The Dallas Morning News

Texas’ Leading Newspaper Dallas, Texas, Wednesday, June 23, 2004 50 cents

Wizard of Oz’s ‘Over the Rainbow’ beats Casablanca’s ‘As Time Goes By’ for best movie song of all time.

One for the Wizard

Get Fuzzy
No. 10

TOP 10 FUNNIES
Starting today, we count down the comics you rated as favorites in last month’s survey. No. 10? Well, the cat’s out of the bag ...

Zits

◗ OVERNIGHT, 7B

◗ TEXAS LIVING, 1E

No. 7

Partly sunny

RUNAWAY PRIESTS

HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT

High: 88 Low: 68 5-day outlook, 8B

◗ NATION

Report corrected: Terrorism hits high

Significant acts of terrorism wordwide reached a 21-year high in 2003, the State Department said in correcting a report that had been cited to boost President Bush’s war on terrorism. 9A

Safe harbor

‘That’s when your hair stands on end and your blood boils’

Judge certifies Wal-Mart bias case
Ruling groups up to 1.6 million women in class-action lawsuit
By MARIA HALKIAS and TERRY MAXON
Staff Writers

Toxic releases rise; figures disputed

Toxic releases from U.S. nonmining industries rose 5 percent from 2001 to 2002, the Environmental Protection Agency said, although a study by environmental groups says the releases might be even higher. 10A

◗ WORLD

Interrogation memos released

President Bush claimed the right to waive anti-torture laws and treaties covering prisoners of war after the invasion of Afghanistan, and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld authorized guards to strip detainees and threaten them with dogs, newly public documents say. 14A

The Rev. Yusaf Dominic, who has many aliases, offers Communion in a church by the Mediterranean Sea. He denied British child molestation charges seven years ago and fled before trial.
MONA REEDER/Staff Photographer

Church aid, legal lapses leave cleric free to roam, recently to a parish on the Italian Riviera
By BROOKS EGERTON and REESE DUNKLIN
Staff Writers

◗ VIEWPOINTS
Do you blog?
If not, you’re missing out on the hottest trend in journalism. A veteran of the medium offers a crash course on how to get out in the blogosphere. 17A

◗ METRO

ALBISSOLA MARINA, Italy — Inside a 16th-century Catholic church by the Mediterranean Sea, the priest dresses as a man of God and preaches about the Holy Spirit. Outside, he tells lies.

“I’m not a functioning priest,” he says, until he realizes a reporter has just seen him celebrate Sunday evening Mass. Then he says he only “occasionally” leads a service and isn’t in active ministry. “Ministry means one has to be in a parish,” he says. In fact, the Pakistani has been serving here since last fall

as associate pastor of Nostra Signora della Concordia. He has also been leading a smaller congregation in the nearby village of Ellera. Italy, it turns out, is at least the third country in which he has worked in parishes since denying child molestation charges in England seven years ago and fleeing, before

he could be tried. The Dallas Morning News tracked him down after Scotland Yard failed. Church aid and law enforcement lapses have made the sojourn possible, as they have in many other cases that The News reviewed in its yearSee CLERIC Page 12A

Miller focusing on broader approach

Mayor Laura Miller says her priorities have changed to a broader vision for Dallas, and at today’s State of the City address, she promises a “big, big announcement.” 1B

Sunday
The Salesians of Don Bosco’s movement of accused priests

Monday
Papal candidate sheltered admitted abuser

Tuesday
Catholic leaders, Mexican justice system help accused priest

Today
Scotland Yard couldn’t locate a fugitive priest, but The News found him leading a parish in Italy.

COMING IN SUNDAY READER: Commentators from across the spectrum of American Catholicism react to The Dallas Morning News’ four-part series, ”Runaway Priests.” Also, The News’ editorial board calls for reform.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. has an Erin Brockovich, and her name is Stephanie Odle. The original plaintiff said she was ecstatic Tuesday when a California judge ruled that a massive gender-discrimination lawsuit against Wal-Mart can move forward as a class action. The decision covers as many as 1.6 million Wal-Mart employees since Dec. 26, 1998 — the date Ms. Odle filed her discrimination complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. “I’m so proud. I hope this makes a difference for every woman in retail,” Ms. Odle said while making airline reservations to fly to New York to appear today on NBC’s Today show. The lawsuit alleges that women were paid less, promoted less often and took longer to get promotions than men at the company. The decision by U.S. District Judge Martin Jenkins in San Francisco means that the women may pursue their claims as one group rather than as individual cases. A Wal-Mart spokeswoman said that “we strongly disagree with his decision” and that the company plans to appeal. “Let’s keep in mind that today’s ruling has absolutely nothing to do with the merits of the case,” WalMart’s Mona Williams said in a statement. “Judge Jenkins is simply saying he thinks it meets the legal requirements necessary to move forward as a class action.” Jocelyn D. Larkin, a California lawyer who is a lead attorney in the case, said the size of the potential class of plaintiffs gives it clout. “The real significance is that with a company the size of WalMart, it’s very hard to get their attention. A couple of lawsuits, a
See WAL-MART Page 13A

◗ OVERNIGHT

Indie-film theater moves into Plano

The Angelika Film Center & Cafe opens today in Plano, marking the theater chain’s first foray into the far suburbs. 7B

As storm debris lingers, city says some confused about pickup times

By MICHAEL E. YOUNG
Staff Writer

North Texas Iraqis Clearing up the trash talk feel the tug of war
While embracing America, expatriates worry about homeland
By GRETEL C. KOVACH
Staff Writer

INDEX
SECTION A People....................................3 Texas...................................4,5 Elections ................................6 Nation...............................9-11 World ..............................14,15 Editorials and Viewpoints .16,17 SECTION B — Metro Lottery....................................2 Obituaries............................4,5 Overnight................................7 SECTION C — SportsDay TV/Radio ...............................2 Baseball..............................4-6 SECTION D — Business Market Day ..........................4-7 SECTION E — Texas Living Kids Day.................................3 Bridge ....................................5 Dear Abby ..............................5 Variety columnists ...................5 Comics and Puzzles ...........8-10 Television..............................11 Arts Day ...............................14 SECTION F — Classified SECTION G — Texas Taste

©2004, The Dallas Morning News

Across some corners of Dallas, evidence of early June’s pounding thunderstorms hangs on endlessly, piled up curbside, giving neighborhoods the feel of an Old West fort — life behind a wall of wood. Fear not, officials say. Those downed tree limbs and uprooted shrubs will be whisked away during the regular once-a-month bulk-trash pickup, but no sooner. That might surprise some people, city spokesman Scott Tims said. When the city announced that homeowners could drag limbs and brush to the curb without regard to their usual bulk-trash schedule, “I think some people thought that meant we’d be picking it up earlier,” he said. Sorry, no. “And we didn’t give people a free ride to haul their old sofa out there and put it with the tree trimmings either,” he said. That’s occurred in some neighborhoods.

Militants behead S. Korean in Iraq

RICHARD MICHAEL PRUITT/Staff Photographer

Other bulk trash should not be put with storm debris, the city says. Pickup will follow the regular schedule.
Dallas Fire-Rescue’s Roland Gamez, who oversees the city’s 311 telephone system, said his staff handled calls from folks worried that the debris would kill the grass beneath it. Crews are working furiously to haul away all the debris — 4,200 loads in less than two weeks, compared with 4,500 for a typical month, said Jody Puckett, director of sanitation services. “Because of that, we’re running about a day and a half behind,” she said. “So people who are used to seeing us on the third Wednesday might not see us until the third Friday.” Or you can haul it away yourself to one of these city locations: 5100 Youngblood Road; 4610 S. Westmoreland Road; 9500 Harry Hines Blvd; 7677 Fair Oaks Ave.
E-mail myoung@dallasnews.com

I

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From the safety of his rose brick home in Murphy, Ali Kadhim doesn’t worry that his young sons will be kidnapped for ransom. No car bombs singe the manicured lawns of his subdivision near Plano; no militias battle U.S. soldiers into the night. But the 38-year-old IraqiAmerican is disturbed by the escalating violence as his native country takes small but significant steps toward political freedom. On June 30, the official occupation of Iraq will end when America transfers power to a recently appointed interim government. Yet Iraq’s future as a sovereign nation remains uncertain. For Iraqi-Americans watching from afar, the transition is even more complex. They have two

Islamic militants beheaded Kim Sunil, a South Korean who pleaded “I don’t want to die” in a videotaped message, after his government refused to pull its troops from Iraq. 2A homelands under fire. They live as both conqueror and conquered. “It makes it even more complicated that I am living in America. Because I feel this is my country, too. What is good for America is good for me,” Mr. Kadhim said. “I am stuck between two worlds.” As fresh violence bloomed this spring in Iraq, Mr. Kadhim had difficulty sleeping. His grades in
See IRAQIS Page 2A

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