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TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS..................................................................................................1 ABREVIATIONS............................................................................................................ 3 ABSTRACT...................................................................................................................4 CHAPTER ONE.............................................................................................................5 1.0 INTRODUCTION.....................................................................................................5 1.1 BACK GROUND.....................................................................................................5 1.2 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM..............................................................................6 1.3 OBJECTIVES...........................................................................................................7 1.3.1 BROAD OBJECTIVE.............................................................................................7 1.3.2 SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES.........................................................................................7 1.4 RESEARCH QUESTIONS.........................................................................................7 1.5 SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY...............................................................................7 1.6 METHODOLOGY OF THE STUDY............................................................................8 1.6.1 SCOPE OF THE STUDY........................................................................................8 1.6.2 STUDY TYPE AND RESPONDENTS......................................................................8 1.6.3 SAMPLING TECHNIQUE AND SAMPLE SIZE.........................................................8 1.6.4 DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS....................................................................8 1.7 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY.................................................................................8 CHAPTER TWO............................................................................................................ 9 2.0 LITERATURE REVIEW.............................................................................................9 2.1 GLOBAL CONTEXT.................................................................................................9

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2.2 ADOLESCENT DRUG USE AT SCHOOL...................................................................9 2.3 THE CONNECTION OF DRUGS AND HIV/AIDS......................................................10 2.4 INVOLVING THE COMMUNITIES...........................................................................11 2.4.1 REACHING STREET KIDS..................................................................................11 2.4.2 REACHING EMPLOYEES IN THE WORKPLACE ...................................................12 2.4.3 MOBILIZING YOUNG PEOPLE ...........................................................................12 2.5 LITERATURE GAP................................................................................................12 CHAPTER THREE.......................................................................................................13 3.0 FINDINGS AND DISCUSSIONS..............................................................................13 3.1 FINDINGS............................................................................................................13 3.2 DISCUSSIONS......................................................................................................17 3.2.1 CAUSES FOR YOUTHS TO EXPERIMENT DRUGS...............................................17 3.2.2 EFFECTS OF TAKING DRUGS TO YOUTHS.........................................................17 3.2.3 SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS...............................................................................18 3.2.3.1 SPECIFIC SCHOOL-BASED PREVENTION PROGRAMS.....................................18 3.2.3.2 DRUG ABUSE RESISTANCE EDUCATION (DARE-PROJECT).............................18 3.2.3.3 LIFE SKILLS TRAINING (LST) PROGRAM.........................................................19 3.2.3.4 PROJECT ALERT.............................................................................................19 3.2.3.5 OUT OF SCHOOL DRUG EDUCATION PROGRAMS..........................................19 3.2.3.6 PEER-GROUP PROGRAMS..............................................................................20 3.2.3.7 FREE CLINICS AND CRISIS CENTERS.............................................................20 3.2.3.8 PROVISION OF MICRO-LOANS TO NON-STUDENTS YOUTHS..........................20

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............................................................................21 4.2 CONLUSION........21 4...........................................21 REFFERENCES.............................................................................................1 RECOMMENDATIONS .......................................0 RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSION ............................... 23 ABREVIATIONS CRS Corporate Social Responsibility Statistical Package for Social Science Sexual Transmitted Infections Human Immune Virus World Health Organization Acquired Immune Deficiency Disease Syndrome SPSS STI HIV - WHO AIDS - 3|Page ..............22 APPENDICES......................................................CHAPTER FOUR........................................................................................................................................................................................21 4..................................

as well as the environment. also called corporate responsibility.ABSTRACT Corporate social responsibility (CSR. employees. suppliers. Sustainable development is a pattern of resource use that aims to meet human needs while preserving the environment so that these needs can be met not only in the present. corporate citizenship. communities and other stakeholders. and responsible business) is a concept whereby organizations consider the interests of society by taking responsibility for the impact of their activities on customers. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is in close relation with sustainability and sustainable development. This obligation is seen to extend beyond the statutory obligation to comply with legislation and sees organizations voluntarily taking further steps to improve the quality of life for employees and their families as well as for the local community and society at large. 4|Page . shareholders.

CHAPTER ONE 1.1 BACK GROUND In the late 1960's. the paper suggests that. Therefore the Business has to address this problem by investing money in Drug education programs to both students at school and non-students out of school so as to stop the problem before it begins. this viewpoint ran into an embarrassing problem: no one was able to develop a factual scientific argument proving that drugs such as marijuana was harmful. especially those who live on the street. also they are from unstable families in terms of treatment and cares from the parents. 1. Through the analysis by using SPSS it shows that 75% of the respondents who are youngsters drug users they have not completed standard seven and they have no enough knowledge about the effects of drugs. some of the marketing cost has to be transferred to that CSR and to associate other development partners in addressing the problem. use drugs to diminish hunger. The paper has examined the key driving forces for the youngsters to become habitual users of drugs through a simple interview at the selected sample around the business operation surrounding area at Mwenge. In the case of Tanzania the number of youths driven into drug abuse is increasing due to several reasons. and emotional pain or to help them sleep or stay awake. however. cold. This paper demonstrate corporate social responsibility which has to be undertaken by the successful business located at mwenge Dar-Es-Salaam.0 INTRODUCTION This chapter serves as a backgrounder for readers to have an overview of the study even without prior reference to other publications on the topic. Tanzania for the problem of the large number of youth being lured into selling and taking drugs so as to build a good public image to the community. Dar-Es-Salaam-Tanzania.but in the indefinite future. some of these youth. Repeated use of these 5|Page . For the business to get out in the trap of simply having to give out donations and create dependence.

no effort would be made to encourage its use by private dispensers of narcotics and the drug peddler would disappear. is not a police problem. With the profit motive gone. all of these characteristics make these youth more vulnerable to STI/HIV infection and unintended pregnancy. and if there is a solution 6|Page . Sexual abuse stunts the skills needed to prevent unintended pregnancy and STIs.2 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM The large number of youth being lured into selling and taking drugs is now a critical issue and challenge in not only Tanzania but also worldwide therefore Governments and societies must keep their nerve and avoid being swayed by misguided notions of tolerance. and brain damage. It is first and last a medical problem. and never can be solved by policemen. the additional risk of contracting HIV. 1. They must not lose sight of the fact that illicit drugs are dangerous . it never has been. Social stigma and lack of a stable. supportive environment diminish the self-efficacy needed to undertake self-protective behavior.drugs can cause physical and psychological problems. Drug addiction. When intravenous drugs are used. like prostitution and like liquor. and other diseases exists. pulmonary edema.that is why the world agreed to restrict them (Antonio Maria Costa. some of these unfortunate victims might be saved from becoming hopelessly incurable. it less likely that youth will use information and skills to protect themselves from risk. Poverty and lack of education and job skills make them more vulnerable to all kinds of exploitation. Collectively. including hallucinations. executive director of UNODC (March 2007). Drugs diminish inhibitions and impair judgment making. kidney failure. New addicts would be speedily discovered and through early treatment. The first step in any plan to alleviate this dreadful affliction should be the establishment of Federal control and dispensation – at cost – of habit-forming drugs. hepatitis.

but by scientific and competently trained medical experts whose sole objective will be the reduction and possible eradication of this devastating appetite.2 • • • • • SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES To identify causes for the large number of youth being lured into selling of drugs To examine causes for the large number of youth being lured into taking or use of drugs To find out the effects of drug abuse to the youths Suggesting better ways for the youngsters to avoid drug taking Recommending strategies by which the business should use to address the problem to the community.3.4 RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1.1 BROAD OBJECTIVE The broad objective of this paper is to examine the main causes for the large number of youth being lured into selling and taking drugs 1. it is important to analyze the main causes for the youths to experiment and become habitual users of drugs and the effects of drug abuse so as to come up with the valid evidence and provide better strategies for the business organization to address the problem to the 7|Page .3 OBJECTIVES 1. 3. 2.3. 1.5 SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY Having considered the impact of the large number of youth being lured into selling and taking drugs to the country.it will be discovered not by policemen. What causes the youths to experiment or use drugs? What is the driving force for the youngsters to sell drugs? What are the effects of using drugs to the youths? 1. 1.

1. 1.000 people (approximated) according to the census survey of 2012 and the youth population density is approximated to 3. 1. hence build a superior customer value.4 DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS The study is based on primary data that has been collected by using structured questionnaires and analyzed by using SPSS and Excel 1.000 youths.7 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY • Time frame for the study to take place was very limited 8|Page .6.6.3 SAMPLING TECHNIQUE AND SAMPLE SIZE Simple random sampling was employed but it was more convenient due to the limitation of the study and the sample size taken was 20 after doing a convenient sampling.2 STUDY TYPE AND RESPONDENTS The study type was the quantitative descriptive and the study population or respondents for study were sampled among all youths who are drug users and sellers. Dar Es Salaam which is about 5square km’s in average which covers a population density of 10.6. 1.1 SCOPE OF THE STUDY The study coverage is the area around the business operations at mwenge.community and build the good image to the public and also gaining some promotion advantages. Kinondoni District-DSM.6.6 METHODOLOGY OF THE STUDY This study has been conducted at Mwenge street. Tanzania where the business organization operates 1.

uninformed concert and confidentiality ware somehow the limitation to the study.2 ADOLESCENT DRUG USE AT SCHOOL There is a large literature that documents the long-run costs associated with drug use. The origins of some of these tensions are clear: rapid changes in political alignment. reduced family and community cohesiveness. 2. improvement of the quality of life for many people has fallen far short of the potential that exists and the rising expectation of people who know life can be better. and the implied gains to lowering adolescent drug use are not difficult to establish from existing research. economic and social marginalization and increased crime. For example.1 GLOBAL CONTEXT Global increases in problems of illicit drugs both reflect and contribute to international tensions. CHAPTER TWO 2. At a time when dramatic improvements are taking place in some sectors.g.• • • The study was costly to the researcher. communications and technology. simply because there was no any financial assistance The study exposes the researcher into a risky due to the interaction with the respondents who are youths drug users Convenience sampling. however they didn’t affect the study results. e. 9|Page .0 LITERATURE REVIEW 2. increased unemployment and underemployment. in an instrumental-variables design. DeSimone (2002) shows that employment probabilities are substantially reduced by marijuana and cocaine consumption.

Yet. Yamada et al. Chatterji (2006) also shows that marijuana use in high school is associated with lower levels of educational attainment." Based on a relationship between marijuana use and lower high-school graduation rates.3 THE CONNECTION OF DRUGS AND HIV/AIDS Perhaps the most evident problem caused by drug abuse is the role of drug injecting in the spread of HIV/AIDS. By June 2000. Somewhat surprisingly. among the established results in the literature. Clearly.Considering the relationship between marijuana use in high school and future earnings. Substance use has also been identified as a leading causal factor in suicidal thoughts and behaviors (Markowitz et al. (2002)). there were more than 34 million people with HIV/AIDS the majority of them live in sub-Saharan Africa. which should motivate policy makers in their stewardship of adolescents. For example. 2. there are several empirical patterns that raise particular concern around this shortcoming. carries a very high risk of transmission of HIV as well as other blood-borne infectious diseases such as hepatitis B and C. and concludes with an appropriate conjecture that public policies that are effective in reducing substance use during high school should have some impact on educational attainment. Ringel et al. whether the injection method be intravenous. which in turn affects earnings. there is the potential for a significant down side associated with adolescent drug use. however. which further supports considering the role of schools in incensing drug use. (2006) add that a significant part of the negative relationship between substance use and earnings reacts an indirect mechanism by which early marijuana use affects human capital accumulation." The literature has also documented that the earlier one starts using a particular drug the less likely one is to stop using that drug (van Ours (2006)). The focus of this analysis is to determine the causal factors for drug consumption. Markowitz (2000) suggests that marijuana may also cause increased engagement in physical fights. intramuscular or beneath the skin. (1998) also conclude with the suggestion that high-school-based preventive programs which discourage alcohol consumption and marijuana use are highly recommended. Sharing injecting equipment. the role of school policy in a student's choice to consume drugs has largely been ignored in the economics literature. The most common way of transmitting the virus is sex between men and 10 | P a g e .

up from 80 in 1992. and non-governmental organizations. the users often let down their guard. the police. Portugal. UNDCP and the World Health Organization (WHO) now participate in such community-based projects in the Philippines. a boy named Karate and his sister Nina.drug injecting – propel the virus in many. 93 also identified HIV among drug injectors. Of these 136 countries. In the Russian Federation between 1998 and 1999 over 90% of all new HIV infections were found among injecting drug users. Kazakhstan. 2. 2. drug abuse has far-reaching social and economic effects.4. Belarus and Russia. UNDCP collaborates with UNAIDS and Street Kids International (SKI). Apart from personal physical effects on the individual. Thailand. They utilize a cartoon. parents. Italy.women but a second epidemic . engage in risky sexual behavior and thus contract the virus. teachers. Spain and Yugoslavia are attributed to injecting drug use. Once intoxicated.4 INVOLVING THE COMMUNITIES Experience shows that effective responses can be organized only when communities take ownership of their drug abuse problem. the number of countries reporting injecting drug use was 136. Zambia. a non-Governmental organization. In 1999. "Gold tooth". Viet Nam. moral or religious authorities. • • • Over half of all AIDS cases in Bahrain. produced by SKI. South Africa. which tells the story of two street children. from young people. to reach out to street kids in a number of countries in South East Asia. It is often overlooked that non-injecting drug abuse can also result in HIV infection. They get involved with drugs and violence in 11 | P a g e . Georgia. It is important to get everyone involved. A large number of youth workers in these countries have been trained on how to talk about substance abuse with children living on the streets. To prevent young people from becoming involved with drugs. if not most countries outside Africa. health services. to the local Government authorities. Tanzania.1 REACHING STREET KIDS UNDCP is increasingly focusing on special needs For example.

2.5 LITERATURE GAP As the review of the late studies explained about the causal factors and effects of drugs to the youths above. one participating company in Mexico reported that when it implemented the UN prevention program.2 REACHING EMPLOYEES IN THE WORKPLACE Even though many drug abusers are unemployed or marginalized. 2. pimps and drug dealers who promise happiness and feed on misery. Secretary-General Kofi Annan sent copies of the Vision from Banff to the heads of all Member States with a letter calling on world leaders to match their seriousness.7 per cent. Canada to discuss drug abuse prevention. particularly street children and working children. The Centre has already trained hundreds of street educators in basic counseling and preventive education for children and adolescents. 2. absenteeism dropped from 7 per cent to 3. UNDCP encourages private and public.4. The cartoon has been translated into 25 languages for use in over 100 countries.3 MOBILIZING YOUNG PEOPLE In 1998 some 200 young people from 24 countries were gathered together in the Youth Vision Jeunesse Drug Abuse Prevention Forum in Banff. the accident rate fell and productivity and quality of output increased. Together with the International Labor Organization of the United Nations (ILO) and the WHO. Like street children everywhere. A global youth network for drug abuse prevention composed of youth groups representing 24 countries around the world now exists. Hence this paper provides international 12 | P a g e . DSM where the business organization operates is due to the rapid increasing rate in the number of youth drug abusers who are in school (A-Level and O-level) and those who are out of school (street children) around the premises of the business operations. there are also many working people around the globe who have drug abuse problems. they must deal with men like the villain Gold tooth. UNDCP has also helped to build the Ecuadorian Centre for Training of Street Educators.4. Many leaders responded assuring their commitment to a future in which young people are free from drugs. Workplaces to engage in drug abuse prevention and in programs for integrating former drug abusers into society.the streets. the rationale for conducting this study in Tanzania at Mwenge.

95% of the respondents interviewed ware boys and 92% of them aged 1825 years as described in the figure 1 below.ways that we could adopt them or suggests new ways of preventing drugs abuse to the youths who are mostly affected and propose to the business organization to put highly consideration to the problem so as to demonstrate the corporate social responsibility to the community.0 FINDINGS AND DISCUSSIONS TABLE 1: Sex V/S Age in Years Cross tabulation 3.1 FINDINGS CATEGORY Sex Total Male Female Age in Years Under 18 5 0 5 18-25 11 1 12 Above 25 3 0 3 Total 19 1 20 This table shows that. CHAPTER THREE 3. FIGURE 1 13 | P a g e .

TABLE 2: Education Level CATEGORY education Level Completed STD Seven Not completed Seven Total STD Age in Years Under 18 2 3 5 18-25 2 10 12 Above 25 1 2 3 Total 5 15 20 The analysis results from table 2 above shows that only 25% of youths drug users. FIGURE 2 14 | P a g e . have completed standard seven and the rest 75% have not completed standard seven as shown in the figure 2 below.

there are four influences mentioned by the respondents but 60% of the respondents mentioned influence from peer group as the major cause for drug experimentation to the youths. as shown in figure below. 15 | P a g e .TABLE 3: Causes or Driving force for the youths to experiment or use drugs CATEGORY Driving force to Poverty experiment or use drugs Influence Group Influence from Friends Total Age in Years Under 18 0 from Peer 4 1 5 18-25 5 6 1 12 Above 25 0 2 1 3 Total 5 12 3 20 From the analysis results shown in table 3 above shows that.

TABLE 4 Effects of taking drugs to the youths CATEGORY Mention at least two Mental Sickness effects of taking drugs Increase of Crimes you know Unnecessary Fights Increase unemployment rate Long Stay Marriage of Age in Years Under 18 0 1 1 0 2 1 5 18-25 4 3 2 1 0 2 12 Above 25 0 1 0 0 0 2 3 Total 4 5 3 1 2 5 20 without Increase of AIDS/HIV infections Total 16 | P a g e .

3.2 DISCUSSIONS 3.2. • • • • • • 3.2.1 CAUSES FOR YOUTHS TO EXPERIMENT DRUGS The main causes or driving force for the youths to experiment drugs have been mentioned by themselves during the survey which are.2 Poverty Influences from Peer Group Influences from Friends Lack of family care Running away from home Homelessness EFFECTS OF TAKING DRUGS TO YOUTHS Also the effects drugs have been sorted out by the youths drug takers them selves as shown in the analysis above which are.From the results in Table 4 above. • Increase of Crimes 17 | P a g e . it shows that the critical effects suggested by most of the respondents are increase of crimes and increase of AIDS/HIV Infections as shown in the figure below.

• • • • • • • • 3.2. Hence the business organization or company has to focus on the following ways so as to address the problem for the large number of youth being lured into selling and taking drugs in collaboration with the community. In the specific school-based prevention programs.3. 3.2.3 Unnecessary Fights Increase of unemployment rate Increase of unemployment rate Long Stay without Marriage Increase of AIDS/HIV infections Increase of mental sickness Long stay without marriage Increase of AIDS/HIV Infections SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS From the analysis results above it shows that 100% of the respondents declared that. therefore the company has adopt this project and implement it in Tanzania through the 18 | P a g e .3.2 DRUG ABUSE RESISTANCE EDUCATION (DARE-PROJECT) This project has been used by different developed countries in preventing the use of drugs to the youths. also to those who have already being taking drugs they might be convinced to stop through these programs.1 SPECIFIC SCHOOL-BASED PREVENTION PROGRAMS The company has to initiate the specific school-based prevention programs so as to build awareness to the students who have not yet experimented drugs. the following specific projects should be undertaken. 3.2. they want to stop taking drugs. The students will be aware with effects of using drugs and scare to experiment them.

second and the third year.2. DARE is the most widely used school based primary drug prevention program which is used in approximately 60% of the schools in the United States.4 PROJECT ALERT This is a universal program for having 8 sessions in primary and secondary school with 3 booster sessions comprising of video. education by itself is not learning. 3. This program has components on knowledge. rather than the formal mechanisms for presenting drug information. 10 and 5 sessions during the first.3. discussions and other participatory methods. This is carried out by teachers and older peers and follows the social influence and resistance skills training.collaboration with the primary and secondary schools or the community in general around the premises of the operation of the company in order to be more efficiently and effectively. most of youth's initial information about a subject comes from his peers we believe that a series of influences help shape these attitudes: the 19 | P a g e . As Helen Nowlis stated before Congress.3. 3. It is a universal program for students in middle or junior high school and has 15.5 OUT OF SCHOOL DRUG EDUCATION PROGRAMS Education does not take place only in school.3.2. the role of the company is to finance and communicate the project. It is carried out by the specially trained police officers through weekly classroom sessions for the 5th grade and 7th grade pupils 3. and providing normative education. those who are non-students living in the streets and those who are students but they are out of school. Information by itself is not education.2. it is learning about drugs that should concern us today. According to the findings in chapter three above. affective education and resistance skills training.3 LIFE SKILLS TRAINING (LST) PROGRAM This program is a comprehensive program that involves teaching general personal and social skills and drug resistance skills. This program will involve all youths. role play.

personal experiences with drugs or drug-related substances. wish fulfillment 3. long-term treatment. and stimulating the involvement of youth in the solution of community problems. Their basic purpose is not to proselytize against drugs but to provide help when people need it most and to disseminate accurate analyses of the risks of street drugs. however. the life-style at home.2.7 FREE CLINICS AND CRISIS CENTERS The company in collaboration with the community members should establish a number of free medical clinics for "street people" providing a range of services on a twenty-four-hour basis-not only emergency medical or psychological help for drug crises (bad trips and severe reactions). and referral. 3.3.2. peer-group pressures. but also up-to-date information on the quality and effects of drugs currently being sold in the immediate area. and the attitude of parents. hence the company has to establish programs of educating the 20 | P a g e . 3. Here youths are encouraged not to use drugs. including music. as well as the factual information presented there.2. but participate in the rest of the psychedelic scenerock music. films.3. crafts-so as to show that one can be "cool" without being drugged.3.6 PEER-GROUP PROGRAMS In this program. flashy dress. magazines and nationally publicized events.8 PROVISION OF MICRO-LOANS TO NON-STUDENTS YOUTHS According to the analysis above the results shows that most of the non-students drug-users youths in Tanzania are jobless. popular culture. merely widens the gap between the "squares" and the drug users and alienates the latter still further. the availability of alternative mechanisms for carrying out certain kinds of behaviorrisk taking. Those familiar with the group admit it has its greatest impact in middle-class suburban areas. lecturing to encourage an understanding of today's drug culture.atmosphere of the school. the psychology is to provide support and reinforcement for youngsters who choose not to use drugs. Such a technique. Other activities include evaluating drug education films.

youths about entrepreneurship. teachers. the company has to use all the suggested possible ways in this paper to demonstrate the corporate social responsibility to the community so as to build a good reputation to the public and advertize or promote its products through those community activities as the cost transfer as a profit gaining. so they are more in need of accurate information about drugs. the provide them with loans so as to keep them busy and prevent them from using drugs. the National Coordinating Council on Drug Education has put out a manual for community actionCommon Sense Lives 4. • • • • As a general rule.1 RECOMMENDATIONS • Parents. parent "help" programs should impart sympathy and counseling together with facts Parents should be responsible to their children because parental responses to a student's involvement in drugs can curb or accelerate further experimentation Teachers should be primarily trained. 21 | P a g e . especially through the ministry of Education The Government should enhance the effectiveness of local efforts. and community leaders should be educated about the effects of drugs simply because they are very close to the youths. CHAPTER FOUR 4.2 CONLUSION Regarding the analysis in the findings above.0 RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSION 4.

C. Washington. 22 | P a g e .REFFERENCES James D. University of Washington. T. Coley. p. World Bank. 1994. Breusch. (2009). The rational adolescent: Discipline policies. Princeton. 18 LaMond Tullis. Climbing the drug staircase: A Bayesian analysis of the initiation of hard drug use. Qian. 147.. and H. Working paper. (2009). Babcock. Redundancy of moment conditions. Welingsky (1998). 89{111. p. Journal of Econometrics 91 (1). NJ: Policy Information Cetner. and L. Draft report prepared for UNRISD at Geneva and the United Nations University at Tokyo. Bretteville-Jensen. Anderson. 23 December 1993. Illegal Drugs in Nine Countries: Socioeconomic and Political Consequences. D. Jacobi (2008).. March 1993. Wyhowski (1999). Educational Testing Service. Discussion Paper 3879. American Journal of Diseases of Children. IZA Bonn. H. vol. Order in the classroom: Violence. disciplined student achievement. and D. lawsuits. Wright. The World Bank Atlas 1994. Schmidt. Economics of Education Review Barton. Donald Karninsky and Martha Wittig. P. D. and skill acquisition. A. "Health and social conditions of street children in Honduras". R. P. M.282. P. The e_ect of the Meth Project on meth use among youths.. L.

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