Stock Duration and Misvaluation 
 
Martijn Cremers 

Ankur Pareek 

Zacharias Sautner 

University of Notre Dame 

Rutgers University 

University of Amsterdam 

mcremers@nd.edu 

apareek@business.rutgers.edu 

z.sautner@uva.nl 

 

 

 

 
December 17, 2012 
 
Abstract 
We study whether the presence of short‐term investors is related to a speculative component in stock 
prices  using  a  new  measure  of  holding  duration.  First,  we  characterize  institutional  investors’  holding 
durations  since  1985  and  find  that  holding  durations  have  been  stable  and,  if  anything,  slightly 
lengthened  over  time.  Second,  we  document  that  the  presence  of  short‐term  investors  is  strongly 
related to temporary price distortions, consistent with a speculative stock component in stock prices as 
modeled  in  Bolton,  Scheinkman,  and  Xiong  (2006).  As  short‐term  investors  move  into  (out  of)  stocks, 
their prices tend to go up (down) relative to fundamentals. As the presence of short‐term investors is 
strongly  mean‐reverting,  this  creates  a  predictable  pattern  in  stock  returns.  We  document  such 
predictability using both valuation proxies and asset pricing tests. 
 
 
 
________________ 
We would like to thank William Goetzmann, Zhiguo He, Florian Peters, David Sraer, and Russ Wermers as well as participants at 
the  Roundtable  on  Long‐Term  Value  in  the  Corporation  at  Harvard  Law  School  (September  2012)  for  their  comments. 
Comments are very welcome. All errors are our own.  
 


 

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2190437

1. Introduction 
 

How  short‐term  are  investors,  and  is  the  presence  of  short‐term  investors  related  to  a 

speculative component in stock markets, i.e., to a deviation of stock prices from fundamental value over 
longer  periods  of  time?  Answering  these  questions  is  crucial  to  inform  the  current  debate  on  the 
efficiency  of  financial  markets,  on  possibly  inefficient  short‐term  firm  investment  policies,  and  on 
managerial  myopia  driven  by  short‐term  incentives  in  executive  compensation.1  The  extent  and 
consequences  of  short‐termism  is  likewise  important  for  addressing  calls  for  greater  shareholder 
engagement  and  power  (see  e.g.  Bebchuk  (2005)),  or  alternatively,  for  a  system  of  corporate 
governance  where  shareholders  are  kept  at  a  greater  distance  from  the  board  (e.g.  the  “director 
primacy” model of Bainbridge (2006) and Blair and Stout (1999)).  
Froot,  Perold,  and  Stein  (1992)  empirically  link  short‐term  investor  horizons  with  managerial 
myopia, for which Bolton, Scheinkman, and Xiong (2006) provide a formal model. Their theory builds on 
the  model  of  Scheinkman  and  Xiong  (2003)  and  posits  that  the presence  of short‐term  investors  with 
heterogeneous  beliefs  that  are  caused  by  overconfidence  can  create  temporary  price  distortions  if 
short‐sales constrains exist. The resulting speculative component in stock prices can affect the behavior 
of  firms’  managers  (and  vice  versa),  whose  compensation  has  become  largely  based  on  stocks  and 
option  grants  with  relatively  short  vesting  periods.2  Daniel,  Hirshleifer,  and  Subrahmanyam  (1998) 
incorporate investor overconfidence in their theory as well, showing that stock price overreaction (i.e., 
misvaluations)  can  be  caused by  investors’  overweighting  of  private  information.  Short‐term  investors 
may  be  more  prone  to  such  overconfidence,  as  suggested  by  DeBondt  and  Thaler  (1995)  or  De  Long, 
Shleifer, Summers, and Waldmann (1991). 
 

In this paper, we propose to study these questions using a new measure of the holding duration 

of  institutional  investors,  called  Stock  Duration,  which  was  introduced  in  Cremers  and  Pareek  (2012). 
Stock Duration is the weighted‐average length of time that institutional investors have held a  stock in 
their  portfolios,  based  on  their  quarterly  13F  holding  reports  and  weighted  by  the  dollar  amount 
                                                            
1

  See,  for  example,  Narayanan  (1985),  Stein  (1988,  1989),  Bebchuk  and  Stole  (1993)  or  Laverty  (1996)  on  short‐
termism and managerial myopia. Phelps (2010, p. 17), for example, is concerned that in “…established businesses, 
short‐termism has become rampant.” Similarly, Chancellor Leo Strine (2007) of the Delaware's Court of Chancery 
raises  concerns  about  the  presence  of  short‐term  investors  for  corporate  America.  Currently  stalled,  the  SEC 
drafted  a  proposal  in  2010  allowing  shareholders  to  nominate  directors  if  they  own  at  least  3%  of  a  company's 
shares for at least the prior three years.      
2
  Gopalan  et  al.  (2012),  for  example,  document  with  their  new  measure  of  executive  pay  duration  that  typical 
compensation packages have stock and option grants vesting within one or two years, which seems short‐term. 


 

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2190437

invested across all institutions currently holding the stock. Using this new Stock Duration measure, our 
paper provides two  main contributions. First, we  characterize the institutional holding durations since 
1985, and surprisingly find that holding durations have been stable and, if anything, slightly lengthened. 
Second, we document that the presence of short‐term institutions is strongly related to temporary price 
distortions,  consistent  with  a  speculative  stock  component  in  stock  prices  as  modeled  in  Bolton, 
Scheinkman, and Xiong (2006). As short‐term investors move into (out of) stocks, their prices tend to go 
up (down) relative to fundamentals. As the presence of short‐term investors is inherently instable (i.e., it 
is strongly mean‐reverting), this seems to create a predictable pattern in stock returns. We document 
such predictability using both valuation proxies (i.e., the market‐to‐book ratio or the misvaluation proxy 
proposed  by  Pastor  and  Veronesi  (2003)),  and  traditional  asset  pricing  methodology  (i.e.,  ex  ante 
portfolio sorts and cross‐sectional predictive return regressions).3 
 

The average Stock Duration equals about 1.2 years in 1985 and increases to around 1.5 years in 

2010, and the percentage of institutional stock ownership held for over 2 years increased from 19% in 
1985 to 31% in 2010. Such lengthened holding durations may be somewhat surprising as it is well known 
that  share  turnover  has  significantly  increased  over  the  same  period  (from  an  average  annualized 
turnover  of  72%  in  1985  to  close  to  300%  in  2010).  Indeed,  business  press  articles  routinely  infer 
average  holding  periods  from  share  turnover,  which  our  results  indicate  is  incorrect  (see,  e.g.,  The 
Economist  (2012)).  The  most  important  reason  that  holding  periods  and  share  turnover  are  quite 
distinctive is that turnover is – and institutional holding periods are not – strongly affected by the recent 
increase  in  high  frequency  trading.  As  high  frequency  traders  typically  have  little  overnight  exposure 
(see,  e.g., Menkveld (2011)),  they  affect share turnover  but not Stock  Duration,  which more generally 
ignores any roundtrip trades occurring within a quarter. On the other hand, lengthening Stock Duration 
is  consistent  with  the  major  recent  shift  towards  indexing  which  is  inherently  longer‐term  (see,  for 
example,  Cremers  and  Petajisto  (2009)  for  evidence  of  “closet  indexing”  by  actively  managed  mutual 
funds, and Cremers and Pareek (2012) for the increase in overall institutional indexing). The correlation 
of Stock Duration and share turnover equals ‐41%, and controlling for share turnover does not affect any 
of our results.4 Across institutions, pension funds and endowments have the longest median durations 
                                                            
3

 Our results are robust to using the misvaluation measure proposed in Hoberg and Phillips (2010). 
 Another difference is that our Stock Duration measure only considers institutional stockholdings rather than all 
stockholdings, which has become less of a restriction over time, as institutional investors as a group have increased 
their average ownership in stocks from 33% in 1985 to 75% at the end of our sample in 2010. The different results 
for turnover are  consistent with Hendershott, Jones, and  Menkveld  (2011), who  show that,  rather  than  creating 
temporary price distortions, high‐frequency trading improves liquidity. Litzenberger, Castura, and Gorelick (2012) 
4


 

(about  1.7  years),  followed  by  banks  and  insurance  companies  (about  1.5  years),  and  by  investment 
companies including mutual funds (about 1.25 years). 
 

In contrast to other measures such as share turnover or the frequency of institutional trading, 

our Stock Duration proxy can be measured at a more de‐aggregated level. Specifically, Stock Duration 
measures how long a specific stock has been in an institutional investor’s portfolio, rather than how long 
all stocks on average have been in the portfolio. Accounting for this is important as one can only observe 
institutional  holdings  at  an  aggregate  institution  level,  e.g.  a  single  quarterly  holdings  report  for  the 
entire  portfolio  of  Goldman  Sachs,  which  includes both  client  retirement portfolios  with  a  more  long‐
term  focus  and  internal  hedge  fund  positions  with  a  perhaps  more  short‐term  focus.  Our  proxy  thus 
allows  any  given  institutional  portfolio  to  be  short‐term  in  some  stocks  and  long‐term  in  others.  As  a 
result, we are able to distinguish durations among the typically large number of different stocks held by 
an  institution  at  a  particular  time,  which  may  be  managed  by  different  portfolio  managers  with 
heterogeneous  investment  horizons.  In  contrast,  existing  measures  such  as  the  classification  of 
institutions as “transient” (see Bushee (1998)) and institutional fund turnover (see Gaspar, Massa, and 
Matos (2005) and Gaspar et al. (2012)) do not account for differences in holding durations among stocks 
within a given institutional portfolio. For these alternative measures, we do not find any association with 
price  deviations  from  fundamentals  or  persistent  return  predictability,  and  our  results  are  robust  to 
controlling for them.  
 

Using our new measure, we document both a strong negative contemporaneous and a strong 

predictive  positive  association  between  Stock  Duration  and  proxies  for  misvaluation  in  pooled  panel 
regressions with firm and year fixed effects.  Our main (mis)valuation proxies are the standard market‐
to‐book ratio and  the proxy proposed in Pastor  and Veronesi (2003).5  The contemporaneous negative 
association  between  Stock  Duration  and  market‐to‐book  is  economically  quite  meaningful,  with  a 
standard  deviation  decrease  in  duration  (of  0.54  years)  associated  with  an  increase  in  the  market‐to‐
book  ratio  of  14.6%.  This  indicates  that  valuations  are  generally  going  up  (down)  while  short‐term 
institutional investors are buying (selling). Similarly, a contemporaneous standard deviation decrease in 
duration  is  associated  with  an  increase  in  the  Pastor‐Veronesi  misvaluation  proxy  of  about  5.5%.  The 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
conclude  in  their  survey  that  automated  and  high  frequency  trading  have  improved  market  quality,  including 
narrower bid‐ask spreads, increased liquidity and lowered intraday volatility. 
5
  The  Pastor  and  Veronesi  (2003)  proxy  is  calculated  as  the  residual  from  yearly  firm‐level  regressions  of 
log(market‐to‐book  ratio)  on  log(book  value  of  total  assets),  leverage  (long‐term  debt  /  total  assets),  return  on 
equity, ‐1/(1+firm age), a dummy for whether the firm pays dividends, and stock return volatility. 


 

contemporaneously  negative  association  is  followed  by  an  equally  meaningful  predictive  and  positive 
association.  A  standard  deviation  increase  in  duration  this  year  is  associated  with  a  decrease  in  next 
year’s market‐to‐book ratio  of 12%, and with another decrease in  the following  year of 4%. The  price 
reversal  pattern  in  the  Pastor‐Veronesi  misvaluation  proxy  is  analogous  and  both  statistically  and 
economically significant.6 
 

We  then  show  evidence  suggesting  that  the  price  reversal  pattern  is  consistent  with  limited 

arbitrage  allowing  temporary  price  distortions  (see,  e.g.,  Shleifer  and  Vishny  (1990,  1997)).  Both  the 
contemporaneously negative and the predictive position association between Stock Duration and price 
levels  is only  apparent in the subsamples  of stocks that have  higher idiosyncratic  volatility or that are 
less liquid. Likewise, the price pattern is only apparent for stocks that have lower institutional holdings 
and thus are more likely to be subject to short‐sales constraints (e.g., Nagel (2005)). These results are 
again similar using either the market‐to‐book ratio or the misvaluation proxy.  
While  these  findings  suggest  that  the  reversal  pattern  could  at  least  partly  be  the  result  of 
temporary price pressure due to the presence of short‐term investors, we acknowledge that we do not 
have  any  instruments  allowing  us  to  only  consider  exogenous  changes  in  Stock  Duration  that  are  not 
related to firm fundamentals. Indeed, the contemporaneous association, if considered in isolation, could 
be driven by new information that short‐term focused institutions are quicker to trade upon. However, 
the documented predictability that provides the reversal pattern cannot easily be reconciled with such 
an information story. Rather, if information is driving changes in the presence of short‐term institutions, 
the reversal suggests a systematic overreaction to any such information on part of institutions that have 
held  these  stocks  for  short  period  of  time.  Such  overreaction  is  consistent  with  the  theory  in  Daniel, 
Hirshleifer, and Subrahmanyam (1998), and with the empirical results in Cremers and Pareek (2012) who 
document that the momentum, reversal and share issuance anomalies are stronger for stocks held by 
short‐term investors. 
 

It  is  this  price  reversal  pattern  and  particularly  the  predictability  that  is  most  suggestive  of 

temporary price distortion. As a result, we investigate this predictability in much greater detail, leaving 

                                                            

6

  However,  a  price  reversal  pattern  is  not  apparent  using  either  share  turnover,  institutional  turnover  or  the 
presence of transient investors, while the results for Stock Duration are robust to their inclusion. As our paper is 
closely related to the price pressure variable in Coval and Stafford (2007), we verify that, while Stock Duration is 
correlated with their measure (correlation of ‐32%), our price reversal results are independent from their variable 
which is driven by extreme mutual fund flows. 


 

38).  misvaluation. Using institutional turnover as a measure of investor horizon.the reasons for trading by (or firms attracting) short‐term institutions for future research. The intuition is that if stocks held by short‐term  (long‐term)  investors  are  more  likely  to  be  overvalued  (undervalued).  Massa. Using the Pastor‐Veronesi misvaluation proxy. and Rajgopal (2005)). This unconditional result confirms the hypothesis  that investor holding duration is related to stock misvaluation.  The  analogous  4‐factor  alpha  remains economically and statistically significant at 3.g.  Accordingly.  whose  presence  is  inherently  instable.65).9% per year (t‐statistic of 2.  Harford.  measured  again  using  institutional  turnover.  and  long‐term  past  stock  return  performance.  each  considering    an  additional  aspect  of  the  three  components  that  make  up  the  reversal  pattern:  Stock  Duration. updating portfolios each  quarter. Some supportive research in this direction is already provided by  Derrien. we find for the tercile group of the most  overvalued stocks that a long‐short equally‐weighted portfolio that buys (sells) stocks with long (short)  durations  has  an  annualized  3‐factor  alpha  of  5.    The second step is to condition on misvaluation. Results are very  similar  if  we  use  the  standard  market‐to‐book  ratio  and  we  cannot  detect  similar  patterns  of  misvaluation when using either share turnover or institutional turnover as proxies for investor horizons.  those  with  holding  durations  of  less  than  6  months).  we  find  that  this  predictability  pattern  is  again                                                               7  While the reversal pattern in stock prices seems quite symmetric during versus after changes in Stock Duration.  We  examine  predictability  conditional  on  misvaluation by using independent 5x3 double sorts on Stock Duration (into quintiles) and misvaluation  (into terciles). Thesmar.  Further evidence consistent with an interaction of investor horizon and corporate policies comes from surveys in  which  managers  admit  that  they  are  sacrificing  profitable  long‐run  project  to  meet  short‐run  earnings  targets  (Graham.   6    .  we  first  start  by  forming  quintile portfolios based on Stock Duration at the end of the previous quarter.38). they find that  mispriced  firms  cater  in  their  corporate  policies  to  the  tastes  of  their  short‐term  investors.  Consistent  with  the  limits  to  arbitrage  argument. It can take several years before large changes in Stock Duration are fully reversed.  do  worse  in  takeovers  as  targets  or  acquirers  (Gaspar. which likewise is left for future research.  we  should  expect  the  predictability  to  be  stronger  conditional  on  misvaluation. and Kecskes (2012).     Our  investigation  of  stock  return  predictability  proceeds  in  three  steps.  and  Li  (2007)). Harvey. A long‐short equally‐weighted portfolio that buys (sells) stocks with long (short) durations has  an annualized 3‐factor alpha of 4% (t‐statistic of 2.7 Let us note  here that the predictive pattern in stock prices is mirrored in the mean‐reverting presence of short‐term  institutions  (e.  Polk  and  Sapienza  (2009)  find  that  firms  cater  in  their  investment  behavior  to  the  tastes  of  short‐term  investors  (measured  using  share  turnover)..  firms  with  shorter  investor  horizons.7%  (t‐statistic  of  3. and likewise  we find that it takes about two years before the price reversal pattern is completed. it  is  quite  possible  that  these  changes  in  the  presence  of  short‐term  investors  interact  with  managerial  decision  making.  and  Matos  (2005)  and  Chen.  Similarly.

 The regression results are consistent with  the portfolio results and confirm that return predictability based on Stock Duration is stronger for more  7    .  while  controlling  for  other  stock  characteristics (see Daniel et al. Combined with the evidence conditioning on the past three‐ year returns. high idiosyncratic risk. we find the strongest  reversal  pattern  (i. while there is no value premium among stocks with long Stock Durations. we would expect our reversal pattern to be stronger for  such stocks.  stocks  with  a  similar  valuation  and  a  similar  presence  of  short‐term  investors  but  with  positive  past  six‐month  momentum  do  subsequently  not  show economically large negative alphas. particularly those held by short‐duration investors. for example.  If  short‐duration  traders  distort  prices.  A  closely  related  question  is  to  what  extent  the  presence  of  short‐duration  investors  could  explain  the  value  premium. and high levels of illiquidity. As large changes in the presence of short‐term investors can take  two to three years to materialize. if the past three‐year stock return is relatively high and a stock has a high valuation.  that  stocks  with  low  market‐to‐book  ratios  tend to  outperform  stocks  with  high  market‐to‐book  ratios. it seems  more likely that the stock is overvalued.  In  contrast. (1997) and Wermers (2003)).  Intuitively.  We  complement  our  portfolio  results  with  regressions  using  Fama‐MacBeth  (1973)  methodology.  We  find  empirical  results  consistent with this.  particularly  allowing  highly  valued stocks to be temporarily overvalued. If so. namely that the value premium in our sample is driven by stocks with shorter Stock  Durations. For these stocks.  and  the  three‐year  past  return.e.  We  further  study  a  direct  connection  to  past  six‐month  momentum.  stocks  with  high  (mis)valuations  held  by  short‐ term investors that also experienced negative six‐month momentum seem good candidates for stocks  whose overvaluation has recently started to become recognized. such as for stocks with low institutional  ownership.. If the  reversal pattern indicates that stocks are temporarily overvalued.e.  large  negative  alphas). past returns could play an important  role to corroborate any overvaluation. then we would expect that the value premium is stronger  for  stocks  held  primarily  by  institutional  investors  with  shorter  durations.  misvaluation. To do this. superior growth opportunities.  Specifically. We confirm this intuition using a 5x3x2  triple  sort  on  Stock  Duration.     The third and final step is to further take the longer‐term past performance into account.strongest in subsamples of stocks with higher arbitrage costs. these results support the notion that high valuations indeed reflect misvaluations rather  than.  i. we consider the effects of the stock returns over the past three years. we estimate predictive cross‐sectional regressions of next year raw returns or  DGTW  adjusted  cumulative  abnormal  returns  on  Stock  Duration.

 Data and Summary Statistics  2.     The  remainder  of  this  paper  is  organized  as  followed.  2. We eliminate stocks in the bottom NYSE size decile and stocks with prices below USD  1 from our sample.  we  calculate  the  holding  duration of ownership of each stock for every institutional investor by calculating a weighted‐measure  of buys and sells by an institutional investor. we require institutional investors to be present for two years  before  being  included  in  the  sample. For  each stock in a given institution’s portfolio. To eliminate any sample bias.  Stock  return  data  is  obtained  from  the  monthly  CRSP  stock  data  files  and  accounting data is from COMPUSTAT.  We  do  this  as  new  institutions  by  construction  have  short  past  holding durations for stocks in their portfolios. Holdings are reported quarterly and all common stock positions greater than 10.2 Methodology: Calculating Stock Duration  Using  the  methodology  introduced  in  Cremers  and  Pareek  (2012). the holding duration measure is calculated by looking back  8    .000 shares or USD  200. Moreover.  we  explain  the  construction of the holding duration measure and the other main variables used and describe their time  series evolution over our sample period from 1985 to 2010. Section 5 concludes. In section 3.overvalued stocks.000  must  be  disclosed. we require stocks to be present in CRSP for at least two years before they  are included in the sample to make sure that IPO‐related anomalies (e.   2.g. Table 1 provides summary statistics for the sample of the  firms that are included in our study. All institutional investors with more than USD  100  million  of  securities under  management  are  required  to  report  their holdings  to  the  SEC  on  form  13F.  In  the  next  section. IPO underpricing) do not affect  our results.  Section  4  considers  the  cross‐ sectional return predictability using portfolio sorts and Fama‐MacBeth regressions.1 Data and Summary Statistics   We use institutional investor holdings data from the Thomson Financial CDA/Spectrum database  of SEC 13F filings to create our Stock Duration measure. as at least five years of holdings data (which start in 1980) is required to calculate the holding  duration measure. Further..  Return  forecasting  and  the  stock  selection  analysis  is  performed  from  January  1980  onwards. weighted by the duration for which the stock was held. we again find that that predictability is strongest in subsamples of stocks  with higher arbitrage costs. Our analysis focuses on US common stocks from January 1985 to  December  2010. we relate the market‐to‐book  ratio  and  the  Pastor‐Veronesi  misvaluation  ratio  to  Stock  Duration.

j = percentage of total shares outstanding of stock i held by institution j at time t = T‐W.  using  as  weights  each institution’s total current holdings in the stock.j = total percentage of shares of stock i bought by institution j between t = T‐W and t = T‐ 1.   We  will  employ  two  other  closely  related  measures  of  institutional  investor  horizon  in  our  empirical  analysis.over  the  full  time  period  since  that  particular  stock  has  been  held  continuously  in  the  portfolio.  αi. as very few stocks  are  held  continuously  for  longer  than  five  years. j T 1   (W  1) H i .  The calculation of the duration for stock i that is included in the institutional portfolio j at time T‐ 1. j .T‐1  over  all  institutions  currently  holding  the  stock.T 1   (T  t  1) i .  If  stock  i  is  not  included  in  institutional  portfolio  j  at  time T‐1. where αi. j . with only a small effect on  the duration of current holdings.T 1  d i . To create the variable.  “dedicated”  institutions  with  low  9    .41 (1. is given by:         Duration i .39) across the sample period. as we only observe  institutional holdings at the end of each quarter. then Durationi.   Next.j.T‐1 = 0.  The  first  measure  was  introduced  by  Bushee  (1998.j. j .T are in quarters  Hi. j i.  Intuitively. The summary statistics in Table 1 show that Stock  Duration has a mean (median) of 1.  we  compute  at  the  individual  stock‐level  our  Stock  Duration  proxy  by  averaging  the  institutional‐stock  level  Durationi.j.t > 0 for buys and <0 for sells. j                 (1)   where  Bi.j. we choose W = 20 quarters.t  =  percentage  of  total  shares  outstanding  of  stock  i  bought  or  sold  by  institution  j  between time t‐1 and t. for all stocks i = 1 … I and all institutional investors j = 1 … J.  2001). t. j i. The most important  limitation of our measure is that any round‐trip trades within a quarter are ignored.  Our  duration  measure  takes  into  account  tax  selling  and  other  temporary  adjustments  in  the  portfolios because intermediate sells are cancelled by immediate buybacks. with changes in Stock Duration  being highly instable and mean reverting as suggested by its negative autocorrelation of ‐14%.  this  institutional‐stock  level  duration  variable  measures  how  long  a  USD  1  investment  in  a  stock has on average been in that institution’s portfolio at a particular point in time.t   H B t T W  i. j   H B i.  whose  methodology  is  based on factor and clustering analysis  to  classify institutional investors  into three groups: “transient”  institutions  with  high  portfolio  turnover  and  diversified  portfolios.

  and  Matos  (2005)  and  Gaspar  et  al. The evolution of these variables is also visualized  10    .  (2012).  These  figures suggest that  these  alternative  measures  are  clearly  distinct  from  our  new  measure  Stock  Duration  (see  Appendix  A2  for  the  full  correlation matrix).  Institutional Turnover is calculated using changes in the quarterly holdings over the past four quarters  and  the stock‐level  weights are  calculated using  the current holdings in the stock in  each institutional  portfolio.  In  contrast. The correlation  between  Stock  Duration  and  the  percentage  of  ownership  by  transient  investors  is  ‐29%. As a result.  Stock  Duration  is  calculated  by  aggregating  the  institutional‐stock‐level  holding  durations.  institutional  turnover.   The  major  difference  between  Stock  Duration  and  the  percentage  of  transient  investors  and  institutional  turnover  is  that  these  measures  are  calculated  at  the  institution‐level  rather  than  the  institution‐stock level before they are aggregated across all institutions holding a stock.28 (0.  with  many  portfolio managers within the largest institutions potentially having different investment horizons.  we  obtain  the  institutional  investor  classification  data  from  Brian  Bushee’s  website  and  include  the  percentage  of  a  firm’s  ownership  by  transient  institutional  investors  (“Transient  Investors”)  as  an  alternative  measure  for  the  level  of  ownership by short‐horizon investors.  the  correlation  between  Stock  Duration  and  share  turnover  equals  ‐41%.  share  turnover. Table 1 shows that the average firm in our sample has about 13%  transient institutional investors.27) for our sample firms.  This  variable  does  not  account  for  differences  in  holding  durations  among  stocks  within  a  given  institutional  portfolio.  thus  allowing  the  same  institutional  investor  to  be  short‐term  for  some  but  long‐term  for  other  stocks.  by  Gaspar.2 Evolution of Stock Duration over Time    Table  2  provides  information  on  the  evolution  of  Stock  Duration.  and  the  correlation  between  institutional  turnover  and  Stock  Duration  equals  ‐57%.  The  variable  is  defined  as  the  weighted  average  turnover  of  the  institutional  investors  holding  a  given  stock.   The  second  alternative  measure  is  “Institutional  Turnover”  which  is  used.  Finally.  Given  that  we  only  observe  institutional  portfolios  at  an  aggregate  level.  To  create  the  variable. this is  an important distinction. The variable has a mean (median) value of 0. and institutional investor holdings over time.  for  example.  Massa. and “quasi‐indexer” institutions with low turnover  and  diversified  portfolio  holdings. they  do not allow for heterogeneity in the investment horizon across different stocks in a given institutional  portfolio.turnover and more concentrated portfolio holdings.   2.

 i.e.5 years). between 12 and 24 months. and “Others” include all other institutional  investors..  share  turnover.  with  a  drop similar to that of share turnover in the years of the crisis.  durations  have  become  longer  again.  pension  funds  and  endowments  have  the  longest  median  durations  (about  1. share turnover  has substantially increased from 72% per year in 1985 to 276% per year in 2010.  between  six  and  12  months. from about 19% in 1985 to 31% in 2010.g. and above 24 months (i. Table 2 shows that the average Stock Duration equals about 1.  we  find  that.  however..  “Investment  Company”  includes  independent  investment  advisors  and  investment  companies  (e.5  in  2010. and investment companies including mutual funds (about 1.  P&G. The holdings add  up to 100%. Figure 2A reports the evolution  of  Stock  Duration  over  time  for  selected  companies  (Apple.  and  Hewlett‐ Packard).           Figure  3  complements  the  statistics  in  Table  2  and  reports  the  percentage  of  institutional  holdings  with  a  Stock  Duration  of  less than  six  months  (i.     We can illustrate these patterns using some specific examples. long‐term holdings).  mutual  funds).  Boeing. and university and foundation endowments.  followed  by  banks  and  insurance  companies (about 1.  For  all  of  these  firms  Stock  Duration  has  increased  over  the  last  decades.e. combined with a lengthening  of Stock Duration.  Since  then.  Microsoft.in Figure 1.  This graph provides a representative illustration  of  an increase in share turnover and institutional investor holdings over time. while Stock Duration lengthened.  As  displayed  in  Table  1.  across  the  entire  sample  period.7  years)..  “Pension  Funds”  includes  corporate  (private)  pension  funds.  and  saw  a  drop  in  the  second  half  of  the  90s. representing the total holdings of all institutional investors at any point in time.    11    . To the contrary.  Stock Duration  has  increased  in  the  late  80s.e.    Our  data  also  allows  us  to  measure  Stock  Duration  across  different  types  of  institutional  investors. a total growth of  about 300%. The increase in share turnover has been relatively continuous over the last decades.  and  institutional  investor holdings for Hewlett‐Packard.  The  increase  in  duration  is  interesting  as  share  turnover  shows  a  very  different pattern over the same time horizon.  the  holdings  of  short‐term  investors  with  Stock  Durations  less  than  six  months  have  not  significantly  changed from 1985 (27%) to 2010 (26%). We classify institutional investor into four categories.  Figure  2B  complements  the  previous  figure  and  shows  the  evolution  of  Stock  Duration.25 years). and increased  by  about  20%  to  1.2 years in 1985. In fact. an increase by more than 60%.  public  pension funds. The figure  shows  that  the  institutional  holdings  with  Stock  Durations  above  two  years  have  increased  over  the  sample period. with a  slight  drop  in  the  years  of  the  financial  crisis.  short‐term  holdings).. The category “Bank” includes banks and  insurance  firms.

  it  indicates  that  institutional  investors  (particularly  the  most  important. looking at the weighted average Stock Duration of all stocks held in the portfolio of a  number of selected institutional investors.  Figure 4A shows the evolution of median Stock Duration by institutional investor type. mutual funds  play a dominant role simply because as a group they have the largest holdings. As a  group.  moving  in  a  range  between  about  1.  with a lengthening of the median duration from 0. making up more than 80% of all short‐term investments by  institutional investors.  However.  from  about  16%  in  1985  to  54%  in  2010.       How  can  we  reconcile  the  simultaneous  increase  of  both  Stock  Duration  and  share  turnover?  First  and  foremost. with the  data underlying this figure being reported in Appendix A3.  This  is  equivalent  to  an  increase in their dollar holdings by more than 200%. namely for Berkshire Hathaway (a very long‐term investment  company).  Their  relative  holdings  as  a  fraction  of  all  equities  have  substantially  increased  over  the  past  decades.       Appendix A5 provides an analysis similar to that in Appendix A4. The holdings of  other investors also increased over time. though they generally seem to have stock for shorter time  periods in their portfolios.  namely  banks.  The  pattern for investment companies is similar. the holdings of banks and pension  funds have slightly decreased  over the sample  periods  (by  4% and  23%.  The  main  caveat  here  is  that  we  can  only  observe  quarterly  holdings  and  are  thus  do  not  observe  changes  in  holdings  due  to  roundtrip  trades  12    . The strongest increase in Stock Duration can be observed for pension funds. but only reports holdings with  stock durations that are less than six months. respectively).  It  shows  that  investment  companies  such  as  mutual  funds  are  by  far  the  most  important  investor  type  based  on  holdings. Figure 4B provides  a similar analysis.8  years.  Fidelity  (a  major  mutual  fund). suggesting again that institutions  generally  have  not  shortened  their  investment  horizons. The appendix shows that mutual funds are again the most  important short‐term institutional investors.  and  the  University  of  Chicago (a university endowment). insurance companies. To the contrary.      Appendix  A4  complements  Figure  4  and  shows  the  evolution  of  institutional  investor  holdings  over  time.85 years in 1985 to 2 years in 2010.  institutional investors have  increased their  average  ownership  in  stocks  from  33%  in  1985  to  75%  at  the  end  of  our  sample  period  in  2010. The figure shows that the stock duration of  banks  has  been  relatively  stable  over  time. pension funds and endowments) as a group are not  those that have significantly increased trading. though from a much lower basis and with the total holdings  still being below 5% of all outstanding equities.2  and  1. investment companies.  STRS  Ohio  (a  public  pension  fund). average institutional turnover has not increased over time. While other investors such as banks also have short‐term holdings.

 their trading increases share turnover but  does not affect Stock Duration.  for  example. and  Menkveld  (2011)  and  Litzenberger.1 Misvaluation and Stock Duration: Results from Panel Regressions    In  this  section.  it  seems  rather  unlikely  that  institutional  investors  could  significantly  increase short‐term trading that would not result in any increase in their quarterly portfolio turnover. that would require that all their increased trading would have to be exclusively due to round trip  trades that fall neatly within calendar quarters rather than being more randomly spread out over one‐ to‐three  month  periods  across  quarter‐ends.  Rather.  As high  frequency traders  typically have little overnight exposure (see Menkveld (2011)).  However.  and  Gorelick  (2012). In  effect. which is based on institutional portfolios at the end of each quarter and  thus  ignores  any  roundtrip  trades  occurring  within  a  quarter.e.  as  we  are  not  aware  of  any  special  institutional  incentives  to  carefully  time  round  trip  trades  this  way.  we  conjecture  that  the  increase  in  both  share  turnover  and  Stock  Duration  is  consistent.  Castura. Misvaluation and Stock Duration  3.  document  that  automated and high frequency trading generally seems to improve market quality. Finding that Stock Duration but not share turnover is related  to temporary price distortions is consistent with the microstructure literature. Jones and Menkveld (2011).within  a  quarter.  with  the  increase  in  high  frequency  trading  and  the  major  shift  towards  indexed  investments. managers whose portfolios are very different  from their benchmarks or with a high Active Share) are more successful in markets with more indexing. which is inherently longer‐term.  We  will  later  show  that  controlling  for  share turnover does not affect our results. Cremers..  Ferreira.  we  provide  evidence  suggesting  that  the  presence  of  short‐term  investors  is  related  to  temporary  price  distortions. and Starks (2012) document the significant increase in explicit indexing through mutual  funds and ETFS. Cremers and Petajisto (2009) document this prevalence for  actively managed mutual funds and in Cremers and Pareek (2012) for all institutional investors.  We  estimate  pooled  panel  regressions  relating  a  set  of  13    .    3.  This  requirement  seems  quite  restrictive.  respectively.   As shown in Hendershott. the increase in high frequency trading is  partly due to a significant lowering  of trading  costs  during  our time period.   The increase in holding duration over our sample period can partly be explained by the increase  in (“closet”) indexing over our time period. Matos.  which may make market less informationally efficient. and find that very active managers (i. Jones. Hendershott.  Window  dressing issues are typically related to returns and prices rather than the length of time stocks are held.

    14    . Their misvaluation proxy is  defined as the residual from regressing market‐to‐book ratios on a set of fundamental variables such as  assets. Both  seem economically meaningful.6%. For all pooled panel regressions.  Results  using  the  Hoberg  and  Phillips  (2010)  misvaluation  proxy  are  reported  in  columns  1  to  4  of  Appendix  A6.  Similarly.  We  further  control for year‐fixed effects as well as a set of other variables that may be related to misvaluations. using the regression  estimates from column 5.8                                                                8  We perform a set of robustness tests to ensure that our Stock Duration variable is not simply picking up the effect  of institutional price pressure driven by extreme mutual fund flows as in Coval and Stafford (2007). illiquidity of the shares. and the misvaluation proxy proposed in Pastor and Veronesi (2003). which combine into a reversal pattern that is consistent with  temporary price distortions that are related to the presence of short‐duration investors.   First.  share  turnover. we employ robust  standard errors clustered at the firm level.4%.  such  a  standard  deviation  decrease  in  duration is associated with an increase in the Pastor‐Veronesi misvaluation proxy of about 5.     We study both  the contemporaneous and the predictive relation between  Stock Duration and  our  (mis)valuation  proxies. leverage or profitability. firm characteristics. We find that our price reversal patterns  are robust to including the Coval and Stafford (2007) measure for institutional price pressure.    The  corresponding  regression  estimates  are  reported  in  Table  3.27*0.  We  include  firm‐fixed  effects  throughout  all  regressions. a standard deviation decrease in Stock Duration is associated with an increase  in  the  market‐to‐book  ratio  of  (‐0. and idiosyncratic volatility. As expected.  we  find  that  there  is  a  strong  negative  contemporaneous  association  between  Stock  Duration and the misvaluation proxies. with a correlation of ‐32%.  containing  results  for  both  standard  market‐to‐book  ratio  and  the  Pastor‐Veronesi  misvaluation  proxy. We consider both the “raw” standard market‐to‐book ratio  as a valuation proxy that could be partly picking up misvaluation once we control for a large number of  controls.  we  control  for  the  percentage  of  holdings  by  institutional  investors.(mis)valuation proxies and Stock Duration. For  example. In terms of economic magnitudes.  The  results  indicate that Stock Duration and (mis)valuation have a significant negative contemporaneous as well as  a significant positive predictive association.  both variables are correlated with each other. As an additional robustness check we will also report results using the  related misvaluation proxy proposed in Hoberg and Phillips (2010).54=)  14. We will later test how  some of these variables interact with Stock Duration.  such  that  we  effectively  test  how  changes  in  Stock  Duration  are  related  to  changes  in  (mis)valuation.  asset  horizon. This indicates that stock prices are going up (down) while short‐ term institutional investors are buying (selling).

 in columns 1 to 3.  This  effect  seems  likewise  uniform  across  the  different  misvaluation  proxies. none of the alternative measures show any evidence  for  a  reversal  pattern. We create this variable by measuring the  percentage  that  is  owned  by  institutional  investors  (relative  to  all  holdings  by  institutional  investors)  with a Stock Duration that is in the bottom 50%. quarterly holding reports allow us to distinguish durations among the typically large  number of different stocks held in the same portfolio of a particular institutional investor at a particular  point  in  time. Specifically. institutional fund turnover has both a positive contemporaneous and a  positive  predictive  association  with  valuations.  thus  providing  again  no  evidence  for  any  reversal  15    . In columns 4 to 6.     Appendix A6 further shows that our results are robust to using the percentage of stocks that is  owned by short‐term institutions rather than Stock Duration. The results in columns 5 to 8 show that firms that have  more short‐term investors have higher contemporaneous and lower future valuations. but no predictive  association. the other two measures  based  on  institutional  holdings  classify  institutions  (i. and thus do not distinguish between potentially very different holding durations across the stocks  in a given institution’s portfolio.  some  stocks  may  have  been  in that institution’s  portfolio  for  a  long  time.     The results in Table 4.  Appendix A6 shows that our results are robust to using the misvaluation proxy proposed in Hoberg and  Phillips (2010). using the market‐to‐book ratio in Panel A and the misvaluation proxy of  Pastor‐Veronesi (2003) in Panel B. The reversal pattern in  the Pastor‐Veronesi misvaluation proxy is analogous and both statistically and economically significant..  A  standard  deviation  increase  in  Stock  Duration  this  year  is  associated  with  a  decrease  in  next  year’s  market‐to‐book  ratio  of  12%.  the  main  difference  between  our  Stock  Duration  measure  and  related. For example. we find that share  turnover has a positive and significant contemporaneous association with valuations.  while other stocks may appear for the first time that quarter. Specifically. with again both the negative contemporaneous and the positive predicate effects being  statistically significant. the contemporaneously negative association is followed by an equally strong predictive  and  positive  association  between  the  misvaluation  proxies  and  Stock  Duration.      As  mentioned  above. underscore that results are very different when any of the alternative  investor horizon measures are used. To the contrary.  existing  measures of  investor  horizon  is  that  our  measure  can  be  calculated at  a  more  dis‐aggregated  level.  and  with  another decrease in the following year of 4% (the latter of which is insignificant).  all  stocks  in  their  portfolios)  as  short  or  long‐ term.e.  For  example.  while  our  baseline  results  are  generally  robust  to  adding  both  lagged  and  contemporaneous values of the alternative measures.  Second.

  especially when considering the misvaluation proxy in Panel B. going gradually  back  until  year  +5  to  its  level  in  the  years  before  the  large  increase  in  short‐term  investors. the year in which Stock Duration goes up. and is smaller both in the years before and after the decrease in Stock Duration. Therefore.   3. we  define  as  t  =  0  the  year  in  which  a  large  change  in  Stock  Duration  occurs.  this  is  evidence  of  limits  to  arbitrage  as  in  Shleifer  and  Vishny  (1990). coming down from around 3. we define large decreases (increases) in Stock Duration as  calendar year‐end changes in Stock Duration that are in the bottom (top) decile. Figure 5B shows that market‐to‐book ratios are  lowest (at around 2.2 five years before the drop.    Figures 5A and 5B complement the previous regression tables. With respect to increases in Stock Duration.2 Misvaluation and Stock Duration: Results from Subsamples    The  negative  contemporaneous  and  positive  predictive  associations  of  Stock  Duration  with  misvaluation create a price reversal pattern that is suggestive of a temporary distortion in stock prices.  Figure 5A shows that the market‐to‐book ratio is largest (at about 3..  and it increases again thereafter.  Again. but  statistical  significance  of  the  contemporaneous  association  between  Stock  Duration  and  market‐to‐book  is  subsumed  by  institutional  turnover  (though  the  economic  effect  is  still  positive).  the  percentage  of  transient  investors  in  columns  7  to  9  has  a  positive  contemporaneous association but no predictive association. providing an analysis similar to  an event study and plotting market‐to‐book ratios around large decreases (Panel A) and increases (Panel  B) in Stock Duration. the price  reversal  pattern  associated  with  Stock  Duration  is  largely  robust  to  adding  any  of  the  other  proxies.9  Finally.  such  that  it  is  important  to                                                               9   We  note  as  an  exception  the  results  in  column  6  of  Panel  A  where  the  predictive  –  and  thus  most  crucial  –  association between Stock Duration and the market‐to‐book ratio remains positive and statistically significant. At the same time.  until  the  large  drop  in  Stock  Duration  is  reversed.  it  seems  that  it  takes  rather  long.  about  three  to  five  years.0) in the year of the drop in  Stock Duration. Stock Duration decreases  substantially in the years before this increase.6) in t = 0. The figure also  documents that Stock Duration shows substantial mean reversion after the large drops. If  so. we also report confidence intervals (two standard deviations around the mean). we cannot detect for any of the  other three proxies the price reversal pattern that was apparent in Table 3. i. It thus  seems to take about two to three years before the price reversal pattern is completed. To create these figures.  Both  variables  are  statistically  significant in Panel B where we use the Pastor‐Veronesi misvaluation proxy.e.  For  the  market‐to‐ book ratios.pattern. For this event study.  and  report  mean  values  of  market‐to‐book  ratios  and  Stock  Duration  in  the  five  years  before  and  after  t  =  0.   16    .

  and  have  higher  idiosyncratic  volatility. misvaluation.g. For both proxies. and the latter two more generally to stocks that  are more difficult to trade.  We  consider  three  stock  characteristics  that  the  literature  has  identified  as  associated  with  more  limitations  to  arbitrage:  (i)  lower institutional investor holdings.e. we use asset–pricing tests to examine return predictability conditional on Stock  Duration  and  the  (mis)valuation  measures.  and  provide  p‐values  of  Chow  tests  comparing  the  coefficients  of  Stock  Duration and lagged Stock Duration across subsamples. we create subsamples based on whether a firm’s characteristic falls  below or above the sample median each year.1 Results from Portfolio Sorts     In this section.  stocks  that  have  lower  institutional  holdings.  each  step  considering  an  additional  aspect  of  the  three  components  that  make  up  the  reversal  pattern:  Stock  Duration. (ii) higher illiquidity as proxied by the Amihud (2002) measure.   17    .    4.  We  proceeds  in  three  steps. Nagel (2005)).  These  results  are  again  similar  using  either  the  market‐to‐book  ratio  or  the  misvaluation  proxy. and an interaction of this variable with Stock Duration and lagged  Stock Duration.  are  less  liquid. with market‐to‐book ratio regressions provided in Panel A.     The results are reported in Table 5.  The  first  characteristic  relates  to  stocks  that  are  more  likely  to  be  subject to short‐sales constraints (e. Shleifer and Vishny (1997)).  misvaluation. and finally in  the third step we consider triple sorts on Stock Duration. For  each of these three characteristics. In the first step. in the second step we do double sorts on both Stock Duration and misvaluation. we find  that  both  the  contemporaneously  negative  and  the  predictive  position  association  between  Stock  Duration and price levels is only apparent in the subsample of stocks with greater limits to arbitrage.  and those using the Pastor‐Veronesi proxy reported in Panel B.  Appendix A7 also shows that our results are robust to using the Hoberg and Phillips (2010) misvaluation  measure. implying also greater limits to arbitrage (e..g.10 Consistently across all three measures. and  (iii)  higher  idiosyncratic  volatility. and long‐term past performance. we show regressions  for  all  subsamples separately.. i.                                                               10   The  Chow  tests  are  performed  based  on  pooled  regressions  that  include  a  dummy  variable  that  indicates  whether a firm belongs to the high or low group. and long‐term past performance. we sort portfolios based only on Stock  Duration.uncover  what  frictions  prevent  arbitrageurs  from  trading  these  away. Return Predictability  4.

 and into three groups based on our  (mis)valuation measures. calculating  returns for the next four quarters and updating the portfolio every quarter.   Constituting  our  second  step.  18    .  We  again  report  monthly  alphas  for  the  CAPM.  and  disappears  after  controlling for momentum. such that stocks ranked in each of the last four quarters form one‐fourth of the portfolio. All of our portfolio sorts are  intended  to  capture  any  reversal  of  longer‐term  mispricing. For example. and the 4‐factor loadings  for each of the five quintile portfolios as well as the long‐short portfolio that buys stocks with long Stock  Durations (top quintile) and sells stocks with short Stock Durations (bottom quintile). The results are reported in Table 6 using in Panel B the market‐to‐book ratio  and  in  Panel  C  the  proxy  from  Pastor  and  Veronesi  (2003).1% per year (t‐statistic of 2. 3‐factor and 4‐factor model.65). This first step thus provides weak initial support for the hypothesis  that the stocks held by short‐term investors are more likely to be overvalued.     Unconditionally.  We  account  for  overlapping  portfolios  by  following  the  methodology  in  Jegadeesh  and  Titman (1993).The results from basic portfolio  sorts on Stock Duration  are reported  in Table 6. The negative alpha of  stocks  held  by  short‐duration  investors  is  generally  not  significant  though.  We  examine  this  by  independently  double  sorting  stocks  into  quintiles based on their stock duration at the end of each quarter.  a  long‐short  equal‐weighted  portfolio  with  long  positions  in  stocks in the highest Stock Duration quintile and short positions in stocks in the lowest Stock Duration  quintile earns a 3‐factor alpha of (12*0.  we  find  some  but  not  strong  evidence  for  a  positive  relation  between  Stock  Duration and future stock returns.  with  longer‐term  meaning  over  the  next  four  quarters. The positive alpha of stocks held by long duration‐investors is significant and  robust to controlling for momentum.  a  stronger  test  of  the  hypothesis  that  the  reversal  pattern  that  was as documented in the market‐to‐book regressions actually constitutes temporary price distortions is  to  consider  the  joint  importance  of  Stock  Duration  and  misvaluation  for  stock  return  predictability.  In Panel A  of  Table 6 we sort the sample into quintiles based on Stock Duration at the end of the quarter. 3‐factor and 4‐factor models.  if  stocks  held  by  the  short‐term  (long‐term)  investors  are  more  likely  to  be  overvalued  (undervalued). We report monthly returns for the CAPM.  Intuitively.34%=) 4.  then  the  above  return  reversal/predictability  results  should  be  stronger  conditional  on  stocks  that  may  be  more  misvalued. as shown in  the  second  column  of  Table  6  Panel  A.  Returns  from  each  of  the  four  sub‐portfolios  are  equally  weighted  to  calculate  the  monthly  portfolio  returns.

 Our results are similar  if we use the Hoberg‐Phillips misvaluation measure (see Appendix A8 Panel A).  the  CAPM  alpha  for  stocks  that  appear  most  overvalued  equals  ‐0.  t‐ statistic= 2.  with  a  long‐short  portfolio  that  is  long  (short)  in  stocks  with  long  (short)  Stock  Duration providing a cumulative return of about 170% over the period 1984 to 2011.   To  complement  this  analysis.  t‐statistic  =  3. or transient investors (Panel F).45%  monthly.20.92).   Interestingly.  Figure  6  provides  cumulative  stock  returns  of  different  Stock  Duration portfolios. this overvaluation does not  exist or is less severe in the presence of long‐term investors.  these differences in stock returns are strongest for a portfolio that also conditions on market‐to‐book  ratios. For example.63)  for  stocks  that  are  also  in  the  longest Stock Duration quintile.  The  figure  shows  that unconditionally.  we  find  that  the  documented  overvaluation  pattern  is  not  present  when  using  share turnover (Table 6 Panel D). in Table 6  Panel B the CAPM alpha for stocks in the high market‐to‐book ratio quintile and the low Stock Duration  quintile  equals  ‐0.23%  per  month  (t‐statistic  of  2. Taken together. with a t‐ statistic  of  2.  Scheinkman  and  Xiong  (2008). all these results provide evidence in  support of the  main theoretical  prediction  in  Bolton.62% is again highly significant. versus only 37% for stocks in the lowest  market‐to‐book ratio group  (bottom tercile).31%.  For  example.  whereas  the  CAPM  alpha  for  stocks  in  the  high  market‐to‐book ratio group and the high Stock Duration group is positive (0. The difference of 0. Panel  D.  with  a  long‐short  portfolio  in  stocks  in  the  highest  market‐to‐book  ratio  group  (top  tercile)  yielding a return of about 280%.  This  difference  in  returns  remains  statistically  significant  for  Fama  and  French  3‐factor  alphas  (0. Moreover.  for  example. the results are similar when using the alternative misvaluation  measure  from  Pastor  and  Veronesi  (2003).We  find  that  stocks  with  high  valuations  have  negative  future  alphas  and  thus  appear  overvalued only when held by short‐term investors.49). Most important.18% per month).  but  it  equals  0.  shows  for  stocks  that  are  more  likely  to  be  overvalued  that  a  portfolio  with  long  positions in stocks in the lowest share turnover quintile and short positions in stocks in the highest share  19    .  one  dollar  invested  in  a  portfolio  of  stocks  with  long  Stock  Duration  (top  quintile)  outperforms  a  portfolio  of  stocks  with  short  Stock  Duration  (bottom  quintile).78)  for  stocks  that  are  also  in  the  shortest  Stock  Duration  quintile.  The difference  of  0.91).47)  and  for  Carhart  4‐factor  alphas  (0. As reported in Panel C.59%  per  month  between the  two  Stock  Duration  groups  is  highly  significant  (t‐statistic  =  2. To the contrary.40%  per  month  (t‐statistic  of  1.41%  per  month  (t‐statistic  of  1.  namely  that  stocks  with high  valuations  are  more  likely to be overvalued in the presence of short‐term investors. institutional turnover (Panel E). stocks with high valuations tend to  have future positive alphas if these stocks are held by more long‐term investors.

  namely  to  what  extent  the  presence  of  investors  with  short‐durations  could  explain  the  value  premium.  This  would  imply  that  negative  future  alphas  of  stocks  held  largely  by  short‐term  investors  should  be  more  prevalent  for  stocks  with  relatively  high  returns  in  the  past  three  years  and  high  current  valuations. we consider the stock return in the past 36 months.6% (t‐statistic of 3. On the other hand.  particularly  allowing  highly  valued  stocks  to  be  temporarily  overvalued. As a result. these findings suggest that the value premium is driven by stocks with  more short‐term institutions.55%=) 6. where we documented that the reversal patterns results are very different when  any of the alternative investment horizon measures are used. the corresponding  long‐short  annualized  4‐factor  alpha  for  stocks  in  the  highest  duration  quintile  is  only  1.  i. Results are similar using the Pastor‐Veronesi misvaluation measure  in Table 6 Panel C.55 in case of the 4‐factor alphas).  The  difference  between  the  long‐short  portfolios  for  long  and short‐duration investors is also highly economically and statistically significant (with a t‐statistic of  2.  which  is  statistically  insignificant  (t‐statistic  of  1.6%.  past  stock  returns  should  play  an  important  role  to  corroborate  any  overvaluation.2% per year (t‐statistic of 2.turnover quintile does not produce economically or statistically significant alphas. This is consistent with  our findings in Table 4.  In  other  words.     Our third and final step incorporates the notion that if reversal patterns indicate that stocks are  temporarily  overvalued.68=) 8.34).e.   20    .     The  analysis  in  Table  6  also  addresses  a  closely  related  question.  For example.  that  stocks  with  low  market‐to‐book ratios (value stocks) tend to outperform stocks with high market‐to‐book ratios (growth  stocks). we find that if we only consider stocks in the  shortest duration quintile.  we  would  expect  previously  documented  predictability to be stronger for stocks where such predictability would indeed create a reversal pattern. If that past three‐year stock return is  relatively  high  and  the  stock  has  a  high  valuation  and  the  stock  has  a  short  Stock  Duration. while there is no value premium among stocks with long Stock Durations.  If  short‐duration  traders  distort  prices. Our empirical results in Panel B and C of Table  6 are consistent with this intuition. then a long‐short equally‐weighted portfolio that buys (sells) stocks with low  (high) market‐to‐book ratios has an annualized 4‐factor alpha of (12*0.95). They show that the value premium in our sample is driven by stocks  with shorter Stock Durations. using the returns reported in Table 6 Panel B.  it  seems  more  likely  that  that  stock  is  overvalued.82).  then  we  would  expect  that  the  value  premium  is  stronger  for  stocks  held  primarily by institutional investors with shorter durations. As large changes in the presence of short‐term investors can take two to three years to  materialize.  and a CAPM alpha of (12*0.

  see.  we  find  in  Table  7  Panel  C  the  strongest  reversal. growth  stocks with short Stock Durations and high past stock returns seem overvalued.  the  Amihud  illiquidity  measure  (Panel  B).  We  only  report  monthly  alphas  for  stocks  in  the  highest  and  lowest  Stock  Duration  quintiles.94%. and three‐year past returns.27).  we form 5x3x2  independent triple sorts  on  Stock Duration. for example.  we  use  institutional  ownership  (Panel  A). Asness (1997) also finds that growth (value)  strategies work best for high (low) momentum stocks.  and  idiosyncratic  volatility  (Panel C) as proxies for arbitrage costs.7% (t‐statistic of 2. we report both 3‐factor and 4‐factor alphas. with an annualized 3‐ factor alpha of ‐3. and Lee and Swaminathan (2000) note that stocks  with low (high) share turnover tend to have value (growth) characteristics.2 Portfolio Results for Subsamples: The Role of Limits to Arbitrage    Having shown that the stocks held by short‐term investors are more likely to be overvalued.69).  market‐to‐book.61).  stocks  with  a  similar  valuation  and  a  similar  presence  of  short‐term  investors  but  with  positive  past  six‐month  momentum have no subsequent economically large negative alphas (annualized 3‐factor alpha of only ‐ 0.  To create this table. with Panel  A  reporting  3‐factor  alphas  and  Panel  B  reporting  4‐factor  alphas.   Our results are consistent with and expand the existing literature considering the interaction of  value‐growth  strategies  with  either  momentum  or  the  presence  of  short‐term  investors. with an annualized 3‐factor alpha of only ‐0.  Consistent  with  the  analysis  in  Table  5. Specifically.  In  contrast. we  next  examine  the  effects  of  limits  to  arbitrage  on  this  overvaluation.  for  example. In contrast.  and  proxies  for  arbitrage  costs.  The results in Panel C and D of Table 7 show that there is also a direct connection to past six‐  month momentum. superior growth opportunities of firms. In all three panel.   4.  with  an  annualized  3‐factor  alpha  of  ‐7.  misvaluation.56).  The  corresponding  results  are  presented in Table 8. Asness (1997) and Lee and Swaminathan (2000).08%  (t‐statistic  of  3. Combined with the results were we conditioned on the past three‐year  returns.   21    .We  formally  study  this  by  conducting  5x3x2  independent  triple  sorts  on  Stock  Duration. with a t‐statistic of 0. stocks with high (mis)valuations held by short‐term investors that also  experienced negative six‐month momentum seem good candidates for stocks whose overvaluation has  recently  started  to  become  recognized. The corresponding results are reported in Table 7.51% (t‐statistic of 0. these findings thus support the notion that these high valuations (though only slowly reversed)  are indeed reflecting misvaluations rather than.  Panel  A  shows  that  for  growth  stocks  with  short  Stock  Durations  and  with  low  past  stock  returns  that  there  is  no  evidence  for  overvaluation  or  predictability.  For  these  stocks.

  while  controlling  for  other  stock  characteristics  (see  Daniel  et  al.81) if institutional  investor  holdings  are  low.  for example in column 9 of the table.  This  confirms  that  return  predictability  based  on  stock  duration  is  stronger  for  more overvalued stocks.3 Results from Fama‐MacBeth Regressions   We finally examine the effect of investor horizon on stock return predictability in a multivariate  regression  setting.      4. in column 3 the value of the coefficient is 0.023. Results are presented in Table 9. with a t‐statistic of 3.  the  coefficient  of  Stock  Duration  is  positive  and  highly  significant  in  most  of  the  specifications.42)  if  idiosyncratic  volatility  is  low.   The  results  are  similar  for  the  other  two  proxies  of  arbitrage  costs.  For  example. we find that the coefficient of the interaction  between  Stock  Duration  and  a  high  market‐to‐book  ratio  dummy  (top  tercile)  is  positive  and  highly  statistically  significant. but only  0.  these  3‐factor  alphas  are  not  statistically  and  economically  significant  if  institutional  investor  holdings  are  large  (‐0.77. Note that our results on institutional turnover are consistent with those in Yan  and Zhang (2009).39) if idiosyncratic volatility is high. Like in their work.  t‐statistic  of  0. namely that stocks with high valuations have  negative future alphas only if held by short‐term investors.6%  per  year  (t‐statistic  of  0. In columns 4 and 10.  (1997) and Wermers (2003)).61). are driven by the subset of stocks with high  arbitrage costs. for example.  We  use  the  Fama‐MacBeth  (1973)  methodology  and  estimate  predictive  cross‐ sectional  regressions  of  next  one‐year  raw  returns  or  next  one‐year  DGTW  adjusted  cumulative  abnormal  return  on  stock  duration.  Arbitrage  costs do not seem to matter if stocks are held by investor with long‐term durations. the difference in 4‐factor alphas between high and low Stock Duration quintile stocks with high  market‐to‐book ratios equals 6.  In  Table  8  Panel  C.   The regression estimates are generally consistent with the portfolio results reported in Tables 6  and  8.11%  per  month.  The coefficient for Stock Duration is robust to using DGTW adjusted returns as the dependent variable.  this  confirms  the  notion  that  predictability is strongest and misvaluation most likely if short‐term investors are present and if limits to  arbitrage are high.49% (t‐statistic of 2.  for  example. For example.We find that the patterns documented in Table 6. we find in Panel A of Table 8 that the monthly 3‐factor alphas for stocks  with high valuations that are held by short‐term investors equal ‐0.  However. we also find that firms held by institutions that tend to trade more  22    .4% per year (t‐statistics of 2. Our results are similar if we use the Pastor‐Veronesi or Hoberg‐Phillips misvaluation  measures (see Appendix A8 Panel B to D).  Again.

  5.have  higher  future  stock  returns  (see  column  3). the low institutional investor holdings dummy equals one  for  stocks  in  the  lowest  institutional  investor  holdings  tercile.  Short‐term  investors  may  be  more  likely  to  be  prone  to  such  overconfidence.  by  Bolton. who introduce a  theory that incorporates investor overconfidence.  for  example.  one  standard  deviation  decrease  in  stock  duration  leads  to  103  bp  lower  returns  over  the  next  one  year  for  stocks  in  the  bottom  institutional  ownership  tercile  compared to those in the top institutional ownership tercile. which results in investor overreaction to public news.  which  is  defined  as  the  weighted‐average  length  of  time  that  institutional  investors  have  held  a  stock  in  their  portfolios. the Amihud illiquidity measure. Conclusions     This  paper  empirically  studies  whether  the  presence  of  short‐term  investors  is  related  to  a  speculative component in stock prices.    For  example. i. Therefore. and Subrahmanyam (1998).  and  Xiong  (2006). to deviations of stock prices from fundamentals over longer  periods  of  time. and idiosyncratic volatility.  We  find  that  this  result  does  not  appear  to  be  very  robust in our sample though (see columns 2 and 9).  called  Stock  Duration. we divide the stocks each quarter into three tercile groups based on one of these  three proxies of limits to arbitrage. by DeBondt and Thaler (1995) and De Long.  our  new  proxy  can  be  23    . A related explanation is given in Daniel. Hirshleifer.  Scheinkman. and the high idiosyncratic  volatility dummy equals one if stocks belong to the highest idiosyncratic volatility tercile.  In  contrast  to  other  measures  such  as  share  turnover  or  institutional  turnover.  as  predicted.  as  suggested  by. The results in  columns 5 to 7 of Table 9 show that the coefficients corresponding to the interactions between these  high  arbitrage  costs  dummies  and  stock  duration  are  positive  and  highly  significant  in  all  three  regression  specifications.    In  the  regressions  in  columns  5  to  7.  the  high  Amihud  illiquidity  dummy equals one for stocks in the highest Amihud illiquidity measure tercile.  for  example. To construct  the dummy variables.  we  include  as  additional  independent  variables  the  interaction  terms  between  Stock  Duration  and  dummy  variables  for  three  proxies  of  arbitrage  costs.e.  namely institutional ownership.  and  was  introduced  in  Cremers  and  Pareek  (2012).    We study this question using a new measure of the holding duration of institutional investors.  Similarly.  This  suggests  again  that  predictability  is  stronger  in  the  subsample of  stocks  with  higher  arbitrage  costs. Shleifer..  Their  paper  provides a formal theory which posits that short‐term investors with heterogeneous investor combined  with  limits  to  arbitrage  can  create  temporary  price  distortions  and  a  speculative  component  in  stock  prices. Summers and Waldmann (1991).

  high  idiosyncratic  risk.  We  cannot  detect  a  similar  a  price  reversal  pattern  for  either  share  turnover. When short‐term investors move into (out of) stocks.     Second.  our  findings  are  consistent  with  a  speculative  stock  component  in  stock  prices  as  modeled  in  Bolton.     24    . We document such predictability using both valuation proxies and  traditional  asset  pricing  methodology.    Overall. with each institutional investor being potentially short‐term in some  stocks and long‐term in others.5 years in 2010.  and  Xiong  (2006).  if anything. their prices tend to go  up (down) relative to fundamentals. slightly lengthened since 1985. Finally. our paper provides two main contributions. First. This increase in Stock Duration may be somewhat surprising  as share turnover has significantly increased over the same period (from an average annualized turnover  of 72% in 1985 to close to 300% in 2010). The average Stock Duration equals about 1.  Our  findings  raise  interesting  questions  for  future  research. while institutional investors as a group have increased their  average ownership in stocks from 33% in 1985 to 75% at the end of our sample in 2010.measured at a de‐aggregated level.2 years in 1985  and increases to around 1.  Scheinkman. predictability is stronger in the subsample of stocks with  higher  arbitrage  costs.  while  results  for  Stock  Duration are robust to their inclusion.  institutional  turnover  or  the  presence  of  transient  investors.    Using this new measure. for example.  such  as  for  stocks  with  low  institutional  ownership. what the reasons for trading by short‐term institutions are or how changes in the  presence of short‐term investor interact with managerial decision making and compensation.  and  high levels of illiquidity. we characterize the  evolution of Stock Duration over time.  we  document  that  the  presence  of  short‐term  institutions  is  strongly  related  to  temporary price distortions. and surprisingly find that holding durations have been stable and. However. the  simultaneous  increase  in  both  share  turnover  and  Stock  Durations  can  be  explained  by  two  separate  phenomena  occurring  during  our  time  period:  the  increase  in  automated  and  high  frequency  trading.  and the major shift towards (closet) indexing which is inherently longer‐term.

  A  team  production  theory  of  corporate  law. 2005..  and  Wei  Xiong. The interaction of value and momentum strategies.  Cremers. Harvard Law Review  119.References  Amihud.  Illiquidity  and  stock  returns:  cross‐section  and  time‐series  effects.  2012.  The mutual fund  industry worldwide: Explicit and closet indexing. Lucian.  Brian. 29–36. Accruals.  Bushee.  2002.  Short‐term  trading  and  Stock  Return  Anomalies:  Momentum.  Contemporary Accounting Research 18. Ferreira.  Martijn. J. 3329–3365..  The  influence  of  institutional  investors  on  myopic  R&D  investment  behavior.  J.  1998.  and  Ankur  Pareek.  Brian. 2006. Working Paper University of Notre  Dame and Rutgers University.  Starks. The case for increasing shareholder power..  Martijn.  2001. Review of Financial Studies 22.  Bainbridge. Clifford S. Working paper. 1735–1749. 557–610.  2007.  and  Lynn  A.  Bolton.  Virginia  Law  Review 85.  Journal  of  Financial Economics 86. 305–333.  2012.  Margaret  M.  Bebchuk. J. 833–861. 479–512. and Antti Petajisto.  1999.  Bushee. K.  Executive  compensation  and  short‐term  behavior in speculative markets.  Accounting Review 73. Harvard Law Review 118. 207–46.  K.  J. 31–56.  Joshua.  Patrick.  Matos  and Laura  T. Directory primacy  and shareholder  disempowerment.  25    . 247–286.  Cremers.  Miguel  A. fees and performance.  Stout. Stephen. K. Pedro P.  Do  institutional  investors  prefer  near‐term  earnings  over  long‐run  value?.  Coval.  Jose  Scheinkman.  Blair.  Asness. Share Issuance and R&D Increases.  and  Erik  Stafford. Review of Economic Studies 73. Martijn.  Cremers.  March/April. 2009. Reversal. How active is your fund manager? A new measure that  predicts performance.  Journal  of  Financial Markets 5.  Asset  fire  sales  (and  purchases)  in  equity  markets.  J. 1997. Financial Analysts Journal.  2006.  Yakov.

  2011.M. Amsterdam.    Graham. Journal of Finance 53.  Harford. R.  Measuring  Mutual  Fund  Performance with Characteristic‐Based Benchmarks.  De  Bondt. Louis. Lawrence H. Handbooks in Operations Research and Management.  Thakor. and Kai Li.  David  Hirshleifer. 1–19.  Radhakrishnan.  Kenneth  A.  and  Jeremy  C.  2012.  Duration  of  executive compensation. Andrei Shleifer.  Jones  and  Albert  J. Massimo Massa.  Gaspar.  Does  algorithmic  trading  improve liquidity?. J. and David Thesmar. In: Jarrow. 1–33.  and  Richard  Thaler.). Journal of Financial Economics 76. Shareholder investment horizons and the  market for corporate control. Massimo Massa. Summers.  Andre  F. Ambrus Kecskes.. and Robert J.  Vol.  1997. 42–58. Journal of Business 64.  and  Zahid Rehman. 385–410. forthcoming.  Kent. Harvey. Journal of Applied Corporate Finance Summer. 2011. Review of Finance forthcoming. 1035–1058.  1992. John R. José‐Miguel. Journal of Financial Economics 99. 2005.  1998. Journal of Accounting and Economics 40.  Kent. Jarrad. Journal of Finance 52.  Rajdeep Patgiri.  José‐Miguel.Daniel.  Werner  F.  Perold.  Shareholder  trading  practices  and  corporate investment horizons. Payout  policy choices and shareholder investment horizons..  Gaspar. Elsevier Science. 1839–1885. 9. (Ed. Investor horizons and corporate policies.  Hendershott. Working Paper. Washington University in St.  Financial  decision‐making  in  markets  and  firms:  A  behavioural perspective..  Stein.  Fenghua  Song.  and  Anjan  V. 135–165. 2012.  Todd  Milbourn. Journal of Finance 66. 1991.  Charles  M. 2005.  Sheridan  Titman.  and  Russ  Wermers.  and  Avanidhar  Subrahmanyam. The economic implications of corporate  financial reporting.  26    . Pedro Matos.  De Long. Bradford.  Menkveld. Francois.  Investor  psychology  and  security  market under‐ and overreactions.  Derrien. Dirk Jenter. The survival  of noise traders in financial markets.  Daniel. 27–39. Campbell R. et al.  Mark  Grinblatt. and Pedro Matos. Waldmann. and Shiva Rajgopal.  1995.  Froot. 3–73.  Gopalan. 2012.  Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis.  Terrence. Institutional cross‐holdings and their effect on acquisition  decisions.

   Narayanan MP.  Economic  “short‐termism”:  The  debate.  Newey.  The  impacts  of  automation  and  high  frequency trading on market quality.  Stock  valuation  and  learning  about  profitability. 59–98..  2003. Journal of  Financial Economics 78.  Jeff  Castura  and  Richard  Gorelick.  Nagel. New Perspectives Quarterly 27. Journal of Finance 40.  Electronic  trading  and  market  structure. 703–708.  2003. Stefan. 65–91. Edmund S..  Lubos.  and  Sheridan  Titman.  UK  Government  Foresight  Driver  Review 16. Whitney K. 1469–1484.  27    . Journal of Finance 48. Short sales.  The  stock  market  and  corporate  investment:  A  test  of  catering theory..  and  Gordon  Phillips. Review of Financial Studies 22.Hoberg.  Polk.  Pastor.  1996. 825–860. Journal of  Finance 55. 17–19. 2010.  2011. Short‐termism is undermining America.  Robert  J.  Real  and  financial  industry  booms  and  busts. 45–86.  Menkveld. 187–217. 1183–1219.  Narasimhan. 1749–1789. 2005. 2017–2069. 1987. Academy of Management Review 21. Managerial incentives for short‐term results.  and  the  implications for management practice and research.  2009.  and  Pietro  Veronesi.  1993. 277–309. West...  Overconfidence  and  speculative  bubbles.  2012.  Scheinkman.  Jose.  Gerald.  Phelps.  Laverty.   Lee. Annual Review of Financial Economics 4. A simple.  2010.  Christopher..  Litzenberger. 2000.  Journal  of  Finance 65. positive semi‐definite. 1985. C.  Journal  of  Finance 58.  Returns  to  buying  winners  and  selling  losers:  Implications for stock market efficiency.. Charles M. Price momentum and trading volume.  Albert  J. heteroskedasticity and  autocorrelation consistent covariance matrix. 111. and Bhaskaran Swaminathan. and Kenneth D.  the  unresolved  issues.  Journal  of  Political  Economy. institutional investors and the cross‐section of stock returns.  Jegadeesh. Econometrica 55.  and  Paola  Sapienza.  Kevin  J.  and  Wei  Xiong.

 655–669. Leo E. 2009. The Economist.  Vishny. Mark Hoven.  Wermers.  Quarterly Journal of Economics 104.Stohs.  Jeremy  C. Vishny. Andrei. 61–80.  and  Robert  W. 1988. and Zhe Zhang. 1997. and David C. Mauer. Xuemin.  1–20.  Efficient  capital  markets. 1996.  Yan. 279–312. University of Maryland.  Stein.  Shleifer. Institutional investors and equity returns: Are short‐term institutions  better informed? Review of Financial Studies 22.  2003.  Andrei.  1990.  The Economist. The limits of arbitrage. and Robert W. Takeover threats and managerial myopia.  Is  money  really  “smart”?  New  evidence  on  the  relation  between  mutual  fund  flows..  Shleifer. Journal of Corporation Law 33. Working Paper. and performance persistence.  Journal of Business 69. Taking the long view.    28    . The pursuit of shareholder value is attracting criticism – not  all of it foolish. 893–924. 35–55. 2007.  Strine. The determinants of corporate debt maturity structure.  Equilibrium  short  horizons  of  investors  and  firms.  Russ.  inefficient  firms:  A  model  of  myopic  corporate  behavior. Journal of Finance 52. Jeremy C.. 148–153. manager behavior.. Journal of Political Economy 96. Issue of November 24.  American Economic Review P&P 80.  Stein. 2012. Toward common sense and common ground? Reflections on the shared interests of  managers and labor in a more rational system of corporate governance.

  We exclude firms that are in the bottom NYSE size decile and firms with stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal year.52  3.06  0.  (t.65  0.03  0.80  ‐0. We report these summary statistics for all observations used in the regressions reported in Column 1 of Table 3.02  0.12  0.84  0. The sample  period is 1985 to 2010.62  0.22  7.07  1.00  0.68  0.33 31.10 0.31  0.32  0.33  206  0.33  0.55  1851  13.29  1.51  0.28 2.24  45.00  0.05  0.46  0.25  1.04  0.62  0.04  0.Table 1: Summary Statistics  This table provides summary statistics of the variables used in the empirical analysis.49  1.40  2.59  0.25  1.16  6.01  23.07  0.22  3304  10.59  ‐0.36  1.06  1.18  0.69  0.31  0.01  13.02  0.54  0.53  0.87  0.50 2.57  13269  10.42  ‐0.09  6.08  0.63  2.76  0.04  0.67  19.82 18.92  0. The sample consists of US firms from Compustat.94 17.22  14.16  0.43  0.32  18. t‐1)  0.07 0.53  0. Variables are defined in Appendix A1.13  ‐0.01  71.02  1.93  7.08  0.03  1.40  1.12  2.56  0.01 32.39 0.35  570  0.65 0.14  0.94  0.01  0.18  0.33  2.12  0.06  0.62  0.01  0.49  2635  0.52  1.20  0.  29418 25554 29413  29413  28977  25079  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29418  29407  29405  28313  11501  29407 29405 28313 11501  .02 ‐0.25  0.01  5.90  1.74  4.57 2.07  0.73  1.01  1.23  0.31  0.       Variable     Mean     Median     STD     25%     75%  Stock Duration  Change Stock Duration (t minus t‐1)  Institutional Turnover  Transient Investors  Short‐Term Ownership   Change Short‐Term Ownership (t minus t‐1)  Share Turnover  Institutional Investor Holdings   MB Ratio  MB Residual PV   MB Residual HP   Market Cap (in mUSD)  Asset Horizon  R&D/Assets  Capex/Assets  PPE/Assets  Debt/Assets  Cash/Assets  Sales Growth  Log(Assets)  Assets   Amihud Illiquidity  Idiosyncratic Volatility  Bank Stock Duration  Investment Company Stock Duration  Pension Funds Stock Duration  Others Stock Duration  Bank Holdings  Investment Company Holdings  Pension Funds Holdings  Others Holdings  1.60  6491  0.33 0.62  0.07  0.22  0.94  1.05 0.08  0.02  1.53  1.19  0.16  0.01  0.54  1.38 1.95                     Autocorr.07 0.26  ‐0.27  10.05  0.52  7.28  12.01  53.84        Obs.79  0.14  213  3.54 0.07  0.  All variables are winsorized at 1%.00  54.00  0.73  1.08  10.65  0.17  564  7.37  0.00  35.28  0.02  0.46  ‐0.14  0.18  0.51  0.23  4.06 1.39  ‐0.54  1890  0.50 3.41 0.

Table 2: Stock Duration and Related Variables over Time  This  table  provides  information  of  the  evolution  of  Stock  Duration.37  1.45  1.51  1.30  0.29  0.32  0.32  0. Variables are defined in Appendix A1.30  0.54  1.31  0.31  1. The sample consists of US firms  from Compustat.28  0.31  0.  1296  1515  1607  1563  1591  1739  1896  2046  2251  2361  2527  2774  2616  2615  2828  2754  2410  2096  2057  2034  2032  2037  2128  2154  2202  597     .38  1.32  0.  institutional  turnover.44  1.32  1.27  0.23  1.29  0.41  1.47  20%                  Obs.29  0.29  0.32  0.46  1.31  0.  institutional  investor  holdings.5%  Obs.34  0.  and  share  turnover over the period 1985 to 2010.  865  1103  1196  1211  1268  1353  1403  1416  1451  1568  1666  1716  1625  1661  1711  1615  1495  1369  1315  1215  1135  1051  956  974  966  402                      Institutional Turnover  Mean  0.32  1.45  1. The table reports mean values of these variables for each year.     Year          1985  1986  1987  1988  1989  1990  1991  1992  1993  1994  1995  1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  2010  Change (1985‐2010)              Stock Duration  Mean  1. All variables are winsorized at 1%.30  1.30  1.52  1.28  0.44  1.44  1.47  1.26  0.27  0.29  1.26  0. We exclude firms that are in the bottom NYSE size decile and firms with stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal  year.51  1.27  0.25  0.25  0.33  0.  1137  1377  1436  1407  1408  1522  1627  1707  1854  1913  1997  2116  1965  1920  1991  1883  1643  1435  1359  1271  1212  1128  1032  1035  1006  409                      Institutional Investor  Holdings   Mean  33%  35%  36%  37%  39%  39%  40%  42%  44%  45%  46%  46%  50%  51%  49%  51%  57%  63%  66%  70%  72%  73%  75%  74%  73%  75%  126%  Obs.  1109  1341  1415  1385  1379  1477  1572  1664  1787  1864  1934  2047  1942  1913  1930  1866  1637  1434  1354  1275  1222  1137  1065  1086  1178  430                      Share Turnover  (annualized)  Mean  72%  92%  103%  87%  94%  93%  120%  126%  147%  133%  162%  180%  169%  171%  223%  228%  207%  207%  215%  233%  233%  251%  282%  318%  316%  276%  283%  Obs.29  0.25  0.40  1.23  1.28  1.44  1.

07)  ‐0.176***  (‐2.10)  0.13)  6.215***  (11.28)  (5) ‐0.14)  (10) ‐0.56)  ‐0.39)  Stock Duration (t‐1)    (2) 0.32) 2.163  (1.09)  0.242*** (5.367***  (7. All variables are winsorized at 1%.86) 0.027 (0.62) ‐0.114 (‐1.425  (‐1.56) 0.406*** (5.00) Stock Duration (t‐2)  Institutional Investor Holdings   Share Turnover (coeff.17) 0.026 (0.674***  (11.104*** (‐8.99) 0.89)  0. respectively.473***  (8.83) 0.07)  0.71) ‐0.39) 0.83) 3.002  (1.152**  (‐1.13) ‐0.66)  0.59) 3.49) ‐0.76) 0.41)  ‐0.009***  (5.73) 0.165***  (6.24)  0.48)  1.89) 0.874***  (‐11.002  (1.107***  (7.184*** (‐12.92)  0.42) 0.131  25841  0.139 22362  0.94)  (7) MB Residual PV  (8) 0.269***  (‐5.56) 0.65) 0.94) 1.159** (‐2.766***  (5.003***  (5.200***  (13.21) 1.637***  (9.003***  (5.12) ‐0.121**  (2.19)  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes 29418  0.011  (1.78) 0.859***  (‐9.649***  (10.278*** (4.115***  (9.43)  0.860*** (3.286***  (5.41) 0.     MB Ratio  (3) (4) ‐0.136***  (9.646***  (‐6.389  (‐1. **.148***  (‐11.642***  (9.64)  0.67) 0.33) ‐0.61)  ‐15.86)  0.039 (1.21)  0.097***  (7.56)  ‐7. calculated based on robust standard  errors clustered at the firm level. are reported in parentheses. t‐statistics.658***  (11.70) 0.455*** (‐6.04) 0.51) 2.139***  (6.391*  (‐1.198***  (‐10.045** (‐2.42)  ‐0.98)  ‐13.26) 1.011  (1.10) 1.56) 0.63) 0.302***  (5.46)  ‐0.676***  (8.87) 2./100)  Asset Horizon  Cash/Assets  Sales Growth  PPE/Assets  Log(Assets)  Debt/Assets  Capex/Assets  R&D/Assets R&D Missing Amihud Illiquidity Idiosyncratic Volatility Firm Fixed Effects  Year Fixed Effects Obs.90) 0.55) ‐0.136*** (5.72) 3.80) ‐0.Table 3: Misvaluation and Stock Duration: Main Specification  This table provides panel regressions linking valuation proxies and Stock Duration.026**  (2.470***  (6.012  (1.54) 0.701***  (5.68)    (9) ‐0.52) 0.74) 0.84)  ‐0. ***.749*** (‐7.133      (6) ‐0.          Stock Duration    (1)  ‐0.002  (1.57) ‐0.003***  (4.87)  0.95)  ‐14.002  (1.59) 6.511***  (8.28) 0.  adj.08) 1.461***  (6.187 (1.24)  ‐7.17) 0.162*** (‐13.307*** (‐6.002  (1.89) 0.15)  ‐7.030 (0.36) 1.02) 0.183 (1.79) 0.79) 0.191***  (‐9.03)  ‐13.169***  (6.47) 0.87) 3.38) 0.94)  0.482***  (6.789*** (3.52) 0.52) 0.085** (2.076*** (7. Variables are defined in Appendix A1.30) ‐0. We exclude firms that are in the bottom NYSE size decile and firms  with stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal year.397***  (6.331***  (‐7.095***  (9.010***  (4.99) ‐0.133 25841  0.183***  (‐3.41)  0.684***  (5.403  (‐1.099***  (‐7.173 (1.240*** (‐13.805*** (4.087***  (8. 5%.13) 6.49) ‐0.46) 0.176***  (‐3.186***  (‐3.639***  (10.85)  2.92) 0.531***  (9.012  (1.75) 0.091***  (7.34)  0.071  (1.060** (‐2.196 (1.57)  ‐7.846*** (4.193***  (‐10.194***  (‐9.086***  (8.57) ‐0. We use the market‐to‐book ratio (MB Ratio) and the misvaluation measure proposed by Pastor  and Veronesi (2003) (MB Residual PV)  as valuation proxies.028*** (‐13.19) 0.490***  (4.50) 0.57)  0.167***  (‐2.201***  (6.369***  (5.178***  (5. R‐sq.28)  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes 29418  0.002***  (4.39) 0.135***  (9.24) ‐0.421*  (‐1.010***  (5.11)  3.877***  (‐10.02)  0.138 . The sample consists of US firms from Compustat.133 22836  0.750***  (5. * indicate significance levels of 1%.135 22836  0.629***  (10.041 (1.91) 0.49)  ‐0.011***  (5.37) 0.140* (‐1.45) 0.197***  (12.65) ‐0.90) 1.58) ‐0.531***  (10.036* (‐1.570***  (9.81)  ‐7.58)  0.41) 0.56) 6.77)  ‐0.33) 1.205***  (‐11.350***  (5.192***  (‐4.89)  0.14) 0.870***  (‐10.21)  0.010  (1.166***  (13.177***  (7.60) 0.019* (1.375***  (6.73) 0.216***  (5.85)  0.51)  ‐14.868*** (3.78)  ‐0.46) 0.47)  0.010***  (4.009  (0.135 22362  0.003***  (4.99)  0.133 25554  0.46)  ‐0.610***  (9.002 (‐0.38) 1.212***  (11.53)  ‐0.85) 0.113***  (8.688***  (8.051*** (‐7.088  (‐1.134 25554  0. and 10%.05)  ‐0.15) 6.073*** (6.51) 0.850***  (‐10.65) 0.71)  ‐0.062** (‐2.498***  (6.92) ‐0.069*** (‐5.88)  2.

27)  MB Residual PV (5)  1. R‐sq.158  27349 0.162  .125*** (2.    Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes Yes  Yes Yes Yes  Yes Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes Yes  Yes 29418  0. * indicate significance levels  of 1%.79)  0.  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes Yes  Yes Yes Yes  Yes Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes 29418  0.40)  0. are reported in parentheses.66)  Share Turnover (t‐1) (coeff.60)  Share Turnover (t‐1) (coeff.20)  0.27)  Transient Investors (t‐1)  Controls as in Table 3  Firm Fixed Effects  Year Fixed Effects  Obs. R‐sq.032***  (‐2.070*  (‐1.013***  (24.003 (1.062*** (‐5.24)  0.75)  0.069***  (‐5.059*** (5.014 (‐1.043***  (19.88)  (6)  ‐0.43)     (3)  ‐0.90)  (8)  0. and 10%.061  (1.025* (‐1.131  25851  0.286***  (5.146  31141  0.102*** (‐8.36)  0.51)  0.20)  0.69)  Transient Investors (t‐1)  Controls as in Table 3  Firm Fixed Effects  Year Fixed Effects  Obs.034*** (2.30)  (9)  ‐0. The sample consists of US firms from Compustat.130**  (2.59)  0.62)  0.091***  (7.  and  a  measure  for  transient  investors.230*** (5.165*** (‐3.15)  3.07)  1. All variables are winsorized at 1%.  adj.127  25547 0.108*** (8.82)  Institutional Turnover (t‐1)  Transient Investors  0./100)     (2)  0.067*** (6.  share  turnover.009  (0.149  27349 0. respectively.77)  ‐0.222*** (17.80)  (9)  ‐0. 5%.93)  (6)  ‐0.139  31141 0.143  27349 0.302*** (‐6. Variables are defined in Appendix A1.133  25851  0.47)  0.  Panel  A  provides  regressions  where  we  use  the  market‐to‐book  ratio  (MB  Ratio)  as  a  proxy  for  misvaluation.25)    Panel B: MB Residual PV        Stock Duration     (1)  ‐0.  calculated based on robust standard errors clustered at the firm level.192***  (‐4.44)  0.001 (1.076* (1.39)  0.131  27049 0./100)  (2)  0.233*** (15.151                          (7)  ‐0.47)  Institutional Turnover (t‐1)  Transient Investors  0.389*** (6.055 (‐1.94)  Stock Duration (t‐1)  Share Turnover (coeff.675*** (6.003*** (5.  institutional  turnover. **.052 (‐0.131  27049 0.272*** (19.62)  0.200*** (5.Table 4: Market‐to‐Book Ratios and Stock Duration: Controlling for Other Measures of Investor Horizon   This  table  provides  panel  regressions  linking  valuation  proxies  with  Stock  Duration.39)  Stock Duration (t‐1)  Share Turnover (coeff.148  27349 0.37)  0.03)  0.039*** (17.569*** (8.19)  0.64)  MB Ratio  (5)  4.98)  Institutional Turnover     (4)  ‐0. We exclude firms that are in the bottom NYSE size decile and firms with  stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal year.091*** (4.128  25547 0.15)                 (7)  ‐0.93)  1./100)  0.990*** (13. while Panel B provides regressions where we use the misvaluation measure proposed by Pastor and Veronesi (2003) (MB  Residual PV).134  31141 0.031**  (2.22)  0.22)  1. ***.029** (‐2.131  27049 0.    Panel A: MB Ratio        Stock Duration     (1)  ‐0.  adj. t‐statistics.011*** (5.92)  ‐0.155  31141  0.007 (‐0.35)  (3)  ‐0.128  27049 0.95)  Institutional Turnover  (4)  ‐0.057*** (5.65)  (8)  0.327*** (5.012*** (22.014 (1./100)  0.77)  0.67)  0.178*** (4.

45) 0.176     Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  15543  0.32) MB Ratio  Amihud Illiquidity  Low High (3)  (4)  0./100)  Amihud Illiquidity  Idiosyncratic Volatility  Inst.142  13804 0.707*** (‐4.20)  0.26)  0.  adj.000           ‐0.05)  ‐0.103***  (7.419***  (‐7.182             Panel B: MB Residual PV          Stock Duration  Stock Duration (t‐1)  Share Turnover (coeff.46)  ‐5.030  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  11750  0.17) ‐0.39) ‐5.296***  (3.31)  0. R‐sq.024  (0.67)  0.99) 0.015  (1.164     ‐0.67)  0.43)  0.386***  (9.089*** (‐4.52)  0.024  (0.64)  0.532***  (‐4.77)  ‐3.142              ‐0.135  13804 0.65)  0.384***  (7.           ‐0.014 (‐0. We provide these  regressions based  on subsamples  using: (i) institutional  investor  holdings.24)  ‐0. Investor Holdings  Low  High (1)  (2)  ‐0.018 (0.68)  ‐9.0310 0.  t‐statistics.07)  0.05)    Idiosyncratic Volatility  Low  High (5)  (6)  ‐0.0000           ‐0.047*** (‐11.113  10011 0.    Panel A: MB Ratio             Stock Duration  Stock Duration (t‐1)  Share Turnover (coeff.187**  (‐2.231**  (‐2.41)  ‐9.1010  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes 11750  0.554***  (‐6.113*** (‐7.248***  (‐5.068*** (‐3.15) ‐21.          ‐0.  We  also  report  p‐values  of  Chow‐tests  comparing  the  coefficients  of  Stock  Duration  and  lagged  Stock  Duration  across  subsamples.185  11389 0.  Panel  A  provides  regressions  where  we  use  the  market‐to‐book ratio (MB Ratio) as a proxy for misvaluation. respectively.057  (1.117** (‐2.43)  ‐4. * indicate significance levels of 1%.050**  (‐2.16)  0./100)  Amihud Illiquidity  Idiosyncratic Volatility  Inst.  calculated  based  on  robust  standard  errors  clustered  at  the  firm  level.00)  ‐0.77)  0.33)  0.  We  create  these  subsamples  by  separating  the  sample  firms  each  year  based  on  median  values  of  the  respective  variables. while Panel B provides regressions where we use the misvaluation measure  proposed  by  Pastor and  Veronesi  (2003) (MB Residual  PV).116*** (6.32)  0.912 0.796***  (‐6.041***  (‐5. ***.07)  Idiosyncratic Volatility  Low  High  (5)  (6) ‐0.80) 0.127**  (‐2.160  .03)  p‐value Chow test (Stock Duration) p‐value Chow test (Stock Duration (t‐1))  Controls as in Table 3  Firm Fixed Effects  Year Fixed Effects  Obs.63) 0.89)  0.06) 0.  The  sample  consists  of  US  firms  from  Compustat.165  11389 0.25)  0.111***  (5.026 (1.Table 5: Market‐to‐Book Ratios and Stock Duration: Results from Subsamples   This  table  provides  panel  regressions  linking  valuation  proxies  and  Stock  Duration.56)  ‐0. R‐sq.73)        MB Residual PV Amihud Illiquidity  Low  High  (3) (4) ‐0.412***  (4. Investor Holdings  Low  High  (1)  (2) ‐0.146  10011 0.275***  (‐4.549***  (‐7.0000 0.22)  0.36)  p‐value Chow test (Stock Duration) p‐value Chow test (Stock Duration (t‐1))  Controls as in Table 3  Firm Fixed Effects  Year Fixed Effects  Obs.087  (‐1.111***  (‐2.37)  ‐0.60)  0.081***  (3.000  0. 5%.0000  Yes Yes  Yes Yes Yes  Yes 14165 0.356***  (5.02) 0.233***  (3.  Variables  are  defined  in  Appendix  A1.19) ‐21.212***  (3.114*** (‐8.66)  0.54) 0.20)  ‐7.094*** (6.00)  0.0000 0.95)  ‐0.88) ‐0.53)  ‐10.29) 0.82) 0.183  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes    15543  0.  We  exclude firms that are in the bottom NYSE size decile and firms with stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal year.097  (‐1.780***  (‐6.26) 0.838*** (‐6.43)  ‐4.619*** (‐6.  adj.182*** (‐9. are reported in parentheses.000 0.032* (1.393***  (3.144*** (6.29) ‐20.054**  (‐2.036***  (‐2.  (ii)  the  Amihud  illiquidity  measure. All variables are  winsorized  at  1%.25)  0. **.018 (1.134***  (‐5.049  (0.  and  (iii)  idiosyncratic  volatility. and 10%.117*** (9.83)  ‐7.370***  (‐7.59) 0.130  (1.084  (1.176*** (‐12.370*** (‐9.000  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  14165 0.06) ‐19.091*** (5.

17 0.77) 0.Table 6: Return Predictability: Portfolio Results  This  table  presents  monthly  equal‐weighted  CAPM  alphas.15  (1.33  (3.23)  0.12  (‐8.44  (2.82)  ‐0.20 (0.35  (3.50  (14.03  (1.49) 3 ‐ 1  ‐0.01) ‐0.61)  (‐0.57)  (13.55) (‐0.65) (1.30  (‐2.24) (‐2.25  (‐14.59) 0.23  (2.10  (2. we follow the methodology in Jegadeesh and Titman (1993) such that stocks ranked in each of the last four quarters form one‐fourth of each  portfolio.06  (‐1.95 (57.36) 0.13  0. 5% significance levels are denoted in bold and t‐statistics are reported in parentheses.28  ‐0.87  (48.86) (2.41)  1.15  0.81) 0.20  0.24)  (3.18  (2.18  (2.21  (8. stocks are first divided into five groups based on Stock Duration.87  (‐3.40)                   MKTRF  1.42) ‐0.19)  0.44) (32.26  ‐0.04  (‐2.18  (‐1.33 (2.94) ‐0.09) 0.43  (2.23) 0.79) (23.35)  (‐1.05  (0.53  (13.07) 0. We then report returns for these 15 portfolios which are calculated over next four quarters.59) 0.36 (16. and ownership of transient investors as a percentage of total institutional ownership  (Panel F). institutional turnover (Panel E).39) 0.59)  ‐0.95)  0.19) (2.12) 0.08)  0.66) ‐0.68  (‐2.33  (‐2.50  (2.32  (‐12.18  (1.17  (1.13  (‐1.51  (‐2.    Panel A: Sorts on Stock Duration    Stock Duration  1 (Short)    2    3    4    5 (Long)    5 ‐ 1    CAPM Alpha  ‐0.21  0.57)  (29.19)  (‐0.28  (‐1.04) 1.19  (63.68)  0.34  0.17  (1.20  (1.81)  0.25) ‐0.07) ‐0.40)  (2.15  (‐1.58)  0.67 (7.55  (‐3.14 (0.68)  0.30  (3.00  (0.32) (‐0.31)  (‐0.14)                      1 (Low) 0.31  (0.86) 0.95) ‐0.34  (16.57) (0.98) (2.85)  0.15  (‐0.82) 0.59  (1.16  ‐0.77)  ‐0.35  (4.48) ‐0.06  ‐0.19  0.80) 0. All the reported returns are in monthly percentages.92) 0.43)  0.05)           3‐1 ‐0.41  (0.46)  0.17  (‐1.33) 0.62) ‐0.16) 0.16  (2.18) Carhart 4‐Factor Loadings  HML  SMB  ‐0.68) 0.18  (2.12  0.40) (0.41  (3.26  (‐1.33  (1.07) ‐0.78) (2.39  (2.56)  (2.62) 0.12  ‐0.49) 0.17  0.59) (‐1.11  (‐0.34  0.18 (‐12.18  0.98) 0.     1 (Short)     2     3     4     5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1     CAPM Alpha  MB Ratio 2  3 (High) 0.13) 0.25)  0.20  0.03  (2.14  (0.14  (1.72) ‐0.43  (‐2.12  (‐0.26) 0.01  (1.24) 0.73)  0. At the beginning of each quarter.33) 0.55  ‐0.64) 0.08) (2.30  (1.22  (1.49) (0.03  (1.66) 0.86)  0.35  (4.66)  (2.45  0.34)  ‐0.17  (1.19) 0.23  ‐0.47  (‐2.66)  (2.09 (68.04  (2.57) 0.69)  ‐0.10  (1.06) 0.79) 0.28  0.48)  ‐0.40) (0.97) 0.99) ‐0.27) UMD  ‐0.28  (‐2.31  0.34)  0.42  (2.20) 0.55)  .60)  0.50)   Panel  B: Double Sorts on Stock Duration and MB Ratio        Stock Duration Uncond.41  (2.  3‐factor  Fama‐French  alphas.  and  Carhart  4‐factor  alphas  for  portfolio  strategies  from  unconditional  sorts  based  on  average Stock Duration (Panel A).43 0. In Panels B and C they are  then independently divided into three groups based on a misvaluation measure.19  0.77)  (2.31  (‐3.55)  ‐0.54) (0.33) 0.69) Average Stock Duration  3 Factor Alpha  4 Factor Alpha  ‐0.95)  (15.64) (‐14.82) 0.34  0.95)  ‐0.19 0. Panels B and C report equal‐weighted alphas for conditional sorts based on Stock Duration and a misvaluation measure (market‐to‐book ratio in Panel B and the Pastor  and Veronesi (2003) misvaluation proxy in Panel C).74) 0.79)  0.19  0.12  ‐0. To  account for overlapping portfolios. stock turnover (Panel D).65) 0.82) FF 3‐Factor Alpha  MB Ratio  2 3 (High) 0.36  (3.03  (‐0.07  (2.45  (1.73) FF 4‐Factor Alpha  MB Ratio 2 3 (High) 0.26  (2.27  (1.15  0.06  (2.03  ‐0.70) 0.47  (2.93)  0.83)                      1 (Low) 0.10  0.91) 1 (Low)  0.88) ‐0.81) 0.47)    3‐1 ‐0.01  (67.05 0.67) (3.17  (1.24 (2.20  (1.02  0.27  (‐0.51) (3.09  (0.08 (‐5.

27 (‐2.47)  0.12 (0.15 ‐0.24 0.38 (‐2.23)    3 (High) ‐0.44)  ‐0.26  ‐0.21)  (2.26)  ‐0.17 (2.26 0.23  ‐0.68)  0.78)  0.38)  (1.50)          Uncond.43 0.11  (0.05)  (‐2.42)    3 (High)  ‐0.42  (‐3.43)  (‐0.63)  ‐0.03 (‐0.04 (2.08)  ‐0.66)  0.22)  0.55)  0.17 (1.18 (1.02 (‐0.01 (0.39)     FF 3‐Factor Alpha  MB Residual PV  2 3 (High) 0.02  (1.50 (‐3.22 0.21 0.39)  (0.02)  (0.32  (1.04 (0.20)  ‐0.22)  FF 4‐Factor Alpha MB Ratio  1 (Low)  2  0.25  ‐0.36)  ‐0.77)  3 ‐ 1 ‐0.02  (1.38 (‐2.39)  ‐0.20 (1.52 (‐3.08 (0.49)  FF 3‐Factor Alpha  MB Ratio  1 (Low) 2 0.62)  0.  0.02)  3 (High) ‐0.19  (0.26)  0.08)  0.16 0.42)  0.82)  ‐0.06)  ‐0.47  (2.53)  3 ‐ 1 ‐0.61)  (1.47 (‐2.02 (‐0.06)  0.02)  FF 4‐Factor Alpha MB Ratio  1 (Low) 2 0.18)  (0.06)  (0.15 0.16 (‐0.71)  Panel E: Sorts on Institutional Turnover      Institutional Turnover  1 (Low)   5 (High)   5‐1   Uncond.01 (‐0.26  (0.  0.01 (0.08)  0.77)  (2.10)  (‐0.24 (2.16 (‐1.38)  (1.63)  0.95)  (2.50)  0.15 (‐1.13 ‐0.06)  0.68)    FF 3‐Factor Alpha MB Ratio  1 (Low) 2 0.29 0.78)  0.45  (2.73)  ‐0.34 0.14  (‐0.31 (2.07 (0.18 (1.60)  0.38 0.68)  0.35)  (2.10)  0.07 (‐0.25)                   1 (Low) 0.77)  ‐0.44)  (‐0.68)  0.28 0.40)  0.04)  0.38)        Panel D: Sorts on Share Turnover    Share Turnover  1 (Low)   5 (High)   5 ‐ 1    Uncond.62)  0.42 (3.31  0.00 (‐0.30)  (2.41 (5.85)  ‐0.56  (3.82)  0.67)  0.14)  0.31)  0.06)  3 (High)  0.55)  3 (High) ‐0.75)  ‐0.42  (2.08)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.55 (3.48  (1.16)  0.03 (‐0.38)          3‐1 ‐0.91)             3‐1 ‐0.13 (1.55)  ‐0.13 (2.18)  ‐0.07 (1.60)  (2.26  ‐0.01  (0.07 (0.51)  0.86)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.08  (‐1.10 (0.27 (‐2.22)  0.23)  (0.  0.20 (3.07 (1.07  (‐0.68)  0.34)                  Uncond.13 0.02 (0.31)  ‐0.07 (‐0.68)  ‐0.23 (3.33)     FF 4‐Factor Alpha MB Residual PV  2 3 (High) 0.86)  (1.51)        3 (High) ‐0.)  Panel  C: Double Sorts on Stock Duration and MB Residual PV        Stock Duration Uncond.28 ‐0.12 (‐0.01 (‐0.60)  ‐0.66)  0.76)  (2.07)  ‐0.73)  0.84)  ‐0.16 (2.05 (3.63)  0.13 (2.20 (‐2.19  (0.19)  0.46 (4.     1 (Short)     2     3     4     5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1        1 (Low)  0.33 (‐3.68  (‐4.32 (3.07)  ‐0.03  (1.01)  (‐0.05 (‐0.01)     .08)  0.29 (‐2.16  (1.62)  0.02)  ‐0.50)  ‐0.20 (2.32)  0.00 ‐0.59)  (1.19 (2.91)  ‐0.14 ‐0.46 0.01)  Panel F: Sorts on Transient Investors     Transient Investors  1 (Low) 5 (High)    5 ‐ 1    Uncond.50)  (1.39 (‐3.27)  ‐0.11 (1.06 (2.14 0.37)  0.06)  Uncond. 0.16 0.32)  0.32)  (1.74)  0.26 (‐1.43)  0.44 (2.05 0.32)  (3.02 (‐0.27)  (1.17 (3.16 (1.83)     CAPM Alpha MB Residual PV  2  3 (High) 0.05 0.46  (2.24 0.32 (‐0.18)  ‐0.25)  (‐1.36  (‐2.01 ‐0.05  ‐0.56)                  3‐1 ‐0.38  0.40 (2.10 (1.14  (‐0. 0.10 (0.00 (‐0.01  (‐0.95)  0.11)  ‐0.17 (3.95)  0.08  (0.03 (0.31)  ‐0.81)  0.14 (2.23 0.27 0.96)  0.77)  0.27  (‐1.13  (‐1.16)  0.18 0.25)  0.52)  FF 3‐Factor Alpha MB Ratio  1 (Low)  2  0.68 (‐3.20)  0.20  (‐2.14 (1.14 (1.21 (‐1.03)  (‐0.08 (2.62 (1.12)                      1 (Low) 0.12  0.60)  (1.35  (‐4.95)  0.00 (0.52)  ‐0.10 0.16)  ‐0.21)  ‐0.22)  0.07 (‐0.67)  0.37)  (1.82)  0.24 (‐1.13 (1.50)  ‐0.63)  0.00 (0.17 (2.29 (‐2.69)  0.40 (0.07)  ‐0.71)  (0.83)  ‐0.43)  0.05  (‐0.29  (1.20 0.28)  ‐0.27)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.29 (‐1.20 (‐1.10 (‐1.37 (3.04)  0.11)  (‐0.08)  ‐0.22  (2.71)  (‐0.09)  0.45 (‐3.01)  3‐1 ‐0.14 (‐1.29)  0.06 (‐0.38)  (‐0.58)  (2.18)  FF 4‐Factor Alpha  MB Ratio  1 (Low) 2 0.27)  ‐0.94)  ‐0.05)  ‐0.25)  (‐1.83)  0.25 (‐1.79)  (‐0.32  0.42 (‐2.08  (1.51)  (2.12 (3.Table 6 (cont.06 (2.19 (1.00 0.02  (0.66)  ‐0.06)  0.04  (‐0. 0.88)  (0.09 (‐0.

56)  0.11  (‐0.05)  3 (High)  ‐0.28) 0. They are then independently divided into  three groups based on their market‐to‐book ratio.69)  0.04  (‐0.75)  0.90)  0.13  (0.04)  2  0.  0.97)  0.15)  0.87)  ‐0.34)  ‐0.70  (4.10 (0.58) 0.30)  ‐0.27  (‐1.13  (‐1.36  (‐2.19 (1.21)  0.14  (1.19  (1.18)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.24 (2.70)             1 (Low)  0.07)  0.09  (0.42)  ‐0.24  (1.31)     3 ‐ 1  ‐0.60)     High‐Low  Past 36‐ Months Ret.17) 0.98)  0. We  only report  results  for  the top and  bottom Stock  Duration groups.24)  0.88)  0.52) 0.89)  0.  ‐0.99)  ‐0.61)  0.11 (0.19 (‐1.41)  3 (High)  0.50)  0.26  (2.22  (‐1.27)  0.66)  ‐0.69)  2  0.42 (‐1.21  (‐1. stocks are first divided into five groups based on Stock Duration.16  (1.24  (1.43  (2.10 (0.23  (1.03  (0.72)  0.30 (‐1.59)  0.51)  ‐0.14  (1.58)  3 (High)  ‐0. We then report returns for these 15 portfolios which are calculated over next four  quarters.16)  0.16  (1.40)  0.38)  0.65)  0.89)  0.77) 0.68)  ‐0.13)  0.20  (1.79)             1 (Low)  0.01 (‐0.  All  the  reported  returns  are  in  monthly  percentages.22 (2.08)  0.27 (2.53) ‐0.64)  3 (High)  ‐0.07) 0.12  (1.40 (3.01 (‐0.09  (‐0.16) 0.  At  the  beginning of each quarter.08 (0.12  (1.28 (1.14 (‐0.38  (2.21  (1.08 (0.31  (‐2.12  (1.74)     3 ‐ 1  ‐0.24  (2.75)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.21  (1. we follow  the  methodology in Jegadeesh and Titman (1993) such that stocks ranked in each of the last four quarters form one‐fourth of each portfolio.07)  2  0.11)  0.82)  0.49  (‐2.01  (‐0.51)  2  0.07  (‐0.06)  2  ‐0.35  (2.  To account  for overlapping  portfolios.11 (‐0.05)     High‐Low  Past 36‐ Months Ret.28 (2.06)  0.25 (1. and past returns.69)  0.14)  ‐0.34)  ‐0.94)  0.26  (‐1.23  (‐1.25)  ‐0.43)  3 (High)  ‐0.69)  0.17  (1.94)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.12)  3 (High)  ‐0.09 (‐0.  0.31  (2.40  (2.01  (‐0.85)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.22 (0.01  (0.58) 0.34)  0.36)  FF 3‐Factor Alpha     Past 36‐Months Stock Returns = High  MB Ratio        1 (Low)  0.26 (1.22)  0.19)  0.30  (2.57)  Panel D: FF 4‐Factor Alphas for Stocks with High versus Low 6‐Months Returns                                FF 4‐Factor Alpha    Past 6‐Months Stock Returns = High     MB Ratio  Past 6‐Months Stock Returns = Low  MB Ratio  Stock Duration   1 (Short)    5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  0.01)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.14 (1.30 (2.07 (0.96)  0.07)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.87)  3 (High)  ‐0.09)     High‐Low  Past 6‐ Months Ret.03)  0.95)  ‐0.28 (‐1.07)  0.06  (‐0.03  (‐0.02)  0.17 (1.71)  2  0.12  (‐0.52 (‐3.05)  ‐0.59)  3 (High)  ‐0.25  (2.88)  Panel B: FF 4‐Factor Alphas for Stocks with High versus Low 36‐Months Returns                 Past 36‐Months Stock Returns = Low  MB Ratio     Stock Duration  1 (Short)    5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  0.23  (‐1.23  (2.10)  Panel C: FF 3‐Factor Alphas for Stocks with High versus Low 6‐Months Returns                                FF 3‐Factor Alpha    Past 6‐Months Stock Returns = High  MB Ratio  Past 6‐Months Stock Returns = Low  MB Ratio     Stock Duration   1 (Short)    5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  ‐0.11  (1.07  (‐0.02 (‐0.77)  0.41 (3.03 (‐0.27)  2  0.11 (0.30  (1.49 (2.05  (0.20  (2.16  (1.43) 0.52 (2. Panel A and B  (Panel  C  and  D)  report  these  portfolios  separately  for  stocks  with  low  and  high  stock  returns  over  the  past  36  (six)  months.86)  ‐0.63 (‐3.  5%  significance  levels  are  denoted  in  bold  and  t‐statistics  are  reported  in  parentheses.59  (‐3.16  (1.  ‐0.04 (‐0.34)     High‐Low  Past 6‐ Months Ret.23  (1.81) 0.38)  ‐0.51  (3.38  (2.22 (1.60)  2  0.20)  0.21  (1.04)  0.91)  0.29) ‐0.26 (1.48)  FF 4‐Factor Alpha      Past 36‐Months Stock Returns = High  MB Ratio        1 (Low)  0.20)  ‐0.00  (‐0.07  (‐0.62  (‐3.Table 7: Return Predictability: Portfolio Results for Stocks with High versus Low Past Returns  This table presents monthly equal‐weighted 3‐factor Fama‐French alphas (Panel A and C) and Carhart 4‐factor alphas (Panel B and D) for  portfolio strategies based on 5x3x2 independent triple sorts based on Stock Duration. market‐to‐book.52  (‐3.83)  0.25  (1.    Panel A: FF 3‐Factor Alphas for Stocks with High versus Low 36‐Months Returns                 Past 36‐Months Stock Returns = Low  MB Ratio     Stock Duration  1 (Short)    5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  ‐0.13 (1.08  (‐0.50)  ‐0.97)  0.42  (3.45)  .

27) ‐0.14  (‐1.07  (‐0.24  (1.13  (0.34)  0.07  (0.49)  0.61  (‐3.50  (2.08) 0.14)  0.67) 0.  Vola. Market‐to‐Book Ratio.04  (0.81) ‐0.31  (2.41 (‐2.32  (1.40) ‐0.64) 0.81)  ‐0.04) 0.43) 0.54) 0.16)  ‐0.12) 0.44  (‐2.13  (‐0.12) 0.42  (2.64) 0.17  (1.44  (‐2.27) ‐0.35)  0.29  (1.30)  0.71)  Panel B: Triple Sorts on Stock Duration.20 (1.35)  ‐0.17  (0.71)  High ‐  Low  Amihu.40  (2.45) 0.12  (‐0.25)  ‐0.22  (2.81)  ‐0.53  (2.18)  .53) ‐0.37)  0. Inv.40)  0.78) ‐0.22  (1.11) 0.86)  ‐0.32)  ‐0.10  (0.27)  FF 3‐Factor Alpha   Idiosyncratic Volatility = High    MB Ratio     1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1        ‐0.68) 0.10) 0.40)  ‐0.31) 0.14  (‐1.56)  0.80)  0. stocks are first divided into five groups based on Stock Duration.14) 0.04  (0.56) High ‐  Low Idio.71) 0.26) 0.38  (2.24) 0. Market‐to‐Book Ratio.27  (2.78)       Stock  Duration  1 (Short)  5 (Long)  5‐1        FF 4‐Factor Alpha Institutional Investor Holdings = Low Institutional Investor Holdings = High  MB Ratio    MB Ratio  1 (Low) 2 3 (High) 3 ‐ 1 1 (Low) 2 3 (High) 3 ‐ 1 0.05)  FF 3‐Factor Alpha   Institutional Investor Holdings = High    MB Ratio     1 (Low) 2 3 (High) 3 ‐ 1         0.21  (2.84) 0.52) 0.12  (0.33) ‐0.83)    High ‐  Low  Inst.81) ‐0.05  (‐0.  ‐0.17)  0.42) 0.06  (‐0.36  (‐2. 5% significance levels are denoted in bold and  t‐statistics are reported in parentheses.30)     0.93) 0.96)  ‐0.03) ‐0.97) 0.  ‐0.48) 0.99)  0.44)         Stock  Duration  1  5  5‐1  FF 4‐Factor Alpha Idiosyncratic Volatility = Low Idiosyncratic Volatility = High MB Ratio    MB Ratio  1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1  0. and Idiosyncratic Volatility          Stock  Duration  1 (Short)    5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1     Idiosyncratic Volatility = Low  MB Ratio  1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1  0. low or high  Amihud illiquidity (Panel B).62) ‐0.25) 0.29  (1.07  (0.08) 0.16)  0.Table 8: Return Predictability: Portfolio Results for Stocks with High versus Low Limits to Arbitrage  This  table  presents  monthly  equal‐weighted  3‐factor  Fama‐French  alphas  and  Carhart  4‐factor  alphas  for  portfolio  strategies  based  on  5x3x2  independent  triple  sorts  on  Stock  Duration.  ‐0.18  (1.19) 0.05  (0.57 (2.03  (0.02) ‐0. They  are then independently divided into three groups based on their market‐to‐book ratio.13  (0.98) 0.23  (2.73) ‐0.01) 0.10  (0.08  (0.59  (3.16  (‐0.64  (‐3. We report these portfolios separately for stocks with low or high institutional investor holdings (Panel A).27  (2.88) 0.12  (1.  Illiq.10  (‐0. market‐to‐book.98)  ‐0.84)  ‐0.12  (0.12  (1.50)     0.02  (0.51)  ‐0.39)   High ‐  Low Idio.22  (2.25  (1.14) 0.73) 0.21) ‐0.27  (2.04  (0.24) ‐0.17  (‐0.03  (0.01 (‐0.61)  0.06  (0.11  (1.01  (‐0.15  (1.15)  ‐0.49  (3.43  (‐3.07)  ‐0.23  (1.58)  ‐0.17)  ‐0.11  (‐0.53) ‐0.08  (0.08  (0.07  (0.09 (0.18  (1.18  (1. To account for overlapping portfolios.32) 0.50) 0.22) 0.24  (‐1.26) 0.27 (0.59) 0.47)  FF 3‐Factor Alpha   Amihud Illiquidity = High    MB Ratio     1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1        0.26  (‐2.00) 0.10 (0.77) 0.13  (1.28  (1.48)  0.41  (2.18  (1.60) 0.93) 0.54  (‐2.16)  ‐0.84) 0.08) 0.35) 0.35  (1.61) 0.26)  High ‐  Low Inst.11)  0.13  (‐0.21  (2.32) 0.48  (‐2.16  (‐1. and proxies for limits to arbitrage.50  (‐3.07) 0.55) 0.11  (0.14  (1.21) 0.13  (‐0.24) 0.55) 0.99) 0.65) 0.69 (4.77  (‐3.33  (2.50 (2.39  (2.17 (‐1.34  (2.03)  0.50)  0.30) 0.53) ‐0.66) 0.49  (‐2.85) 0.05  (0.  Holdings  0.38)  0.08  (0.22  (1.54)  0.10  (0.72) ‐0.05  (‐0. and low or high idiosyncratic volatility (Panel C).  We only report results for the top and bottom Stock Duration groups.59) 0.85) ‐0.35  (3.08) 0.76) ‐0.20  (1.42  (2.24  (2.37)  0.52) 0.24  (2.65  (‐3.34  (1.52)  0.07  (‐0.18  (0.11  (‐1.29  (2.02  (‐0.32  (1.59 (2.08  (‐0.  Inv.84)  ‐0.71)  0.09)  ‐0.    Panel A: Triple Sorts on Stock Duration.47) 0.36  (2.35  (‐2.09  (0.24)  Panel C: Triple Sorts on Stock Duration. Market‐to‐Book Ratio.01  (‐0.33  (1. we follow the methodology in Jegadeesh and Titman (1993) such that  stocks ranked in each of the last four quarters form one‐fourth of each portfolio.93) 0.07) 0.24  (1.  Vola.29) 0.44) 0.43)  ‐0.03  (0.17  (1.96)          Stock  Duration  1  5     5‐1    FF 4‐Factor Alpha Amihud Illiquidity = Low Amihud Illiquidity = High MB Ratio    MB Ratio  1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1  0.12  (‐0.16)  0.26) 0.02) 0.39  (‐2. and Institutional Investor Holdings          Stock  Duration  1 (Short)    5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1     Institutional Investor Holdings = Low  MB Ratio  1 (Low) 2 3 (High)  3 ‐ 1  0. We then report returns for these 15 portfolios which are calculated over next four quarters.30  (2.64) 0.06  (0.11  (1.15  (1.03  (‐0.56)    High ‐  Low  Amihu.01  (0.95) 0.08  (‐0.03 (‐0. and Amihud Illiquidity         Stock  Duration  Amihud Illiquidity = Low  MB Ratio  1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1  1 (Short)    5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1     0.03 (0.12  (1.61)  ‐0.78) 0.72)  0.15) ‐0.92) ‐0.16  (1.25  (1.08)  0.38)  0.15  (0.07  (0.43) 0.96) 0.24  (‐1.12  (1.41  (2.84) 0.26  (2.  Illiq.13  (‐0.  Holdings  0.34) ‐0. All the reported returns are in monthly percentages.79) 0.  0.21  (2.24  (2.40)  ‐0.08  (0.21  (2.30  (1.22  (2.77  (4.48  (2.24  (2.08  (‐0. At the beginning of each quarter.01) 0.54 (3.31  (‐1.82)  0.24  (1.

92)  ‐0.26)  (2)    0.76)    0.01)  0.005 (0.91)  (2.34)          (3) (4) (5) (6) 0.045**  (‐2.49)  0.  To  construct  the  dummy  variables.40)    DGTW Adjusted Return 12 Months  (8)  (9) (10)   0.77)  0.95)  ‐0.52)    ‐0.128  (0.003  (0. and high idiosyncratic volatility equals one if  stocks  belong  to  the  highest  idiosyncratic  volatility  tercile.93)  0.098  (0.1 161230  104    7.042  (0.003 (0.77)  0.11)  (0.013*  0.34)  0.004 (‐1.68)  (3.77)    ‐0.71)    ‐0.014*  (1.007* (‐1.26)  0.33)  0.017  ‐0.36)  0.58)  ‐0.62)  ‐0.4 161230  104    7.38) ‐0.25)  0.123  (0.  .009 (2.0  161230  100    .40)      ‐0.53)  ‐0.019 (0.023*** (3.002  (‐0.88)  0. share  turnover.91)    ‐0.065***  (‐4.7  126730  104            4.021**  (2.001 0.  market‐to‐book  ratio.56)  0.037***  (3.03)  0.26)    7.004 (‐0.004  (‐0.31)  0.30)  0.014* (1.49)    0.004 (‐1.83)  0.002  0.017 ‐0.017** (2.022*** 0.4  161230  104              7.034***  (4.  we  divide  stocks  each  quarter  into  three  groups. Holdings    High Idiosyncratic Volatility*  Log(Stock Duration)    High Idiosyncratic Volatility    High Amihud Illiquidity * Log(Stock  Duration)    High Amihud Illiquidity       Average R‐sq.  and  high  Amihud  Illiquidity.023**  (2.66)      0.  ***.024***  (3.017   (1.  *  indicate  significance  levels  of  1%.009 0.  institutional  investor  holdings.29)                                                       0.004 (0.89)  ‐0.020 (0.006  (‐0.  are  reported  in  parentheses.55)  0.25)  0.007 (0.017 (0. (in%)  Obs.02)  ‐0.018  (0.85)  0.009  0.008 (1.92)  ‐0.005  (0.69)  ‐0.  **.9 161230  100                                4.  Number of Quarters  Return 12 Months (1)    0.)    Log(MB Ratio)    Momentum 12 Months    Log(Share Turnover)    Log(Institutional Investor Holdings)    Log(Idiosyncratic Volatility)    High MB Ratio * Log(Stock  Duration)    High MB Ratio    Low Institutional Inv.00)  0.68)  ‐0.003 (‐0.89)                0.020 (0.76)  (0.014* (1.22)  (0.35)  (0.27)  (‐1.138  (1.004  ‐0.117  (0.023** (‐2.79)  ‐0.79)  0.013* 0.97)  0. institutional turnover.20)  0.024**  (‐2.75)  (0.  respectively.Table 9:  Return Predictability: Fama‐MacBeth Regressions  This  table  provides  quarterly  Fama‐MacBeth  predictive  regressions  linking  next  twelve  month  stock  returns  (columns  1  to  7)  or  next  twelve month DGTW adjusted cumulative abnormal returns (columns 8 to 10) with lagged Stock Duration.0029 (‐0.82)  0.10)  0.183  (1.003 (‐0.006  (‐0.005 (0.4 161230  104            7.021 (1.038 (‐1.89)  (‐1. We further include interactions of Stock Duration with the market‐to‐book ratio.29)  (‐1.55) ‐0.016  0.15)  ‐0.021  (1.  and idiosyncratic  volatility.014** (1.  5%.007 (‐0. and dummy variables for high idiosyncratic  volatility.005 (‐0.  and  10%.07)  0.023** (‐2.61)                    7.011 (0.015 (‐1.003  ‐0.013  0.2 161230  100    3.013 (1.  high  Amihud illiquidity equals one for stocks in the highest Amihud illiquidity measure tercile.76)  ‐0.71)  (‐0.  calculated  based  on  2‐lags.004 (0.152  (1.43)  0.020  (1.42) ‐0.002  (‐0. Holdings *  Log(Stock Duration)    Low Institutional Inv.85)  ‐0.002 ‐0.4  161230  104        (7)    0.  low  institutional  investor  holdings.62)  ‐0.14)                                                                    0.016*  (1.18)  0.18)  0.6 161230  104    7.  Variables  are  defined  in  Appendix  A1.49)  ‐0.37)  0.002 (0.022** (‐2.081***  (‐4.28)  0.002 (0.28)  (0.22)  0.53)    ‐0.06)  ‐0.71)  0.94)  (1.033*** (2.  Low  institutional  holdings  equals  one  for  stocks  in  the  lowest  institutional  investor  holdings  tercile.005 (‐0.017***  0.35)      ‐0.34)  0.044***  (‐3.  past twelve month returns (Momentum 12  Months).021**  (‐2.  and  Newey‐West  (1987)  adjusted  t‐ statistics.023** (‐2.24)        ‐0.10)  (‐0.003 (‐0.          Intercept    Log(Stock Duration)    Log(Institutional Turnover)    Log(Market Cap.48)  (1.015** (2.

 All variables  are winsorized at 1%. Share Turnover.40 200% 1.  institutional  turnover.  institutional  investor  holdings.60 350% 1. The table reports mean values of these variables for each year.50 300% 250% 1.  and  share  turnover  over  the  period 1985 to 2010. Variables are defined in Appendix A1. Institutional Turnover. The sample consists of US firms from Compustat.10 50% 1.00 0% 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Stock Duration (in years) Stock Duration.30 150% 1.Figure 1: Evolution of Stock Duration and Related Variables over Time  This  figure  shows  the  evolution  of  Stock  Duration.20 100% 1.  1.  We exclude firms that are in the bottom NYSE size decile and firms with stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal year. and Institutional  Investor Holdings from 1985‐2010   Stock Duration (left axis) Institutional Investor Holdings (right axis) Share Turnover (annualized) (right axis) Institutional Turnover (right axis)     .

 P&G.2 200% 2 1.4 50% 1.4 250% 2. Microsoft. and Institutional Investor Holdings for  Hewlett‐Packard Institutional Investor Holdings (right axis) Share Turnover (annualized) (right axis)         .Figure 2: Evolution of Stock Duration for Selected Companies  Figure 2A shows the evolution of Stock Duration for selected companies over the period 1985 to 2010.6 100% 1.8 150% 1.2 1 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 0% Stock Duration (left axis) Share Turnover and Institutional Investor  Holdings (in %) Stock Duration.  Figure 2A: Stock Duration of Selected Companies  Stock Duration for Selected Companies 3 Stock Duration (in years) 2. Figure 2B shows the evolution of Stock Duration.5 2 1. We report this variable for five  companies: Apple. and Institutional Investor Holdings for Hewlett‐Packard  300% Stock Duration (in years) 2.5 1 0. Share Turnover. and  institutional investor holdings for Hewlett‐Packard over the period 1985 to 2010.6 2. Boeing.5 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 0 Apple Microsoft P&G Boeing Hewlett‐Packard   Figure 2B: Stock Duration. Share Turnover. share turnover. and Hewlett‐Packard.

 between six and 12 months.e.. between 12 and 24  months. Variables are defined in Appendix A1. All variables are winsorized at 1%. We exclude  firms that are in the  bottom NYSE size  decile and  firms with  stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal year. and above 24 months (i.e.. The holdings add up to 100%. short‐term holdings).Figure 3: Evolution of Institutional Investor Holdings with Different Stock Durations  This figure shows the evolution of institutional investor holdings over the period 1985 to 2010. The  sample consists of US firms from  Compustat. representing the total holdings of all institutional  investors.   Institutional Investor Holdings: Investors with Different Stock Durations 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% Stock Duration ≤ 6 Months 6 Months < Stock Duration ≤ 12 Months 12 Months < Stock Duration ≤ 24 Months Stock Duration > 24 Months 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 0% 1985 Institutional Investor Holdings (in %) 100%     . long‐term holdings). We report the holdings of institutional  investors that have a Stock Duration of less than six months (i.

 Variables are defined in Appendix A1.00 0.5 1 0.Figure 4: Stock Duration over Time by Institutional Investor Type  Figure 4A shows the evolution of Stock Duration over the period 1985 to 2010 by institutional investor type.5 0 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Institutional Duration (in years) Stock Duration for Selected Investors (Weighted Average Stock Duration Across all Stocks of an Investor) Berkshire Hathaway Fidelity STRS Ohio U Chicago       .  We  report  this  variable  for  four  institutional  investors:  Berkshire  Hathaway  (investment  company). public pension funds. and  university  and  foundation  endowments.00 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Stock Duration (medians. We calculate this variable as the weighted Stock Duration of all holdings held by an institutional investor. “Pension Funds” includes corporate (private) pension funds.5 3 2.00 1.  and  the  University  of  Chicago  (university  endowment).  The  table  reports  median  values  of  these  variables for each sample year.  “Others”  include  all  other  institutional  investors.5 4 3.5 2 1.  The  category  “Bank”  includes  banks  and  insurance  firms.  STRS  Ohio  (public  pension  fund). using as  weights  the  current  portfolio  holdings  of  an  institutional  investor.50 0.50 2.  “Investment  Company”  includes  independent  investment advisors and investment companies. We classify institutional  investor  into  four  categories.  Fidelity  (mutual  fund). in years) Stock Duration by Institutional Investor Type from 1985‐2010 Bank Stock Duration Pension Funds Investment Company Others   Figure 4B: Stock Duration of Selected Institutional Investors  5 4.50 1.  Figure 4A: Stock Duration by Institutional Investor Type  2. Figure 4B shows the evolution of the average Stock Duration for selected institutional investors over the  period 1985 to 2010.

10 2.  We define a large decrease (increase) in Stock Duration as a change in Stock Duration that is in the bottom (top) decile.80 t‐5 t‐4 t ‐3 t ‐2 t ‐1 t 0 t +1 t +2 t +3 t+4 t +5 Event Time in Years (t=0 is defined as year in which Change in Stock Duration from t‐1 to t0 is in Top  10%)  MB Ratio (left axis) +2SE ‐2SE Stock Duration (in years) (right axis)   .30 2.20 1.20 1.  we  report  mean  values.90 0.40 1.50 1.60 1.30 3.00 2.40 3.  We  also  report  standard  error  bounds  around  the  means  of  the  market‐to‐book  ratio  (+/‐  2  standard  errors  around the mean).60 1.10 3.00 1.60 2. We define as t=0  the year in which the large change in Stock Duration occurs.40 2.20 1. Variables are defined in Appendix A1.20 3. and report variables in the five years before and after t=0. All variables are winsorized at 1%.30 1.00 0.80 Stock Duration MB Ratio MB Ratio and Stock Duration if Stock Duration Goes Down  (change in bottom 10%) 1.10 Stock Duration MB Ratio MB Ratio and Stock Duration if Stock Duration Goes Up  (change in top 10%) 1.70 1.70 2.60 2.40 1.70 3.20 1.40 1.50 2.90 2. For all variables.80 3.00 t‐5 t‐4 t ‐3 t ‐2 t ‐1 t 0 t +1 t +2 t +3 t+4 t+5 Event Time in Years (t=0 is defined as year in which Change in Stock Durationfrom t‐1 to t0 is in  Bottom 10%)  MB Ratio (left axis) +2SE ‐2SE Stock Duration (in years) (right axis)    Figure 5B: Large Increases in Stock Duration  1.80 2.50 2.Figure 5: Misvaluation and Stock Duration in Event Time: Large Changes in Stock Duration  These figures show how market‐to‐book ratios change around large decreases (Figure 5A) and increases (Figure 5B) in Stock Duration.    Figure 5A: Large Decreases in Stock Duration  3.

Figure 6: Cumulative Portfolio Returns in Calendar Time  This  figure  shows  cumulative  stock  returns  over  the  period  1984  to  2011  for  different  Stock  Duration  portfolios  that  invest  USD  1  in  1984.  The  cumulative  returns  are  calculated  based  on  these  monthly stock returns.5 Dollar Value 3 2. To calculate the monthly stock returns.  but  now  for  stocks  that  have  low  (“Long/Short  Stock  Duration (MB Ratio=Low)”or high (“Long/Short Stock Duration (MB Ratio=High)” market‐to‐book ratios. stocks are  first divided into quintiles based on Stock Duration.5 2 1.  The  first  two  portfolio (“Short Stock Duration” and “Long Sock Duration”) consist of stocks with short (bottom quintile) and long (top quintile) Stock  Duration.  constructed  using  different  portfolios. Stocks have low (high) market‐ to‐book group if they are in the bottom (top) tercile. at the beginning of each quarter.5 1 0. Variables are defined in Appendix A1. For the returns where we also condition on market‐to‐book ratios. they are then  independently  divided  into  three  groups  based  on  the  market‐to‐book  ratio.5 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 0 Short Stock Duration Long Stock Duration Long/Short Stock Duration Long/Short Stock Duration (MB Ratio=Low) Long/Short Stock Duration (MB Ratio=High)       . The next portfolio (“Long/Short Stock Duration”) consists of long positions in stocks with long Stock Duration (bottom quintile)  and short positions (top quintile) in stock with short Stock Duration. The next two portfolios consist again of long positions in stocks with  long  Stock  Duration  and  short  positions  in  stock  with  short  Stock  Duration.    Cumulative Portfolio Returns in Calendar Time 4 3.  We  calculate  these  cumulative  returns  based  on  monthly  stock  returns.

  .T‐1 = 0. j .  This variable is defined as debt over total assets. j i. a dividend payer dummy. j T 1   (W  1) H i .j = percentage of total shares outstanding of stock i held by institution j at time t = T‐W.T‐1 over all institutions currently holding the stock.  The variable is defined as the weighted average of the turnover of institutional investors holding a given stock.T 1  d i . j . j     H B i .  We  choose  W  =  20  quarters.  If  stock  i  is  not  included  in  institutional  portfolio  j  at  time  T‐1. Industries are defined by 2‐digit sic codes. j .j. where  αi.. is given  by:  Durationi . and equipment. “dedicated” institutions with low turnover and more concentrated portfolio holdings.Appendix A1: Definitions of Variables  This table provides definitions of the variables used in the empirical analysis. ‐1/(1+firm age). whose methodology is based on factor and clustering analysis to classify  institutional  investors  into  three  groups:  “transient”  investors  with  high  portfolio  turnover  and  diversified  portfolios. The calculation of the duration for stock i that is included  in the institutional portfolio j at time T‐1.j. plant. using as weights the  total current holdings in the stock of each institution.   This variable is based on Hoberg and Phillips (202010) to proxy for misvaluation.t =  percentage of total shares outstanding of stock i bought or sold by institution j between time t‐1 and t. Next.  This variable is defined as R&D expenditures over total assets. j  where Bi. and stock return volatility.  weighted  by  the  duration  for  which  the  stock  was  held.  leverage  (long‐term  debt/total  assets).  This variable is defined as the market value of the equity of a firm. Hi. t. a dividend payer dummy. The maturity of current assets is defined  as current assets divided by the cost of goods sold.  Institutional Turnover is calculated using changes in the quarterly holdings over the past 4 quarters and the  stock‐level weights are calculated using the current holdings in the stock in each institutional portfolio.  This variable is defined as the market capitalization of the equity of a firm. It is defined as the residual  from regressing  for each year and industry log(MB Ratio) on log(assets). Variables are defined in Appendix A1.  ‐ 1/(1+ firm age).  This variable is defined as net property.  This variable is defined as the year‐by‐year change in sales.   This variable is defined as the percentage ownership of institutional investors. j i . We obtain the institutional investor  classification  data  from  Brian  Bushee’s  website  and  calculate  the  percentage  of  a  firm’s  ownership  by  transient institutional investors.   This  variable is based  on  Stohs and  Mauer (1996)  and defined as the (book) value‐weighted  average of the  maturities of current assets and net property.  For  each  stock  in  a  given  fund  manager’s  portfolio. and equipment is that  amount divided by annual depreciation expense. and zero otherwise. we compute at the individual stock‐level our “Stock Duration” proxy by averaging the  institutional‐stock level Duration¬i.  This variable is defined as the market value of equity over the book value of equity.e. and “quasi‐ indexer” institutions with low turnover and diversified portfolio holdings.  It  is  defined  as  the  residual  from  yearly  regression  of  log(MB  Ratio)  on  log(total  assets).  as  very  few  stock  positions  are  held  continuously  for  longer  than  5  years. This variable is defined as cash and cash equivalents over total assets.  The  measure  was  introduced by Bushee (1998. leverage.   This  variable  measures  the  percentage  that  is  owned  by  institutional  investors  (relative  to  all  holdings  by  institutional investors) with a Stock Duration that is in the bottom 50% (i. The maturity of net property.j.t  >  0  for  buys  and  <0  for  sells. for all stocks i = 1 … I and all institutional investors j = 1 … J.T are in  quarters.   This variable is defined as capital expenditures over total assets. 2001).  ROE.  This  variable is based  on  Amihud  (2002) and  is defined  as  the  annual average of  the  ratio of  daily absolute  stock returns to daily dollar trading volume. αi. This variable is calculated as the holding duration of ownership of each stock for every institutional  investor  by  calculating  a  weighted‐measure  of  buys  and  sells  by  an  institutional  investor.    Variable  Stock Duration  Definition  This  variable  is  defined  as  the  weighted  average  duration  a  stock  has  been  in  the  portfolios  of  institutional  investors.  the  holding  duration measure is thus calculated by looking back over the full the time period since that particular stock  has been held continuously in that fund’s portfolio.j = total percentage of shares of stock i bought by institution j between t = T‐W and t = T‐1.   This variable is defined as the total assets of a firm. and equipment (PPE) over total assets. ROE.   This  variable  measures  the  percentage  ownership  of  transient  institutional  investors. that have held the stock for the  short‐term only).t   H B t T W  i.   This  variable  is  based  on  Pastor  and  Veronesi  (2003)  to  proxy  for  misvaluation. plant. stock  return volatility.  This  variable  is  defined  as  the  number  of  a  firm’s  shares  that  are  traded  divided  by  the  number  of  shares  outstanding.  then  Durationi. plant.  This variable takes the value one if data on R&D is missing.T 1  Institutional Turnover  Transient Investors (in %)  Share Turnover  Institutional Investor  Holdings   Short‐Term Ownership   MB Ratio  MB Residual PV   MB Residual HP   Market Cap (in mUSD)  Asset Horizon  R&D/Assets  R&D Missing  Capex/Assets  PPE/Assets  Debt/Assets  Cash/Assets  Sales Growth  Assets   Market Capitalization  Amihud Illiquidity   (T  t  1) i .j.

  This  variable  is  defined  as  the  percentage  ownership  of  “pension  funds”.  This variable is defined as the twelve months DGTW adjusted cumulative abnormal stock return.  This  variable  measures  the  stock  duration  of  “banks”.  The  category  “bank”  includes  banks  and  insurance firms. and university and foundation endowments. The category “investment  company” includes independent investment advisors and investment companies (e. mutual funds). It is estimated using daily returns over the quarter before the fiscal year end.  This  variable  measures  the  stock  duration  of  “pension  funds”.  The  category  “pension  funds”  includes  corporate (private) pension funds..  This  variable  is  defined  as  the  percentage  ownership  of  “others”.  This  variable  measures the stock duration of  “investment  companies”..g.  This variable is defined as the twelve months raw stock return.  This variable is defined as the past twelve months raw stock return.  The  category  “bank”  includes  banks  and  insurance  firms.  The  category  “pension  funds”  includes corporate (private) pension funds. and university and foundation endowments. public pension funds. Investment Company.  This  variable  is  defined  as  the  percentage  ownership  of  “banks”. and Pension Funds.  The  category  “others”  includes  all  other  institutional investors that are not captured in the categories Bank. Investment Company.g. public pension funds.Appendix A1 (continued)  Variable  Idiosyncratic Volatility  Bank Stock Duration  Investment Company Stock  Duration  Pension Funds Stock  Duration  Others Stock Duration  Bank Holdings  Investment Company  Holdings  Pension Funds Holdings  Others Holdings  Return 12 Months  DGTW Adjusted Returns 12  Months  Momentum 12 Months  Definition  This  variable  is  defined  as  the  residual  that  is  obtained  from  a  3‐factor  Fama  and  French  model  of  stock  returns. The  category  “investment  company”  includes independent investment advisors and investment companies (e.  This  variable  measures the stock duration  of  “others”. mutual funds).  The  category  “others”  includes  all  other institutional  investors that are not captured in the categories Bank. and Pension Funds.  .  This variable is defined as the percentage ownership of “investment companies”.

2615*  1 0.0123  ‐0.1471* ‐0.0699*  0.5792*  0.6958*  0.1021* 0.1583*  1  0.2323*  1 0.0792*  ‐0.0810* 0.1737* 0.0932*  0.4118* 0.0387*  1 0.3378* 0.         Stock Duration  Institutional Turnover  Transient Investors Share Turnover  Institutional Investor Holdings   MB Ratio  MB Residual PV  MB Residual HP   Market Cap (in mUSD)  Asset Horizon  PPE/Assets  Amihud illiquidity  Idiosyncratic Volatility        [1]  [2]  [3]  [4]  [5]  [6]  [7]  [8]  [9]  [10]  [11]  [12]  [13]             [1] 1  ‐0.2000*  ‐0.0002 ‐0.1194* 0.0956*  ‐0.0922* ‐0.0022  ‐0.8490*  0.1254* ‐0.1503* ‐0.1389* 0.0329*  0.0507*  ‐0.1614*  0.0304* 0.0278*  1  ‐0.3215*  0.3569* ‐0.2185*  ‐0.0371* 0.1785*  0.3609*     [2]    [3]    [4]    [5]    [6]     [7]    [8]    [9]    [10]    [11]    [12]    [13]  1  0.1103*  ‐0.7830*  ‐0.2099*  1  .0558* 0.2312*  1  0.0066 0.1910* ‐0.1484*  ‐0.1996*  ‐0.2863* ‐0.1438* ‐0.1486*  ‐0.1624*  ‐0.1571* ‐0.0149 ‐0.3951* 0.5734*  ‐0.0786*  1 0.3604*  1  0.1329*  1  0.1871* 0.1055*  ‐0.0796* ‐0.2441*  ‐0.0512*  ‐0.1858*  0.1320*  1 0.0857* ‐0.0420* 0.2173* 0.Appendix A2: Correlations of Variables  This table reports pairwise correlations of some of the key variables of the paper.0168* ‐0.8211* 0.0786* ‐0.0280* ‐0.2504*  ‐0.2151*  ‐0. * indicates significance at 1%.1840* 0.0197*  ‐0.1609*  ‐0.0212*  0.3321* 0.

62  1.72  134%  Obs.23  1. The sample consists of US firms from Compustat.23  1.18  1.  865  1103  1196  1211  1267  1349  1402  1414  1450  1567  1664  1714  1625  1661  1711  1615  1494  1369  1315  1215  1135  1051  953  1068  1124  423  33961           Investment Company  Stock Duration        Pension Funds Stock  Duration  Median  1.39  1.65  0.30  1.25  1.64  1.15  1.19  1.g. We classify institutional  investor  into  four  categories.     Year     1985  1986  1987  1988  1989  1990  1991  1992  1993  1994  1995  1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  2010  Total  Change (1985‐2010)     Median  1. All variables are winsorized at 1%.29  1.  863  1102  1196  1210  1267  1352  1403  1413  1450  1567  1664  1714  1625  1659  1707  1615  1494  1369  1315  1215  1135  1051  953  1068  1125  424  33956     Obs.98  1.00  1.22  1.65  1.09  2..44  1. We exclude firms that are in the bottom  NYSE size decile and with stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal year.19  1.23  1.10  1.23  27%  Median  0.52  1.92  1.17  2.  “Others”  include  all  other institutional investors.71  2.82  0.36  1.25  1.78  1.80  1.34  1.52  2.63  1.30  1.42  1.75  1.26  1.39  1.Appendix A3: Stock Duration by Institutional Investor Type over Time   This table shows the evolution of Stock Duration over the period 1985 to 2010 by institutional investor type.68  1.10  1.13  1.28  2. “Pension Funds” includes corporate (private) pension funds.37  1.06  0.50  32%         Bank Stock   Duration    Obs.90  2.97  1.82  0.43  1.58  1.50  1.41  1.18  1.49  1.34  1. Variables are defined in  Appendix A1.15  1.  The  category  “Bank”  includes  banks  and  insurance  firms.20  1.90  1.97  2.71  1.53  1.79  0. public  pension  funds.70  1.96  2.69  1.31  2.81  1.15  1.67  0.30  1.64  1.15  0.80  1.24  1.74  1.76  1.75  0.60  1.  “Investment  Company”  includes  independent  investment advisors and investment companies (e.16  1.  and university and  foundation  endowments.86  0.  197  211  246  117  150  109  187  273  262  303  298  286  322  291  295  290  577  1043  1069  1160  1130  1049  950  1066  1122  422  13425     .63  1.60  1.41  1.67  1.37  1.00  ‐30%  Obs. mutual funds).48  1.33  1.01  1.57  1.10  1.27  1.36  1.36  1.50  1.  The  table reports  mean  values of these variable for each sample year.41  1.73  1.68  1.27  1.11  1.05  1.93  1.15  1.85  1.20  1.53  1.  779  921  1080  1199  1256  1334  1385  1400  1431  1553  1658  1620  1529  1534  1499  1435  1414  1352  1312  1214  1134  1049  951  1067  1123  422  32651           Others   Stock Duration  Median  1.

 “Others” include all other institutional investors. and  university and foundation endowments. “Investment Company” includes independent investment advisors  and investment companies (e. The sum of all holdings adds up to 100%. public pension funds. “Pension Funds” includes corporate (private) pension funds. mutual funds)..e.g.Appendix A4: Institutional Investor Holdings by Investor‐Type over Time   This  figure  shows  the  evolution  of  the  holdings  by  different  institutional  investor  types..  60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% Bank Holdings Investment Company Holdings Pension Funds Holdings Others Holdings 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 0% 1985 Institutional Investor Holdings by Type (in %) Institutional Investor Holdings by Investor‐Type 1985‐2010         .  to the total holdings of all institutional investors together. The category “Bank” includes banks and insurance firms. i.  We  classify  institutional  investor  into  four  categories.

  hedge  funds). short‐term holdings).  The  category  “Bank”  includes  banks  and  insurance  firms.  public  pension  funds.Appendix A5: Institutional Investor Holdings by Investor‐Type if Stock Duration is less than 6 Months   This  figure  shows  the  evolution  of  the  holdings  of  different  investor  types..  90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% Bank Holdings Investment Company Holdings Pension Funds Holdings Others Holdings 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 0% 1985 Institutional Investor Holdings by Type in % Institutional Investor Holdings by Investor‐Type:  Only if Stock Duration is ≤ 6 months         . and university and foundation endowments. We classify institutional investor into four categories.  “Investment  Company”  includes  independent  investment  advisors  and  investment  companies  (e.g.  Hereby.  we  only  report  those  holdings  of  institutional  investors with a stock duration of less than six months (i.. “Others” include all other institutional investors.  mutual  funds.e.  “Pension  Funds”  includes  corporate  (private)  pension  funds.

775***  (3.135 21906  0.175***  (‐3.77) 0.268*** (‐2.45)  ‐0.003***  (5.847***  (‐9.500***  (‐13.110*** (‐10.008  (0.36)  ‐0.845***  (6.84)  ‐15.80)  ‐0.015*  (1.037  (0.873*** (‐6.228***  (4.61) 0.076*** ‐0.45) 6.011***  (5.43)  ‐0.002***  (5.158**  (‐2.477***  (6.459*** (‐12.78) 0.89)  0.848***  (4.14)  0.351***  (5.648***  (10.87)  1.05)  0.02) 0.66)  ‐4.004**  (2.210*** (‐2.753***  (3.055***  (4.15) 0.56)  0. **.22)  ‐0.62)  0.23)  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  25554  0.80)  0.840***  (‐10. ***.  This  variable  measures  the  percentage  that  is  owned  by  institutional investors (relative to all holdings by institutional investors) with a Stock Duration that is in the bottom 50% (i.137  Short‐Term Ownership (t‐2)  Share Turnover  Asset Horizon  Cash/Assets  Sales Growth  PPE/Assets  Log(Assets)  Debt/Assets  Capex/Assets  R&D/Assets  R&D Missing  Amihud Illiquidity  Idiosyncratic Volatility  Firm Fixed Effects  Year Fixed Effects  Obs.342*** (3.621***  (9.  Variables  are  defined  in  Appendix  A1.79)  0.140  21906  0.46) 0.034  (1.  adj.58)  0.202***  (‐3.14) 0.238***  (4.e.862***  (3.83)  0.046** (‐2.184 (1.067***  (4.54)  0.60) 1. are reported in parentheses.  As  valuation  proxies  we  use  in  columns  3  and  4  the  market‐to‐book  ratio  (MB  ratio)  and  in  columns 5 and 6 the misvaluation measure proposed by Pastor and Veronesi (2003).158***  (11.07)  0.68)  0.97) 0.212***  (3.18)  (7.43) 0.003***  (5.54)  ‐0.52) ‐0.14)  Short‐Term Ownership (t‐1)  Institutional Investor Holdings        0.40) 2.086 25219  0.  Columns  3  to  4  provide  panel  regressions  linking  valuation  proxies  and  the  percentage  that  is  owned  for  the  short‐term.132 25219  0.59) 3. The sample consists of US firms  from Compustat.088***  (6.36)  0.332***  (5.84)  0.814***  (6.50)  0.51) ‐0.046 (1.71)  0.197***  (‐3.013  (1.062***  (‐2.17) 0.04) ‐0.494***  (8. As valuation proxy we use the  misvaluation  measure  proposed  by  Hoberg  and  Phillips  (2010).77)  0.640***  (9. 5%.69) ‐0.29)  0.266*** (‐3.29)  0.84) ‐0.70)  ‐0.312***  (5.269*** (‐7.45)     Stock Duration  Stock Duration (t‐1)  Stock Duration (t‐2)       Short‐Term Ownership   MB Ratio  (3)  (4)  0.  calculated  based  on  robust  standard  errors  clustered at the firm level.168*** (6.188***  (‐11.105***  (9.067** (‐2.31)  0.  MB  Residual  HP.48)  (‐5.24)  0.15)  ‐5.070*** (‐6.168***  (10.038* (‐1.406  (‐1. R‐sq.005***  (2.18)  0.67) 0.029  (0.049***  (7.45)  0.           MB Residual PV  (5)  (6)  0.99)  ‐13.407  (‐1.096***  (6.46) 0. respectively. We exclude firms that are in the bottom NYSE size decile and with stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal year.38)  ‐0.761***  (5.687***  (5.297***  (5.19)  0.72)  ‐7.002  (1. * indicate significance levels of 1%.47)  0.190***  (‐10.16)  0.174 (1..69) 2.43) 0.074*** 0.011***  (5. 10%.45) ‐0.58)  0.46)  ‐7.31)  0.01)  0.99)  0.666***  (8.876*** (‐8.10)  ‐0.65)  1.412*** (4.33) 0.09)  ‐0.  All  variables  are  winsorized  at  1%.Appendix A6: Misvaluation and Stock Duration: Robustness Checks   This table provides in columns 1 to 2 panel regressions linking a misvaluation proxy and Stock Duration.015  (‐0.505***  (6.094***  (5.184***  (‐9.181***  (‐8.             MB Residual HP  (1)  (2)  ‐0.56) ‐0.30)  ‐0.71) 1.177***  (7.025  (‐1.003*  (1.06)  ‐0.002***  (4.016 (1.82) 6.90) 0.97)  0.074*** (7.166** (‐2.212***  (11.087  22362  0.97)  ‐0. MB Residual PV.31)  0.  t‐statistics. that have  held  the  stock  for  the  short‐term  only).344***  (5.197***  (12.19)  .022  (‐1.60)  0.199***  (6.53) 3.36)  ‐0.586***  (9.97)  ‐0.58) ‐0.

15)  ‐3.134***  (‐7.000 (0.86)  0. All variables are winsorized at 1%.43)  0.  and  (iii)  idiosyncratic  volatility.46)  0.087***  (‐6.7730  0.36)  0.451*** (‐7.0850              MB Residual HP Amihud Illiquidity Low  High  (3)  (4)  ‐0.0000  0.01)  ‐2.100*** (6.36)  ‐2.17)  ‐3.062*** (2. respectively. We use the misvaluation measure proposed by  Hoberg and Phillips (2010) (MB Residual HP).097        Idiosyncratic Volatility Low  High  (5)  (6)  ‐0.087***  (‐6. ***.43)  0.408*** (‐4.77)  0.060*** (‐3.46)  0.039**  (‐1.01)       ‐0.053*** (3. * indicate significance levels of 1%.085  13804  0.  t‐statistics.28)  ‐0.Appendix A7: Misvaluation and Stock Duration for Subsamples: Robustness Checks   This table provides panel regressions linking a misvaluation proxy and Stock Duration.117  .032* (1.16)  ‐0.                  Inst.41)  0. 10%.82)  ‐0. **.736*** (‐2.025 (‐1.  (ii)  the  Amihud  illiquidity  measure.93)  ‐0.044** (2.015 (0. We provide the regressions based on subsamples using: (i) institutional investor holdings.020  (‐1.890*** (‐7. We exclude firms that are in  the bottom NYSE size decile and with stock prices below USD 1 at the end of a fiscal year. 5%.076  10011  0.  adj.05)     Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  11750  0.  calculated  based  on  robust  standard  errors  clustered  at  the  firm  level.0000            ‐0./100)  Amihud Illiquidity  Idiosyncratic Volatility  ‐0.08)  0.98)  0. R‐sq.102*** (4.465**  (‐2.113     Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  15543  0.39)  0.37)  0.79)  ‐5. The sample consists of US firms from Compustat.184***  (‐4.  ‐0.38)  ‐6. Investor Holdings Low  High  (1)  (2)     Stock Duration  Stock Duration (t‐1)  Share Turnover (coeff.033**  (2.112*** (9.227*** (‐9.11)  0.115  11389  0.  We  also  report  p‐values  of  Chow‐tests  comparing  the  coefficients  of  Stock  Duration and lagged Stock Duration across subsamples.0020  Yes  Yes Yes  Yes  Yes Yes  14165  0.16)  0.0000  0.05)  0.033  (1.57)  0.80)  p‐value Chow test (Stock Duration)  p‐value Chow test (Stock Duration (t‐1))  Controls as in Table 3  Firm Fixed Effects  Year Fixed Effects  Obs.094*** (7.112** (‐2.  are  reported  in  parentheses.111*** (‐5.65)  ‐5.008  (‐0.  We  create  these  subsamples  by  separating  the  sample  firms  each  year  based  on  median  values  of  the  respective  variables.063*** (4. Variables  are  defined  in  Appendix  A1.

55)  0.03 (2.59)  ‐0.64) ‐0.33 (3.  and  proxies for limits to arbitrage.04  (‐0.40 (3.15 (3.13 (2.  Holdings  0.28)  ‐0.16)  0.21  (‐0.28  (2.17 (‐1.23 0.06)  0.60)  0.38 0.40  (2.22 (2.75)  0.29  (1.07)  ‐0.21 (2.18 (2.49) 0.00) 0.83  (‐3.97)  (‐0.09)  (1.08  (0.62)  1 (Low) 0.03 (1.374 (4.90) 0.26 (‐1.02 (0.98)  ‐0.11 (2.48)  0.05)  ‐0.20  (1.51)  0.09  (‐0. 5% significance level is denoted in bold and t‐ statistics are given in parentheses.86) 0.14 (0.51 (‐2.93) 0.25  (‐1. and  low or high idiosyncratic volatility (Panel D).27  (2.44  (2.27 0.37 (2.25  (1.42  (2.40)  0.07)  (2.24  (‐1.57)        3 ‐ 1 ‐0.25 0.82) ‐0.66)       ‐0.32 (‐2.17  (1. Inv.18  (0.52)  3 ‐ 1  ‐0.49) 0.58)  (‐1.18)  ‐0.54 (2.18 (3.47) 0.32  (2.  Holdings  0.25)    0.25)  0.31 (3.22 (‐1.41)  (0.50)  0.81)  ‐0.25)  (2.12 0.37)  0.20)  ‐0.39)  ‐0.29 (1.17 (1.13  (‐1.52)  0.46)  0.51) 0.28  (2.06  (‐0.85)  (1.24)  ‐0.15 ‐0.64)                      Stock  Duration  ‐0.92)  0.74) 0.11 (‐0.07 (0.44 0.34 (‐2.12 0.30  (‐1. stocks are first divided into five groups based on the Stock  Duration.11)  (‐1.91)  FF 4‐Factor Alpha  MB Residual HP  2 3 (High) 0.37  (1.07) 0. We report these portfolios separately for stocks with low or high institutional investor holdings (Panel B).87)  ‐0.    Panel A: Double Sorts on Stock Duration and MB Residual HP              Stock Duration Uncond.21) 0.50) ‐0.21 0.08)  ‐0.28  (1.79)  (0.61) 0.04 0.92)  (1.29  (‐1.57)  (0.33 0.72)                     FF 4‐Factor Alpha Institutional Investor Holdings = Low    Institutional Investor Holdings = High  MB Residual HP    MB Residual HP  1 (Low) 2 3 (High) 3 ‐ 1 1 (Low) 2 3 (High) 3 ‐ 1 0.19)  (2.32)  ‐0.96)        0.23)   1 (Short)    5 (Long)    5 ‐ 1  ‐0.16 (‐0.28  (2.58)  0.  We  report results for the top and bottom Stock Duration groups.48  (2. All the returns are in monthly percentage.39 (‐3.87) 0. Misvaluation.11  (‐0.61  (‐3.72) 0.55)  0.58) 0.96)    0.224 0.20) ‐0.63) ‐0.27 0.97) 0.57)  0.24)  0.93)  ‐0.36  (2.11)   High ‐  Low  Inst.70)  0.  market‐to‐book.02)  0.13  (0.06 (1.94) 0.36  (2.14  (0. At the beginning of each quarter.51  (2.    1 (Short)    2    3    4    5 (Long)    5 ‐ 1       1 (Low)  0.52)  (1.40  (2. To account for overlapping portfolios.38)  0.13)     CAPM Alpha  MB Residual HP  2 3 (High) 0.10  (‐0.98)  (0.22 0.51) ‐0.36) 0.42)  0.17)  0.18  (1.35  (2.03 (‐0. low or high Amihud illiquidity (Panel C).20  (1.18  (‐2.13) 0.86)  0.49) 0.27  (‐2.39  (‐2.86)  ‐0.13)  Panel B: Triple Sorts on Stock Duration.10 (3.07  (0.73)  0.13 (1.18)  (1.41 (4.57)  0.73)    ‐0.73)  0.48)  0.13)  ‐0.68)    High ‐  Low  Inst.35)                       1 (Low) 0.01 (1.79)  0.02 ‐0.19 0. 3‐factor Fama‐French alphas and Carhart 4‐factor alphas for portfolio strategies from conditional sorts based  on Stock Duration and the misvaluation measures from Hoberg and Phillips (2010).37  (1.41)  ‐0.16 (‐2.33) ‐0.66) ‐0.25 (‐2.11  (‐0.13  (‐0. we follow in all panels the methodology in Jegadeesh and Titman (1993) such  that the stocks ranked in each of the last four quarters form one‐fourth of the portfolio.46 (3.42 0.25  (2.13)  (‐0.08 ‐0.08  (‐0.61)  (2.03 (0.Appendix A8: Return Predictability: Robustness Checks  This table presents in Panel A monthly equal‐weighted CAPM alphas. stocks are first divided into five groups based on the Stock Duration and they are then independently  divided  into  three  groups  based  on  the  Pastor‐Veronesi  or  Hoberg‐Phillips  misvaluation  measure.22  (2.28  (‐3.19  (0.90)  (2.28)  (1.29)  0.15 (3.18) ‐0.  They are  then  independently divided into three  groups based  on  the  misvaluation  measure  and returns for  these  15  portfolios are  calculated over next  four quarters.63)  ‐0.43  (1.13 (1.71  (2.15 ‐0. and Institutional Investor Holdings          Stock  Duration  1 (Short)    5 (Long)     5 ‐ 1                          FF 4‐Factor Alpha Institutional Investor Holdings = Low    Institutional Investor Holdings = High  MB Residual PV    MB Residual PV  1 (Low) 2 3 (High)  3 ‐ 1     1 (Low) 2 3 (High) 3 ‐ 1 0.32 (‐0.21) 0.58)  (1.00  (0.03  (‐0.34  (‐1.14  (0.08  (0.53) ‐0.24)  0.20 (0.31)  (‐0.63)  0.09)        0.08)  ‐0.  We  then  calculate  returns  for  these  15  portfolios  over  next  four  quarters.30)  0.78) 0.27  (1.23)  ‐0.23 (3.06 (‐0.19 (‐0.28  (1.05 (0.09  (0.09 0.91)  0.72)  0.67)                       FF 3‐Factor Alpha  MB Residual HP  2 3 (High) 0.27  (‐3.93)  0.  Panel  B  to  D  present  monthly  equal‐weighted  Carhart  4‐factor  alphas  for  portfolio  strategies  based  on  5x3x2  independent  triple  sorts  on  Stock  Duration.31  (2.70)  ‐0. Inv.89)  .58  (2.29  (2.19)  0.55)  0.74)        3 ‐ 1 ‐0.39  (2.69) ‐0.33)  0.19)  0.50)  0.25 ‐0. At the beginning of each quarter.18 (1.23 (1.49  (‐3.51) 0.30  (2.

15 (1.25)  0.51)  0.  0. and Amihud Illiquidity             Stock  Duration  1    5     5‐1                 FF 4‐Factor Alpha  Amihud Illiquidity = Low    Amihud Illiquidity = High  MB Residual PV    MB Residual PV 1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1  0.22 (2.59)  0.49)  0.29)  ‐0.93)  ‐0.13  (‐0.37)  ‐0.24  (2.98) ‐0.38 (‐1.13 (‐0.37 (2.05)     0.49)  .75 (4.19  (2.60) 0.29  (1.27 (2.01  (‐0.37  (1.77)  ‐0.40) ‐0.33)        0.50)  0.24 (‐1.10)  0.06 (0.11  (‐0.21 (1.02)  0.02 (‐0.46)  0.77) 0.20) ‐0.25 (2.29)  ‐0.08 (‐0.43  (1.63)  ‐0.74)  ‐0.09  (0.  Vola.37 (3.61)  0.94) 0.44)         0.  0.62) 0.25 (2.19  (0.36)  ‐1.49)  0.12  (0.75 (2.67  (‐3.76)  0.34  (3.12)  0.78) ‐0.42)  0.29)  0.92)        Stock  Duration      1   5     5 ‐ 1                        FF 4‐Factor Alpha  Idiosyncratic Volatility = Low Idiosyncratic Volatility = High MB Residual HP    MB Residual HP  1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1  0.39  (‐1.91) ‐0.11  (0.01 (‐0.58 (2.09  (‐0.91 (‐4.  Illiq.04 (‐4.76) 0.79)  High ‐  Low  Idio.50  (2.81)  0.16 (1.13 (1.17  (1.  ‐0.15)  ‐0.76 (4.18 (2.80 (3.47)        0.33  (‐1.31  (3.02  (0.28) 0.62)  0.59)  0.24 (1.12)                  0.72)  0.05  (0.78) 0.32  (1.04 (0.48)  ‐0.  Vola.36) 0.91)  0.06)  ‐0.16 (0.09 (0.14 (0.16) 0.18  (‐1.99)  ‐0.60 (‐3.23)  ‐0.32  (1.17)  0.50  (2.01 (‐0.10 (0.36)  ‐0.80)  0.29)    Panel D: Triple Sorts on Stock Duration.87) 0.16)  ‐0.63)  0.33 (2.30 (2.22)  0.83)       0.07)  0.76)  0.11  (0.30 (‐2.05  (‐0.16 (‐1.20  (2.36) 0.19 (‐0.62)  ‐0.09  (0.13  (0.14) 0.72  (‐3.78) ‐0.)    Panel C: Triple Sorts on Stock Duration.08)  0.47)  ‐0.49) 0.04)  0.33)  ‐0.11 (‐0. and Idiosyncratic Volatility             Stock  Duration  1    5     5 ‐ 1                       FF 4‐Factor Alpha  Idiosyncratic Volatility = Low    Idiosyncratic Volatility = High MB Residual PV    MB Residual PV  1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1  0.17 (1.28  (2.27 (2.14)  ‐0.18  (‐1.29  (‐1.30  (2.74)  0.09) 0.76)  0.09)  0.42 (2.21)  0.29)     0.29  (‐1.83)  0.26 (1.08)  0.34)  ‐0.24) ‐0.39  (3. Misvaluation.77)  0. Misvaluation.40 (2.73)  0.37)  0.85)  0.74 (3.09  (0.14)  0.35 (2.55  (‐2.05  (‐0.62)  ‐0.49  (‐2.14 (1.14 (1.28  (‐1.26 (2.35  (3.17 (1.Appendix A8 (cont.56 (‐2.05)  ‐0.41)  ‐0.22 (2.38)   High ‐ Low  Amihu.90)  0.14) ‐0.17  (‐1.07)  0.55  (2.04)  0.94)  0.73)  ‐0.96)    High ‐  Low  Amihu.36  (2.69) ‐0.13 (1.13  (‐1.85)  ‐0.27 (2.  Illiq.87) ‐0.83)       High ‐  Low  Idio.  ‐0.11 (0.29  (‐1.11  (‐1.07  (0.06 (‐0.17)         Stock  Duration  1   5    5 ‐ 1            FF 4‐Factor Alpha  Amihud Illiquidity = Low    Amihud Illiquidity = High  MB Residual HP MB Residual HP 1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1     1 (Low)  2  3 (High)  3 ‐ 1  0.27)        0.83)  0.51  (2.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful