR, sun-
room, built-in garage, C/A & more.
MLS# 13-364
MIKE D. 714-9236 $139,500
PLAINS NEW LISTING Stunning NEW
CONSTRUCTION 3BR, 2 bath Ranch in
Mill Creek Acres - Kitchen w/granite &
stainless steel appliances, LR w/gas FP.
A must see! MLS# 13-820
CHRISTINA K. 714-9235 $235,000
PLAINS Spacious home on corner lot
in convenient location. 3 BRs, 3 baths,
DR, LR, eat-in kit, FR, detached 1 car gar.
Must see! MLS# 12-2900
DEBORAH KROHN 696-0886 $68,000
FORTY FORT NEW LISTING Modern kitchen
w/maple cabinets, Italian tile foor, Quartz
countertops, stainless steel appliances w/
breakfast nook, ductless A/C, HW foors,
3BRs, 2 baths, gas heat. A must see home!
MLS# 13-796
DEB K. 696-0886 $219,900
MOUNTAINTOP Impressive custom-built
home in Walden Park with 3BRs, 3 baths,
granite kitchen, HW foors, gas freplace,
fnished lower level w/tons of loads of
storage in a quiet area. MLS# 13-686
MARY M. 714-9274 $259,900
PLYMOUTH Nice 2-story, 2BR, 1.5 bath
on large lot. Modern kitchen, 1st foor
laundry, covered deck, fenced yard.
MLS# 12-3927
PATTY A. 715-9332 $69,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN, 3/10
12:00-2:00PM
OPEN HOUSE SUN, 3/10
12:00-1:30PM
OPEN HOUSE SUN, 3/10
12:00-1:30PM
OPEN HOUSE SUN, 3/10
1:00-3:00PM
OPEN HOUSE SUN, 3/17
1:00-3:00PM
SHAVERTOWN Beautiful Contemporary in serene 3+ acre Bulford Farm setting
features an open foor plan & 1st foor Master Suite. Attention to detail is evident
throughout. Silver glazed maple frs blend w/neutral tones & custom built-ins. Stun-
ning European kitchen has terrifc storage & Miele & Sub Zero appliances. Great
lighting, new wrap around composite deck, large screened porch, speakers inside
& out. MLS# 13-489. RHEA 696-6677 $609,000
SHAVERTOWN This striking two-story w/open foor plan features living rm, dining
rm, family rm w/gas freplace, bonus rm w/surround sound & 2 laundry rooms. This
4 bedroom home has 2 1/2 baths, hardwood fooring, kitchen w/breakfast bar &
granite countertops. 3 car garage & fantastic views make this one to see!
MLS# 12-1433
JUDY 714-9230 $439,990
PAGE 18E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Professional Ofce Rentals
Full Service Leases Custom Design
Renovations Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial
Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call:
1-570-287-1161
New Bridge Center
480 Pierce Street
Ofcenter250
250 Pierce Street
Ofcenter270
270 Pierce Street
Park Ofce Building
400 Third Ave.
Ofcenter220
220 Pierce Street
KINGSTON OFFICENTERS
www.lippiproperties.com
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
Title Insurance
Rapid Title Search & Closing
Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
8
0
5
3
4
1
WERE BUILDING NOWFOR SUMMER OCCUPANCY
NEW: THE MULBERRY II our ranch-style 2BR; 2BATH with an
additional 180 sq.ft. of rst-oor living space!
RESERVE NOWFOR SUMMER OCCUPANCY!
GREAT LOCATION! Minutes to NE ext. and I-81.
CALL: 877-442-8439 Susan Parrick, Director, Sales/Marketing
Model Home Now For Sale!
2000 sq. ft. + open foor plan
formal dining room - 3BR/2.5 Bath
Priced to Sell $247,000
THE APPALACHIAN - 2,300 sq. ft. with frst-foor
master suite; END UNIT; 2-car garage, hardwood
foors, jetted-tub, freplace; maple and granite kitchen
$294,000
LIKE US ON www.staufferpointe.com
DIRECTIONS: From William St., Pittston, turn onto Fulton St. At 4-way, cross Butler St. and go straight to Grandview Dr.
Ready For Occupancy
Smith Hourigan Group
Smarter. Bolder. Faster.
Shavertown 570-696-1195
Ruth K. Smith
Call Ruth K. Smith 570-696-1195 / 570-696-5411
39 Butler Street, Kingston
Ruth K. Smith
Open House Sunday, Mar. 10
th
1:00-3:00PM
Restored 4219 sq. ft. Century home with all original woodwork on a large double lot
in Kingston. 5 bedrooms, 3 baths. Formal dining room, family room & sunroom.
Fireplace in master bedroom. 3rd oor studio with bookshelves. Te architecture
and size of the lot are what set it apart from the other homes. New cedar fence, 90%
Pella new architectural windows. Replaced heating system to gas hot water radiators.
3 zoned PEX tubing throughout heating systems. New hot water heater.
DIR: From Rutter Ave., Kingston to one way on Butler St.
$469,000
SUSQUEHANNA
MODULAR HOMES
BUILD THIS SPRING!
Less than half the time to complete project!
Call us for
your consultation.
Well work with you!
Proud builder
of affordable
handicapped
accessible
housing.
Rear 913 Wyoming Ave, Wyoming, PA
(Behind McDonalds) 1-866-823-8880
16 BIRCH ST., PLAINS
Great home in Hudson Gardens.
4 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, central
a/c, new roof and windows, newly
painted, screened porch, fam.
rm. w/freplace and bar.
MLS#12-2688
Directions: E. Carey St., Plains to
Hudson Rd. to left on Wilcox, right
on Birch. Property on the left.
$167,000
CALLNANCYANSWINI 288-1444
288-1444
230 Wyoming Ave., Suite 5
Kingston, PA 18704
email: gilroyre@yahoo.com
OPENHOUSETODAY 11:30AM1:00PM
T
I
M
E
C
H
A
N
G
E
ELEGANT HOMES, LLC.
51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612
(570) 675 9880
www.eleganthomesinc.net
New Construction! $198,900
* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft.
* 2 Car Garage
with Storage Area
* 2 Story Great Room
* Cherry Kitchen
with Granite
* Fenced in Yard
with Patio
* Gas Heat/AC
Directions: From Wyo-
ming Ave. take Pringle
St. to the End, take left on
Grove St. Twins on left -
267 Grove St. Kingston
Luxurious Twins in Kingston
Open House Today 1:00-3:00PM
Brenda Suder
REALTOR

(Cell) 570.332.8924
(Ofce) 570.824.9800
(Fax) 570.824.9801
bsuder@remax.net
Nobody Sells More Real Estate Than RE/MAX

229 Nicholson St.


@ Route 309 Wilkes-Barre Twp.
Phone (570) 824-9800 Fax (570) 824-9801
www.RPPNEPA.com
MLS#13-678
MLS#12-4181
1102 Pierce St., Scranton
Precision Properties
$160,000
MLS#12-2764
295 W. Broadway St., Larksville
$49,900
$209,900
81 Mara Ln., Plains
Think Spring!
Contact us for all of your New Home,
Addition and Remodeling needs.
Check us out on the web at
tupperconstructioncompany.com
or call us at 570-287-2765
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY FORT
Immaculate, attrac-
tive & spacious 3
bedroom, 2 story.
Freshly painted,
new carpet, well
insulated. New
energy efficient
hybrid water heater.
Charming back
yard, mature trees
& landscaping.
Off street parking.
MLS# 12-3421
$119,900
Call Marie Montante
570-881-0103
288-9371
HANOVER
TOWNSHIP
REDUCED TO
$249,900
Brick fronted
rancher situated on
a 1.23 acre parcel
in Liberty Hills,
Hanover Township.
Excellent condition
describes this
2900SF, 10 room, 4
bedroom home.
Elevated covered
rear deck overlooks
the kidney shaped
in-ground pool, full
finished lower level,
2-car garage, hard-
wood floors, central
air conditioning,
plus wood burning
fireplace.
#12-2904
$259,900
Ted Poggi 283-9100
x25
HANOVER TWP.
Three bedroom
town house ready
for new owners.
Nice level, over
sized yard & con-
venient location.
New hardwood
floors in some
rooms. Almost new
washer & dryer are
included. Large
patio off dining
room.
MLS #13-403
$113,900
Call Paul for
appointment
760-8143
696-2600
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
209 Constitution
Avenue
Meticulously main-
tained 4 bedroom, 2
story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situ-
ated on a generous
lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st
floor family room, 2
car garage, deck
and soooo much
more!
MLS #11-2429
$274,900
Call Florence
Keplinger @
715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
474-6307
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
HANOVER TWP.
SELLER SAYS
MAKE ME
AN OFFER
Come tour this well-
maintained 2-story
at 10 Rowe St. This
1 owner, brick &
vinyl home, in a
great neighborhood,
is in move-in condi-
tion. Large living
room, formal dining
room, large eat-in
kitchen with tile
floor, counter &
backsplash. 3 bed-
rooms & modern
bath with a tile tub/
shower. Finished
lower level 21 x 15
family room with
built-in storage, a
2nd full bath & laun-
dry area/utility
room. A B-Dry
System, freshly
painted & new car-
peting on 1st & 2nd
floors. Central air &
new electric serv-
ice. Attached 1 car
garage with work-
shop or storage.
Screened-in patio
overlooks a large,
level private back
yard. For more in-
formation & to view
photos online, go to:
www. pr udent i al
realestate.com &
enter PRU7W7A3 in
the Home Search.
PRICE REDUCED TO
$132,900.
MLS#12-3160.
Call Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
or Walter Belchick
696-2600, Ext. 301
696-2600
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Custom built colo-
nial two-story. 4
bedrooms, 4 baths,
two vehicle garage.
View of the Wyo-
ming Valley. Located
on a dead end, pri-
vate street, just
minutes from the
Wyoming Valley
Country Club, Han-
over Industrial Park,
& public transporta-
tion. Sun room, fam-
ily room with wood
burning fireplace,
hardwood floors on
1st & 2nd floors, 1st
floor laundry room &
bathroom. Central
cooling fan. Lower
level recreation
room with bar, lots
of closets & stor-
age, coal/wood
stove, office/5th
bedroom & bath.
MLS #12-4610
$280,000
Louise Laine
283-9100 x20
283-9100
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
HARDING
$249,900
1385 Mt. Zion Rd.
Great country set-
ting on 3.05 acres.
Move in condition
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
inground swimming
pool, hardwood
floors. Finished
basement with wet
bar. 2 car garage,
wrap around drive-
way. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 12-2270
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
PRICE REDUCED
$69,900
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. MARCH 10
2:30-4
2032 ROUTE 92
RIVER VIEWS PLUS
EXTRA LOT ON
RIVER. Just 1/4
miles from boat
launch, this great
ranch home is
perched high
enough to keep you
dry, but close
enough to watch
the river roll by.
Surrounded by
nature, this home
features large living
room and eat in
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, full unfin-
ished basement.
Ready to move
right in and enjoy
country living just
minutes from down-
town. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HUGHESTOWN
$84,500
64 CENTER ST.
Large 4 bedroom
with master bed-
room and bath on
1st floor. New gas
furnace and water
heater with updated
electrical panel.
Large lot with 1 car
garage, nice loca-
tion. www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
Must be sold to
settle estate
MLS 13-294
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
22 Wood Street
Nice cottage with
lake rights, close
to the public boat
dock. New kitchen
& living room ceil-
ings & insulation
just completed.
Enjoy this place
during the Summer
months or year
round. Recently
updated with new
roof & floors.
MLS# 12-3820
$69,900
Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
$198,900
184 Rock St.
Spacious brick
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, large living
room with fireplace.
3 baths, large Flori-
da room with AC.
Full finished base-
ment with 4th bed-
room, 3/4 bath,
large rec room with
wet bar. Also a
cedar closet and
walk up attic. www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3626
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
$27,900
151 E. Saylor Ave.
Fixer upper with
great potential in
quiet neighborhood.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
with off street park-
ing and nice yard.
Directions: Rt 315,
at light turn onto
Laflin Rd to bottom
of hill. Turn right
onto E. Saylor.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3672
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2
bath cape cod with
central air, new
windows, doors,
carpets and tile
floor. Full concrete
basement with 9'
ceilings. Walking
distance to Wilkes
Barre. Electric and
Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WEST PITTSTON
Split level, stone
exterior, multi-tiered
deck, bluestone
patio, flood dam-
aged, being sold as
is condition.
$73,500
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
NEW LISTING!
Quality home in con-
venient location.
Move in ready. Nice
size rooms, finished
room in basement
used as 4th bed-
room or office. Gas
heat, off street
parking. Three sea-
son porch.
MLS#13-560
$115,500
Call Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
Find your next
vehicle online.
timesleaderautos.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 19E
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
177 Third Avenue
COMPARE WHAT
YOU GET FOR YOUR
MONEY! Modern 3
bedroom end unit
townhouse, with 2
1/2 baths (master
bath). Central air.
Family room, foyer,
deck with canopy,
patio, fenced yard,
garage. Extras!
PHFA financing:
$3,500 down; $540
month, 4 1/8% inter-
est, 30 years.
$115,000.
MLS # 12-3012
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
LAFLIN
$129,900
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. MARCH 10
12-2
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Split Level
home with hard-
wood floors, 1 car
garage, large yard
and covered patio
in very convenient
location. Great curb
appeal and plenty
of off street park-
ing. Rt. 315 to light
@ Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin Rd.
Home is on left.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
$254,900
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. MARCH 10
12-2
24 Fordham Road
Great Split Level in
Oakwood Park,
Laflin. 13 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. 2 car garage
and large corner
lot. Lots of space
for the large or
growing family.
www. atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-452
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LAFLIN
$389,900
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. MARCH 10
12-2
10 Fairfield Drive
Exceptional & spa-
cious custom built
cedar home with
open floor plan and
all of the amenities
situated on 2 lots in
picturesque setting.
Create memories in
this 5 bedroom, 4
bath home with 18
ceiling in living
room, gas fireplace,
granite kitchen,
large 2 story foyer,
huge finished lower
level for entertain-
ing with bar/full
kitchen & wine cel-
lar. Inground pool &
hot tub. Directions:
Rt 315 to Laflin Rd.,
right onto Oakwood
Dr., right onto Ford-
ham Rd, left onto
Fairfield Dr., home
is on the right.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4063
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4
bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car
detached garage.
This home features
a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, fur-
nace, hot water
heater, replacement
windows, fenced
yard and large
covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-7846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
NEW LISTING
OAKWOOD PARK
If you like comfort &
charm, youll love
this sparkling
3,800+ sq. ft. 5 bed-
room, 4 bath two
story traditional
home in perfect
condition in a great
n e i g h b o r h o o d .
Nothing to do but
move right in. Off-
ers formal living &
dining rooms, 1st
floor family room
with fireplace, gran-
ite countertops in
kitchen & baths,
lower level recre-
ation room with fire-
place & wet bar.
MLS #13-549
Only $335,000
Call
Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
MOOSIC
$99,900
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home
with endless possi-
bilities. 3-4 bed-
room, 1 bath, cen-
tral air, plenty of
storage. Enclosed
porch, garage with
carport. Situated on
3 lots. Directions: 1-
81, Exit 180 Moosic
(Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile.
Turn R onto 8th St.,
up hill, turn left,
house 3rd on right.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
MOUNTAINTOP
46 Farmhouse Road
Large, fabulous
ranch with vinyl sid-
ing and stone front,
central air, gas heat,
modern kitchen &
baths. Two car
garage, gas fire-
place, finished lower
level, deck & securi-
ty system. A must
see home.
MLS #12-1359
$265,900
Call Florence
Keplinger @
715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
474-6307
MOUNTAINTOP
This one acre set-
ting features a nice
1 bedroom home
with good sized
rooms that needs
updating. 1 car
garage. Enclosed
back porch. Shed.
Partially finished
basement with 2nd
kitchen (for can-
ning). Coal burner in
basement.
MLS# 13-185
$99,900
Mary Ann
Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
MOUNTAIN TOP/
GLEN SUMMIT
Beautifully appoint-
ed home on 2
acres. Community
amenities include
private lake with
sandy beach, tennis
courts, trails for hik-
ing & biking. This
home boasts per-
ennial gardens &
mature landscaping,
fenced rear yard
enclosing a 20x40
heated in-ground
pool, raised garden,
custom dog house
& run. Entertain &
dine on the wrap-
around porch with
mahogany flooring
& electric hurricane
shutters. The resi-
dence features
hardwood flooring,
French doors, cher-
ry kitchen, 3-4 bed-
rooms, updated
heating/air. Emer-
gency generator for
inclement weather.
MLS# 12-1647
$410,000.
696-2600 ext. 210.
Maribeth Jones
696-6565
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
$125,000
WOW. Modern
Ranch! King size
brick Ranch located
on the outskirts of
Nanticoke, Youll fall
in love with the
open floor plan.
Sunny, large sunken
living room, tiled
modern kitchen,
formal dining room,
3 bedrooms. Bath
with tiled garden
tub & glass shower.
Additional amenity,
finished lower level
with fireplace. 3/4
bath with laundry
area.
MLS 12-4107
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
NANTICOKE
25 W. Washington
Move right into this
very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home.
Lots of natural
woodwork and a
beautiful stained
glass window.
Newer kitchen
appliances and w/w
carpeting. Supple-
ment your heating
with a recently
installed wood pel-
let stove. New roof
installed 11/17/12.
This home also has
a one car
detached garage.
MLS 12-2171
$76,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
260-262
E. Green Street
Double Block
Plenty of parking
with paved back
alley. Close to
LCCC. New roof
installed in 2007
along with a kitchen
& bath update
in #260.
MLS #13-694
$65,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
REDUCED
1457 S. Hanover St.
Beautiful Tudor
style split level
home. This home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
recreation room
with a bar, wood
burning stove, 2 tier
patio, storage shed,
fenced yard and 1
car garage. Securi-
ty system and
more.
MLS 12-3292
$179,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained bi-
level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3
season porch.
Professionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
PITTSTON
$119,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home
with Victorial fea-
tures, large eat in
kitchen with laun-
dry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath
with claw foot tub,
lots of closet
space. Move in
ready, off street
parking in rear.
MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-883-7594
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
24 S. Prospect St.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION!
Former firehouse
uniquely designed
for multipurpose.
Building includes a
clubhouse in base-
ment with bar and
restrooms. Huge
office, computer
training room, large
carpeted exercise/
utility room, garage
and central air. Two
(2) newer 150,00
BTU Modine over-
head heaters. Off-
street parking
behind building. This
is a very solid struc-
ture located in a
prime business area
in Nanticoke!
DONT MISS
THIS FANTASTIC
INVESTMENT
OPPORTUNITY!
$86,000
MLS# 12-1666
Call Ron
570-817-1362
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
PITTSTON
Amazing Property!!!
Five bedrooms, 4
with private bath.
spectacular master
suite with sitting
room + 3 room clos-
et. Four fireplaces
All hardwood floors.
Gazebo style ceiling
in library. 3 car
garage. Resort-like
yard with in-ground
pool with cabana &
outside bath. Adult
amenities, full fin-
ished basement.
PREQUALIFIED
BUYERS ONLY
MLS# 12-1091
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
Joseph P. Gilroy
Real Estate
570-288-1444
PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED
$39,900
514 Main St.
Grand older home
being sold as-is.
Four bedrooms,
large kitchen, hard-
wood floors on first
floor, vinyl sided,
some newer win-
dows. Needs work
but makes a great
winter project. MLS
#12-2873. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PITTSTON TWP.
$144,900
10 Norman St.
Very nice, classic
two story brick
home with large
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, plenty of
baths, large base-
ment, open deck
and covered deck.
Large eat in
kitchen, plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #11-2887. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
NEW PRICE
$64,900
9 rooms, aluminum
sided, new
windows & wrap
around porch.
Kitchen with all
appliances, w/w
carpet, laundry
room with washer
& dryer, nicely
painted. Gas heat,
walk up attic on
50 x 150 lot with
shed.
Call Joe, 613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
32 Brians Place
Townhouse in pris-
tine condition. Move
right in! Has location
& view. Tastefully
finished with two
large bedrooms,
two full baths and
over sized closets.
Living room with
corner fireplace.
Custom kitchen with
hardwood floors.
Well manicured
lawns with privacy
walls. 2,400 sq. ft.
Recreation & multi-
use room. A must
see!! MLS#12-3622
$210,000
David Rubbico, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
PLAINS TWP.
$67,900
This 2 story, 3 Bed-
room Home located
close to Solomon
School is move-in
r eady. Feat ur es
include the fenced
backyard, above-
ground pool, large
deck, off-street
parking & 1st floor
laundry. Call Today!
MLS #13-144
Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
Signature Properties
570-675-5100
SHAVERTOWN
2 years old, open
floor plan, hard-
wood floors 1st &
2nd floors. 2 story
great room with
floor to ceiling fire-
place, 3 sides brick
exterior. Lower level
finished with French
doors out to patio,
breathtaking views,
upgraded landscap-
ing with 3 waterfalls.
MLS #12-4215
PRICE REDUCED
$599,000
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Lake Front Property
at Shickshinny Lake!
4 Bedrooms, 2.75
baths, 2 kitchens,
living room, large
family room. 2 sun-
rooms, office &
laundry room. Two
car attached gar-
age with paved
driveway, above
ground pool, dock &
100' lake frontage.
$375,000
MLS #12-860
Call Kenneth
Williams
570-542-2141
Five
Mountains
Realty
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SHICKSHINNY
BILBY HILL ROAD
Manufactured home
located on quiet
country acre. 3
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Eat in kitchen, front
porch & rear deck.
Surround yourself in
Nature! Not in flood
zone!
$82,500.
Call Patsy
570-204-0983
570-759-3300
SWOYERSVILLE
$129,900
115 Hemlock St.
Lots of updates in
this roomy Cape
Cod in a desirable
neighborhood.
Large eat in kitchen
with new flooring.
Finished basement
with theater/rec
room. Large level
yard. Priced to sell!
MLS 12-4231
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
STEEPLECHASE
50 Grandville Drive
Outstanding 3 bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath
townhouse out of
the flood zone.
Formal dining room,
family room, master
bedroom suite.
Central air & central
vacuum. Deck,
garage + many
extras. Freshly
painted and carpet-
ed, so move right in!
$179,900.
MLS # 13-195.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
WILKES-BARRE
Large, move-in con-
dition 10 room, 4
bedroom, 3 bath, 2-
story home with off-
street parking near
Barney Farms. This
is a well maintained
home with a large
eat-in kitchen, map-
le cabinets & par-
quet floor. The fur-
nace/central air
conditioning is only
2 years old. Buy this
home & enjoy your
summer days &
nights in your large
screened in rear
porch or in the
fenced yard with a
black top patio/bas-
ketball court.
MLS#13-69
$169,900
Karen Altavilla
283-9100 x28
696-2600
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home
features a great
yard with over 2
acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldnt
want to miss out.
There is a pond at
the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$49,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WEST PITTSTON
128 LINDEN ST.
Motivated Seller!
Beautiful Cape
Cod. 3+ bed-
rooms, 2 full
baths. Ultra-mod-
ern kitchen with
granite counter-
tops, tile floors &
laundry area. Din-
ing room has
French doors,
with laminated
floors. Plenty of
closet space. 2nd
floor master bed-
room & adjoining
den. New win-
dows, water
heater, electric,
gas furnace.
Three season
porch, mudroom
& fenced yard.
$125,900.
570-883-9943
570-212-8684
WEST PITTSTON
112 Clear Springs
Court
NEW PRICE
$164,000
Ledgeview Estates
Updates, Updates,
Updates New
hardwood floors,
granite counter
tops in kitchen, new
granite vanities, tile
floor, finished, walk-
out basement with
gas fireplace.
Call Donna
570-613-9080
WHITE-HAVEN
501 Birch Lane
Beautiful 4 bed-
room, 3 bath. Enjoy
the amenities of a
private lake, boat-
ing, basketball
courts, etc. The
home has wood
floors and carpeting
throughout. French
doors in the kitchen
that lead you out to
the large rear deck
for entertaining. The
backyard has 2 utili-
ty sheds for storage
MLS 12-1695
NEW PRICE
$174,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES BARRE
$44,900
70 N. Meade
3BR, 1 bath in move
in condition with
new electric box,
water heater, and
plumbing. Off
street parking in
rear for 3 cars,
good credit and
your house, taxes &
insurance would be
under $400/month.
MLS #12-3900. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WILKES BARRE
$54,000
735 N. Washington
Street
Spacious 2 story, 3
bedrooms with 2 ca
detached garage,
good starter home,
needs TLC. MLS #12
3887. For more
information and pho
tos visit www.atlasre
altyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES BARRE
$69,900
253 Parrish St.
Spacious home,
ready to move into.
Large open floor
plan offers a great
layout for all your
needs. Three bed-
rooms, plus lower
level family room.
Modern bath and
open kitchen.
Shared driveway
gives you off street
parking for a couple
of cars,detached
garage. MLS #12-
3628. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES BARRE
REDUCED
$45,000
61 Puritan Lane
Very well main-
tained home fea-
tures large rooms,
first floor bath &
laundry, large
fenced in yard,
potential for drive-
way for off street
parking. MLS #12-
1823. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
$72,900
35 Hillard St.
Hardwood floors,
fenced in yard,
large deck. Off
street parking. 3
bedroom home with
1st floor laundry.
Move in condition.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1655
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
$99,900
77 Schuler St.
NOTHING to do but
move right in! This
home has every-
thing you need...3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, large fenced
in yard, screened in
porch, off street
parking, quiet
neighborhood.
Home recently
remodeled inside &
out. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-467
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
68 Jones Street
This 2 story home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1.5
baths, an attached
sunroom, private
back yard, large liv-
ing room all great
for entertaining.
Close to schools &
shopping.
$44,900.
MLS 12-3211
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
68 Jones Street
This 2 story home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1.5
baths, an attached
sunroom, private
back yard, large liv-
ing room all great
for entertaining.
Close to schools &
shopping.
$44,900.
MLS 12-3211
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Three bedroom
ranch on corner lot,
convenient to
Wilkes-Barre Blvd.
& Rt. 81. Living
room, dining room
& modern kitchen.
Enclosed porch with
large deck and hot
tub, full basement, 1
car garage, shed
and carport. All
electric.
Maintenance Free.
$99,900
Leave Message
570-824-8245
WILKES-BARRE
21 Caffrey Street
Country living in the
city! Almost one
acre corner lot.
Newer roof. Fantas-
tic views, fruit trees
& quiet street.
Large room sizes
and wrap around
porch. Additional
enclosed porch in
back. Finished
basement with bar,
kitchen & 1/2 bath -
could be used as
separate apart-
ment. Two car
detached garage.
Very private proper-
ty. A must see!
MLS 12-4268
$93,000
Linda Cuono
570-715-7743
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
WYOMING
Great area with a
fenced yard, one
car detached gar-
age, and above
ground pool. Mod-
ern kitchen & baths.
Vinyl siding & re-
placement win-
dows. Too good a
house in this neigh-
borhood to pass up!
Please contact
Dave Wychock at
885-1670
for showing.
MLS #13-221
$125,000
RUBBICO
REAL ESTATE
570-826-1600
906 Homes for Sale
WYOMING
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. MARCH 10
12-2
575 Susquehanna
Avenue
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
NEVER
FLOODED
4 bedroom, 2 full
bath in a great
neighborhood.
New windows
entire home, fin-
ished lower level,
detached garage,
4 season sun-
room. Master
suite has new full
bath and large
walk in closet.
New above
ground pool with
deck. Must see!
PRICED TO
SELL $179,000
570-885-6848
YATESVILLE
$139,900
617 Willowcrest Dr.
End unit. 2 bed-
room townhome
with master bath on
2nd floor. Needs a
little TLC.
MLS 13-569
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
YATESVILLE
$174,900
603 Willowcrest Dr.
Super end unit
townhouse, no
fees. 2 bedrooms,
3 baths, central air,
electric heat, cathe-
dral ceiling with
skylights. Large
family room with
propane stove and
its own ductless
air. MLS 13-482
Call Tom
570-262-7716
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
BEAR CREEK
$149,900
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
$39,900
93 Main St.
Four units. 3 resi-
dential and one
storefront.Great
corner location,
flood damaged
home being sold as
is. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1948
Call Tom
570-262-7716
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit property.
Lots of off street
parking and bonus 2
car garage. All units
are rented. Great
income with low
maintenance.
$139,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
HANOVER
Repossessed
Income Property
Out of flood area
5 apartments, 2
buildings on one lot
in excellent condi-
tion. Hardwood
floors. $95,000
570-822-9697
HANOVER TWP.
COMMERCIAL
LEASE
8,500 sq. ft. building
$4,000/month, ten-
ant pays utilities.
Building Ready for
many uses. Owner
will build to suit.
Custom Leases
Available. Property
has 5 garage bays,
office space & plen-
ty of parking and
fenced side yards.
Heated with rest-
rooms. unlimited
potential.
MLS #13-63
Call Today!
Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
Signature Properties
570-675-5100
KINGSTON
341 Wyoming Ave.
3 story Victorian
home located in a
high exposure area.
Has all the lovely
signature wood-
work of a grand
VIctorian of yester-
year! Can be
restored for use as
a residential home
or a landlord invest-
ment. Currently
subdivided into mul-
tiple office spaces
and 2 apartments.
MLS 12-617
$149,000
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
Newly remodeled,
immaculate office
building. 1,600 sq.
ft., central air, plenty
of parking, abun-
dant storage areas,
handicapped acc-
essible.
MLS#13-667
$79,900
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
105 S. Market St.
Superb, brick com-
mercial building with
second floor apart-
ment. Well main-
tained. Ideal for
beauty salon, start-
up small business.
Call for details.
Priced to sell at
$125,000.
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
PITTSTON
Completely remod-
eled with new addi-
tion in prime loca-
tion. 2 separate
Main Street ent-
rances. Can be
used as one office
or two. Handicap-
ped accessible,
security system,
garage, 2 kitchens,
2 baths, newer roof
and heating system.
MLS# 13-9
A Must See!
$289,000.
Call Christine
570-332-8832
570-613-9080
PITTSTON
68 William St.
Great investment
property with 3
units and separate
utilities. Each unit
has 2 entrances
and washer hook
up. Roof is 5 years
old. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1897
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
T I M E S L E A D E R
(570) 474-9801
If you are buying or selling anywhere
in the county, I can help you!
Only if you call!
Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323
Jim Graham
Associate Broker
9 ceilings 1st foor. Granite
countertops in kitchen. Very
bright 1st foor master bed-
room & bath. It is a modular
construction. Not assessed.
Taxes to be announced.
MLS#12-3928 $159,900
Spacious 4BR, 2.5 bath, LL
FR w/bar, LR, DR, oversized
2 car garage, in-ground pool
& cabana, fenced yard.
Priced to sell!
MLS# 12-4305 $179,500
HANOVER TWP. WILKESBARRE
ERA1.com
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
Mountaintop
(
570
)
403-3000
Clarks Summit (570) 587-9999
Peckville (570) 489-8080
Moscow (570) 842-2300
Lake Ariel (570) 698-0700
Mt Top (570) 403-3000
Scranton (570) 343-9999
Stroudsburg (570) 424-0404
Lehighton (610) 377-6066
Toll Free 877-587-SELL
Sunita Arora
Broker/Owner
Accredited Buyer Representative
Certied Residential Broker, E-Pro
Graduate Realtors Institute
Seniors Real Estate Specialist
OVER $100 MILLION SOLD IN 2012*
How Much Time do You Have? As a CARTUS Co-Principal Broker, We have In-
stant Access to Active Buyers and Sellers Around the Block and Around the World!
WORKING AROUND THE CLOCK FOR THE
NEPA REGION FOR OVER A DECADE
* = Based on adjusted year end statistics from Greater Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Pike/Wayne, Carbon County and Pocono Mountain Board of Realtors.
Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to seller and house must meet specic qualications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, based upon a discount of the homes appraised value.
Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC. Call your local participating ERA professional to review details. Not available in all areas.
2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA and Always There For You are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Ofce is Independently Owned and Operated.
TOBYHANNA
Home in Pocono Country Place
$75,000 MLS#13-445
ASHLEY
Newer roof, furnace, electrical
$68,500 MLS#12-3512
EDWARDSVILLE
Two 3BR apartments
$66,000 MLS#11-1607
PITTSTON
2-story, 3BR, 3-season porch
$67,500 MLS#12-4279
MULTIFAMILY
BUSHKILL
Saw Creek Estates 2-story
$119,900 MLS#11-115
WILKESBARRE
2-unit, 4BR and 3BR
$118,000 MLS#12-3753
WHITE HAVEN
New construction townhouse
$115,000 MLS#12-3105
EXETER
5BR, 2 kitchens, garage
$114,900 MLS#12-4492
LAFLIN
4BR Single-level living
$129,300 MLS#13-508
PITTSTON
Updated nished 3rd oor
$120,000 MLS#12-4289
HARVEYS LAKE
Luxury Lakefront Estate
$1,475,000 MLS#12-2045
DRUMS
Cape Cod Beech Mt Lakes
$265,000 MLS#13-670
TUNKHANNOCK
Updated in Clarendon Acres
$224,900 MLS#12-5579 scr
BLAKELY
4BR, 2BA on double lot
$162,500 MLS#13-839 scr
BIG BASS LAKE
Charming 4 Season Chalet
$149,900 MLS#12-4771 scr
DURYEA
New kitchens, baths, roof
$104,900 MLS#12-4275
DURYEA
Totally updated, 3BR and 1BR
$104,900 MLS#12-4278
BEAR CREEK
3 acres, Laurelbrook Estates
$98,550 MLS#13-145
DURYEA
Updated kitchens and baths
$95,900 MLS#12-4246
PLAINS
Fantastic income potential
$94,000 MLS#13-519
DURYEA
Updated ranch, nished LL
$78,500 MLS#13-517
MULTIFAMILY MULTIFAMILY MULTIFAMILY MULTIFAMILY
Two-story
Townhomes
1st oor master
Formal Dining Room
Eat-in Kitchen
Loft
Valuted Ceilings
Front Porch
Garage
Garden Area
Pure Indulgence... Luxury Condominums nestled in a
quiet corner of Northeast Pennsylvania
Watch this Community come to life by becoming a Bell Weather Resident. Tere has
never been a better time to join wwus
Prices Starting in the $140s
Find us in our convenient Location: Wyoming Avenue to Union Street.
Turn onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne
VACANT LAND
MULTIFAMILY MULTIFAMILY
HAZLETON
5,400 SF Oce Space
$199,999 MLS#12-3156
COMMERCIAL
J
U
S
T
L
I
S
T
E
D
!
CHANGE YOUR CLOCK,
CHANGE YOUR BATTERY
Te Consumer Product Safety
Commission (CPSC) encourages
consumers to change the batteries in
their smoke alarms and carbon monoxide
(CO) alarms this weekend. Fresh batteries
in alarms are
essential to
keeping your
alarm working
and on guard to
protect you and
your family.
Lewith &Freeman Real Estate
(570) 696-3801 (570) 696-0883 Direct
metcalf@epix.net
New Listing - Larksville
Birchwood Estates
Set apart from the rest of this
attractive 2 story home, theres a
delightful retreat. Close the MBR
doors & enjoy your own luxurious
suite complete w/FP & giant master
bath. Oers a total of 4 BRs, 3 baths,
attractive LR, DR, eat-in kitchen &
Florida room. MLS#13-815
Just $249,900
1755 MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA18708
Lot 1 Woodberry Dr., Mountaintop
Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story
model w/ lots of HW & tile. Gran-
ite counters in kit, MSTR Suite
w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath
w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirl-
pool. Home/lot packages avail-
able. TERRY D. 715-9317
Dir: 309S. to Right on S Main, Right on
Nuangola, RIght on Fairwood Blvd. to
end. Straight into Woodberry Manor. 1st
house on left.
DALLAS
10 DAKOTA DRIVE
DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious
w/3 BRs, 1st fr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale
appls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208
RHEA 696-6677 $379,000
DIR: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods
OLD FORGE LAFLIN FORTY FORT WILKES-BARRE
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1:00-3:00 PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1:00-2:30 PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY 12:00-1:30 PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1:00-3:00 PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY 2:00-3:30 PM
300 W. CENTER HILL ROAD
SHAVERTOWN Tastefully remodeled & spacious home situated
on 1acre w/Master Suite on 1st foor, in-ground pool, hot tub &
more! MLS# 12-3539
REBECCA D. 696-0879 $277,000
DIR: Rt.309N to Rt.415 to L on Center Hill Road.
28 FAIRFIELD DRIVE
LAFLIN OAKWOOD PARK - If you like comfort & charm, youll love this
sparkling 3800+SF, 5BR, 4 bath, 2-story Traditional home. Perfect
condition. Great neighborhood. LR, DR, FR w/FP, granite counters in
Kit/baths, recreation rm w/FP & wet bar. MLS# 13-549
BARBARA M. 696-0883 $335,000
DIR: Rt.315 L on Lafin Rd (Oakwood Park) 1st R on Fordham @ T
Turn R then L on Fairfeld Drive - Property on R - Sign on Property.
WILKES-BARRE Move into this home & enjoy the good life.
Clean, move-in ready 4BR, 2 full & 2 1/2 baths, HW, large deck,
in-ground pool. Just bring your stuff! MLS# 13-787
SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117 $289,900
OLD FORGE 3-4BR 2 story home w/large LR/DR, eat-in oak
kitchen, 2 full baths, 1st foor FR, fnished lower level, 2 car
garage & fenced yard. MLS# 11-988
MATT 714-9229 $249,900
LAFLIN Elegant brick ranch in charming neighborhood! Kit w/
bkfast rm, heated FL rm & basement, tiled baths, 4 cedar clos-
ets. Hw in LR & DR. Its a beauty! MLS# 12-1057
TERRY D. 715-9317 $368,900
FORTY FORT Gracious 3BR, 3 bath Cape Cod. HW foors,
crown molding, large eat-in kitchen, large lot. Create family
memories here! MLS# 12-2007
LESLIE 696-0841 $249,900
INSIGNIA POINT COURTYARDS
JENKINS TWP. Distinctive design in the NEW Insignia Ranch.
Open foor plan, granite & stainless steel, HW & tile foors, full
walk-out basements. MLS# 12-688
MARCIE 714-9267 $249,900
DIR: N. Main St, Jenkins Twp, to Insignia Point Courtyards.
KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS
Kingston 862 Anthracite Ave 1-2:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Forty Fort 100 Walnut St 2:30-4PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Kingston 39 Butler ST 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Kingston 35 South Welles St 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Larksville 437 Washington Ave 12-2PM Lewith & Freeman
Kingston 579 Warren Ave 1-2PM Lewith & Freeman
PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS
Pittston Twp. 16 Powder Mill Road 1-3PM Classic Properties
Lain 10 Faireld Drive 12-2PM Atlas Realty
Lain 24 Fordham Road 12-2PM Atlas Realty
Lain 111 Lain Road 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty
Exeter 343 Susquehanna Ave 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty
Avoca 910 Church St 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty
Harding 310 Lockville Rd 1-3PM Atlas Realty
Harding 2032 Route 92 2:30-4PM Atlas Realty
Duryea 600 New St 12-1:30PM Atlas Realty
West Pittston 134 Ann ST 2-4PM Jack Crossin Real Estate
Pittston 3 Sand St 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Lain 28 Faireld Dr 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Jenkins Twp Insignia Point Courtyards 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Wyoming 171 Susquehanna Ave 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Yatesville 39 Antrim Road 12-2PM Century 21 Signature Properties
MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS
Mountaintop 55 Aleksander Blvd 1-2:30PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 46 Farmhouse Road 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 29 Hemlock Terrace 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Mountaintop 82 Congress Road 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Mountaintop 510 (Lot 4) Ryan Way 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Mountaintop Lot 1 Woodberry Drive 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS
Dallas 46 Poplar St 1-2:30PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Dallas 691 Carpenter Drive 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico
Dallas 112 Davenport St 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Dallas 17 Highland Drive 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Dallas 10 Dakota Drive 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Shavertown 300 W. Center Hill Rd 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Dallas 16 Westminster Drive 11-12:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Shavertown 1025 Shefeld Rd 3-4PM Lewith & Freeman
WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS
Wilkes-Barre 535 North River St 12-1:30PM Classic Properties
Wilkes-Barre 94 Oak St 12-2PM JJ Mantione
Plains Birch ST 12-1:30PM Gilroy Real Estate
Wilkes-Barre 237 Matson Ave 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico
Wilkes-Barre 104 Miner St 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Wilkes-Barre 465 Carey Ave 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Plains 11 E. Ann St 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROUNDS
Shickshinny 413 PA 239 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico
Nanticoke 4 Overlook Dr 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Hanover Twp. 30 East St 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Plymouth 473 West Shawnee 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan Group
Hanover Twp. 183 Red Coat Lane 1:30-3PM Eileen Melone Real Estate
Nanticoke 501 East Washington St 1-3PM Gordon & Long Real Estate
HAZLETON & SURROUNDS
Drums 108 Fairway Dr/Showcase Home 12-5PM Tuskes Homes
OPEN HOUSES - SUNDAY, MARCH 10TH, 2013
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PAGE 22E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
$115,000
142-144 Carroll St.
Well maintained,
fully rented 4 unit
investment property
in quiet neighbor-
hood. Owner took
good care of this
property. www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-4514
Call Terry
570-885-3041 or
Angie
570-885-4896
PITTSTON
$129,900
224 William St.
Are you a hair-
dresser or barber?
Need a space for
an in home busi-
ness? This might be
just what youre
looking for. Well
maintained 4 bed-
room home with
salon (previously a
barber shop for 60
years). Very well
established, high
visibility location
and additional home
with 3 bedrooms
currently rented to
a tenant. Must be
sold as one pack-
age. www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 13-216
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLYMOUTH TWP.
Route #11 Two Bay
Garage in high traf-
fic location. 250
frontage ideal for
contractor, auto
repair, small busi-
ness. priced to sell
at $95,000.
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
UNION TWP
Great Old 80 Acre
Farm, Location Next
to Northwest High
School with approx.
35 acres of fields &
45 acres wooded.
Small pond, barn,
old farmhouse with
out buildings(in poor
condition - little or
no value) plenty of
road frontage.
MLS #13-807
$359,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
675-4400
SWEET VALLEY
3.8 acres, zoned B2
with home & pond.
Priced for quick
sale. High traffic
area Located at the
intersection of
Rt. 118 & Main Road.
$89,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
675-4400
WILKES-BARRE
Owner Retiring
Turn Key Night
Club For Sale.
Two full bars,
game area.
Four restrooms.
Prime Location!!!
Creative financing
Available $80,000,
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
WEST SIDE
Well established
Italian Restaurant
on the West Side
with seating for 75.
Business only
includes good will,
all furniture and fix-
tures, all kitchen
equipment and
delivery van for
$150,000. Building
sold separately.
Restaurant on 1st
floor and 2 bed-
room luxury apart-
ment on 2nd floor
for $250,000.
www.atlasrealty
inc.com
MLS 12-3433
Call Charlie
912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about
5,000 roadfront on
2 roads. All Wood-
ed. $385,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
Bear Creek Blvd.
Wonderful opportu-
nity! Beautiful 3.45
acre wooded build-
ing lot for your new
home. 200' front-
age.
MLS #13-157
$39,900
Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
DALLAS
Memorial Highway
3.65 acre B-2 com-
mercial parcel with
488 of prime
frontage on busy
Rt. 415. Ideal for
retail/office devel-
opment, bank,
restaurant. The
possibilities are
endless. Property
has a 30x40 Pole
Barn with concrete
floor.
MLS 12-4396
$425,000
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DURYEA LOTS
FOR SALE
Borough of Duryea
Request for SEALED
Bids for the Pur-
chase of Lots 1, 2, 3
and 4 Located on
Jones Street,
Duryea Borough,
Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania. The
Borough of Duryea
bid documents, in
accordance with
specification and
requirements on file,
are available for
pick up at the office
of the Duryea Bor-
ough Manager, 315
Main Street, Duryea,
between 7:00 AM-
noon and 1:00 PM -
3:00 PM Monday
through Friday
beginning Monday,
February 25, 2013
Bid
Envelopes are to be
sealed and plainly
marked with the Lot
Number and contain
all the specifications
along with any other
pertinent informa-
tion. All bids must
be received by the
Borough Manager,
Lois Morreale, 315
Main Street, Duryea,
no later than 3:00
PM, on Monday,
March 11, 2013. Bid
Opening will be at
the Borough Council
Meeting, Tuesday,
March 12, 6:30 PM,
in the Duryea Bor-
ough Building -
Council Chambers,
315 Main Street,
Duryea PA 18642.
The right to reject
any and all bids is
hereby reserved by
the Borough of
Duryea.
Lois Morreale
Duryea Borough
Manager
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
EARTH CONSERVANCY
Land For Sale
61 +/- Acres
Nuangola $95,000
46 +/- Acres
Hanover Twp.
$79,000
Highway
Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp.
Acreage Zoned
R-3
Sugar Notch Lot
$13,500
See Additional
Land for Sale at:
www.earth
conservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot
with utilities avail-
able. Ideal home
site. Affordable at
$12,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY RE CO
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Hughestown Boro
LAND
1/2 acre of land for
sale in Hughestown
Boro. 92 road
frontage & over
300 deep. Public
sewer, water, &
gas. Located
behind Grace Luxu-
ry Apts. on Division
St. $55,000.
17,000 sq. ft. lot for
sale in Hughestown
Boro. 118 road
frontage x 137
deep. Back proper-
ty line is 132 wide.
Public sewer, water,
& gas. Located
behind Grace Luxu-
ry Apts on North
View Drive. $35,000
570-760-7326
JACKSON TWP
LAND FOR SALE
Russell Dr.
Lots 4-5-6-7
$1,500
570-814-8920
LEHMAN
9 Acres on Lehman
Outlet Road. 470
front, over 1,000
deep. Wooded.
$125,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
912 Lots & Acreage
KINGSTON
HUGE PRICE
REDUCTION!
302-304 Wyoming
Avenue
One of the only
commercial building
lots available on
Wyoming Ave.
Make this extremely
busy site the next
address of your
business.
MLS 08-1872
$59,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
MOOSIC
BUILDING LOT
$29,900
Corner of Drake St.
& Catherine,
Moosic. 80x111
building lot with
sewer & water
available, in great
area with newer
homes. Corner lot.
For more details
visit www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
MLS #12-1148.
Call Charlie
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS
1 mile south of
L.C.C.C.
Established
developement with
underground utili-
ties including gas.
Cleared lot. 100
frontage x 158.
$35,000.
Lot 210 frontage
158 deep on hill
with great view
$35,000.
Call 570-736-6881
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
PLAINS TWP.
VACANT LAND
KING OF THE
MOUNTAIN!
Truly a 360 degree
view from the high-
est point of this
property. 48.49
acres to be sold as
one parcel. Build
your dream house
here or buy and
sub-divide. Will
require well and
septic system. Just
minutes from High-
way 315, near the
Casino but very pri-
vate. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4142
Only $149,000
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
SHAVERTOWN
Call Now! Build your
dream home on this
1 acre building lot in
established Back
Mountain sub-divi-
sion. Beautiful
views! Underground
utilities, public
sewer & private
well.
MLS #12-3546
$77,500
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
SHAVERTOWN
Beautiful 1 acre
building lot located
in established back
Mountain sub-divi-
sion. Buy now and
start building your
dream home in the
spring. Lot has
underground utili-
ties, public sewer
and private well.
MLS #13-137
$62,400
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
SHICKSHINNY
23+/- acres of
wooded land and
farmland with barn
in good condition
and a nice travel
trailer. Well on
property.
MLS#12-2572
$115,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY
26 acres of mostly
open land for
a beautiful
homesite near
Shickshinny Lake.
MLS #12-3394
$130,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Location, Location,
Location
A most unique &
desirable lakefront
property. This is an
opportunity to
purchase a
centrally situated
lot with an
unmatched view of
this beautiful lake.
If you are looking
for that special
building site, this is
it! MLS# 11-1269
$169,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains
Realty
570-256-3343
915 Manufactured
Homes
HANOVER TWP.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath
mobile home locat-
ed in a park on a
rented lot along a
quiet, dead end
road. Covered car-
port and shed. In
good condition, but
needs updating
$8000. OBO. Please
call 570-829-3476
or 570-994-6308
938 Apartments/
Furnished
SHICKSHINNY
1 bedroom no smok-
ing, heat water,
parking. 542-4187
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED
1 BEDROOM
Short or long term
Excellent
Neighborhood
Private Tenant
Parking
$600 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
AVAILABLE NOW
2nd floor, modern
living room &
kitchen. 2 bed-
rooms & bath. Off
street parking.
Washer/dryer hook-
up. Appliances. Bus
stop at the door.
Water Included.
$575 + utilities &
security. No pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
ASHLEY
Quiet 2nd floor, 2
bedroom. Laundry,
off street parking
with carport. Large
yard. Includes
water, sewer &
garbage. Refer-
ences, 1st, last +
security required.
No pets. $550/mo.
570-735-8730
570-332-8080
AVOCA
3 rooms includes
heat, hot water,
water, garbage &
sewer + appliances,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off street park-
ing. Security. No
pets. $490/month.
570-655-1606
BACK MOUNTAIN
2nd floor.
NON SMOKING
Spacious 2 bed-
room. Modern kit-
chen, separate liv-
ing & dining rooms.
Includes: heat, hot
water, cable & gar-
age. $800/month,
no pets, references,
1 month security.
570-675-4128
BACK
MOUNTAIN
Large 1 bedroom,
living room, kitchen
with appliances,
tiled bath, deck.
No Pets. $425.
570-696-1866
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
DALLAS
HI-MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
1075 Memorial Hwy.
Low & Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
*Electric Range &
Refrigerator
*Off Street Parking
*Community Room
*Coin Operated
Laundry *Elevator.
*Video Surveilence
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-675-5944
8a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-675-6936,
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
EXETER
BEAUTIFUL 1st floor
1 bedroom 1/2
duplex. Eat-in
kitchen, appliances
included refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer, & washer/
dryer hook-up. No
pets. $720/ mo +
security & electric
heat, water,
garbage & sewage
included.
570-301-7247
FORTY FORT
485 River Street. 2
bedroom apt. First
floor, 1 bath, off
street parking.
$550/mo. + utilities.
No pets. Call
570-881-0582.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, Wyoming
Avenue, 2 bedroom
wall to wall carpet,
tile bath, stove &
fridge furnished,
washer/dryer hook
up. Heat, public
water, sewer & re-
cycling furnished by
landlord. Use of
attic, yard & porch-
es. Good location,
off street parking.
No pets. 1 year
lease & security.
$675 570-655-0530
LUZERNE
ONE-OF-A-KIND
Beautiful brick
trimmed Colo-
nial, 2nd floor 2
bedroom unit
with wood pan-
eled loft. Remod-
eled completely,
maple kitchen,
all appliances,
gorgeous en-
closed porch,
covered carport,
gas fireplace,
more! $800 +
utilities. 2 YEAR
SAME RENT
LEASE, NO PETS
/ SMOKING.
EMPLOYMENT
VERI FI CATI ON
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
570-288-1422 570-288-1422
GLEN LYON
1st floor 4 room apt.
Electric & propane
gas heat. Off street
parking. Washer
/dryer hookup, ref-
rigerator, garbage
included. No dogs.
$400/month refer-
ences required, 1
year lease + 1 month
security.
570-714-1296
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK
APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
HANOVER AREA
2 Bedroom apart-
ment. Immediately
available near
Hanover. appli-
ances, bay windows
washer/ dryer hook-
up. $595.
570-709-0170
HANOVER TWP.
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. New kitchen,
bath & carpeting.
Fresh paint, off
street parking. No
pets or smoking.
One year lease.
$625/month
+ security. Heat,
hot water &
garbage included.
570-825-6720
570-430-9836
HARVEYS LAKE
Spacious, newly
refurbished, 2
bedrooms. Two
baths, kitchen with
granite counters.
Frontal view of lake.
Dock available.
$1,200/month +
utilities & security.
570-675-5129
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom , wall to
wall carpet, appli-
ances, Lake rights.
Off street parking.
No pets. Lease,
security and
references.
570-639-5920
HUGHESTOWN
GRACE LUXURY
APARTMENTS
has an opening. It is
our largest unit. 3
bedrooms, 2 & 1/2
baths. Hardwood
floors, granite coun-
ters, extra large
kitchen, stainless
appliances, gas
heat, central air,
washer/dryer.
Beautiful grounds
with plenty of park-
ing. Property main-
tenance & garbage
included. Apart-
ment only 1 year old.
Rock St. $1,500.
570-760-7326
KINGSTON
2 bedrooms. Hot &
cold water included.
$595/month.
NO PETS.
Section 8 OK.
570-817-3332
KINGSTON
28 East Vaughn St.
Beautiful 1 bedroom
apartment in nice
neighborhood.
Hardwood floors,
French doors, natu-
ral woodwork,
includes refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer, garbage
disposal, washer &
dryer. $450/month
plus utilities & secu-
rity. Off street park-
ing. No pets / No
Smoking, Available
April 1st. Please call
570-287-4047
for appointment
KINGSTON
3rd floor, 1 bed-
room, living & dining
rooms. Large kit-
chen with enclos-
ed back porch, new
appliances. Heat &
water included. No
pets/smoking. $650
/month & security.
570-714-3332
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
E. E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor. Located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living room,
dining room, sun-
room, bath, 3 bed-
rooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of clos-
ets, built-in linen
closet & hutch.
Hardwood & car-
peted floors. Fire-
place. Storage
room. Yard. Washer
/ dryer, stove /
fridge. Heat and hot
water included. 1
year lease + securi-
ty. $950
570-283-4370
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted. Security
system, garage
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No pets.
References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $730.
month. Call
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Modern 2nd floor.
Spacious 3 bed-
room, hardwood
floors, modern
kitchen with appli-
ances, laundry in
unit. Electric heat.
Would consider
small dog. No
Smoking. $800
month plus utilities
& $800. security
deposit.
Call Rae
570-714-9234
KINGSTON
Newly renovated
duplex, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
new gas furnace
with central air,
all new
appliances and
carpeting. Garbage
included off-street
parking, $750 plus
security and
utilities/per month.
Call (570)288-1561
KINGSTON
One bedroom, kit-
chen, living room &
full bath. Includes
w a s h e r / d r y e r ,
stove, refrigerator,
off street parking for
1 car. Water & heat
included. One year
lease + security.
$550.
Call Flo
570-674-1718
570-675-5100
KINGSTON
SECOND FLOOR
Efficiency
Apartment
Refrigerator and
stove provided. All
utilities included.
Nice neighbor-
hood. $475 per
month. Lease, first
& security deposit.
R e f e r e n c e s
required. No pets.
570-288-5569
KINGSTON
Near Kingston Cor-
ners, 2nd floor,
totally remodeled.
clean & bright. One
bedroom, living
room, office/den,
laundry room off
large kitchen. Gas
range, oak cabinets,
modern bath, walk
up attic, ceiling fans
in each room. New
flooring, mini-blinds,
2 air conditioners,
yard parking, water
& sewer included.
No pets, smoking.,
$600/month + utili-
ties, lease & securi-
ty. 570-288-9843
KINGSTON
Totally renovated
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances, office/ den,
laundry in base-
ment, off street
parking, storage,
yard. No pets. No
smoking. Refer-
ences. $625 month
plus utilities
570-714-9234
LEE PARK
Hanover Twp.
2nd floor, 1 1/2
bedrooms, living
room, rear porch,
washer & dryer.
Water, garbage &
sewer included. No
pets. $450/month.
1st, last, security &
references.
570-606-3256
LUZERNE
1 bedroom, wall to
wall, off-street
parking, coin laun-
dry, water, sewer &
garbage included.
$495/month +
security & lease.
HUD accepted.
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
LUZERNE
3 rooms & bath on
2nd floor. Washer,
dryer, range &
refrigerator. Off
street parking, no
pets or smoking.
$450/month + utili-
ties & security.
. 570-696-1763
PITTSTON
144 Carol St.
2nd floor, 4 rooms,
washer dryer hook
up. $450/month,
tenant pays utilities,
570-498-2665
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LUZERNE
276 Bennett St.
2nd floor, large,
2 bedroom, large
living room, den,
dining room, tiled
bath, kitchen with
stove and refrig-
erator, washer
and dryer hook
up, off street
parking. Water
and sewer includ-
ed. $600 plus utili-
ties and security,
no pets or smok-
ing. References.
Call
570-288-7309
Leave Message
MINERS MILLS
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms. Refrigerator
& stove, washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking. $500
/month + utilities,
security, references
570-881-7372
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
NANTICOKE
1st floor, 4 rooms.
Washer/dryer hook
up, stove & refrig-
erator. Newly reno-
vated. No pets. Non
smoking. Heat &
hot water included.
$555/month.
570-287-4700
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom, wall to
wall carpet, off-
street parking,
$595/month + utili-
ties, security, lease.
HUD accepted. Call
570-687-6216
or 570-954-0727
NANTICOKE
Hanover Section
Remodeled, 2nd
floor, 2 bedrooms.
Stove, fridge, wash-
er/dryer hook up, fire-
place. $500 + utilities
& security. Sewage
& sanitary included.
No pets.
570-574-8021
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON LEXINGTON
VILLAGE VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1
bath apartments.
Refrigerator,
stove,
dishwasher &
washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
PITTSTON
1st floor, large 1
bedroom apart-
ment. Newly reno-
vated, off street
parking, washer/
dryer hook up.
SUB-ZERO
SPECIAL!
$725/month, all utili-
ties included.
570-443-0770
PITTSTON
ECONOMICAL
Nice modern eco-
nomical 2 bedroom
apt. Stove, refriger-
ator, washer/dryer
hookup. No pets.
$475/month. +
utilities & security.
570-417-2063
PITTSTON
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Includes
stove & refrigerator.
Laundry hook-up.
Heated garage, off
street parking.
Heat, sewer, water
& garbage included.
$695/month + sec-
urity & lease. No
smoking or pets.
570-430-0123
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
MUST SEE!
2 bedroom apart-
ment, completely
renovated with new
hardwood floors &
ceramic tile. New
appliances, off
street parking, coin
operated washer &
dryer in basement.
No pets, no smok-
ing. $600/month +
security & utilities.
570-357-1383
PITTSTON
One & two bed-
room apartments.
1st & 2nd floor.
Newly painted.
$500/month + secu-
rity. Includes range
& refrigerator,
washer/dryer hook
up & sewage. Off
street parking.
Call Bernie
888-244-2714
ROTHSTEIN INC.
REALTORS
288-7594
PITTSTON
AVAILABLE NOW
3rd floor, 3 bed-
room. $600 +
security. Sewer &
garbage included.
570-574-4380
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PLYMOUTH
176 Orchard St.
1st floor, very nice.
2 bedroom washer
dryer hookup. $485
plus security.
570-779-4240
PLYMOUTH
2 ROOM
EFFICIENCY
All appliances, no
pets/no smoking.
Utilities paid. Back-
ground check & ref-
erences required.
Near bus stop.
$475/month + 1
month security.
(570)592-2902
PLYMOUTH
2nd floor. Bus stops
at door. 5 rooms.
Range, refrigerator,
washer/dryer. Wall
to wall carpet.
Newly remodeled.
Utilities by tenant.
$495/month + sec-
unity. no pets.
570-574-1276 or
570-288-4860
PLYMOUTH
Available
Immediately.
Nice clean 3 (or 2)
bedroom with new
carpeting, stove/
fridge included.
Washer/dryer hook
up. Off street park-
ing. Call quick,
wont last long.
$595/month + utili-
ties. I pay sewer.
Phone
570-674-3120,
day or night.
Marilyn K. Snyder
Real Estate
825-2468
SCRANTON
GREEN RIDGE SECTION
Large 1 bedroom.
Heat included.
Bathroom, eat in
kitchen, living room.
Off street parking.
$625/month
(631) 821-8600 x103
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
SWOYERSVILLE
Must see! Brand
new 1st floor, 3 bed-
room. Comparable
to a Ranch home.
Large living room,
stove, fridge dish-
washer, washer/
dryer, laundry room,
Air & heat. Your
dream home. Wall
to wall carpeting,
hardwood floors, off
street parking, large
back yard. All utili-
ties paid except
e l e c t r i c .
$1075/month + sec-
urity & references.
570-762-2471
WEST PITTSTON
1 room apt. 2nd
floor. Full kitchen,
full bath, hardwood,
washer/dryer heat
included, pets neg.
$550.
267-745-8616.
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WEST WYOMING
425 West 8th Street
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room with off street
parking, washer/
dryer hook up,
stove. No pets.
$525/mo + security.
Sewer & garbage
included, other
utilities by tenant.
570-760-0458
WEST WYOMING
Large modern 2
bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment on quiet
street.
$550 a month
plus utilities.
(570)479-0302
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE /
KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2
bedrooms. Includes
all utilities, parking,
laundry. No pets.
From $390 to $675.
Lease, security
& references.
570-970-0847
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom, 1 bath
2nd floor. Off street
parking. All appli-
ances including
washer & dryer.
Gas heat. No pets.
$575/month
+ utilities, security.
570-881-3359
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms, living
room, kitchen, fin-
ished attic off street
parking. 1st & last
months rent + secu-
rity. Leave message
570-817-0601
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St.
1.5 bedrooms, new-
ly renovated build-
ing. Washer & dryer
available. $650/mo.
includes heat, hot
water & parking.
570-855-4744
646-712-1286
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio, 1 & 2
bedroom apart-
ments. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence & all
doors electronically
locked.
1 bedroom - $450.
2 bedroom - $550.
Water & sewer paid
1 month security
deposit. Email
obscuroknows@
hotmail.com or Call
570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to
schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with
study, off street
parking, laundry
facility. Includes
heat and hot
water, hardwood
floors, appliances,
Trash removal.
$580/mo Call
(570)821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
HEIGHTS
Townhouse type
apartments. 2 bed
rooms, Stove,
fridge, washer/
dryer hookup. Off-
street parking.
Utilities by tenant.
No pets or smok-
ing. $475/month
570-825-8355
6 to 8 pm ONLY
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included.
1 Bedroom$550
2 Bedroom$650.
Call Jazmin
570-822-7944
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 + tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH END
17 Thompson Street
Good neighborhood
& good landlord
requests good ten-
ants. 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er/dryer hook up in
basement. Heat,
hot & cold water
included. Shared
yard & off street
parking. Newly ren-
ovated. Section 8
OK. Small pets con-
sidered. Refer-
ences, credit &
background
checked. $625/
month + security &
lease. Now avail-
able. Leave name &
phone number.
570-825-0151
WI L KE S - BA RRE
RENTALS
Two, 3, & 4 bed-
rooms. $650-$900.
613-9090
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 OK
570-357-0712
WILKES-
BARRE
TOP OF HILL
NORTH MAIN
Maple kitchen,
all appliances,
laundry, FIRST
FLOOR $625 +
utilities. Beauti-
fully done Victori-
an, fireplace
(ornamented), 1
bedroom. NO
PETS /SMOKING.
EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
570-288-1422 570-288-1422
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE TWP
3 bedroom newly
remodeled available
immediately. appli-
ances $600. month.
570-793-6256
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
By General Hospital
Large 1 bedroom,
hardwood floors,
appliances. Eat in
kitchen. Parking
space available.
$500/month +
utilities. No pets.
570-540-5312
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom
water included
2 bedroom
water included
3 bedroom
single
HANOVER
2 bedroom 1/2
double.
4 bedroom
double
LUZERNE
2 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
Large 1 bed
room water
included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WYOMING
1st floor 1 bedroom
apartment. No
pets, no smoking.
Eat in kitchen,
washer & dryer
hookup with partial
basement. Nice
yard. $475/month
plus utilities. 1 year
lease and 1 month
security required.
570-840-0400 for
appointment.
WYOMING
Charming 2nd floor,
1 bedroom, appli-
ances included.
Clean quiet neigh-
borhood. $625/mo
includes heat,
water, sewer and
refuse. No Pets.
570-693-2148
570-430-1204
944 Commercial
Properties
CLARKS SUMMIT
Beautiful 2,000
square foot com-
mercial building
available, within
Main Clark Summit
area. Will lease first
and second floors
separately or
together. More
than adequate
parking with rental.
Professional
inquiries only.
Call:
570-499-6409
570-587-5048
For information.
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315 2,400 Sq.
Ft. professional
office space with
beautiful view of
Valley & Casino.
will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
FORTY FORT
Modern space avail-
able in a nice Forty-
Fort location, high
traffic area, was
used as dental
office with reception
area. $700/month
plus utilities.
Cathy Tkaczyk
696-5422
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
GLEN LYON GARAGE
3 car garage with
additional 1,000 sq.
ft. $400/month.
Please call
570-881-0320
GLEN LYON
STOREFRONT
Unique opportunity
at 61-63 East Main
St. High Traffic
Area. 570-881-0320
PITTSTON
108 S. Main Street
5,000 square feet.
Suitable for many
businesses. Park-
ing for 100 cars.
$600/month + secu-
rity. 570-540-0746.
RETAIL SPACE
RTE 315 LAFLIN
1200 SQ. FT.
$600. PER
MONTH
INCLUDING
UTILITIES.
Business must be
related to Home
Furnishings.
Call 570-650-6265
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 23E
1112 Memorial Hwy,
Shavertown Pa 18708
Oce: 570-901-1020
Fax: 877-202-2103
E-mail: wesellfast@yahoo.com
www.WeichertTradeMark.com
CAREER NIGHT
Is your current position less
than exible?
Whatever your job lacks,
you could nd it in a career
in real estate
Every Tuesday 6 pm
Call Elena for details
570-902-9990
Please call our oce to conrm
your reservation at 570-901-1020
REDUCED! $96,900
REDUCED! $144,900
PITTSTON
Affordable, remodeled, plenty of parking, back
yard, large kitchen, two baths, new roof, ready for
you to move right in. Yes, it will qualify for FHA
fnancing! We can help.
Call Ofce 570-901-1020. MLS#13-3804
BLAKESLEE
This is IT! Large immaculate colonial style home. Large
4 bed, 2.5 bath, HW foors, Large LR with formal DR,
FR, freplace, large modern kitchen, large master
bedroom with Jacuzzi tub, so much more.
Call Ofce 570-901-1020. MLS#13-806
$99,900
MOUNTAIN TOP
Great investment property in Mountaintop. Newer roof,
furnaces, and hot water heaters. OSP, large yard, attic,
and basement. Separate utilities, positive cash fow.
Call Gene Kahley 570-814-4170. MLS#12-3945
$99,900
EAST STROUDSBURG
Reduced! Large two story home with large rear yard
and plenty of off street parking. Convenient location
for commuters to NYC or NJ,one car garage, large LR
with freplace, and so much more.
Call Ofce 570-901-1020. MLS#12-4585
$112,500
TAYLOR
Great Buy. Huge 3 unit apt building in beautiful
Taylor. All units have large rooms and their own
porches. Nice Back yard plus a 3 car garage.
Newer roof and furnace. MLS#13-218
$88,900
WILKES-BARRE
Mostly Rehabbed Property needs to be fnished. New Drywall,
rugs, tile, ceiling fans, kitchen, 200 Amp Elec. Service, bath-
rooms and roof is new. Both sides have large walk up attics.
Call Dave Sudimak 570-406-1488. MLS#12-49.
REDUCED! $33,610
PITTSTON
3 Bedroom home, rear deck and yard convenient to
downtown Pittston, shops and bus routes. Spacious eat-
in kitchen with 1st foor laundry area.
Call Michael OBoyle 570-793-5233. MLS#13-388
R
Ca O
$95,000
WHITE HAVEN
Great bi-level with open foor plan and plenty of space
for all your needs. Serene wooded lot and a stream
that runs trough it. Owner willing to consider rent with
option to buy. Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 or
Donna Cain 570-947-3824. MLS#12-4331
Open House Today 1:30-3:00PM
183 Red Coat Ln., Liberty Hills, Hanover Township
From the welcoming front porch to the completed lower level, this house boasts amenities that go on
an on w/over 3000 sq. ft. of comfortable living space. Gather in the modern granite & S.S. kitchen
w/its open plan that expands into the family room w/gas f.p. An inviting 4 season sunroom over-
looks your own private backyard resort w/built in heated Grecian pool, a deck w/retractable awning
& pool house....a summer oasis. Te 2nd oor oers an open home oce area, master BR w/walk-
in closet that connects to a private bath w/shower & jacuzzi soaking tub & his and her sinks. Walk
up attic, 2 heat pumps, security system & attached garage + so much more.
Directions: S. Main St. W-B...towards Han. Twp. Left onto St. Marys Rd. Follow Rd. to left into
Liberty Hills. 1st right onto Red Coat. House on right.
Te Somerville - 2,210 sq. ft.
2808 Scranton/Carbondale Highway
Blakely, PA 18447
570-383-2981 www.heritagehomesltd.com
Featuring:
Youve Got Dreams. Weve Got Plans.
Scan Code and
Visit Our Website:
MODEL HOURS
Weekdays 12-7
Sat & Sun 12-5
Closed Fridays
HERITAGE HOMES INCLUDE:
Gas Warm Air Heat
Site Work Package
Central Air Conditioning
Concrete Front Porch
Andersen Windows
1st Floor Laundry
Granite Kitchen Top
2 Story Great Room
2 1/2 Tile Baths
1st Floor Master Bedroom
12 Tile Kitchen, Eating
Poured Concrete Foundation
Heritage Homes Promise:
Competitive Pricing
944 Commercial
Properties
LAFLIN
GYM FOR RENT
Set up as a full
court basketball
court with hard-
wood floors, mens
& ladies room and
changing room.
Could be put to any
related use ie: fit-
ness gym, basket-
ball camp or any-
thing that requires a
large open space.
Lots of free parking,
heat and utilities
are included. Rent
is is $3,000 per
month
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for
rent on the Pittston
By-Pass. Highly vis-
ible location with
plenty of parking.
$1,800 sq. ft. of
beautifully finished
space can be used
for any type office
use. $1,750/ mo.
plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
SCHOOL FOR RENT
Finished basement
with classrooms, 1st
floor contains bas-
ketball court, stage
area & kitchen area,
second floor is fin-
ished with class-
rooms. Parking for
25+ vehicles. Prop-
erty maintenance
included. $2,500.
570-760-7326
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
WILKES-BARRE
WAREHOUSE/
OFFICE SPACE
5,000 sq. ft. with
parking lot. Office,
1,000 sq. ft.
Off I-81, EXIT 165
Call 570-823-1719
Mon. Through Fri.
7 am TO 3 pm.
WILKES-BARRE
Great Location to
have a business.
Excellent access.
Building has many
spaces of computer
access. Configura-
tion may permit
multi-use of building
$185,000
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
950 Half Doubles
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom. Washer
dryer hookup. $600
+ utilities. Call
570-954-7919
950 Half Doubles
ASHLEY
3 bedrooms, laun-
dry room on main
floor. Newly reno-
vated. Fenced in
yard. Hanover
School District.
$670. plus utilities.
570-851-2929
leave message
DURYEA
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths, separate
laundry area. Large
yard. Off street
parking. $700/
month + security,
utilities & garbage.
570-466-0401
570-655-6475
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath
1/2 double. Living
room, dining room,
eat-kitchen off
street parking. No
smoking or pets. 1
year lease. $800
month + security.
Call Rae
570-714-9234
KINGSTON
3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath 1/2 double in
excellent condition
with large living &
dining rooms,
kitchen & pantry.
Washer/dryer hook
up. 1 car garage.
No pets or smok-
ers. $750/month +
security. Call
Barbara Metcalf at
696-0883
PLAINS
Spacious, modern 2
bedroom. Wall to
wall carpeting,
bath, living room,
kitchen with all
appliances, off
street parking.
$600 + utilities, 1st
& last months rent
& security.
Absolutely no pets
or smoking!
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
WEST PITTSTON
3 bedroom 1 bath,
freshly painted, new
carpet, modern
appliances. $635 +
utilities.
570-239-3887
953Houses for Rent
BACK MTN. AREA
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
3 garage stalls on
approximately 3
acres. Lawncare &
snow plowing in-
cluded. Tunkhan-
nock School District.
$1,200/month. Call
Richard Long
570-406-2438
570-675-4400
DALLAS BOROUGH
1,700 square feet
bi-level, living room
with hardwoods,
oak kitchen, with
granite counter
tops, three bed-
room, and full bath,
14 by 16 deck all
upstairs. Family
room, bedroom or
office, full bath, 1
car garage and
patio all downstairs.
100 by 150 lot.
Rent, $1,450 month
plus utilities
no pets.
Call Kevin Smith,
696-5420.
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
DALLAS
Modern, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath con-
temporary. $895 +
utilities, security &
lease. No smokers.
570-696-5417.
LEHMAN
4 bedroom, 2 baths,
2 car garage, no
pets, references,
light & heat includ-
ed. 1 month security.
$1,200/month.
570-675-2608
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS BOROUGH
2 bedroom town
home, 1 1/2 baths,
living room, dining
room, kitchen with
all appliances. Full
basement, 12 by 14
deck. No pets.
$800 a month plus
utilities.
Call Kevin Smith,
696-5420.
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
DALLAS
PERFECT 2 BEDROOM
2 bath, 1 car
garage on 1 acre
cared for by
Landlord. All brand
new appliances
included. 1st Floor
laundry, full base-
ment for storage,
Great view, patio.
$1100/mo plus utili-
ties.
570-762-8481
FORTY FORT
45 Butler Street
2 huge bedrooms,
brand new carpet-
ing, refrigerator &
stove, washer/dryer
hook up. Off street
parking. Beautiful!
No pets. $650/
month & security.
570-479-5092
570-417-4180
HANOVER TWP.
34 Allenberry Dr.
End Unit! Many
windows make this
2 bedroom, 2 bath
Townhouse bright
and pleasant.
Please contact
David at
570-235-7599
KINGSTON
Fully remodeled. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath.
close to schools &
shopping. All new
appliances. Front &
rear porches, full
basement & attic.
Off street parking.
$850/month +
utilities, security &
lease.
Call 570-824-7598
KINGSTON
Single family home,
3 bedrooms, one
and a half bath,
with washer and
dryer hook up.
Hardwood floors,
tile floor and
kitchen.
$875/month plus
utilities, security
deposit and
references.
No pets,
No smoking.
570-693-1511
LUZERNE
374 Miller Street
Lovely, remodeled,
two huge bed-
rooms, 4 oversized
closets, ceiling fans.
Full bath on each
floor. Huge living
room, hardwood
floor. Laundry room
off large kitchen.
Many oak cabinets,
gas range, dish-
washer. Enclosed
porches, concrete
patio, full basement
with exit. New gas
baseboard heat,
wiring, plumbing,
flooring. Large
shed & yard. Park-
ing for 3 cars. No
pets, smokers.
Lease & security.
$850/month + utili-
ties. 570-288-9843.
MOUNTAINTOP
Private setting, 3
bedroom, 2 bath
home. Hardwood
floors, area rugs,
large kitchen, dish-
washer, stove &
fridge and gas fire-
place. Office &
second floor bonus
areas. Laundry
hook up in base-
ment. Enjoy this
beautiful setting
with an enclosed
front and back
porch. Sewer &
water included.
No Smoking. No
Pets. $1,350/month
+ security, lease &
background check.
available mid/late
April.
570-678-5850
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP
1 bedroom, large
kitchen, living room,
one bathroom,
refrigerator, stove,
washer/dryer, air
conditioner. Base-
ment, yard, off
street parking and
deck. No smoking
no pets. $1,000
Security, $595 a
month plus utilities.
Call (570) 586-3015
SHAVERTOWN
Good location,
excellent schools.
Modern, 4 bed-
rooms, office, 2 full
baths. Living, dining
rooms. Finished
family room, granite
kitchen with ceram-
ic tile . Large wrap
around deck, out
door Jacuzzi, in
ground heated pool.
Gas heat. Four car
off street parking.
$1,500/month +
utilities, security +
last month deposit.
Includes fridge,
stove, washer/dry-
era, sewer & trash.
Available July 1st.
Pictures available
through e-mail. Call
570-545-6057.
PAGE 24E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
DOING WHAT I LOVE THE BEST!
Working with Buyers and Sellers -
100%Concentration On My Clientele.
I know my business and LOVE it!
2012 BRER Afliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Afliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock
symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license
with no other afliation with Prudential . Equal Housing Opportunity.
Maribeth Jones, GRI, CRB, CRS
Associate Broker
28 Carverton Road
Shavertown, PA 18708
Ofce: 570.696.2600 ext. 210
Direct: 570.696.6565
mbjones@poggi-jones.com
www.poggi-jones.com
I relinquished my administrative responsibilities in March
of 2011. I amfull time and if you heard the rumor that I
retired, it is a RUMOR!
I amentering my 34th year in the real estate business in
Wyoming Valley.
Some of my accomplishments include:
* Certied Relocation Specialist and I work
extensively with relocating families.
* Held the position of Relocation Director for
10 years with Prudential Poggi &Jones.
* Graduate of the Real Estate Institute of
Pennsylvania-GRI Designation.
* Certied Residential Specialist, CRS;
Certied Residential Broker, CRB, Realtors
National Marketing Institute, Chicago.
* Previously held a Broker Appraisal License.
* Past President of Greater Wilkes-Barre Association of
Realtors.
* Graduate of Leadership Wilkes-Barre.
* Sustaining Member of the Junior League of
Wilkes-Barre.
* Member of Greater Wilkes-Barre and Greater Scranton
Multiple Listing Services.
* Graduate of Wyoming Seminary Dean School of
Business.
I know what it takes to market properties. Years of local
expertise and access to the most sophisticated marketing
resources helps me bring together clients fromthe widest
pool of Home Buyers and Sellers in the United States and
abroad. Contact me today to discuss how I can help you
with your real estate needs.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 25E
4
Tax, Documentation Fee and Registration Fee are extra. Chrysler Group retains the right to change incentives/rebates without prior notice. Lease Bonus Rebate is for eligible customers currently leasing
a Chrysler Group Vehicle or returning from a Chrysler Group Vehicle Lease, Restrictions Apply. Military Rebates are for Military Members currently serving or retired Military Members with 20 years
of prior service. Rebates are in lieu of low nance options such as 0% Ally (except on select models, see sales consultant). All prior sales offered excluded. All rebates have been applied to prices.
Ally/Chase Rebates require nancing thru Ally or Chase. All Subject to prior sales. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purpose only. Exp. Date 3-14-13. Some restrictions apply.
888-323-6924
TUNKHANNOCK AUTO MART
2013 CHRYSLER 200
TOURING SEDAN
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate
and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment
is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee.
No Security Deposit.
2013 JEEP COMPASS
LATITUDE 4X4
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest
Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per
year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and
documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate
and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is
plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No
Security Deposit.
9 200S
IN STOCK
Front & Side
Airbags
U Connect Voice
Command
w/Bluetooth
Includes $3,000 Rebate, $1,000 Conquest Rebate, $500 Military
NEW 2013 JEEP PATRIOT
OSCAR MIKE 4X4
Stk# 1355009 Stk# 1373002
STK# 1374023
Price includes 2500 Rebate and 750 Bonus Cash. Additional Rebates may apply (Military, Lease,
Conquest ect..) see Sales Consultant for details.
Stk# 1382005
MSRP $23,275
NOW AS
LOW AS
$
19,436
2013 DODGE
JOURNEY R/T RALLYE
AWD
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease,
10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No
Security Deposit.
Stk# 1347002
Rear DVD
Leather Seating
GPS Navigation
Power Sunroof
4 RTS
AVAILABLE
AT SIMILAR
PRICE
$
341/36mo*
Lease
For
Heavy Duty Snow
Plow
Prep Pkg.
Limited Slip Rear
U-Connect Voice
Command
w/ Bluetooth
2012 RAM 2500
CUMMINS DIESEL 4X4
Stk# 1286246
MSRP $44,235
NOW AS
LOW AS $36,220
2013 RAM 1500
EXPRESS QUAD CAB 4X4
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500
Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495
due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk# 1386010
Price include $1,250 rebate, $1,000 Truck Month Bonus Rebate,
$1,000 Truck Trade in Rebate.
NOW AS
LOW AS $
24,300
Stk# 1386009
5.7 V8 Hemi MDS
20 inch alum chrome wheels
Class IV Receiver hitch
Trailer Brake Control
Keyless Entry
Sirius XM Satellite Radio
Fog Lamps
5.7 V8 Hemi w/MDS
Automatic
Transmission
Sirius XM Satellite
Radio
Remote Keyless Entry
Pwindows Plocks
5 AVAILABLE
AT THIS PRICE
MSRP $30,190
N
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2013 DODGE
CHALLENGER SXT PLUS
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military
Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus
license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk#1348001
PWR.
SUNROOF, GPS
NAVIGATION,
BLUETOOTH, 5
SPD AUTOMATIC
N
E
W
2013 CHRYSLER 300 AWD
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery
plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk# 1351007
ALL WHEEL
DRIVE,
GARMIN NAV.,
REAR BACKUP
CAMERA
27 HWY MPG
N
E
W
N
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W
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N
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W
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AVAILABLE
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Dont risk paying too much somewhere else, truck
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delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
2013 DODGE DART SXT
Stk#1360011
17 DARTS AVAILABLE
AT SIMILAR SAVINGS
Lease For
$152/36 mo.*
2013 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per
year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk# 1320059
AIR
CONDITIONING
$
312/36mo*
Lease For
2013 RAM 1500
TRADESMAN 4X4
2013 CHRYSLER TOWN
& COUNTRY TOURING - L
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at
delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk# 1357006
Driver Convenience Group - Includes Keyless
Enter-N-Go, Remote Proximity Keyless
Entry, Heated Front Seats, Heated Second
Row Seats, Bright Door Handles, Heated
Steering Wheel, Power Adjustable Pedals,
Entertainment Group #2 - Includes Single
Disc DVD Player, 3rd Row Overhead 9 Video
Screen, 2nd Row Overhead 9 Video Screen..
$
295/36mo*
Lease
For
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*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military
Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus
license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
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Remote Start
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NOW THRU THURSDAY NIGHT WE ARE OFFERING
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AutoStick
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PAGE 26E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
941 Apartments
Unfurnishe
941 Apartments
Unfurnishe
941 Apartments
Unfurnishe
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call
570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To
Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen
acres.com
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Equipped Kitchen
Free Cable
Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
CEDAR
VILLAGE
Apartment
Homes
Ask About Our
Winter Specials!
$500 OFF
1ST MONTHS RENT
FEATURING
Washer & Dryer
Central Air
Fitness Center
Pet Friendly
Easy Access to
I-81
Newly Renovated
Sundeck Pool
Mon Fri. 9 5
44 Eagle Court
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706 (Off Route 309)
Call for a special
appointment
570-823-8400
cedarvillage@
affiliatedmgmt.com
10+ Prime
Commercial Acres
w/200+ff on RT 315 &
500+ff on Fox Hill Rd.
Surrounded on 3 sides by
Mohegan Sun Casino &
Race Track. Easy access
to RT 81 & PA Turnpike,
(RT 476) MLS#12-3849
ANN LEWIS 714-9245
State of
the art 34,000 SF office
bldg w/open floor plan.
Features 1000 SF data
center, 8000 SF warehouse
space & parking for 165
cars. Zoned C-4 Heavy
Commercial. MLS#12-3565
JUDY RICE 714-9230 OR
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
Great Investment
Opportunity! Price reduced $905,000 from
original list price. Currently priced below
appraisal. MLS#11-1346
VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371
Commercial opportunity awaits
your business.1st flr 10,000 SF w/offices.
2nd flr storage. Plenty of pkg on 4.62 acres.
MLS#10-1110
JUDY 714-9230
High visibility
for this 3.2 acre parcel! It
is ideal for franchise,
developer or retail use.
Parcel has access from 2
roads and can
accommodate several
buildings MLS#12-2535
JUDY 714-9230 OR
CHRISTIAN 585-0614
Outstanding brick
bldg! Parking for 7-10 cars.
MLS#08-2790
PEG 714-9247
Retail, Office, Medical -
Whatever your need - This 4000 SF Bldg can
accommadate it! Parking for 10. NEW PRICE!
MLS#12-276
JUDY RICE 714-9230
High traffic location. 2900 SF
professional office space w/basement
storage. Pkg for at least 12 cars. MLS#12-
416
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
Ideal bldg for retail sales
or prof offices. High traffic location on
Route 309S. Zoned Commercial. MLS#12-
1534
MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100
PRIME LOCATION - Vacant land
with Penn Dot access already in place. Close
to everything! MLS#12-2517
DAVID 970-1117 or SANDY 970-1110
Warehouse w/office area.
28,000 SF w/overhead door. Ample parking.
Easy access to Rte 81. Motivated Seller!
MLS#12-2947
JUDY RICE 714-9230
5100 SF Masonry building
zoned for lumber yard, machine shop, heavy
equip, etc. Over an acre w/parking.
MLS#12-3216
DEANNA 696-0894
Great opportunity! an
operating US Post Office, plus a 3 bedroom
apartment and 1 bedroom apartment on
Main Rd. Priced to sell! MLS#12-4400
BOB 970-1107
Large Commercial Warehouse
& Office space. Over 3.5 acres overlooking
the river & mountains. Developers need to
see! Perfect for Townhouses! MLS#13-737
ANDY 714-9225
3 BR, Ranch w/gar+
attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal
for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367
RAE 714-9234
6000+ SF furniture
store, plus apt. & lots more space.
High traffic area. MLS#11-3865
RAE DZIAK 714-9234
Large 8000 SF building looking
for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial.
MLS#11-4058
SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117
This 2400 SF bldg
features offices & garage w/overhead door.
Across from Hollenback Golf Course.
MLS#11-4561
JUDY RICE 714-9230
3235 SF Building on .816
acre. Renovated in 2001. Perfect for truck
repair, lanscaper, contractor, etc. MLS#12-
1376
ANDY CISNEY 714-9225
2-Story masonry bldg on
96x180 lot w/pkg for 36 cars. Ideal for apts
or small mfg business. MLS#12-1758
MIKE 970-1100 or MARGY 696-0891
5 Unit building w/private
parking. Well kept - fully rented w/long
term tenants. MLS#10-3866
TERRY DONNELLY 715-9317
Priced to sell! Former store perfect
for a small business or offices! Plus 3 modern
apartments for addtional income. Detached garage,
OSP. High traffic area & convenient location! Dont
miss this one! MLS#12-3805
RAE DZIAK 714-9234
Spacious building in
high traffic location with ample parking.
Adaptable to many uses. MLS#12-3786
ANN LEWIS 714-9245
2 Parcels sold as 1. Many uses for
your new business! Plenty of parking on a
busy street make this an ideal location!
MLS#12-4522
MARY 479-0302
Flood damaged property-
1st floor gutted & ready to remodel! Prime
location. Successful business location for
years. MLS#12-4560
MARK N 696-0724
Former restaurant close
proximity to turn pike, secluded location
could be used as office. MLS#13-108
MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100
Bank owned Warehouse with
loading dock, offices, 3 bathrooms.
Additional pole building offers more space.
Over 1 acre. MLS#13-355
TRACY 696-6674
Currently being used as 1 story
residential home - zoned highway
commercial. Being sold as is. Additional
commercial land MLS#13-602
PATTY ARMELLINO 715-9332
Former bar with 2 apartments,
liquor license & equipment included, no
kitchen in bar, osp for 12 cars. Let
apartments pay the mortgage! MLS#13-784
ANDY 714-9225
Currently set up for a
business on 1st floor with 3BR apartment on
2nd floor. Rear is a large garage with storage
above. MLS#13-735
ANDY 714-9225
Prime Location -
1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09-
3085
MARGY 696-0891
32,000SF,
30+ parking, including trailer spaces
MLS#08-1305
VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371
Located in Central City - on site
parking with loading docks, record storage
space, climate controlled, secure building, metal
racks available for organized storage. MLS#
VIRGINIA ROSE
FOR LEASE - 1200SF Retail space
in prime location. 1st floor, parking in back.
C/A, remodeled restroom. 1 year lease.
$750/m plus utilities. MLS#13-379
NANCY PALUMBO 714-9240
FOR LEASE - 1300SF Retail space
in prime location. 1st floor, gas heat. Parking in
back. 1 year lease. $775/M plus utilities.
MLS#13-376
NANCY PALUMBO 714-9240
Contemporary office space available in a
prime location in Old Forge. Open office space in the front
with hardwood floors. Private office and kitchen in the
back. Parking lot in rear of building. Tenant pays all
utilities. MLS#12-4300
TINA 714-9251
Newly remodeled immaculate
office building. Plenty of parking. Reception
areas, 5 offices, kitchenette. Handicap
access. MLS#13-667
DANA 715-9333
953Houses for Rent
SYLVAN LAKE
1 bedroom house
on Sylvan Lake,
$515/month, plus
utilities & one
month security.
Available April 1.
Call 570-256-7535
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
THORNHURST
MUST SEE!!!
45 minutes west of
the Gap. Large, 4
bedrooms, 3.5
baths, pool commu-
nity, all appliances,
garage, no pets.
$900/month + utili-
ties, 2 months sec-
urity. Must have
good references.
718-916-9872
WEST PITTSTON
1/2 double, 7 rooms
& bath, hardwood
floors, natural wood
work, garage. Great
neighborhood. Non-
smokers. No pets.
Call 570-655-2195
953Houses for Rent
WEST WYOMING
Beautiful brick ranch
home for rent. 2
bedrooms, 2 large
full baths, gas heat,
central air, washer
/dryer, extra large
kitchen, huge two
car garage. Great
quiet location .
Property mainte-
nance & garbage
included. $1,200.
570-760-7326
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, wall to
wall carpeting, small
backyard, washer &
dryer hookup, no
pets. $550 + securi-
ty & utilities. Call
570-822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom. single.
Gas air heat, new
rug and paint, off
street parking for 1
car. Close to store
and bus stop, no
pets, $525 Plus util-
ities and 1 month
security.
570-821-6906
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
All appliances
including washer &
dryer. Small fenced
yard. 1st floor hard-
wood. Large
kitchen. No pets
$650/month +
utilities & security
570-881-3359
WILKES-BARRE
4 bedroom, 2.5
baths. Off street
parking. $800 + util-
ities & security. No
pets. 570-820-7861
Leave Message.
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 5 room
2 bedroom, car-
peting, hookups,
yard, electric heat.
$525 + utilities.
No pets. 868-4444
959 Mobile Homes
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Affordable New &
Used Homes For
Sale & Rental
Homes Available.
HEATHER HIGHLANDS
MHC 109 Main St
Inkerman, PA
570-655-9643
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
WEST PITTSTON
Gorgeous, furnished
room for rent in Vic-
torian home. Every-
thing included. Only
$150/week + securi-
ty. 570-430-3100
WYOMING
Sleeping room.
Private entrance &
bath. Non smoking,
drug free. Subject
to background
check. $100 weekly
+ $200 security.
570-239-3997
Leave Message!
965 Roommate
Wanted
MOUNTAIN TOP/DRUMS
SANDS SPRINGS
GOLF COMMUNITY
Room to rent/
townhome share.
Room with private
bath. Kitchen, deck,
washer/dryer.
410-707-7473
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
OCEAN CITY .
MARYLAND. Best
selection of afford-
able rentals. Full/
partial weeks. Call
for FREE brochure.
Open daily. Holiday
Real Estate. 1-800-
638-2102. Online
reservations:
www.holidayoc.com
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 PAGE 27E
$19,499
2.5L. Auto., CD, 16 Steel Wheels, Tilt,
PW, PDL, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air
Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft
Sys., Message Center, Cruise Control,
Keyless Entry, SYNC, Auto. Headlamps
$
159
$
159
$
15924
MOS.
WAS.....................$22,495
FORD REBATE.............1,500
OFF LEASE REBATE. . . . .1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT..........496
LEASE
LEASE LEASE
FOR
FOR FOR
37
37 37
MPG
MPG MPG
85
85 85
TO CHOOSE FROM TO CHOOSE FROM TO CHOOSE FROM
OVER
OVER OVER
ALL NEW
ALL NEW ALL NEW
2013 FORD
2013 FORD 2013 FORD
FUSION
FUSION FUSION
1
.9%
1
.9%
1
.9%
60
60 60