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RDEDigest

Official Research, Development and Extension Newsletter of the University of the Philippines Los Baños
visit the UPLB RDE Portal at http://ovcre.uplb.edu.ph

Volume 4 Number 2 July - December 2012

UPLB holds international conferences on cooperatives, climate change adaptation
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▲PARTICIPANTS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE on Cooperative Enterprises organized by the CEM-Institute of Cooperatives and Bio-enterprises last November 8-10.

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▲PARTICIPANTS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation on Food and Environmental Security last November 21-23.

PLB, with the support of several partners, recently held two international conferences this November 2012, furthering its bid to internationalize its research. The first conference, the "International Conference on Co-operative Enterprises" was organized by the Institute of Cooperatives and BioEnterprise Development of the College of Economics and Management last November 8-10 at SEARCA, UPLB Campus as part of the university's celebration of the International Year of Co-operatives. The conference featured keynote speeches, scientific papers and testimonials on the different breakthroughs and significant experiences in co-operative promotion and development. Papers presented were in the focal areas of cooperative education, cooperative enterprise development, cooperative finance, ICT/database management for cooperatives, women

and youth in cooperatives, and the role of co-operatives in environmental sustainability. It drew nearly 200 participants from all over the country and from countries such as Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia Viet Nam and even as far away as the Czech Republic. The conference also became a rallying point for various stakeholders of the Philipine cooperative movement to take stock of the status of cooperativism and how research along the field could provide answers to the current problems of cooperatives. The second confab, the "International Conference on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation for Food and Environmental Security," held at SEARCA from November 21-23, was organized by the UPLB Interdisciplinary Program on Climate Change and several other development partners from the Asia-Pacific region and Europe.
1 2 2 3 5 5 PHIVOLCS lecture on earthquakes ... BIOTECH pilot plant inaugurated ... Personality profile: Dr. Romar Sese ... Personality profile: Prof. Nel Altoveros ... Communities prepare for disasters ... Pahinungód tackles volunteerism ...

It primarily aimed to promote the exchange of state-of-the-art knowledge on climate change science, adaptation strategies, disaster risk reduction, planning and management and vulnerability and impact assessment tools among regional stakeholders specifically in the agriculture and environment sectors. The conference attracted more than 200 researchers, academicians, policy makers and planners, development workers, and other professionals from different international, government, nongovernment and academic organizations from all over the globe. A total of 44 papers were delivered by researchers coming from Japan, Singapore, Canada, Italy, Germany, Costa Rica, Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, Lao PDR, Nepal, Egypt, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Fiji, Timor Leste, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, and Kenya (Florante A. Cruz with reports from Alexandria Camille M. Castillo) ■
6 7 8 10 12 14 Faculty train in basic robotics ... 15 College chem teachers retooled ... 15 UPLB launches business incubator ... 16 IPO holds orientation series ... 17 DOST-UPLB TBI in national confab ... 18 Volume Photo News ... 4 Number 2 19 1 July - December 2012

IN this ISSUE:

UPLB holds international conferences ... More support to research start 2013 ... Performance indicators evaluated ... Cornell and UPLB renew ties ... UPLB at the 2013 NSTW ... REPS hold pre-conference ...

NEWS

University increases support for basic research; allots funds for publication fees and international conferences for REPS
proposal crafted by the Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Extension to increase the UPLB Basic Research Program from P1.5 M to 5M per year has gotten the nod of the Office of the Chancellor. "This development will translate to at least 30 grants per year, from the current average of 10 grants per year," Vice-Chancellor for Research and Extension Maria Victoria O. Espaldon recently reported. The increase in funds will commence in 2013 and will benefit those who have submitted proposals to the UPLB Basic Research Program this year. "We are also very happy to inform all our Research, Extension and

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Professional Staff (REPS) that UPLB has expanded the coverage of its Academic Development Fund, which originally provides support only to faculty members, to also provide support to REPS," Dr. Espaldon added. Through the UPLB Expanded Academic Development Fund, REPS can request financial assistance for them to publish their research outputs in journals accredited by Thomson Scientific (ISI-listed) and attend international conferences to orally present their research papers. The financial assistance of not more than US $500 maximum or the equivalent peso amount maybe availed once every three years by REPS for the abovementioned purposes.

With a renewed thrust to place itself in a level alongside world-class universities in the region, the university has been pursuing several initiatives to increase research productivity. "We are also studying giving support to the various ISI-indexed journals published by units in the university. For example, we might seek to provide funds for these journals to produce special issues on identified topics, i.e. our growth areas," the Vice-Chancellor said. The OVCRE has also submitted a proposal to provide a regular research budget for our Professor Emeriti, to the tune of P1.5 M a year, which would enable them to do research and mentor our junior scientists at the same time. (Florante A. Cruz) ■

UPLB gives inputs in workshops evaluating research performance indicators

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he Office of the ViceChancellor for Research and Extension represented the univeristy during the SeminarWorkshop on Research Performance Evaluation conducted by the National Academy of Science and Technology last August 29-30, 2012 at the Bellevue Hotel in Alabang, Muntinlupa City. During the activities, Vice-Chancellor Dr. Maria Victoria O. Espaldon and Assistant Vice-Chancellor Dr. Edna A. Aguilar was able to share the university's mechanisms in evaluating its research performance and the strategies being pursued to upgrade UPLB's scientific capabilities.

Representatives from De La Salle University, Ateneo de Manila University, Mindanao State UniversityIligan Institute of Technology and other government research institutions also participated. Officers from scientific publishing organizations Elsevier and Scival Solution Services also gave orientations on how research performance can be evaluated through bibliometrics. According to the organizers, while research institutions in the country already have their own way of assessing performance, evaluation systems should still be improved in order to enhance research capability. (Florante A. Cruz) ■

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▼ASSISTANT TO THE VICE-CHANCELLOR Dr. Edna A. Aguilar presents their group's outputs on research performance evaluation during the workshops held on the second day.

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest

NEWS

UPLB renews academic agreement with Cornell University as Cornell Club celebrates centenary

PHOTOS: ACMCASTILLO

▲CALS Dean Dr. Kathryn J. Boor

▲CIIFAD Director Dr. Ralph D. Christy

▲Cornell Prof. Emeritus Dr. Randolph Barker

n celebration of its centenary, the Cornell Club of the Philippines, headed by former UP President and UPLB Chancellor Emil Q. Javier, hosted the visit of Cornell University officials led by the Dean of its College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) Dr. Kathryn J. Boor last November 16, 2012 During the day, Dr. Boor, along with other prominent Cornell graduates, also delivered separate talks in a symposium on "Philippine Rural Development and Cornell" held at SEARCA's D.L. Umali Auditorium. The symposium covered topics on the future of Philippine agriculture and the state of the economy, while centering on the contributions of Filipino Cornell graduates to the country and the developing world. The highlight of the symposium was the signing by Chancellor Dr. Rex Victor O. Cruz and Dean Boor of the

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renewal of the Academic Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the two institutions. UPLB Office of Institutional Linkages Director Prof. Jean Loyola and CALS Director of International Programs Dr. Ronnie Coffman served as witnesses during the MOU signing. The symposium started with former Department of Agriculture Undersecretary Dr. Orlando J. Sacay and 1st district of Leyte Congressman Ferdinand Martin G. Romualdez giving the welcome address and opening remarks, respectively. Dr. Boor, an acknowledged food scientist, served as the main speaker, and stressed the importance of agriculture to food security through her topic, "Hungry for Change: Serving up Solutions for Food Security." The second speaker from Cornell was Dr. Ralph D. Christy, Director of the

Cornell International Institute for Food, Agriculture and Development (CIIFAD). Dr. Christy talked about "Addressing Today’s Global Development Challenges." The third Cornellian, Professor Emeritus Dr. Randolph Barker, shared his thoughts and research on "Water for Agriculture: Growing Concerns in the Philippines." Dr. Barker is very familiar with the Philippines, having worked with the International Rice Research Institute for a significant part of his scientific career. From the Philippine side, speakers included former UP President Dr. Emil Q. Javier, former NEDA Director General Dr. Vicente B. Valdepenas, Jr.; and CHED Chairperson Hon. Patricia B. Licuanan. Former CA Dean Dr. Cledualdo B. Perez, also a Cornell graduate, served as the master of ceremonies. (Alexandria Camille M. Castillo) ■
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NEWS

At the 2012 NSTW, a bumper crop of awards for UPLB

PHOTOS: FACRUZ | ACMCASTILLO

University showcases research products anew in national technology exhibitions

▲DR. MILAGROS M. PERALTA, Professor of chemistry and convenor of the UPLB Nanotechnology Program explains to the visitors of UPLB's booth at the National Science and Technology Week Exhibition the potential uses of nanotechnology in making agriculture more productive and efficient through value-addition. The exhibition was held at the SMX Convention Center, Pasay City.

▲DR. LUIS REy I. VELASCO, former UPLB Chancellor, is awarded by DOST Secretary Mario Montejo the 2012 Gawad LIDER Award for championing science education.

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he Office of the ViceChancellor for Research and Extension has again successfully taken the lead and coordinated the university’s participation in two major, nationally-held exhibitions, namely the DOST - National Science and Technology Week (July 10-14, 2012) at the SMX Convention Center; and the DA-BAR National Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Week Technology Forum and Product Exhibition at the SM MegaTrade Hall (August 8-12, 2012). An estimated 2,000 visitors dropped by the UPLB booths during the course of the two exhibitions. The university also participated, in partnership with the UPLB Foundation, Inc., in the National Academy of Science and Technology’s exhibition held during the academy’s Annual Scientific Meeting from July 11-12, 2012. About 200 visitors

▲DR. CHRISTIAN JOSEPH R. CUMAGUN, plant pathologist at the CA-Crop Science Cluster received the Eduardo A. Quisumbing Medal (Outstanding R and D Award) for his significant work on Fusarium of rice and corn.

▲DR. SUSANA M. MERCADO poses with DOST Usec. Fortunato Dela Peña after winning the Likha Award during the 2012 National Invention Contest and Exhibits with her entry "Microbial rennet technology for cheese-making."

interacted with UPLB representatives during the said event. Additionally, UPLB spearheaded the SiyenSaya Los Baños Science Festival's Wonderama

from July 17-20, 2012. More than 4,000 visitors, mostly students from the CALABARZON region, came to the annual festival. (Florante A. Cruz) ■

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest

NEWS

Research, Extension and Professional Staff Pre-Conference held at UPLB
PLB's Research, Extension and Professional Staff (REPS) sector converged at the A.G. Samonte Hall last October 19, 2012 in a pre-conference to discuss the issues and concerns they face as the university quests for a 'world-class research university' status. The Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Extension, with ViceChancellor Maria Victoria O. Espaldon at the helm, has committed support to the REPS sector and has closely collaborated with the UP Society of REPS, Inc. (UP REPSS) for the success of the pre-conference. With the theme "UPLB REPS in One UP," the REPS' pre-conference aimed to: (1) characterize the REPS sector in UPLB; (2) identify constraints to the sector’s fulfilment of its role in the attainment of UPLB’s academic goals and objectives; and (3) recommend measures that will address the identified constraints. During the conference plenary, Vice-Chancellor Espaldon gave a keynote address which focused on the initiatives UPLB is undertaking in order to transform itself into a worldclass research university. Dr. Espaldon enumerated several initiatives in the

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areas of capability-building, financial support, professional development and improvement of research facilities. Four more talks were delivered during the morning session. Dr. Calixto M. Protacio, Director of the CA-Crop Science Cluster, talked about research productivity in UPLB, encouraging the REPS to constantly push themselves to publish in ISI-indexed journals. On the subject of hiring and mentoring to sustain an environment of excellence in UPLB, Graduate School Dean Dr. Jose DV. Camacho, Jr. showed that UPLB should now look for certain personal qualities and skill sets from new researchers to makes its personnel base at par with international organizations. He also gave tips on how mentors and mentees should act and treat one another. The third speaker, UPLB Ugnayan ng Pahinungód Director Dr. Rowena DT. Baconguis talked on UPLB as a public service university and the role of the REPS as public servants. She highlighted the public service efforts being done by the different colleges and units. She stressed that although UPLB should focus on the underserved, the Los Baños community should also greatly benefit from the university.

Finally, Assistant to the ViceChancellor for Research and Extension Dr. Edna A. Aguilar showed interesting data on how UPLB is generating funds to sustain its culture of excellence. She happily announced that the administration has increased the funds allocated for basic research. Dr. Aguilar also encouraged the audience to actively do research as it not only generates funds for the university, but provides personal incentives and recognition as well. She also pushed the REPS to commercialize and profit from their research outputs, citing six UPLB technologies that are now commercialized. During the afternoon, the REPS formed groups to discuss the morning session topics. The workshop outputs and recommendations will be the main talking points of a bigger REPS conference, targeted to be held on March 2013. UPLB has the most number of REPS in the whole UP System. In closing the activity, UP REPSS President Ms. Laida J. Abarquez said that through the conference, the UPLB REPS will be better informed, thus be more productive in achieving with unity the goals of the university. (Alexandria Camille M. Castillo) ■
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NEWS

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n celebration of the Ecology Awareness Week, the Environmental Biology Division of the Institute of Biological Sciences held a seminar on "Earthquake Hazards and Risks in Metro Manila and Nearby Provinces" last July 23, 2012; with no less than Dr. Renato U. Solidum, Jr., Director of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) lecturing. A distinguished geologist and earthquake expert, Dr. Solidum stressed the role of PHIVOLCS in using science to make communities safer. He described earthquakes and presented the hazards and risks that Metro Manila, Laguna and Cavite would face in the event of an earthquake. He also gave instructions on how to survive an earthquake attack. The Philippines, located along the 'Pacific Ring of Fire,' is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. A number of natural disasters occur in the Philippines every year, specially typhoons. However, Filipinos should prepare more for earthquakes than for any other hazards, Solidum said. "This is primarily because earthquakes can cause further destruction such as ground rupture, ground shaking, liquefaction, landslide, tsunami, and fire," the director explained. According to Solidum, using technologies at PHIVOLCS, they have already created different scenarios in case active fault lines in the Philippines would move. The active fault line that would affect Metro Manila down to Calamba is the West Valley Fault. PHIVOLCS' studies show that this fault has moved four times in the past 1600 years with magnitude 7 in the average. "An earthquake of magnitude 7 is equivalent to 32 Hiroshima bombings," he analogized the gravity of the number. "When the West Valley Fault moves again, we anticipate

PHIVOLCS’ Solidum lectures on earthquake awareness
intensity 8-9 for Metro Manila and intensity 7-8 for UPLB," he shared. The last recorded movement of this fault was in August 20, 1653 with a magnitude of 6.9. "Kapag hindi ka na makatayo, intensity 8 na ‘yon, delikado na," Dr. Solidum said. He also stressed that the so-called "triangle of life" is untrue because furniture or any object tend to move during very strong earthquakes. Thus, the right thing to do is to go under a table and hold the table's feet so that it would not move. So, in earthquake drills, what is instructed to everyone is to duck, cover, and hold. Providing some statistics on the earthquake activity in the country, Solidum showed that "there are 20 earthquakes recorded per day; 200 earthquakes felt per year; and 90 destructive earthquakes and 40 tsunamis have occurred in the past 400 years." According to him, a destructive earthquake comes every five years while a destructive tsunami happens every ten years. Although it is improbable to predict a specific date when a destructive earthquake might happen, Dr. Solidum said that it may occur anytime within 400 years after the 1653 earthquake caused by the West Valley Fault. Although Dr. Solidum gave some grim scenarios that may cause personal alarm, for him, "it is always important
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▲PHIVOLCS DIRECTOR Dr. Renato U. Solidum, Jr. jokes about calling himself a "fault finder" during the special seminar on earthquakes.

that you first give the facts, the real score, to people, and then tell them what to do." He stressed that the Local government units are primarily responsible in implementing the earthquake impact reduction plans that PHIVOLCS provides. Currently, PHIVOLCS has improved their earthquake monitoring system by acquiring two new processing systems that can detect local and global earthquakes. They are also targeting to increase their station networks from 68 to 85 by 2016. More information about earthquake (including volcano and tsunami) awareness, preparedness materials, and hazard maps are available on www.phivolcs.dost.gov.ph. A copy of the latest Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study (2004) is also available from the PHIVOLCS website. (Alexandria Camille M. Castillo) ■
Originally published online by the UPLB RDE Portal, 07/12/12

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest

NEWS

▲DR. FIDEL REy NAyVE, (in white headwear at right), BIOTECH's lead person for the pilot plant's renovation leads the tour and entertains the reporters.

▲CHANCELLOR REX VICTOR O. CRUZ (3rd from left) leads the cutting of the ribbon with DOST Undersecretary for R&D Dr. Amelia P. Guevara, assisted by former DOST Secretary and BIOTECH Diretor Dr. William G. Padolina and current BIOTECH Director Dr. Reynaldo V. Ebora.
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BIOTECH inaugurates renovated Pilot Plant
Conducts business forum as part of National Biotechnology Week celeb
PLB had every great reason to celebrate last November 29, 2012 as BIOTECH, the country's premier R&D institute for agricultural biotechnology, inaugurated its newly renovated pilot plant. The launch, attended by more than a hundred guests, was the culmination of the university's celebration of the 8th National Biotechnology Week, observed all over the country from November 26 to 30. Leading the celebration at BIOTECH were Department of Science and Technology (DOST) Undersecretary for R&D Dr. Amelia P. Guevara, Dr. William G. Padolina, President of the National Academy of Science and Technology (NAST), former UP President and UPLB Chancellor Dr. Emil Q. Javier, Dr. Rex Victor O. Cruz, UPLB Chancellor and Dr. Reynaldo V. Ebora, UPLB-BIOTECH Director, among others. The renovation of the pilot plant was part of a P50-million research and

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development grant from the DOST given to BIOTECH to upgrade the plant's equipment and increase its capabilities. With new equipment, BIOTECH will be able to step up the production of biotechnologies from laboratory scale, and later to commercial scale. During the press conference held by the organizers for several members of the press brought in from Metro Manila, Dr. Ebora reported that the funds infused by the DOST to BIOTECH through the Philippine Council for Industry, Energy and Emerging Technology Research and Development (PCIEERD) was an important step for the institute to go into a higher level of research. Dr. Fidel Rey Nayve, program leader of BIOTECH's Fermentation Engineering Service Laboratory and leader of the renovation project said that the building and the old equipment was rehabilitated at a cost of P25 million. New equipment were also acquired, purchased with the millions

of pesos the project was able to save by tapping local chemical engineering companies to upgrade the BIOTECH's fermentors. In the afternoon, BIOTECH held a technology business forum in cooperation with the DOSTPCIEERD, Department of Trade and Industry's Bureau of Investments (DTI-BOI) and the UPLB Center for Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship. BIOTECH products presented to the audience were 'Brown Magic', an orchid biofertilizer; 'Salmonella DAS Kit, a cheap detection system for Salmonella contamination in food, water and feeds; 'Biovac HS', a vaccine against hemorrhagic septicemia, and 'Microbial rennet', a microbebased substitute to animal rennet for cheese making. DTI Special Events Division OIC Mr. John Clemente introduced the DTI-BOI programs and support mechanisms which both technology developers and investors can tap in putting up technology-based enterprises. (Florante A. Cruz) ■
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PEOPLE AND PERSONALITY
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his is about a boy who read books and then fell in love with the stars. Like many before him, he was enchanted with the wonders of the vast sky and what lies beyond. In 1865, Jules Verne wrote a science fantasy novel, From the Earth to the Moon, on space travel. This was read at that time as something comical, absurd and impossible. Half a century later, it inspired Konstantin Tsiolkovsky to develop the theory of spaceflight. This in turn, made possible the first manned spaceflight by the Soviet Union in 1961. And eventually, the first men set foot on the moon in 1969. A hundred years has passed and one deemed impossible feat was made a reality because one man had a vision. And Dr. Rogel Mari Sese is a man filled with vision, although one that is different from that of Verne's. While Verne’s vision was fueled by uncanny creativity, Dr. Sese arms his with an array of mathematical formulas, scientific objectivity and precision. "What I can say about him is that he is very driven," narrated Director Dr. Virgilio P. Sison of the Institute of Mathematical Sciences and Physics. "He knows what to do and he accomplishes it according to what he has set." Star spangled man At a relatively young age, Dr. "Romar" Sese has already achieved a lot. He is the Philippine Government's Focal Person in its Space Science Education Program and is very active in several national and international astronomical organizations. He is the founding chairman of the Southeast Asian Young Astronomers Collaboration.

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Romar Sese
Championing space education in the Philippines
BY DANIEL DAVE J. BATAYO

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest

PEOPLE AND PERSONALITY
PHOTO: DDJBATAYO

in radio and television programs to further promote the wonders and science of astronomy. Into the core Astrophysicist, is a term and profession foreign to most Filipinos even from those in the academe. Chances are slim of finding a Filipino youth dreaming of becoming one; much less know what an astrophysicist really does. So the question begs to be answered, Why is he here? The study of astronomy and astrophysics was virtually non-existent in the country then. Much like a farmer with no land to till, Dr. Sese decided to drop his teaching job so he can pursue his dream of studying astrophysics in Japan. With the help of the Monbukagakusho (Japanese Government) scholarship, he managed to finish his advanced degrees on time. "We never expected him to communicate with us and say I want to return to UPLB to serve the university and the country," said Dr. Sison, "He could have stayed because there are a lot of opportunities for him there." A lot of his colleagues were dumbfounded on his intent to return to the country specially that there is nothing waiting for him in the Philippines. But Dr. Sese saw things from a different perspective. According to him, the reason why astrophysicists don't have anything to work with in the country is because no one dared to start one. "No one wants to build from scratch and do the dirty work," he said. Thus, Dr. Sese strongly believes that it is high time for the Philippines to have its own space agency. He knows that it is a long road and admits, "it does not happen overnight." According to him, the reasons why he and his partners are focusing on extension work and education is because they are thinking for the long term.

"We are trying to spike interest among the youth for them to pursue courses that are in line with astronomy, astrophysics and other related disciplines," according to Sese. He says that it would be useless to have a space agency with no trained personnel to run it. "Astrophysics and space science is a study that is out of this world, literally and figuratively," said Dr. Sese. The benefit of studying this field, however, encompasses a vast array of areas, not just physics, but also agriculture, weather science, and even national security. "There is a high need to raise public awareness about astrophysics and space science. That is why we a give a lot of attention to education and extension work," Sese explained. Feet still on the ground This scientist and space champion is still human. Even with a set of intimidating achievements under his belt, he still leads a normal life. Although precision and calculated events govern his expertise, Dr. Sese leads his life much like everyone else's. "I value spontaneous events," shares Dr. Sese. He furthers that not everything you do have to be planned. "What's important is you don't lose track of your long term goals and simply treat everything as a learning experience towards what you're aiming for." Aside from teaching at UPLB, Dr. Sese is in involved in various projects and activities which aligns with his goal of establishing a Philippine Space Agency. He is optimistic that the fruits of his labor would be seen in a matter of two to five years. Establishing a Philippine Space Agency may seem comical, absurd, and impossible for many right now. But with the efforts of Dr. Sese and his colleagues, we can be sure that unlike Verne's, Dr. Sese’s vision does not have to wait a century for it to be fulfilled. ■
Volume 4 Number 2 July - December 2012

▲DR. ROMAR SESE, aside from teaching physics subjects, heads the very first astrophysics research laboratory in the Philippines, a pioneer in promoting astrophysical research and education in the country.

Through his efforts, the university, as well as the country, have started participating in various regional fora in the fields of astronomy and astrophysics. He serves as the country’s permanent representative to the Asia-Pacific Regional Space Agency and holds the position of national coordinator for the Universe Awareness Program. Described by his institute as "one of IMSP’s most prolific scientists", he has participated in several scientific meetings locally and abroad and has made numerous contributions to the field of astrophysics through his oral presentations and publications. But what sets him apart from other scientists is that he exerts a tremendous part of his time and efforts just for promoting space science education. He regularly visits different schools to share among young Filipinos about astronomy, astrophysics and space. He has also served as resource person

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PEOPLE AND PERSONALITY

The Robotics Guru Nel Altoveros

BY ALEXANDRIA CAMILLE M. CASTILLO

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obotics, both as a science and practice, has yet to flourish in the Philippines.

One UPLB professor, Nelio C. Altoveros, has made it a life goal to help improve science and technology in the Philippines through teaching and research in robotics. Altoveros, an associate professor of physics at UPLB’s Institute of Mathematical Sciences and Physics (IMSP), is a robotics enthusiast and a very proud grandfather. A native of Calamba, Laguna and the youngest among nine children, Prof. Nel was raised by a modest family. Young Nel's perspective in life was heavily influenced by his mechanic father and sisters, who were school teachers. "Even at an early age, I already knew what I wanted to be -a teacher - and I really pursued my calling," Sir Nel recounted. Being exposed to his father’s work sparked his interest in electronics. So when he got a college scholarship

from the then National Science and Technology Authority, and given the choice between BS Math or BS Physics for Teachers, he chose the obvious. He finished cum laude from the Philippine Normal College with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics for Teachers. After graduation, he taught for five years at the UP Rural High School, while pursuing a two-year MS Teaching in Physics at the De La Salle University under a UPLB Local Faculty Fellowship. He returned back to UPLB and became a physics instructor at IMSP. To further his specialization, he went to the University of Central Queensland in Australia to complete his second masters degree – Master of Applied Science in Physics. Then, with a fellowship from the Australian Assistance for International Development (AusAID), he pursued a PhD in Physics at the Central Queensland University. Unfortunately,

he was not able to finish his coursework because he has to go back to the Philippines after four years to fulfill his contractual obligations. Nonetheless, he assures that it is not the degree that counts, but the knowledge that he was able to gather during his stay in Australia. "Being able to do what I really want, to teach and do research, I am already happy with what I have achieved," he said. Leaving Australia behind, he went back to the Philippines and continued where he left off at IMSP. At the institute, his skill in coordination and facilitation was spotted by his peers. So aside from serving as a full time professor, he was given several administrative positions over the years as well – Deputy Director, Physics Division Head, System Administrator and Physics Coordinator for Research. Even with all of these administrative experiences, Sir Nel realized that he is not really wired for that type of job. "I would rather teach and do research

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest

PEOPLE AND PERSONALITY
projects," he confided. His love for and excellence in teaching did not go unnoticed as he was awarded the 1987 IMSP Outstanding Young Faculty Award and the 2005 CAS Outstanding Senior Faculty Award. To add to that, he has received the following recognitions: 2010 UPLB Centennial Professorial Chair Award; 2005 San Miguel Professorial Chair Award; 2004 UPLB Diamond Jubilee Professorial Chair Award; and 2001 Onofre D. Corpus Professorial Chair Awards. He made it clear though, that he is not after the awards, but the experience of being the best at what he is. He smiled when he relayed that being the "best grandfather" is by far, his greatest achievement. Robotics guy loves to share For Prof. Altoveros, robotics is "the fusion of electronics and computer programming," his two academic and research interests. As of the moment, his specializations are in the areas of microcontroller hardware design, embedded systems, robotics and instrumentation. He dedicates his career to the field of robotics by conducting workshops, heading research projects and participating in various seminars, trainings and conferences. "I really like conducting workshops and trainings, specially those that are hands-on, where I can share my skills," he gamely mentioned. High school teachers are his favorite participants as he wants to interact with and meet new people who also shares his passion and interests. And even though he already has his hands full with teaching at UPLB, he still manages to conduct programs at the UP Information Technology Training Center and teach physics courses at the UP Open University. Of course, Sir Nel also prides himself as a someone with a big appettite for learning. "Attending training courses and workshops is one sure way to further develop oneself, so you'll probably notice that those two activities fill up most of my professional resumé," Altoveros teased. But even with his many contributions to the field, Sir Nel has remained lowkey and yet, a very passionate mentor to his students. In fact, he even lets his students use his personal robotics equipment because the university has limited resources. The materials came from his vast network and linkages in the robotics world, an offshoot of his over 25 years in the academe. Currently, he is kept busy by three projects. While coordinating a project that will put up weather stations in Laguna, and training high school students on robotics, the cheery professor is developing low-cost instruments which will be given to ill-equipped high schools and colleges in the country. He also heads the UPLB Agricultural and Environmental Robotics group. Being kept busy is not much of a problem for him. "Why not make use of one's hobby and skills to educate other people?" Sir Nel mused. He also plans to venture into business by nurturing one of his projects into a fully-developed technology which can be appreciated by teachers and students alike. "Of course, I want my research projects to benefit science education," Prof. Altoveros said. ■

▲PROF. NEL ALTOVEROS brought along some students and faculty from the Physics Division to the 6th Annual Scientific Forum on "Harnessing Robotics for the Philippine Society" sponsored by the Philippine Career Scientists' last October 5, 2012 at the National Museum in Manila.

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▲PROF. ALTOVEROS is assisting a company which pioneered unmanned aerial vehicles in the country by developing robotic attachments for aerial imaging.
Volume 4 Number 2 July - December 2012

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RESEARCH UPDATES
PHOTO: COURTESY OF JCVSALINAS

Helping communities prepare for disasters
BY DANIEL DAVE J. BATAYO

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ilipinos have long been resilient to typhoons which constantly barrage the country during the monsoon season. The calamities that recently hit the country, however, have shocked even the usually buoyant Filipino spirit. Many of these typhoons have caused severe flooding, flash floods and landslides; claiming thousands of lives and destroying millions worth of crops and property. Steps are now being pursued by the government for communities to be prepared for the worst and prevent disasters from recurring. In Laguna, the School of Environmental Science and Management (SESAM) and Institute of Mathematical Sciences and Physics (IMSP) recently partnered with the World Food Programme (WFP) to conduct a Disaster Preparedness and Response (DPR) project to aid in the disaster management of municipalities in the province. The DPR was conceptualized and is being led by Prof. Nelio C. Altoveros, Associate Professor 5 at

IMSP. Meanwhile, Julius Cris V. Salinas, Instructor 1 from IMSP and Thaddeus P. Lawas, University Research Associate II at SESAM serve as project coordinators. Later on, Jedd Jaurigue and Kristine Joyce Ragudo, were added to the team as project staff. According to Ragudo, the DPR project aims to set-up Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) and Early Warning Systems (EWS) in four towns in Laguna. It also aims to implement a communication protocol based on the installed systems. This protocal can be adapted by the municipalities in the event of flooding or landslides due to heavy rains. The towns referred by Ragudo are Mabitac, Pila, Rizal, and Famy. She said that these towns were chosen because of their vulnerability to flood during heavy rains. "...Of course there are still other towns that are also vulnerable to floods... We hope to include them in the future," she added. Ragudo said that starting the project involved a lot of discussions. "We talked to the Municipal Planning and Development Coordinators of the four

municipalities and looked for possible sites for the AWS," she explained. As of date, the team has already set up four AWS, two in Mabitac and one each in Pila and Los Baños. How Automatic Weather Stations work The AWS units being installed through the project are special. These are the first AWS units in Laguna and are unique from the others installed in the country because of its capability to send data through text messaging. The AWS have been bought from Davis, a manufacturer of weather instruments that can measure and record temperature, wind, humidity and rain among others. The recorded data is stored in a console and can also be uploaded to the Internet if a connection is available. Attached to the AWS is a locally fabricated device developed by Salinas which can determine whether the recorded atmospheric data has reached the critical levels identified by PAGASA. With the said device, the AWS will be able to initiate the warning system. The warning system will trigger lights and sirens that will alert the community that there is imminent danger. Focal persons in

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest

▼PROF. NELIO ALTOVEROS inspects the AWS device before its installation in Pila, Laguna.

▲CHILDREN get curious over the AWS units in Pila, Laguna, later forming a crowd gamely following the project team as it installs the unit in the community.

the community would also receive the warnings through text messages delivered via their phones. Currently, Prof. Altoveros and Mr. Salinas are developing a software that will enable the AWS to send data via text message to a Central Data Station (CDS) which they also made. Salinas said that the device and software have already been tested and may already be installed and deployed in the community. "We are still fine-tuning how the data is sent to the CDS but this would not affect the main purpose of the AWS in the community," he said. The AWS also serve another important purpose, according to Salinas. The gathered and stored data can also be used for research. The data would be invaluable to UPLB students who are conducting their researches and theses. Communication Protocol As part of the DPR project, the team will also develop a communication protocol. A series of consultations and focused group discussions have been set in February, 2013 for the team to discuss with the community on how they want to work things out in case of calamities. They will also training for local government units (LGUs) on the proper use and care of the AWS. The

team will also conduct awareness lectures and campaigns for the said municipalities. The team would also be working with PAGASA in conducting flood and other emergency drills to better prepare the communities in case of disasters. After everything has been done, the AWS and EWS will be turned over to the respective LGUs. Members of the team are hopeful that the project would truly help the communities avert future disasters. However, these are mere tools to warn people according to Mr. Salinas. "The safety of the community still lie in the hands of the people. They must heed the warnings and do the necessary actions," he explained. ■
▼ LAWAS AND SALINAS (1st and 2nd from right) with student and research assistants during the installation of the AWS on top of the New College of Arts and Sciences Building in UPLB.

▼APPLIED PHySICS STUDENTS from UPLB helped in installing the AWS in Mabitac, Laguna as part of their of their exposure in the field.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF JCVSALINAS

Volume 4 Number 2 July - December 2012

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EXTENSION UPDATES

Volunteerism takes center stage again in Pahinungód anniversary forum
PHOTOS: ACMCASTILLO

I
▲PNVSCA DIRECTOR Joselito De Vera

n celebration of its 18th anniversary, the UPLB Ugnayan ng Pahinungód organized a public forum themed "Volunteerism in the Philippines: Status and Prospects, Issues and Challenges" last September 24, 2012 at the College of Arts and Sciences Auditorium, UPLB. Three distinguished speakers from different volunteerism groups inspired more than 400 faculty and students attendees with their stories and experiences in managing volunteerismcentered organizations. The first speaker, Director Joselito De Vera of the Philippine National Volunteer Service Coordinating Agency (PNVSCA) at first oriented the audience on the Philippine Volunteer Act of 2007. He also talked about the current trends in the world-wide volunteer movement, which includes "voluntourism, student gap year programs and diaspora volunteering." Meanwhile, after sharing the experiences of her group, International Association of Volunteer Efforts (IAVE) Vice-President for Internal Affairs Dr. Deanie Lyn Ocampo emphasized that "volunteering should always be both an

action and reflection." She added that evaluation is ultimately an important process of any volunteerism activity. Speaking on the other hand from an academic point of view, UP Diliman Psychology Professor Dr. Grace Aguiling-Dalisay stressed that there should be a balance among the three goals of the university – teaching, research and public service. Hence, according to her, everyone in the university should volunteer as a form of public service. "Service and learning should go together," said Dalisay, currently the chairperson of the Volunteer Organizations Information Coordination and Exchange, Inc. (VOICE Network), in reference to doing volunteerism within the confines of the university. Traditionally, the UPLB Ugnayan ng Pahinungód observes its anniversary on every 28th of February. This year, it rescheduled the anniversary celebration to September, the program's conception month, to synchronize UPLB's activities with other Pahinungód offices in other UP units. (Alexandria Camille M. Castillo) ■

▲IAVE IA AFFAIRS VP Dr. Deanie Lyn Ocampo

▲VOICE NETWORK CHAIR Dr. Grace Dalisay

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest

EXTENSION UPDATES

Physics faculty train researchers in basic robotics
Management held an "Arduino and Robotics Training Workshop" last September 14, 2012 at the OVCRE Annex Building. Physics professor Nelio C. Altoveros spearheaded the training with assistance from fellow IMSP faculty Mr. Julius Cris V. Salinas. "We believe that researchers who want to employ automation in their research work should have at least the rudimentary knowledge of robotics; this way it would be easier for them to craft project proposals that would involve the use of robots," Altoveros said. Altoveros, who also chairs the committee, was joined by seven other faculty members from various colleges: Dr. Pepito M. Bato, Dr. Delfin C. Suministrado and Engr. John DG. Agsalud (College of Engineering and Agro-industrial Technology), Dr. Vladimir Y. Mariano and Prof. Jaderick P. Pabico (CAS-Institute of Computer Sciences) and Mr. Dante Gideon K. Vergara (School of Environmental Science and Management). The training was made possible through the support of the Philippine Australian Alumni Association (PA3i) and the Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Extension. The participants were able to use robotics equipment and components which Prof. Altoveros acquired through a grant from PA3i. The participants were able to experience operating and controlling e-gizmo boards using Arduino, an opensource prototyping software. (Alexandria Camille M. Castillo) ■

▼DR. PEPITO M. BATO of CEAT-IAE slips a component chip onto the e-gizmo board during the hands-on exercises on basic robotics.

The UPLB Technical Working Committee on Robotics and Automation R & D for Agriculture, Environment and Natural Resources

PHOTOS: ACMCASTILLO

LuzVis college teachers benefit from retooling workshop by Institute of Chemistry
Building with funding from the Commission on Higher Education (CHED). The camp was comprised of four plenary lectures. Lecturers included Dr. Merle C. Tan, Director of the National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development in UP Diliman; Dr. Fabian M. Dayrit, Dean of Ateneo de Manila's School of Science and Engineering; and Dr. Milagros M. Peralta and Prof. Josefina L. Solivas of UPLB.
▼SELECTED CHEM TEACHERS from other state universities review laboratory procedures during the chemistry teachers camp held at UPLB.

University, Adventist University of the Philippines, Cebu Normal University and Negros Oriental State University. The Institute has been conducting teacher camps to help strengthen and improve the chemistry degree programs of other universities. The institute is the sole CHED-recognized Center of Excellence in the Southern Tagalog Region. The camp was a fruitful experience for all the particiapnts as well as the organizers, as it provided opportunities for both parties to share experiences and learn from one another. "We hope that the participants will be able to apply what they have learned to enhance their chemistry curriculum," Prof. Ma. Desiree B. Aldemita, organizing committee chair, said. (Alexandria Camille M. Castillo) ■
Volume 4 Number 2 July - December 2012

UPLB's Institute of Chemistry organized a three-day College Chemistry Teachers Camp last August 22 to 24, 2012 at the Physical Sciences

After the lectures, workshops on general, in/organic, physical, analytical and environmental chemistry, and biochemistry were held at the institute's laboratories. Six universities benefitted from the free training: Bicol University, Batangas State University, Central Luzon State

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TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION UPDATES
PHOTOS: ACMCASTILLO

▲CHANCELLOR REX VICTOR O. CRUZ, cutting the ribbon, is assisted by Vice-Chancellor for R&E Dr. Maria Victoria O. Espaldon and DOST-UPLB TBI Project Leader Dr. Enrico P. Supangco.

▲DR. SUPANGCO orients the participants of the business forum on the programs of the Center for Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship, UPLB's main technology commercialization arm.

UPLB launches Technology Business Incubator
Holds technology forum and exhibit to attract more investors

O

n October 8, a day before the university celebrated its 94th Loyalty Day and Alumni Homecoming, UPLB and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) formally launched the DOST-UPLB Technology Business Incubator (TBI) inside the Science and Technology Park. Chancellor Rex Victor O. Cruz, along with Vice-Chancellor Maria Victoria O. Espaldon and DOST-UPLB TBI Project Leader Dr. Enrico P. Supangco, led the launch, together with other university officials and special guests from the UPLB community. The TBI is a 16-unit complex of offices built at the 3rd floor of the UPLB Center for Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship (CTTE) Building using funds from the DOST-Philippine Council for Industry, Energy and Emerging Technology Research and Development (PCIEERD). The TBI is a program aiming to accelerate the commercialization of

both UPLB and non-UPLB research outputs by nurturing start-ups and early-stage technology-based enterprises. More than 50 participants came to the technology business forum, with representatives coming from companies such as Ramgo International Corporation, Tobee's Roasted Chicken, Agrichexers Corporation, Best Value Trading Corporation, Delica See Food Corporation, Joah's Corporation, Herb Republic, YCP Farms, Solar Farmers Corporation and other businesses. The business players were joined by people from the finance sector and representatives from the DOST Main Office, DOST-Technology Resource Center, Department of Trade and Industry, Department of Agriculture, and several local government units from the CALABARZON region. At present, the TBI project offers the use of 6-square meter offices, two incubator buildings, a 40-seat conference room and an exhibit display system.

During the forum, Dr. Supangco said that to encourage more business locators at UPLB, the TBI project is providing an inexpensive start-up environment and an array of business support services for its clients. "We hope to attract more investors to set up in the incubator, specially those interested in adopting technologies in agriculture, biotechnology, food and dairy, and information and communication technology," Dr. Supangco added. The UPLB CTTE also offers rentals or lease of land and building, access to analytical and contract research services, product development assistance, training and human resource development services, and training on intellectual property and technology commercialization. With the Technology Transfer Act of 2009, UPLB is now able to fully help the industry by developing entrepreneurs who are not only technically competent, but have also been stewarded into business trailblazers. (Florante A. Cruz) ■

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest

TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION UPDATES

Intellectual Property Office holds orientation series for faculty, researchers and students

PHOTOS: FACRUZ

GARCIA

PULUMBARIT

SUPANGCO

T

he Intellectual Property Office of the UPLB Center for Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship (CTTE) held a series of orientations spanning July to November 2012 in an effort to orient UPLB constituents on the rules and regulations of the UP System on intellectual property, which was recently revised due to the enactment of the Technology Transfer Act of 2009. According to Dr. Enrico P. Supangco, head of the UPLB CTTE and leader of the DOST-UPLB Technology Business Incubator project, the orientations was very timely as it was able to acquaint faculty, researchers and even students on the new provisions of the law and the potential benefits they can get from technology transfer and commercialization. More than 500 participants coming from the colleges and schools, and the National Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology were oriented during the said period. The orientations were primarily delivered by technical experts from the UP System Technology Transfer and Business Development Office (TTBDO) and speakers from UPLB. The panel of speakers from the UP System was led by Dr. Reynaldo Garcia, Director of the UP TTBDO,

Atty. Elizabeth Pulumbarit, UP TTBDO Legal Counsel; and Dr. Enrico P. Supangco of UPLB CTTE. During the orientations, the legal frameworks behind the university's regulations on intellectual property were presented: The Philippine Constitution, Civil Code of the Philippines, Intellectual Property Code of the Philippines, the Technology Transfer Act, and the Magna Carta for Scientists, Engineers, Researchers and S&T Personnel. More importantly, the various types of intellectual property were itemized and extensively discussed on. Intellectual properties include copyrights, trademarks or service marks, patents, utility models, industrial designs, layout designs of integrated circuits, geographical indications, trade secrets and new plant varieties. Three important information have been repeatedly stressed during the orientations, and these were on the issues of copyrights, inventions and royalty sharing. On the aspect of copyrights, students and faculty should know that a student can now request the non-disclosure and withholding of access to his or her thesis/ dissertation if he or she will apply for a patent and protection of intellectual property.

On the other hand, the college, department, or institute may also withold public access to theses/ dissertations and the defense proceedings if they contain confidential and/or proprietary information on a "patentable" or "registrable" invention. Related to this, the Office of the UP President issued Memo No. 201203 last February 2, 2012 which now requires all thesis/dissertations to include a page which provides notice whether if it will be made accessible to the public or not. On the matter of inventions, inventors must disclose the invention and assign the intellectual property rights to the university if the invention was either an output of 1) government funds, 2) substantial resources provided by UP, or 3) the performance of inventor’s regular assigned duties. Faculty and students who successfully commercialize university technologies can benefit from three revenue schemes: 1) Royalties, 2) Upfront, milestones and other payments, and 3) Equity shares and dividends for spin-off / spin-out companies. Furthermore, in the royalty system, the inventor will automatically get the first P200,000.00 of the royalty shares. In excess of the amount above, a 60-40% sharing scheme will be followed, the 40% of which will be given to the inventor. (Florante A. Cruz) ■
Volume 4 Number 2 July - December 2012

17

TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION UPDATES

▲ UPLB CTTE DIRECTOR and leader of the DOST-UPLB TBI Project Dr. Enrico P. Supangco shares the university's experiences in developing and operating the country's first agribiotech-ICT -focused technology business incubator during the Incubators' Forum last January 10, 2013.
PHOTOS: JRDIAZ,JR.

UPLB technology business incubator project participates in national TBI conference

T

he Technology Business Incubator Project team of UPLB recently participated in two separate activities of the the National Technology Business Incubators' Conference held last January 10 to 11, 2013 in Diliman, Quezon City. The first activity, the Incubators’ Forum held January 10, was done at the National Engineering Center at UP Diliman, while the second, the Investors and Startup Forum, was held at the UP-Ayala Technohub in Diliman, Quezon City last January 11. Speakers during the two-day event included UP-Ayala Technohub Senior Manager Mitchi Barcelon, MAD (Make A Difference) Incubator CEO and Founder Andrew Wong, DOST Planning and Evaluation Director Bernie Justimbaste, Plug & Play TechCenter Co-Founder Jojo Flores, Narra

Venture Capital Managing Director Francisco Sandejas, USAID Economic Growth Specialist John Lawrence Avila, IPO Director General Atty. Ricardo Blancaflor, and UPD Enterprise Program Leader Dr. Luis Sison. According to Dr. Enrico P. Supangco, head of the UPLB Center for Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship and leader of the DOST-UPLB Technology Business Incubator project, the activities have been great venues for highlighting the success of the many people and agencies which have been involved in TBI operations over the past years, as well as the sharing of best practices of successful techno-entrepreneurs in the Philippines. There are 20 TBIs in the country, six of which are privately run, while the rest are being operated by the government. The operation of the TBI in the UPLB

campus, which can accommodate 16 start-ups, is being funded by the Department of Science and Technology - Philippine Council for Industry, Energy and Emerging Technology Research and Development (DOSTPCIEERD).(Florante A. Cruz) ■

▲ DOST-TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER Director-General Dennis Cunanan (upper right) addressing participants during the incubators' forum.

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest

PHOTO NEWS

▲ THE DILIMAN RESEARCH EXPERIENCE. Dr. Henry J. Ramos, Director of the Project Management and Resource Generation Office of UP Diliman's Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Development oriented UPLB faculty and scientists on the different support systems needed in physical science research last July 12, 2012.

▲ ASWANG TRANSMEDIA LECTURE. Dr. Felicidad “Bliss” Cua Lim (2nd from right), associate professor of Film and Media Studies at the University of California, Irvine, receives a certificate from the College of Arts and Sciences - Department of Humanities after lecturing a different take on the topic of aswang last August 22, 2012

▲ DNA EXTRACTION FOR KIDS. Students from the Laguna College get their own DNA through a simple extraction method demonstrated by staff of the Institute of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences during the 2012 Los Baños Science Festival activities held from July 18 - 20, 2012 at the Baker Hall.

▲ ASTRONOMY STAR. Dr. Laszlo Viktor Tóth of the Astronomy Department of Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary gave special lectures on the birth and death of stars, and finding other planetary systems through the Hungarian Automated Telescope Network last July 25 - 26, 2012 at the UPLB Operations Room.

▲ UEP VISITS CAMPUS. Ma. Charito E. Balladares (rightmost), University Researcher at the College of Agriculture Crop Science Cluster shows faculty from Samar-based University of Eastern Philippines the assorted vegetables grown in their edible landscaping garden project funded by the Department of Agricultural Research last August 13, 2012.

▲ ELECTION REFORM FORUM. Atty. Luie Tito Guia (center), LENTE Executive Director and Atty. Rona Ann Caritos, LENTE Project Officer (left) campaigns for good governance and a truthful 2013 elections last September 10, 2012 in a forum organized by the College of Public Affairs and the Office of the Chancellor.

Volume 4 Number 2 July - December 2012

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PHOTO NEWS
► NEW PCIEERD DIRECTOR. Dr. Rowena Cristina L. Guevara (center), the newly appointed Executive Director of the DOSTPhilippine Council for Industry, Energy and Emerging Technology Research and Development, gets updates from researchers of BIOTECH led by its Director Dr. Reynaldo V. Ebora during a visit last July 24, 2012. ▼ A SOCIAL AFFAIR. Maria Ressa (right), CEO of social media news company Rappler reads through a copy of the UPLB RDE Digest given by Vice-Chancellor Maria Victoria O. Espaldon. The Rappler team was in town last September 19, 2012 as part of its #MOVEPH series where they talk about social media and its capability for development and change.

▲ BOOK BUYING. Camarines Sur solon Luis Rey Villafuerte, Sr. (center) visits the booth of UPLB and UPLB Foundation, Inc. at the 8th Agriculture and Fisheries Technology Forum and Product Exhibition held at the SM MegaTrade Hall II, Mandaluyong City from September 9 - 12, 2012. ◄ FORUM ON FISHKILL. Dr. Ken-ichiro Kawabata (center) is presented with a certificate of appreciation after delivering a paper on fishkill by Lakehead project leaders Dr. Ryohei Kada (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan) and Dr. Roberto F. Rañola, Jr. (UPLB Collge of Economics and Management-Department of Agricultural Economics) last August 24, 2012 at the UPLB Operations Room.

Official Research, Development and Extension Newsletter of the University of the Philippines Los Baños

The RDE Digest
managing editor/ layout
Florante A. Cruz

is published semi-annually by the Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Extension (OVCRE), University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB). Contributions related to research and extension from UPLB faculty and staff are welcome. Please send manuscripts and digital photographs via email: ovcre@uplb.edu.ph. Comments on the published content can also be sent through the same email address. Requests for use of content for publication should be addressed to the Editors. For inquiries, please contact us at: Information Management and Technology Utilization Section OVCRE Building, Kanluran cor. Lanzones Roads, UPLB, College, Laguna 4031 Philippines Tel. No. (63) 49 536-5326 , VOIP: 1520, Email: ovcre@uplb.edu.ph.

The RDE Digest

writers/ photographers
Florante A. Cruz Alexandria Camille M. Castillo Daniel Dave J. Batayo

production/ circulation
Evelyn E. Bite • Alex C. Genil

adviser

Maria Victoria O. Espaldon

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University of the Philippines Los Baños Research, Development and Extension Digest