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22nd IPVS Congress | JEJU, Korea

Porcilis PCV Abstracts

EFFICACY AND RETURN OF INVESTMENT OF THREE COMMERCIAL VACCINES SCHEMES AGAINST PORCINE CIRCOVIRUS TYPE 2 (PCV2) IN A MEXICAN HERD AFFECTED BY A SUBCLINICAL PORCINE CIRCOVIRUS ASSOCIATED DISEASE (PCVAD)
Rosales E., F. 1; De Grau, F. 2; Piña D., R. 1.
2 1 MSD-Salud Animal/México. Merck-Animal Health/Canada.

jose.andres.francisco.rosales.espinosa@merck.com

Introduction
As a result of the severe PCVAD outbreaks during 2004-2007, commercial vaccines have appeared on the market and since then, PCV2 vaccination has become a core component of swine vaccination programs worldwide1,2. Several studies have shown that vaccination against PCV2 increases average daily gain (ADG) and decreases mortality rates3,4. Although PCV2 vaccines have specific label directions as required by regulatory authorities, many alternate, vaccination schemes have been adopted in the field to meet labor, management and disease control constraints5. The objective of our study was to evaluate three vaccination programs in a multi-site farm located in central Mexico. ADG, feed conversion (FC), mortality and number of pigs sold were measured and expected return on investment with each program was determined.

Materials and Methods
A total of 1,504 finisher pigs, three weekly weaning groups, from a 1,200 sow multi-site commercial operation located in La Piedad, Michoacan were used in the study. Each weaning group received one of the three vaccines as shown in Table 1. Each group was housed in a separate barn with a separate feed system per normal procedures in this operation. Pigs were weighed at weaning and at marketing. Production data was obtained from the farm’s routine record keeping program, and entered into Excel for data calculation and summary. Vaccines were administered by the farm’s staff.

Table 2 Productivity and economics
Parameter Estimated weight (175 d) Daily gain Full market value Light weights Deads / no values Feed Conversion Sales per pig Deads / no values cost (US dollar) Feed Cost Sales-costs (Net) Net vs Vacc C Vacc A 108.0kg 814g 92.8% 1.8% 5.4% 2.64 $161.88 $4.30 $85.87 $71.71 -$9.69 Vacc B 109.1kg 859g 93.4% 0.8% 5.8% 2.60 $163.21 $4.62 $89.13 $69.46 -$11.94 Vacc C 111.1kg 843g 94.8% 0.6% 4.6% 2.49 $168.31 $3.68 $83.22 $81.40 NA

Conclusions and Discussion
The objectives of a disease control program are to improve animal performance, such days to market and FC, to improve profitability or eliminate disease from the herd, or control its prevalence at a low enough level that it does not significantly limits production economically6. All PCV2 commercial vaccines have been shown to control PCVAD mortality. Our study indicates that vaccines and vaccination programs differ in their control of PCVAD and in turn, impact profitability (ROI). Our data indicates that two dose program administered per label directions out performed a one dose given per label and a two dose program that is based on off-label usage.

Table 1 Vaccination programs.
Vaccine A B C Pigs 502 502 500 Program 1 X 1ml 2 X 0.5ml 2 X 2ml Age (d) 24 24 and 45 24 and 45

Results
Differences between the vaccine groups were observed for ADG, percentage of pigs market (regular and light weights, and culls), and mortality. Most importantly, there were significant differences in the feed cost (FPC)/kilo pig produced, FC and return of investment among the three vaccinated groups (Table 2).

References
Francisco et al., AASV Proc 2007; Fachinger et al., Vaccine 2008; 26:1488-99 Kristensen et al., Prev Vet Med 2011; 250–258 Horlen et al., JAVMA, 232, 6, Mar, 2008 Cardinal & Jones, Proc Banff Pork Sem 2008 Deen et al., in Radostits: Herd Health. Food Anim Prod Med. 3° Ed 2001. Drs. Brad Thacker and Alex Eggen.

Acknowledgement

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