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Teaching Beyond Belief Therapeutic Education Gina M. Tricamo, M-HYT gmtricamo@gmail.

com 858-774-0785
7 Ways Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Benefit from Yoga 1. Yoga develops motor skills - Kids with autism frequently experience delayed motor development, which can be improved as yoga tones muscles, enhances balance and stability, and develops body awareness and coordination. As motor skills develop, children have a greater sense of their physical self in space and in relation to others, and can improve their gait and stability 2. Yoga improves confidence and social skills - Poor coordination often yields low self-esteem as kids may be singled out or teased for not moving or behaving like other children, or not excelling in sports and outdoor activities. By learning self-control and self-calming techniques through yoga, they are likely to grow confidence in interacting with other children and refine their social skills. Learning to work together in a yoga class and playing with partner poses can also increase confidence within group settings 3. Yoga provides sensory integration - Children with autism often suffer from a highly sensitive nervous system and are easily over stimulated by bright lights, new textures, loud noises, strong tastes and smells. Yoga’s natural setting of dim lights, soft music, smooth mats, and “inside” voices creates a comforting environment largely protected from unknown or aggressive stimuli in which calming down becomes enjoyable. Yoga’s physical poses allow nervous energy to be released from the body in a controlled manner, also leading to a calming sensation. Less stimulation means less uncontrollable behavior, outbursts and repetitive nervous movements 4. Yoga provides coping techniques to both kids and parents -Whether teaching the child breathing techniques for self-calming, talking the class through a guided visualization the child can use when getting anxious, or sharing flashcards of the day’s poses with parents to use at home, yoga provides an awesome toolbox to parents and siblings. It is a transportable practice that both parents and kids can draw from for a lifetime and share a meaningful home activity 5. Yoga facilitates self-awareness - Yoga is particularly instrumental in helping kids with autism learn self-regulation. By becoming aware of their bodies and aware of their breathing, yoga provides them with the ability to cope when they start to feel anxious or upset. Many 'Yoga for Autism' classes teach yoga or breathing techniques specifically intended to help children contend with their escalating emotions. Since these children are visually oriented, savvy instructors add a visual element so that the child has a colored picture of each pose near his or her mat. Often, classes incorporate other experiences known to benefit a child on the autism spectrum, such as massage, music, dance, rhymes and stories 6. Yoga engages the emotional brain - We all know that yoga is far from purely physical, and this combination of movement, music, breath work and story-telling activates the brain’s emotional region. This encourages children to develop awareness of their emotions and those of others, as well as keeps

their attention in the class. Music is another powerful tool that the yoga instructor can share with parents to use at home to recreate the environment of a yoga class 7. Yoga is orderly and consistent - Ideally, the class will be scheduled at the same time and same day of the week, with the students’ mats in the same layout, in the same room, with the same instructor(s). In my experience, there was one instructor per student, with the pairing the same week after week to impart a sense of trust and steadiness. This element of order is very important for a child and communicates stability – a state much preferred to being unexpected and thus out of control. Students may also enjoy learning yoga sequences, such as modified sun salutations, that are performed in the same order at every class. The class should have an opening and closing routine or practice – singing, tuning in, etc. – that further supports the students’ need for order

Brief Bio:
Gina Tricamo holds a Degree from the University of San Diego in Psychology and Cultural Counseling and an AA in Child Development. She is the Creator of Positive Choices through Yoga/Meditation (PCYM) Program for At-Risk Populations, former Juvenile Deputy Probation (Specialty Units) Officer with over 300 hours in Psycho-Therapy, Criminology, Combat Training and Substance Abuse Education. She holds a Masters in Holy Yoga Therapy and a certification in Warriors at Ease Body /Mind Techniques for working in military settings. After years working in law enforcement she resigned her position to begin the process of inner healing and a desire to serve all communities from a more integrated holistic and spiritual prevention/intervention best practice. Reinventing towards a less punitive perspective and growing new hand was a slow, mindful process that led her to redesign her gifts into the arena of healing arts. Gina incorporated her previous professional knowledge to develop a combination of psycho-therapy; kinesthetic educations, art therapy, visualization therapy, breathe work, yoga and meditation for at-risk populations. Gina develops and implements Beyond Belief Holistic Wellness Education via webinar throughout the U.S. and Canada and facilitates private retreats. She has written several therapeutic writings; including teachings dealing with yoga therapy for Addictions, Health Opportunities (including HIV/AIDS), End of Life Journey and Grief Process, Brain Injury, Chronic Pain and Women with Issues. She continues to write extensively in areas regarding holistic and therapeutic approaches in order for all to live fully present in body/mind/spirit. Ms. Tricamo has a private practice as a Holistic and Spiritual Life Coach and Yoga Therapist and presently teaches Yoga at the Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, AZ. WHAT OTHERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT MS. TRICAMO:  ―Gina Tricamo is one of the most gifted presenters I have ever heard. She speaks from her heart with a great deal of sensitivity to the participants while imparting her practical knowledge in therapeutic ways that each person can experience and remember. It is my opinion that Gina's PCYM model has a great deal of potential to heal in real and lasting ways.‖ Dr. Teeya Scholten, R. Psych., Calgary, Alberta ―Again, we see the pattern of deep ethical commitment to social justice and to the spirit of the traditions – whether Christian or Hindu or Buddhist—many of us claim. Gina is not only sincere but charismatic, and many have been helped by her expertise in healing arts and by her positive spirit. Dr. Gail Pérez, University of San Diego San Diego, California ―Ms. Tricamo brings to her role as a yoga therapist and teacher her many years of experience working as a Probation Officer in San Diego, California, who consistently went against the grain, developing innovative and highly-successful programs that brought hope and the possibility of self-renewal to countless incarcerated youth and their families Ricardo D. Stanton-Salazar, Ph. D., Sociologist of Education

INTAKE EVALUATION FORMS   Parent fills out 6 month evaluation/ self-report forms Child fills out self-report forms

Parent’s Form: This evaluation asks questions about your child's feelings, complaints, or behaviors. All of the items below will be true for every child at some time in his or her life. Please read each question carefully and place an x mark under the descriptive word that corresponds to what you believe is most true for your child during the past 6 months Does your child: Never Fidget, is unable to sit still Act as if driven by a motor Daydream too much Distract easily Feel sad Feel hopeless Have trouble concentrating Fight with other children Feel down about him/herself Worry a lot Seem to be having less fun Not listening to rules Not understanding other people's feelings Tease others Blame others for his/her troubles Refuse to share Take things that do not belong to him/her Sometimes Often

PARENT-REPORT FOR CHILDHOOD ANXIETY RELATED DISORDERS Directions: Below is a list of items that describe how people feel. For each item, please write corresponding # that best describes your child's feelings now or in the past 2 weeks. Please answer all items as well as you can, even if some do not seem to concern your child. 1. = Not True or Hardly Ever True 2. = Somewhat True or Sometimes True 3. = Very True or Often True 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. When my child feels frightened, it is hard for him/her to breathe ( ) My child gets headaches when he/she is at school ( ) My child doesn't like to be with people he/she doesn't know well ( ) My child gets scared if he/she sleeps away from home ( ) My child worries about other people liking him/her ( ) When my child gets frightened, he/she feels like passing out ( )

7. My child is nervous ( ) 8. My child follows me wherever I go - he/she is like my shadow ( ) 9. People tell my child that he/she looks nervous ( ) 10. My child feels nervous with people he/she doesn't know well ( ) 11. My child gets stomach aches at school ( ) 12. When my child gets frightened, he/she feels like he/she is going crazy ( ) 13. My child worries about sleeping alone ( ) 14. My child worries about being as good as other kids ( ) 15. When my child gets frightened, he/she feels like things are not real ( ) 16. My child has nightmares about something bad happening to his/her parents ( ) 17. My child worries about going to school ( ) 18. When my child gets frightened, his/her heart beats fast ( ) 19. My child gets shaky ( ) 20. My child has nightmares about something bad happening to him/herself ( ) 21. My child worries about things working out for him/herself ( ) 22. When my child gets frightened, he/she sweats a lot ( ) 23. My child is a worrier ( ) 24. My child gets really frightened for no reason at all ( ) 25. My child is afraid to be alone in the house ( ) 26. It is hard for my child to talk with people he/she doesn't know well ( ) 27. When my child gets frightened, he/she feels like he/she is choking ( ) 28. People tell my child that he/she worries too much ( ) 29. My child doesn't like to be away from his/her family ( ) 30. My child is afraid of having anxiety/ panic attacks ( ) 31. My child worries that something bad might happen to his/her parents ( ) 32. My child feels shy with people he/she doesn't know well ( ) 33. My child worries about what is going to happen in the future ( ) 34. When my child gets frightened, he/she feels like throwing up ( ) 35. My child worries about how well he/she does things ( ) 36. My child is scared to go to school 37. My child worries about things that have already happened 38. When my child gets frightened, he/she feels dizzy 39. My child feels nervous when he/she is with other children or adults and has to do something while they watch him/her - for example read aloud, speak, play a game, play a sport ( ) 40. My child feels nervous when he/she is going to parties, dances, or any place where there will be people that he/she does not know well ( ) 41. My child is shy ( )
Mood and Feelings Questionnaire - Parent Version Please the corresponding # next to the statement that best describes your child in the PAST TWO WEEKS 1. = Not true 2. = Sometimes 3. = True

1. S/he felt miserable or unhappy 2. S/he didn't enjoy anything at all 3. S/he was less hungry than usual 4. S/he ate more than usual 5. S/he felt so tired s/he just sat around and did nothing 6. S/he was moving and walking more slowly than usual 7. S/he was very restless 8. S/he felt s/he was no good anymore 9. S/he blamed her/himself for things that weren't his/her fault 10. It was hard for her/him to make up her/his mind 11. S/he felt grumpy and cross with you 12. S/he felt like talking less than usual 13. S/he was talking more slowly than usual 14. S/he cried a lot 15. S/he thought there was nothing good for her/him in the future 16. S/he thought that life wasn't worth living 17. S/he thought about death or dying 18. S/he thought her/his family would be better off without her/him 19. S/he thought about killing her/himself 20. S/he didn't want to see her/his friends 21. S/he found it hard to think properly or concentrate 22. S/he thought bad things would happen to her/him 23. S/he hated him/herself 24. S/he felt s/he was a bad person 25. S/he thought s/he looked ugly 26. S/he worried about aches and pains 27. S/he felt lonely 28. S/he thought nobody really loved her/him 29. S/he didn't have any fun at school 30. S/he thought s/he could never be as good as other kids 31. S/he felt s/he did everything wrong 32. S/he didn't sleep as well as s/he usually sleeps 33. S/he slept a lot more than usual 34. S/he wasn't as happy as usual, even when you praised or rewarded her/him

Ends parent’s section

SELF-REPORT FOR CHILDHOOD ANXIETY RELATED DISORDERS
YOUTH FORM - for children ages 8 to 11 it is recommended that the child answer the questionnaire sitting with an adult in case they have any questions Directions: Below is a list of statements that describe how people feel. Read each statement carefully and decide which best describes you! Please respond to all statements as well as you can, even if some do not seem to concern you. Place corresponding # choice after each statement 1. = Not True or Hardly Ever True 2. = Somewhat True or Sometimes True 3. = Very True or Often True 1. When I feel frightened, it is hard to breathe ( ) 2. I get headaches when I am at school ( ) 3. I don't like to be with people I don't know well ( ) 4. I get scared if I sleep away from home ( ) 5. I worry about other people liking me ( ) 6. When I get frightened, I feel like passing out ( ) 7. I am nervous ( ) 8. I follow my mother or father wherever they go ( ) 9. People tell me that I look nervous ( ) 10. I feel nervous with people I don't know well ( ) 11. I get stomachaches at school ( ) 12. When I get frightened, I feel like I am going crazy ( ) 13. I worry about sleeping alone ( ) 14. I worry about being as good as other kids ( ) 15. When I get frightened, I feel like things are not real ( ) 16. I have nightmares about something bad happening to my parents ( ) 17. I worry about going to school ( ) 18. When I get frightened, my heart beats fast ( ) 19. I get shaky ( ) 20. I have nightmares about something bad happening to me ( ) 21. I worry about things working out for me ( ) 22. When I get frightened, I sweat a lot ( ) 23. I am a worrier ( ) 24. I get really frightened for no reason at all ( ) 25. I am afraid to be alone in the house ( ) 29. I don't like to be away from my family ( ) 26. It is hard for me to talk with people I don't know well ( ) 27. When I get frightened, I feel like I am choking ( ) 28. People tell me that I worry too much ( ) 30. I am afraid of having anxiety (or panic) attacks ( ) 31. I worry that something bad might happen to my parents ( ) 32. I feel shy with people I don't know well ( ) 33. I worry about what is going to happen in the future ( ) 34. When I get frightened, I feel like throwing up ( ) 35. I worry about how well I do things ( ) 36. I am scared to go to school ( ) 37. I worry about things that have already happened ( ) 38. When I get frightened, I feel dizzy ( )

39. I feel nervous when I am with other children or adults and I have to do something while they watch me - for example: read aloud, speak, play a game, play a sport ( ) 40. I feel nervous when I am going to parties, dances, or any place where there will be people that I don't know well ( ) 41. I am shy ( )

Mood and Feelings Questionnaire - Youth Version
Place the corresponding # next to the statement that best describes you in the PAST TWO WEEKS 1. = Not true 2. = Sometimes 3. = True 1. I felt awful or unhappy ( ) 2. I didn't enjoy anything at all ( ) 3. I was less hungry than usual ( ) 4. I ate more than usual ( ) 5. I felt too tired I just sat around and did nothing ( ) 6. I was moving and walking more slowly than usual ( ) 7. I was very restless ( ) 8. I felt I was no good anymore ( ) 9. I blamed myself for things that weren't my fault ( ) 10. It was hard for me to make up my mind ( ) 11. I felt grumpy and upset with my parents ( ) 12. I felt like talking less than usual ( ) 13. I was talking more slowly than usual ( ) 14. I cried a lot ( ) 15. I thought there was nothing good for me in the future ( ) 16. I thought that life wasn't worth living ( ) 17. I thought about death or dying ( ) 18. I thought my family would be better off without me ( ) 19. I thought about killing myself ( ) 20. I didn't want to see my friends ( ) 21. I found it hard to pay attention or concentrate ( ) 22. I thought bad things would happen to me ( ) 23. I hated myself ( ) 24. I felt I was a bad person ( ) 25. I thought I looked ugly ( ) 26. I worried about aches and pains ( ) 27. I felt lonely ( ) 28. I thought nobody really loved me ( ) 29. I didn't have any fun at school ( ) 30. I thought I could never be as good as other kids ( ) 31. I felt I did everything wrong ( ) 32. I didn't sleep as well as I usually sleep ( ) 33. I slept a lot more than usual ( )

ends youth’s section