t

ourier C
Claremont

GUN CONTROL ISSUE PACKS COUNCIL CHAMBER/PAGE 3
Friday, March 15, 2013 u One dollar

claremont-courier.com

LETTING THE

sunshine in

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Solar panels are installed on a new covered parking area at the US Bank branch Tuesday on the corner of Foothill and Indian Hill Boulevards in Claremont. The bank leased the panels from Solar City as a way to offset their energy costs and create green power. Corey Fierro and Robert Franco of Champion Electric manage the installation. PAGE 3

Charter school applicant makes second plea/ PAGE 5

Get lucky with Some Crust

PAGE

16

Claremontʼs Melanie Lauer warms up before going up to bat on Monday during girls softball action in West Covina.

CHS girls softball has rough start with 5-0 loss to La Habra/PAGE 28

t

t

t

POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 8

SPORTS/ PAGE 28 CALENDAR/ PAGE 20

More news and photo galleries every day at: claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

2

City delays release of documents Keep the Club trees
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com

READERS’ COMMENTS
Dear Editor: I have lived in The Club for over 15 years. The big, mature pine trees that line my streets are one of the reasons my family move here. It’s also one of the reasons that the people who live here, and so many others from outside the neighborhood, drive through, walk their dogs, push their strollers, jog and run here, not because the sidewalks and streets are a challenge to walk on or unsafe. The removal of 59 trees now and others in 4 years is because they are damaging the hardscape, not because they are diseased or at risk to fall. Their removal would drastically change the appearance of our neighborhood and reduce the value of my home. The proposed “Tree Replacement Program” would destroy valuable environmental assets that will take generations or more to replace, and it would also set a bad precedent for other neighborhoods throughout the city of Claremont that are now, or soon will be, facing the challenge of maintaining their mature trees. I do not support the views of my HOA and the city staff. I support the current tree policy!
Laura Grochowski Claremont

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
Convivial cave, Loaves, a bottle—what a friend We have in cheeses.
—D. J. Kraemer Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Education Reporter/Obituaries Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Sports Reporter Chris Oakley
sports@claremont-courier.com

Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Back Page Sammy
sammy@claremont-courier.com

Dear Editor: I am writing in response to Mayor Larry Schroeder’s letter to the editor (Friday, March 8) suggesting that the city has been fully compliant with the intent and spirit of the California Public Records Act (PRA). The California Alliance to Protect Private Property Rights, a California private property rights organization, respectively disagrees with the mayor’s assertion. For one, the city has not provided us all the documents we requested, including those required by law. We know this to be true because the city has been corresponding with other public agencies, and these agencies have provided us the very same documents that the city of Claremont has chosen to withhold from our organization and the public. Secondly, the city has violated the spirit of the law by employing delay tactics to delay even the simplest requests. Such tactics may be legal, but are designed to withhold public information for the longest period possible. Claremont residents share our interest in an open and transparent government. Even if the city can legally withhold some documents, there is nothing prohibiting the city from releasing a simple statement that explains how they intend to finance the taking of Golden State Water Company's private property by eminent domain and whether such action will in fact lead to lower water rates. We hope the mayor, city council and staff reconsider their long held belief that the public is not entitled to know how the city intends to use their tax dollars.
Nick Mirman CAPPPR

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Tuesday, March 19 City Council, Special Meeting Council Chamber, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 21 CUSD Board of Education Kirkendall Center, 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 25 Tree Committee Council Chamber, 6 p.m.
The Claremont City Council will hold a special meeting on Tuesday, March 19 to select the new mayor and mayor pro tem. In contrast to other cities, Claremont has long-held a tradition of councilmembers selecting the mayor, as opposed to it being an elected position. Mayor Larry Schroeder will pass the torch after a year as Claremont’s mayor. Also, Mr. Schroeder and Councilmember Corey Calaycay will be sworn back into office following their re-election. The ceremony takes place at 5:30 p.m. in the City Council Chamber, 225. W. Second St.

READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

Production
Ad Design Jenelle Rensch Page Layout Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch

Advertising
Advertising Director Mary Rose
maryrose@claremont-courier.com

Classified Editor Jessica Gustin
classified@claremont-courier.com

Business Administration
Office Manager/ Legal Notices Vickie Rosenberg
legalads@claremont-courier.com

EVERY FRIDAY IN PRINT...
For $52 a year ($47 for seniors): • Our print edition is mailed to your home • Full access to our award-winning website • Our popular mid-week newsletter email with the latest news and photos

Billing/Accounting Manager Dee Proffitt Distribution/Publications Tom Smith
tomsmith@claremont-courier.com

EVERY DAY ONLINE

our C ier
Claremont

claremont-courier.com

Circulation/Subscriptions
subscriptions@claremont-courier.com

909-621-4761

Intern Open

The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 18

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

3

Council shelves vote on gun control resolution
After 2 hours of back-and-forth debate, the Claremont City Council decided not to vote on gun control, at least for another couple weeks. With Sam Pedroza absent from the Tuesday night meeting, the council supported refraining from a vote adopting a resoCITY lution in support of the COUNCIL Assault Weapons Ban of 2013 until all were present. The decision was made with a 3-1 vote. Mayor Pro Tem Opanyi Nasiali cast the dissenting vote because he believed the council was ready to make its decision. With the same 3-1 vote, Mayor Larry Schroeder will also hold off on adding his name to the Mayors Against Illegal Guns. Voting on the resolution and petition is expected to take place at the next council meeting on March 26. The assault weapons ban is currently being considered by the US Congress in response to recent mass shootings. If approved, the ban would stop “the sale, transfer, importation and manufacturing of military-style assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition feeding devices,” according to Senator Dianne Feinstein, author of the bill. Refraining from a vote may not have been popular with all in the room, but the majority of the council, even with its difference of opinion on the topic, left the vote undecided without qualms. “Whether you are a Democrat, a Republican, Libertarian, Tea Partier or decline to state, having a public debate of sorts that we had tonight is a win-win situation,” said Mayor Larry Schroeder. “It airs the viewpoints of everybody.” The crowd amassed at City Hall was

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff With a show of hands, residents indicate which side of the assault weapon ban they support during the Claremont City Council meeting Tuesday evening. People on both sides of the issue voiced their opinions about a resolution that would include Claremont among cities in California that support the Assault Weapons Ban of 2013, authored by Senator Dianne Feinstein. The council decided to delay voting on the issue until its next meeting due to the absence of Councilmember Sam Pedroza.

reflective of the nation’s divison, with equal debate from all sides of the issue. There was standing room only in the City Council Chamber despite the relatively light council agenda. And not without reason. Issues of gun control have been a dominant area of debate as Claremonters and citizens across the country ponder the recent succession of mass shootings. In the wake of the tragic events in Aurora, Colorado and New-

town, Connecticut among others, the nation has remained divided on the topic of guns—is stricter gun control the answer to the problem or would it only infringe upon the Constitutional right to bear firearms? Should guns be banned or proper gun education encouraged? These were among the questions posed to the city council before a decision would be made. Claremont residents came to the meeting equipped with

their own array of answers, from those calling for support of the ban to those calling for the city to give it a rest when it comes to localizing national issues. “What would be appropriate is to have a discussion, in a different venue of course, on firearms and the Second Amendment,” suggested Claremont resident Douglas Lyon. “What is not
ASSAULT WEAPONS BAN continues on the next page

Bank’s use of solar panels part of ongoing movement

W

hile Claremont residents have come to know and appreciate the historic nature of the US Bank building on the corner of Indian Hill and Foothill boulevards, there is a new aspect to the old architecture that’s grabbing attention.
It comes in the form of photovoltaic paneling. Claremont’s US bank is going solar. Last month, the city approved the bank’s request to install 200 solar panels on the roof and on the attached, shaded carport areas to the rear of the business, which are expected to generate 185 kilowatts of energy per day. That’s enough to power much of the bank’s solar needs on sunny days, according to bank spokesperson Nicole Garrison-Sprenger. Each solar panel is comprised of a series of reflective photovoltaic cells, which absorb the sun’s energy. The energy absorbed is then transmitted through a wire to an inverter box within the building, which converts that energy to make it compatible with household appliances. Claremont’s branch is one of 4 southern California US Banks jumping on the solar bandwagon. In addition to Claremont, installations have begun in Downey, Los Alamitos and Rancho Cucamonga. The bank hopes to COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff have 9 banks fitted with solar panels by the end of April Robert Franco of Champion Electric installs solar panels on a new covered parking area Tuesday at the US Bank as part of its effort to cut back on energy costs.
branch on the corner of Foothill and Indian Hill boulevards in Claremont. The bank leased the panels from SoSOLAR PANELS lar City as a way to offset their energy costs and create green power. continues on page 12

CITY NEWS
ASSAULT WEAPONS BAN continued from the previous page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

4

appropriate is for a special interest pressure group to ask this council to adopt a Constitution-hostile resolution, which would presume to speak for all of Claremont on the national issue, an issue over which this council has no jurisdiction.” Others begged to differ. “People here can get killed like in Newtown, Colorado, Utah, Arizona or anywhere else,” said Claremont resident Robert Smith.

The Claremont City Council adopted a set of best practices to “refrain from taking a policy stance on all matters clearly unrelated to the local jurisdiction.” That practice has become muddled of late as residents question what is and is not the responsibility of local government. Over the past year, the council has adopted resolutions in favor of last election’s Prop 30, approving a quarter-cent rise in sales tax over the next 4 years to provide funding to California’s public schools, as well as one in favor of fair banking practices.

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff A resident who only identified himself as David because he is concerned about his safety displays one of the targets he uses for sport shooting. Residents voiced a wide array of opinions about the issue of gun control during the public comment session of Tuesday nightʼs city council meeting.

Best practices were called into question once again with this latest resolution request. At the council’s February 26 meeting, residents came before the council in public comment to request a policy on gun control be adopted. At the same time, Mayor Larry Schroeder told the council that he had been asked to sign a position by the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition, but did not feel it was right for him to do so as mayor of Claremont until he received council approval. After examining council policy, city administrators went ahead with suggesting the resolution in part because

they believed City Manager Tony Ramos’ position on the Public Safety Committee for the League of California Cities put council within its right to adopt a supportive stance. However, others feel the city needs to steer clear of wide-sweeping issues like immigration and global warming and instead focus on important local matters, like concerns with Wilderness Park safety and overcrowding and the city’s continued fiscal health. “Your real issues are local,” said Nick Quackenbos, addressing the council. “Parks, trees, affordable housing, streets, good business climate.”

Claremont resident Douglas Lyon addresses the Claremont City Council while fellow resident Karl Hilgert waits for his turn on Tuesday as the council considers the symbolic assault ban measure. Mr. Lyons was against the measure while Mr. Hilgert was in favor.

Mayor Pro Tem Opanyi Nasiali and Corey Calaycay felt the city should not be voting for or against an issue on which the community is clearly so divided. Mayor Larry Schroeder and Joe Lyons voiced support on the matter. Mr. Pedroza will be in the hot seat next week as opinions voiced by council members at the meeting are as split as those of the audience. —Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Friday, March 8 A resident of the 100 block of Sunflower Place is probably wishing they had been a little more watchful over a purse left in their car, in plain sight, overnight, according to Lieutenant Shelly Vander Veen. A burglar performed a series of smash-and-grabs in the Sunflower Place neighborhood Thursday night and claimed the purse as their own. Inside the purse was $1000 in cash.

POLICE BLOTTER

Police catch man with slew of outstanding charges
On Thursday, March 7, the claim that his truck had run out of gas wasn’t enough to justify 53-year-old Eddie Paz’s decision to change his mode of transport to a stolen bike, especially when it turns out the truck was stolen to begin with. Police caught up with Mr. Paz at the Keck Science Center where they found him, bolt cutters in hand, putting the bike Rincon Azteca across the complex: front glass door smashed, register gone. Total loss is estimated at over $3000 including damages. Burglars were back at it later that day, but this time on the other side of town. Two subjects kicked in the front door of Luscious Nails and Spa (446 Auto Center Dr.) and stole cash and equipment from the store. The suspects then smashed a hole in the wall to enter the adjacent business, the M.W. Smoke Shop, located at 444 Auto Center Dr. Once inside, the suspects removed cash and merchandise. The burglars are described as 2 black males, who were seen driving a tan SUV with chrome rims. It is unknown if they are connected to the other crimes. Police are requesting the public’s help in locating the crooks involved in any of these cases. Any information should be reported to the Claremont Police Department at 399-5411. **** Claremont police put a 32-year-old into the back of the stolen pickup. While police weren’t able to nab the man for the stolen bike because it wasn’t registered, they didn’t need help finding a slew of other charges to file against the Bloomington resident. Mr. Paz was arrested for the stolen car, possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.

with $50,000 bail. Monday, March 11 A sandwich is nothing to cry about, especially when you are out in public and trying to keep a low profile in the first place. Twenty-four-year-old Angelo Gonzalez of Claremont was allegedly causing such a scene—cussing and yelling at his mom for supposedly “taking too long at Subway,” according to the police logs—that a security guard at Claremont’s Super King market was moved to call the cops. Police met up with Mr. Gonzalez in the parking lot where he refused to calm down, causing a struggle before officers were able to successfully take him into custody, according to Lt. Vander Veen. He was wanted for an outstanding warrant for vandalism. Wednesday, March 13 Just 2 weeks after Inka Trails Peruvian Restaurant and the Shell Gas Station were targeted in early-morning burglaries, the north Claremont business burglars are back at it. Two more establishments were targeted in an early Wednesday morning spree in the Vons Shopping Center, located at 546 E. Base Line Road. Police responded to Euro Cafe, another Peruvian eatery, after the burglary alarm was activated around 2 a.m. The front glass door was found smashed and the register missing. The story was similar over at

Saturday, March 9 An unsuspecting Chevron/McDonalds patron left the lot Saturday evening without $20 and with no Big Mac or Shamrock Shake to show for it. Unknowingly, the customer had been dealt a fraudulent $20 bill. The cashier spotted it immediately and called police, but the customer was released when it was determined that they really were none-the-wiser as to the counterfeit money. Police left with the fake money, while the patron left empty-handed. Sunday, March 10 One person’s potential pocket dial ended up being another’s misfortune. The accidental call lead police right to Vail Park, 2454 Grand Ave., where a Claremont man was hoping to stay off the police’s grid. Twenty-one-year-old Christopher Bloomberg, wanted for an outstanding warrant for vandalism, happened to be hanging out at the park at the moment police arrived. He was arrested

Pomona man behind bars after he was found with a 14-year-old runaway from Utah early Wednesday morning. Donny Wade faces criminal charges of lewd acts with a child as well as communicating with a minor with the intent of committing an offense, according to Lt. Vander Veen. The teenager had been missing for 5 days before police caught up with her on the roof of the parking structure at First Street and Claremont Boulevard. The teen had been linked to Mr. Wade’s home and several local hotels before she was found. Police were able to locate her by tracking her computer usage. Police say Mr. Wade and the juvenile had met through online chat rooms on Meetme.com. Mr. Wade successfully persuaded the girl to come out to Claremont, buying her a ticket on the Greyhound on March 8. Mr. Wade is being held for $100,000 bail. His arraignment was held yesterday, March 14.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

5

Passionate presentation still may not convince board to support charter school
Kids are slipping through the cracks in the Claremont Unified School District, Lynette Lucas asserted at the Thursday, March 7 school board meeting. “You have the power to save a community of children that is essentially dying,” she told the school board during a public hearing for the Embracing the Whole Child Arts and Technology Academy. Ms. Lucas assured the board and community members that her proposed charter school—which she emphasized would feature a rigorous, Common Core-based curriculum and meaningful interventions—is not aimed at students who are thriving within CUSD schools. Instead, the academy would focus on severely socio-economically disadvantaged (SED) kids, such as those living in mobile homes and residential hotels like the American Inn, located along Foothill Boulevard. Though the neighborhoods she cited are in Pomona, they are in an area of CUSD known as the Wedge, which includes the region from Towne to Garey on the northbound side as well as a small portion south of Garey on Foothill. Many of these kids, though they belong to CUSD, aren’t enrolled in schools here and are, instead, “scattered to the winds,” Ms. Lucas said. Those who do attend district schools face significant challenges, including families so poor they may not even have a car and insufficient wardrobes that may draw jeers and foster low self-esteem. Most significantly, Claremont’s SED students have an 18 to 25 percent deficit in their state testing scores as compared to Claremont’s higher-income students, she noted. While any CUSD student could be able to apply for the academy, which would offer hands-on arts and technology experiences, SED students would have enrollment priority. “We want to serve homeless kids, foster kids—kids who are behind 2 years or more or who are being a problem in your classes,” Ms. Lucas said. “Often, despair is disguised as bad behavior.” An earlier petition filed by Ms. Lucas, executive director of the Oxnard-based Embracing the Whole Child Foundation (EWCF), and EWCF president Julie Thompson, a Montclair resident, was rejected in June of 2012. The board listed several reasons for its rejection of the Embracing the Whole Child Academy, including concern over the soundness of the proposed school’s educational program and doubt as to EWCF staffers’ ability to implement their concept. The board’s concerns were echoed by Jeffrey DesCombes, owner of the Claremont-based company Sprocket Digital. He worried that if a charter school were to be created without the proper organizational structure, the students would be at risk should the school fail. Mr. DesCombes took to the podium again Thursday, saying that the questions raised by the first petition were left unanswered by the second petition. According to Mr. DesCombes, his research revealed no foundation website, no record of any board meeting and a group of organizers that seemed to largely hail from outside the district. Mr. DesCombes also expressed concern that Ms. Lucas and her team at EWCF were not striving to create a relationship with Claremonters and meet-and-greets, etc. “They don’t seem to have the inherent structure to make it successful,” Mr. DesCombes said. Ms. Lucas, who has cited more than 20 years in the education field as her qualification for this endeavor, says the EWCF has undertaken significant outreach efforts, including tutoring services and a Thanksgiving dinner for residents of the American Inn. The board for the proposed school, CUSD which would intitially serve 63 students, has met, she NEWS added, but since they are only a foundation at this point and not a school, they haven’t been legally required to post their minutes. Ms. Lucas has notably served as a teacher in the Rio School District in Oxnard. In spring of 2012, she launched a recall drive, petitioning to remove Eleanor Torres, Henrietta Macias and Ramon Rodriguez from their positions on the Rio School District Board of Directors, citing financial mismanagement. In 2010, Ms. Lucas challenged the Rio School District Teachers Union, for what she claimed was “a poorly run union that shirked rules and left teachers in the dark about union finances and governance,” according to the Ventura County Reporter. Ms. Lucas lodged complaints of dishonesty and financial mismanagement with police, the Fair Political Practices Commission, the Public Employee Relations Board (PERB) and the Internal Revenue Service. Though the recall effort was unsuccessful, Ms. Lucas said her complaints about the union were later corroborated by the PERB, among others. With her focus shifted to Claremont, Ms. Lucas said she feels passionate about helping the most vulnerable of the city’s students. She cited a recent conversation with a CUSD third grader who was unable to read and cried when they spoke, saying he wanted to learn. While it is up to the board to ponder whether or not to approve Ms. Lucas’ petition, Mike Bateman, assistant superintendent of student services and the district’s homeless liaison, said the charter school’s goals may represent a duplication of services.

Every school in the district has programs in place to aid SED students, he noted. Student services staff visit sites like the American Inn at least twice a year, he said, making sure families there are aware of and enrolled in Claremont schools. Ms. Lucas said that the district would have to visit a site like the American Inn at least once a month to make a meaningful impact, because families are not allowed to stay in the region’s residential motels for more than 30 days at a time. CUSD also makes a concerted effort to make sure its SED pupils have the proper supplies and support, Mr. Bateman continued. When they need it, the district’s poorest families are referred to support programs ranging from Tri-City Mental Health Services to Claremont Connect, an online database connecting the community to government, nonprofit and pro-bono social services . “We educate all kids in Claremont, regardless of what status you come from and where you live,” Mr. Bateman said. “Our schools go out and really work with these families.” Ms. Lucas pointed out that, considering that the district’s lowest-income students don’t have access to computers, they are unable to benefit from the city’s online resources. Her proposed charter school, which aims to put a tablet computer in each students’ hands, would address the technology deficit head-on, she said. No source of funding for such techonology is noted in the charter school proposal. In these tough economic times, every district in the country has more need than they can reasonably address, Ms. Lucas said, but the Whole School Academy of Arts and Technology, represents a start at addressing the problem.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier

CHS Theatre Renovation nears completion, community celebration planned
The Claremont Unified School District Board of Education and the Claremont High School Theatre Renovation Committee invite the public to the opening of the newly renovated Don F. Fruechte Theatre for the Performing Arts. Recognizing that schedules are busy, there are several opportunities to join in the celebration. On Thursday, March 28 at 3:30 p.m. a dedication ceremony and ribbon-cutting will be held with guided tours. The ribbon-cutting and dedication will be repeated on Saturday, March 30 at 1 p.m. Also on Saturday, March 30, a Claremont High School Alumni performance has been scheduled at 7:30 p.m. Tickets for the performance are required and can be purchased through the Claremont High School ASB website. The Theatre Renovation Project was made possible by a $1.5 million career and technical education grant from the state, which was matched through donations from CUSD, hundreds of community members, CHS alumni, current students and their families, estates and foundations.

OUR TOWN
Breakfast fundraiser for CHS Class of 2016
The Class of 2016 is hosting a breakfast fundraiser tomorrow, Saturday, March 16, from 8 to 11 a.m. at Taylor Hall in Claremont (1775 N. Indian Hill Blvd.) Tickets are on sale now for $5 each, cost at the door is $7. The community is invited to attend.

W

alter’s Restaurant will host a fundraiser to benefit Ruth M. Bobo, a retired Claremont High School English and creative writing teacher, on Saturday, March 16.

Fundraiser for Ruth Bobo at Walter’s Restaurant

Celebrate spring at RSABG
The Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden invites the public to take part in Free Admission Day next Saturday, March 23, in honor of spring’s arrival. Celebrate the season’s bounty as March 23 marks the beginning of the garden’s Weekend Wildflower walks, which will continue through June 9. The guided walking tours take place at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. In addition to free admission, garden visitors are invited to enjoy complimentary refreshments at 11 a.m. and prize drawings at the California Garden Gift Shop. For information, visit www.rsabg.org.

Anyone who stops by for lunch between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. on that day—which happens to be Mrs. Bobo’s 75th birthday—needs only to mention her name and Walter’s will donate 15 percent of their purchase to the Ruth M. Bobo Fund. The Save Mrs. Bobo campaign was organized by former students and friends to help the beloved CHS teacher stay in her Claremont home in the face of mounting medical expenses. Walter’s Restaurant is located at 310 N. Yale Ave. in Claremont. For more information on the popular village eatery, call 624-4914 or visit www.waltersrestaurant.com. If you are interested in contributing to the Save Mrs. Bobo campaign via a cash donation or by organizing a fundraising event, visit http://ruthmbobofund.com.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

6

Do we beware the ides, and others, too much?
by John Pixley

T

wo weeks ago, it was warm enough on Friday afternoon for me to take off my shirt and just wear my overalls. What’s more, I could sit and read out in my backyard.

Not bad for March 1. And it was yet another reason, or perhaps the reason, we love it here in southern California. We have all heard the stories about people calling their relatives or friends in the frigid Midwest and gloating or of people getting up on snow-bound New Year’s Days and turning on the television to watch the Rose Parade in impossibly sunny, balmy Pasadena (and how many then move here?). But it was still winter. Even as I enjoyed getting an early start on my tan, I knew that winter wasn’t over and that it would be cold and wet in a few days. Sure enough, a couple storms came through last week. That, as I learned when reading an article in the Los Angeles Times late last month, didn’t stop Los Angeles from closing its Westside winter shelter for the homeless on March 1 “for the season.” Never mind that the next week was forecast to be wet and cold. Never mind that, even now, “the season” isn’t over for another week. And never mind that, even in sunny, funny SoCal, the first month or so of spring can bring rain and chilly weather (after all, “April showers bring May flowers”). And what about the summer heat and smog? Never mind giving the homeless shelter from that. The article I was reading was about a storage trailer made available in a pilot program in Venice Beach where the homeless could keep their stuff not allowed at the overnight shelter. The unit was accessible for two hours each afternoon and was, like the shelter, slated to close down on March 1. “We’re going to bag and tag [their items],” said Los Angeles Councilman Bill Rosendahl, who represents Venice. “We want to make it inconvenient but within the law." How convenient—or inconvenient—will Claremont make it for the homeless on its streets? Will we put up with them until a certain random date, no matter how cold or how wet or how hot it is, and then that’s it, we kick them out...to where (they’re already on the street)?

observer
I’ve been wondering about this as Claremont has been discovering its homeless in the last year or so. That’s right—discovering—for, after declaring that there were 3 homeless people in Claremont, the city, with the assistance of people involved in Occupy Claremont, saw that it was off by a factor of 10 and that there are thirty people at least living on Claremont’s streets. Not only that, but the city has been discovering that it has to do something about the homeless, other than throw them out (to Pomona, to Ontario, to LA’s skid row, if we really want to answer the “to where” question). Back when the city presumably thought that there were 3 homeless people in Claremont, it passed an ordinance outlawing public camping and sleeping, essentially banning the homeless, but there was a court ruling saying that such a law is unconstitutional. Since then, there has been another court ruling, stemming from Los Angeles, decreeing that a homeless person’s items, left unattended, cannot be discarded. Los Angeles has been wrestling with this, recently requesting an appeal, and it appears that the storage trailer in Venice was an answer. Another answer in Los Angeles has been something called SHARE, in which a small group of homeless people live in a house, made available by its owner and with rules, where they get the services they need to regain or gain stability in their lives. Maybe one of these houses can be in Claremont. The Claremont City Council has recently decided to make the homeless a priority, and as it ponders what to do with them (other than kick them out), is there a reason why there can’t be a house like this here? Or will the focus be on getting the homeless out of Claremont? Will the city do everything it can to deter the homeless, certainly not to attract them, and not to reach out to those who are here and try to help them? There are those who argue that offering services at-

tracts the homeless. Yes, “beware the Ides” may well be good advice, but compassion and charity are also known for good results. Making the homeless more of a problem may well only make the homeless more of a problem. Something like this happened about ten years ago when LA County came up with a proposal to have five regional service centers for the homeless rather than having so many of the homeless funnel into Skid Row in L.A. However, there was so much of a NIMBY outcry that the idea was shelved, and now Skid Row has become even more of a sinkhole, with, probably as a result, a rare strain of TB being the latest problem. I wonder if such a service center or a S.H.A.R.E house here is even possible when there was a commentary in these pages last week stating that “many neighbors are vehemently against” hospice, assisted living and community group houses in northern Claremont. The worry is that these residential homes for the dying, the elderly and other “challenged” individuals, regulated and monitored by the state, are a threat to "our treasured neighborhoods.” Dying people. Foster kids. People in wheelchairs. A threat? Really? And this is the homeless we’re talking about here. We’re not talking about convicted sex offenders who have completed their prison terms and are listed in a public registry and who are trying to be constructive members of society. They are being driven out even in LA, where small “pocket parks” are being put in. Yes, it’s good that some areas are finally getting parks, even if they are only a swing set and a bench on a patch of grass. But, as was pointed out in a recent Los Angeles Times article, these new parks also have another, perhaps primary purpose: Convicted sex offenders can’t live within 2000 feet from parks, as well as schools and other such places. Being cautious and on guard is all well and good, as the Ides of March remind us. But I wonder if the upcoming season of renewed life and hope, of newfound freedom and peace, has a message for us as we consider how to deal with the others in our midst.

Rockin’ my mom clothes
by Debbie Carini

T

here’s a picture of me from the mid1980s and I’m looking pretty chic in a pair of black leggings and an oversized silk shirt. I wore this pairing to work and felt, in the parlance of my then fashion copywriting job, that it could go from “9 to 5 and after, from the desk to dinner, from the boardroom to happy hour.”

The other day, I found myself in a somewhat similar outfit before heading out to eat—elastic-waist bottoms and extra large shirt (albeit more tee-shirty than silky) when my husband looked at me and said, “Are you going out in your mom clothes?” First of all, yes—because when I’m going out for dinner, elastic waist pants always seem like a good idea (in terms of comfort and capacity), and second of all, yes—because that’s about what fits me in my closet right now (especially if I want to sit down at the restaurant and not risk ricocheting a button throughout the establishment and potentially shooting someone’s eye out). What are “mom clothes” anyway? It had the tinge of political-incorrectness to it. If my husband puts on a T-shirt and jeans, that’s his

outfit. If I try to sport the same look (add some Lycra stretch), that’s mom clothes! I really did try in the beginning, when the kids first arrived. But how many times did I make an effort, only to be soiled in some vile manner? Short of wearing a rain slicker year-round, or inventing the mom-bib (there’s an idea for some Esty-minded entrepreneur), I often had no choice but to don what could reasonably weather the detritus of childhood (or what the police describe as “spatter patterns”). The sheer litany of stains I’ve endured (as have most other parents) is mind-boggling and their occurrence seemed to fall in direct relation to my state of dress, for example: a good silk blouse on mom equals a kiss on the shoulder from a child after he’s eaten a slightly melted chocolate candy bar.

I’ve learned how to remove bubble gum— “I’m sorry it just fell out of my mouth,” said whichever child left that on my jeans—by putting the garment in the freezer for a while. And how to take out grease stains made by those french fry-oiled fingers that reach out to use your sleeve as a napkin (dish soap!). For all other incidents, I’m basically the mom with the stain stick product on a keychain (make sure your kids can read before you start carrying this around though, so they don’t try to use it as lip balm—just saying). In the end, I did change my outfit so that I wasn’t wearing “mom clothes” on the date night with my husband. But in the restaurant, as I ripped the corner of a package of soy sauce, I suffered a little PTSD (post traumatic stain disorder) flashing back to the times I’d been “accidentally” squirted by packet juice of all sorts (ketchup, mustard, taco sauce), proving once and for all, that you can take the woman out of “mom clothes,” but you should never take the mini stain stick off your key chain.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

7

AB1064 school funding
[Editor’s note: The following letter was sent to Assemblyman Chris Holden, 41st District, with a copy forwarded for publication. —KD] Dear Editor While I appreciate [Assemblyman Chris Holden’s] good intentions for funding schools, I do not think the proposal to use student enrollment is the appropriate mechanism. As a former teacher for 37 years, I offer the following input. Presently, the schools receive funds based on student average daily attendance (ADA). This method incentivizes school administrators to enforce student atten-

READERS’ COMMENTS
dance. The proposed bill has the potential to weaken this incentive unless it includes a provision to enforce student attendance. If the bill should be passed, I suggest you include a provision which requires parents to ensure students’ attendance when school is in session. As it is, with existing ADAbased funding, parents pull their students from school before the school day ends. I propose further strengthening of the ADA-based funding by requiring that attendance is recorded at the end of the school day rather than at the beginning, as is the case currently. Recording attendance at the end of the day will ensure that students stay in class—except in case of emergency—for the whole school day, and school administrators will have more incentive to insist that parents do not take their students out of class before the end of the school day. After all, the objective is to educate students, and that can be achieved only when the students are in class. Both parents and

school administrators have the responsibility to ensure that students are in the classroom for the entire school day. Therefore, while funding of schools is important, it should not be the sole objective. The objective should always be to educate students and that can only be achieved if the students are in school. Thank you for the endeavour to improve our educational system. Nevertheless, emphasis should be placed on having the students in the classroom and not merely sending money to schools, which seems to be the objective of the proposed bill.
Kathryn A. Nasiali Claremont

City dismisses Wilderness Park citations, announces lot opening

H

ikers at the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park started up the trail to enjoy last Saturday’s sunshine only to receive an unpleasant surprise at the end of the loop. About 30 parking tickets were issued to Wilderness Park visitors on March 9 as no parking signs went up on Mills Avenue and Mt. Baldy Road in anticipation of the newly expanded north lot. However, it appears officers may have been a little too eager. On Monday yellow plastic bags had been placed over the no parking signs located along Mills Avenue. Later that evening, city officials informed

the public that parking along Mills would not be restricted until the new lot opens, which is not expected for another couple weeks. The tickets were mistakenly issued and will be voided, according to Claremont Chief of Police Paul Cooper. “The signs were supposed to be covered until the lot was open,” Chief Cooper said. “Someone in engineering put up some no parking signs in areas that are going to be enforced once the new parking lot opens, and that wasn’t communicated to us. Officers were simply doing their job, Chief Cooper continues, as the police department “gets complaints all the time

about illegally parked cars [at the Wilderness Park].” Those who received a ticket for parking within the newly restricted areas at the Wilderness Park over the weekend will be contacted by the police and advised that the citations will be voided, according to Chief Cooper. However, while the newest parking restrictions will not go into effect until the parking lot’s opening, it was noted that all previous restrictions will continue to be enforced. City staff will be available to answer questions at the Wilderness Park entrance this Saturday and Sunday, March 16 and 17. Information on the new parking restrictions will be available. Questions may also be directed to the Claremont Police Department at 399-5411. City preps for parking lot opening After months of construction, the newly expanded parking lot is expected to make its debut on Friday, March 22.

However, in order to prepare for the opening, the Wilderness Park will have to close first. The city will shut off access to the park entirely on Wednesday and Thursday, March 20 and 21 as construction is finalized. In addition to park closure, Mills Road north of Mt. Baldy and the Wilderness Park’s south lot at Mills and Mt. Baldy will also be closed to traffic. Parking restrictions on Mills and Mt. Baldy along with enforcement of the new parking lot permits and metered parking will begin on April 1, according to the city. Annual permits are now available at Claremont City Hall and the Alexander Hughes Community Center for $75 each. Claremont residents may obtain a maximum of 2 free passes by presenting an id or utility bill. City Hall is located at 207 Harvard Ave. The Hughes Center is at 1700 Danbury Rd. For more information, call the city at 399-5460.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

8

Janet Tate

OBITUARIES
Orchestra (1984) as well as with the Claremont United Methodist Church Choir and the Pilgrim Congregational Church Choir in Pomona. Mrs. Tate’s specialty was performing solos in large works, such as the Verdi Requiem, Mozart Requiem and Beethoven’s Mass in C major. One of Mrs. Tate’s favorite retirement pastimes was travel. She and her husband visited the British Isles, France, Germany, Spain, China, Russia and Austria and, while in the latter, enjoyed singing together with the Classical Music Seminar participants in Eisenstadt. One of her favorite destinations, though, was “home, ” by which she meant Alabama and, more specifically, Birmingham. Much of her family stayed in that area and raised their families, so it was always a joy for Mrs. Tate to visit with her kinfolk. There’s a saying, “Once a Southerner, always a Southerner.” After a few years in California, Mrs. Tate’s Southern accent faded until relatives insisted she sounded like a Yankee. She still identified as a Southerner, however, and loved to wear her GRITS hat: i.e. “Girls Raised in The South.” And yes, she did often cook grits for breakfast. Most recently, the 2012 family reunion drew her, for the last time, to see her “homeland” and to hug the people who meant so much to her. Just after that, she and her husband flew to Missouri to see their son, grandchildren and 5 greatgrandchildren, a visit that will be cherished by her family for many years. Ms. Tate couldn’t tell a joke—she always started off with the punch-line— but she had a great sense of humor and loved to laugh, her husband said. She was a people person who made friends quickly, an ability that was no more evident than during her last years at Mt. San Antonio Gardens, where she continually made new friendships and renewed old ones. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and friend, and will be sorely missed, family shared. Mrs. Tate is survived by her husband, John Tate of Claremont; by her sons and daughters-in-law, Paul and Barbara Tate of Wright City, Missouri and David and Tammy Tate of Menifee, California; by her grandchildren, Lora (Tate) and Jason Jacobson of Kahoka, Missouri, John Paul and Sarah Tate of High Ridge, Missouri, Cheryl (Tate) and Ryan Hatch of Chicago, Illinois and Gordon Tate of Wright City, Missouri; and by 4 greatgrandchildren, Lance Jacobson and William, Kalina and Joshua Tate. Mrs. Tate is also survived by 2 sisters, Irene (Jordan) Caplan of Dalton, Massachusetts and Maude Ellen (Jordan) Brown of Valley Grande, Alabama, and by one brother, David Jordan of Birmingham, Alabama. She was preceded in death by 2 brothers, Eugene and Timothy Jordan; by 4 sisters, Martha (Jordan) Stewart, Sara (Jordan) Coe, Carolyn (Jordan) McCracken and JoAnn (Jordan) Johnston; by a number of nieces and nephews and, most recently, by one great-grandchild, Sawyer Jacobson. A memorial service for Mrs. Tate will be held on Sunday, April 21 at 3 p.m. at the Claremont United Methodist Church, located at 211 W. Foothill Blvd. in Claremont. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to Cotty College FAIB, 1000 W. Austin Blvd., Nevada, MO 64772-2790, or to the Mt. San Antonio Gardens Homeship Fund, 900 E. Harrison Ave., Pomona CA 91767. Please write “In Memory of Janet Tate” on the memo line.

Talented vocalist, loving wife, mother and grandmother
Janet Virginia Jordan Tate died in her sleep in the early morning hours of Wednesday, March 6, 2013 at age 81. She had recently been in failing health due to multiple problems related to her heart and lungs. Mrs. Tate was born on December 14, 1931 in Birmingham, Alabama, the ninth child and the youngest of 7 girls in a family of 10 children. Hers was a musical family. Her father was director for a high school marching band as well as for a community band and her mother played violin in the local symphony orchestra. Each of Mrs. Tate’s siblings learned to play various instruments. She played flute and piano, though she eventually became primarily a vocalist. When Mrs. Tate was 17, she studied voice with the Julliard faculty, learning the “Bel Canto” technique she practiced the rest of her life. She later studied at Howard College, now Samford University, in Birmingham, earning a bachelor’s degree in vocal music. While she was there, mutual friends introduced her to a student at another local school, Birmingham-Southern College, named John Tate. She and Mr. Tate had grown up living less than a mile from one another. They had even attended the same high school, where Mr. Tate had admired his future wife, who was a year older, from afar. He was charmed by her singing voice, among other attributes. “The most attractive part of her was her smile, which was a magnet to her personality,” he said. They were married in Birmingham in October of 1954 and lived in Sylacauga, Alabama for 3 years, where they both taught in the local school district. They welcomed their first child before moving to Texas. After Mr. Tate finished graduate school at Southern Methodist Uni-

versity in Dallas, they lived for a time in San Jose, where Mrs. Tate gave birth to a second son. Mrs. Tate was a working mother, teaching vocal music in public schools at the primary and secondary levels in Dallas and San Jose as well as previously in Alabama. In 1964, the Tates settled in Claremont, where Mrs. Tate earned a master’s degree in vocal music from Claremont Graduate University and taught vocal music in the Alta Loma and Central school districts in Rancho Cucamonga. Later, she developed an interest in home economics, particularly sewing, and taught in that area until retiring in 1987. Aside from her professional career, Mrs. Tate was known as a soprano soloist in the southern California area. Her solo performance experience included singing in the arena in Ephesus, Turkey where the apostle Paul preached and singing on HCJB radio in Quito, Ecuador. Locally, she was a soloist with the University of La Verne’s Choir and

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

9

Lynn Tobin Jackson
Community activist, political advocate
Lynn Tobin Jackson, a longtime Claremont resident, died on March 7, 2013. She was 77. Ms. Jackson was born on February 19, 1936 in Springfield, Illinois to Ruth Ashmore Tobin and J. Willard Tobin. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Illinois and taught English and history for some time, then went on to pursue a PhD in sociology at the Claremont Graduate University. Wherever Ms. Jackson went, she threw herself into community service. Beginning in 1962, she was an active and longstanding champion of the League of Women Voters. In 1979, she was elected to the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education, serving as board president during her tenure. Ms. Jackson made a significant impact on the district, according to fellow board member Jim Merrill. She instituted a tradition: During each board meeting, she would make a point of circulating among the audience members so she could hear their concerns. “She really believed strongly that we needed to listen to what the parents and residents were thinking about our schools,” Mr. Merrill said. As a strong supporter of the arts, she fought for programs like the high school theater department. She was also a ligence in a new direction, returning to school to pursue a law degree at Loyola Marymount University. After becoming a lawyer at age 50, she practiced law at Legal Aid in Compton for 20 years, and was dedicated to the low-income community she served. Sandy Baldonado, a Claremont lawyer who attended law school with Ms. Jackson when she, too, was in her 40s, says she was a truly good and decent person. “Lynn was a brilliant lawyer who, instead of focusing on making money, dedicated her legal abilities to the poor,” Ms. Baldonado said. Ms. Jackson’s upbeat demeanor was another asset in her profession, according to another friend, Sue Keith. staunch advocate of athletic opportunities “I suspect her clients, the most vulnerfor girls, in an era when Title IX was in its able members of society, were comforted infancy At the time, CHS had only one by this strong, determined women whose gymnasium, which was usually used for ready smile and sunny personality could boys sports such as basketball and volley- turn despair into hope,” Ms. Keith said. ball. When the district sold a parcel of the Ms. Jackson subscribed to the CHS campus to the Griswold’s complex, COURIER and the Los Angeles Times, Ms. Jackson was in the forefront of the reading both from cover-to-cover. campaign to use the proceeds to build a “She would get all riled up and say, second gymnasium to accommodate girls’ ‘Can you believe this?’” her daughter sports. Her priorities showed great fore- Cynthia recalled. sight, Mr. Merrill noted. Politics were regularly discussed at the “Claremont’s been blessed with a lot of dinner table, but they weren’t confined to bright women, and she was certainly one it. As a member of the Claremont United of them,” he said. Methodist Church, Ms. Jackson served as Ms. Jackson soon channeled her intel- the chair of the Status of the Role of Women Committee, was active in the Sanctuary movement and was an advocate for CUMC becoming a Reconciling church. Whether she was advocating for the hungry and the homeless of this country or for the political refugees of Latin America, Ms. Jackson was always willing to take to the streets to protest, an activity that in more than one instance led to

OBITUARIES
her arrest. A steadfast champion of human rights, Ms. Jackson also had a soft spot for animals. Growing up, she loved spending time on her family’s farm, where she would ride horses with her grandfather. Horseback riding continued to bring Ms. Jackson joy throughout her life. She kept horses in Claremont for a time and spent many summers at the family cabin in New Mexico, horseback riding, hiking and enjoying the outdoors. Whatever she did, Ms. Jackson had the support of her husband of 41 years, Steve. “When I think of Lynn, I think of Lynn and Steve together, good friends to each other and to those of us who have known them well,” Ms. Keith said. “They shared a bond, a commitment to social justice, and both put their principles into action.” Ms. Jackson not only passed on her commitment to social activism to her children and grandchildren. She inspired all those around her to reach out and lend a hand, said Clara Sota Ivey who, after meeting Ms. Jackson at the United Methodist Church, struck up a friendship that lasted nearly 4 decades. “It was her gentleness and kindness that warmed everyone, and her passion for justice,” Ms. Ivey said. “When she saw something that was not fair, she worked towards changing it. She did a lot of good.” Ms. Jackson is survived by her husband of 41 years, Steve Franklin Jackson; by their 5 children; by her 6 grandchildren and by her sister, Ann Hart, and her family.   A memorial service for Ms. Jackson will be held on Sunday, March 17 at 3 p.m. at the Claremont United Methodist Church, 211 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

10

Is purchasing Golden State even worth it?
by Tobias Hecht

I

n offering to purchase the water delivery system from Golden State Water Company for $54 million, the city of Claremont has stated that it is seeking fairness in water service and rates. These are reasonable goals. It is also true that many other municipalities successfully administer their own water. Yet there are some difficult questions to be asked.

VIEWPOINT
mont, I have had access to potable water 24 hours a day, every day. I have never had or heard of a problem in service delivery. Considering the billions of people around the world who lack access to water— even undrinkable water—in their homes, it is hard to understand where the complaint about service comes in. Are the rates unfair? We do pay somewhat more than those in surrounding communities and if that is your only measure of fairness, then the rates are unfair. Yet if one stops to think that the median family income in Claremont is more than 50 percent higher than in Pomona (where the unemployment rate is nearly double ours) one can be certain that our neighbors pay considerably more, in proportion to their income, than we do. What is unfair and profoundly irresponsible about the Golden State Water rate structure is that it punishes conservation and awards waste: Those who consume the least (generally those with limited resources) subsidize the most profligate. It isn’t obvious if you look at your bill, because the rates seem to go up as one consumes more water. But those who believe that are forgetting something. The water company assesses a “service charge” just for providing water. What it means in practice is that the first gallon of water costs us over $12. The last gallon, even for the most extravagant of consumers, costs a fraction of

First, is water expensive in Claremont? We are a family of 3. We bathe every day, wash clothing and dishes, drink and do everything else that other people do with water. Our bill has been well under $30 per month for the past 4 months, or around 33 cents per day per person. That doesn’t strike me as extortion. It has been raining, so recently there has been almost no need for irrigation, but living in a semi-desert environment, sprinklers are a choice, not a necessity. One can landscape with plants that require almost no water, and more and more residents do just that. It seems reasonable that if you want a big lawn or a swimming pool that it should cost you more than 33 cents per day. It is also worth asking whether making water any cheaper than it is would even be desirable, given the scarcity of water in southern California and the environmental consequences of using it with little thought to the cost. Is service poor? As a 20-year resident of Clare-

a penny. In effect, unless you are filling an Olympicsized pool, the more you waste the cheaper the total amount of water you use becomes—gallon for gallon. This is regressive and wasteful. If the city’s offer is accepted, the city would pay the equivalent of more than $1500 per resident to buy Golden State Water Company (there are only 35,000 of us to put up the $54 million, the math is simple). If the purchase leads to lower rates—and of course it is possible it will not—how long will it take to amortize the investment? If my household bill were cut by onethird (which is a long shot if you look at the experience of other cities that have taken over water administration), it would require 37 years to break even on the investment of $4500 for the 3 of us—and that is assuming zero inflation. Finally, we must also ask, what else could we do with $54 million? A lot. We could provide free day care for all children under 5. We could offer the best hospice service in southern California. We could give our overworked teachers a break by paying for assistants. We could even give every household that gets rid of its lawn a few thousand dollars; for most people that would cut the average summer bill by half or more, ultimately saving rate payers a lot more money than the city’s plan would. We could do many things. If the city gets its wish, however, the best we will be able to do is waste a precious resource with even greater abandon. —Disclaimer, I don’t work for Golden State Water or know anyone who does. I have no financial ties to the company, either.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

11

Eula Mae Maloney
Beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, friend
Eula Mae Maloney, a 40-year resident of Claremont, died on March 1, 2013. She was 91. Mrs. Maloney was born on April 6, 1921 in Spadra, California to Oscar and Zeda Glidewell. She attended Pomona High School and Pomona Junior College. In 1943, she married William Maloney, then a captain in the United States Air Force. Together, they had an amazing life, traveling the world and raising 4 daughters. When Mr. Maloney retired in 1970, Mrs. Maloney began a 17-year career with the Los Angeles County Fair, ultimately retiring as operations manager. She continued working with the Fair Association as a consultant as well as the director of communications for the Orange Show. Mrs. Maloney was committed to community service and served on many local boards, including United Way, Camp Fire Girls, the Cable Airport Association, Women's International Bowling Congress, Retired Officers Association Auxiliary, Red Hill Country Club, Friends of the Fair and the Military Officers Association of America. She remained very active throughout her life, whether traveling to visit her children, grandchildren and great-grand children all across the country for special events or holidays or out on the town with her many friends attending lunches, dinners, parties or entertainment events. She was always on the go and ready for a new adventure, according to family. “It is with great sorrow that we announce the passing of our mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and dear friend. We will all treasure the countless memo-

ries gathered over those many years,” Mrs. Maloney’s family shared. Mrs. Maloney was preceded in death by her sister Alma Glidewell, and her husband of 64 years, William R. Maloney. She is survived by her daughter Elizabeth; by her daughters and sons-in-law, Cathleen and Marcel, Karen and Jim, and Debi and Dean; and by 7 grandchildren and 5 greatgrandchildren. A Memorial Mass will be held at 10 a.m. on April 6, 2013 at Our Lady of theAssumption Church in Claremont. Mrs. Maloney will be laid to rest in a family ceremony beside Mr. Maloney in Riverside National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, you may make a donation to Wreaths Across America, PO Box 249, Columbia Falls, ME 04624

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

12

SOLAR PANELS continued from page 3

“US Bank is committed to aligning our business practices and customer offerings with sustainability goals,” Ms. GarrisonSprenger said. “US Bank has long been a leader in renewable energy investing and we are looking forward to having our own solar generation on-site.” Claremont businesses and commercial organizations are joining an energy-saving movement that has long since caught on in Claremont. In 2006, the city saw a slight jump in solar usage, coinciding with the introduction of Sustainable Claremont into the city’s general plan. In 2007, numbers doubled. In 2010 Sustainable Claremont introduced the Claremont Home Energy Retrofit Project (CHERP), a collaboration of residents working with community organizations, contractors and cities to promote sustainable building practices and reduce fossil fuel use in Claremont and beyond. Since the start of the CHERP Program, the numbers continue to increase. In 2012, Claremont property owners added solar panels to 70 homes and 2 college buildings. This represents 888,000 kilowatt hours of additional renewable energy produced in the city per year, according to Chris Veirs, senior planner and sustainability coordinator. It is the city’s largest single-year increase to date. Mr. Veirs attributes the jump to technological advancements, lower costs and new funding strategies, like leasing the panels. As more residents make the move,

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Corey Fierro secures a solar panel to a steel infrastructure that will become covered parking during construction on Tuesday at the US Bank branch in Claremont.

businesses look to add their support. “We hear our customers talking about how they are using solar power and we wanted to follow suit,” said Ryan Hibler, manager of the US Bank on Foothill. “Not only is it great for the environment, but it will help us save money in the long run. The reaction has been very positive so far.” The local US banking branch isn’t the only local business heeding the residential call to go solar. The Claremont United Church of Christ is also currently in the process of installing 200 panels as part of

a $190,000 solar project spearheaded by a church solar committee. The church expects to see a savings of $25,000 a year on their energy bill with the use of solar panels, according to Tom Helliwell, CUCC parishioner and chair of the church’s solar committee. Part of the reason for the move stems from the church’s desire to save money for use in programing and other important services. “We have to wean ourselves away from fossil fuels,” Mr. Helliwell said. “We can’t do it all at once, but we can contribute,

using alternative means of energy whenever we can.” The CUCC solar committee has been at work since December 2011, petitioning the congregation to support the solar cause. Parishioners answered the call heartily. Though a portion of the $190,000 sum has been borrowed, the church’s congregation has provided most of the money.   “The congregation been extremely supportive of this. I’ve been very encouraged by both the moral and financial support to this project.” The main problem with the introduction of solar remains in blending the new with the old. It isn’t easy to meld the bulky solar panels with the historic architecture and character residents have come to expect in Claremont. The city is limited in what it can do, says Mr. Veirs, as state law prohibits much meddling for aesthetic reasons. While Mr. Veirs said he was initially concerned with adding the paneling to the US Bank, a beloved historical building, he is grateful that the company has worked with the city to ensure the panels blend, adding shade structures and using paint to match the existing structure. Continuing to make sure new technologies blend with Claremont’s old-town charm will be a work in progress for the city as people embrace energy-efficient advancements. It’s a challenge they take in stride, pleased to see the sustainability goals of the city master plan moved into action. “It’s a work in progress,” Mr. Veirs said. —Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

13

Geena Davis uses celebrity to crusade for women’s rights

I

f we want to shrink the gender gap in today’s media, life needs to intimate art, said Academy Award-winning actor and women’s advocate Geena Davis at Garrison Theater last Thursday.
It’s a cause Ms. Davis works tirelessly for as the founder of The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, as well as in her roles as chair of the California Commission on the Status of Women and special envoy for women and girls in the field of technology for the United Nations. Through her dedicated crusade, Ms. Davis hopes to change the way women are represented in the media, which she believes currently stands as stereotyped and underrepresented. The key lies in combating media with media, she says. “It’s often found in medicine that the cure can come from the same source as the disease, and I think that media itself can be the cure for the problem that it’s creating,” she said. “We can create a different future by changing what people are seeing. I always say if they can see it, then they can be it.” Ms. Davis delivered her message to a standing roomonly crowd, mostly women, as part of Scripps College’s Alexa Fullerton Hampton Endowed Speakers Program. While peppering her talk with humor, showcasing her true talent as an entertainer, her message was serious: COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Something needs to give about the way women are viewed on the big screen. As a mother, that vision be- Academy Award-winning actor Geena Davis, 57, met with reporters following her speech, “Gender Equality in Modern Media‚“ on Thursday at Scripps College. came clear. “What message are we sending to young boys Years later, Ms. Davis found herself at home and girls if the female characters are one-dimenwatching G-rated movies along with her then 2sional, sidelined, stereotyped, hyersexualized, or year-old daughter, Alizeh. All too familiar with the simply not there at all? We are saying that women lack of great female roles, Ms. Davis started to take and girls are less valuable to our society than men notice of how few women were being represented and boys,” Ms. Davis said. “We are saying that in the movies her daughter was watching. She women and girls don’t take up half the space in questioned her friends, but no one had noticed. She the room, and the message is sinking in. The more asked those in the film industry, and they declared hours of television a girl watches, the fewer opto her that they were “addressing the problem,” but tions she feels she has in life, and the more a boy she was skeptical. watches, the more sexist his views become.” A self-exclaimed datahead, she took matters into Most of the time we do these things without her own hands. The data she found shocked her. even noticing, Ms. Davis suggests, like when we Like the fact that the ratio of male-to-female charrefer to a man as an actor and a woman as an acacters in movies has been exactly the same since tress. 1946. Or the fact that one study concluded that if “If you look at the dictionary, an actor is a perwe added women at the rate we have been to Conson who acts. It’s not a man who acts,” she said. gress, we would achieve parity in 500 years. An“I think very soon, actress will sound as quaint as other study suggested women represent 17 percent doctress or poetess. People really use this. I conacross sectors. The House of Representatives is 17 sider myself a former waiter who became an percent female. So is the percentage of female actor.” movie narrators, cardiac surgeons, tenured profesAs a young child growing up in a small town, Ms. Davis meets with some of her fans while posing for photos fol- sors, the animation guild and the number of Ms. Davis felt her options were endless, but had lowing her talk Thursday evening at Scripps College. women who participated in the latest world ecoher sights set on one particular goal from the very nomic forum. The number of women who make beginning. At age 3, Ms. Davis told her parents that she title role as the first female president in the television up crowd scenes in movies? Also 17 percent. wanted to be an actor. Where she got the idea, she has no drama Commander in Chief, for which she won a “You think you almost have to go out of the way to clue, but her parents were always supportive. They were Golden Globe, Ms. Davis said she was always acutely pull that one,” Ms. Davis said, but it got her thinking. even unfazed, to her surprise, when she announced years aware of how few great female roles existed. “What if the problem of gender equality is much, much “Of the parts that are there, many are not that interest- deeper than we ever possibly imagined?” later that she would be pursuing an acting degree at ing. You are just the girlfriend or just the eye candy,” she Boston University. Ms. Davis hopes to start making up the difference “My family and I were so removed from anything that explained. through See Jane, an arm of her nonprofit that advocates While admittedly taking on some roles that didn’t jibe for gender balance in the shows or movies children view. had to do with show business that...they were like oh that’s fine, as if I’d mentioned a field where you can ac- with her plan to empower women—she jokes about her Using media could be the key to change. She further entually expect to get a job,” she joked. “Either I had this 1988 film Earth Girls Are Easy—she says her part in courages parents to get involved in their children’s viewunshakeable faith or I was too dense to understand sim- Thelma & Louise changed her life. ing experience, pointing out differences and engaging “It really brought home to me, in a very personal way, them in discussion. ple percentages.” But the numbers turned out in her favor. After a brief how few opportunities we give women to feel like that “Lets say I wanted to be a role model as a nuclear stint as a fashion model, Ms. Davis was cast in her first coming out of a movie, to feel inspired and excited about physicist. It would take me countless years to study that role in 1982’s Tootsie, starring Dustin Hoffman. Her ca- the female characters in the movies,” she said. and...become famous for being a nuclear physicist, but I From that time on, Ms. Davis says she dedicated her- can play one tomorrow,” she said. “It’s that fast in media. reer took off. In the decades that followed she brought to life a number of memorable characters, including Dottie self to liberating women by more carefully selecting the It just happens. In the world of endless possibilities that Hinson in A League of Their Own, Thelma in Thelma roles she accepted. It became increasingly important to exist in Hollywood...life will imitate art. The art can lead & Louise alongside Susan Sarandon, and Muriel Pritch- select roles with a character that sought to choose her the way for changing these societal barriers.” —Beth Hartnett ett in The Accidental Tourist, for which she won the own fate. She had no idea that her selectiveness would lead to a more active role in advocacy for women in news@claremont-courier.com Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 1988. Known for her strong female portrayals, such as her media.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

14

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
architect/construction
HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD

architect
WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street Claremont, CA 91711

attorney MIKE F. OʼBRIEN
Attorney at Law

attorney Kendall & Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law 134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
Claremont, CA 91711

100 West Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 670-1344
www.hartmanbaldwin.com Since 1984
Residential remodeling, historic restorations, and custom home building

212 Yale Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 482-1422
Specializing in Family Law in Claremont since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation with Children, Property Division, Alimony, Child Support

(909) 624-5095
www.wheelerarchitects.com

(909) 626-9999
Specialist in personal injury and wrongful death cases. Se habla español

Building a better Claremont since 1985

attorney
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation

child & family therapy
ANN BINGHAM NEWMAN, PH.D., MFT
Child Specialist
Children have problems at home, at school and with friends... Is your child having difficulties? I can help. Individual, Child and Family Therapy

chiropractor
DR. MARTIN S. McLEOD
411 N. Indian Hill Blvd.

c.p.a. LIGHTFOOT • RALLS & LIGHTFOOT LLP
Certified Public Accountants 675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300 Claremont, CA 91711

414 Yale Avenue, Suite K Claremont, CA 91711

Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-1208
• Joint & Muscle Pain • Headache • Sciatica • Pinched nerve • Most Insurance accepted • Personal injury

(909) 621-4707
41 years experience in: Business Law, Probate, Family Law, Estate Planning, Real Estate Law, Civil Litigation, Bankruptcy.

(909)398-1984 dentist
PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S. D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.
Cosmetic & General Dentistry
615 W. Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 626-2623
Tax Planning & Preparation • Accounting

design/build SRS GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
909-621-1559
www.srsgeneralcontractor.com
Practical design, tastefully executed.
• Residential Remodel • Restoration of Unique & Vintage homes • Room additions.

financial consultants
SUZANNE H. CHRISTIAN
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® Professional Securities offered through LPL Financial Member of FINRA/SIPC 419 Yale Ave. Claremont

marketing COURIER
Advertise your professional service here. Call Mary Rose for rates and great ideas on ways to boost your business.

(909) 624-6815
1 Hour In-Office Bleaching, Veneers, White Fillings, Dental Implants, Dentures.

(909) 625-1052
“Your financial security is my priority”

(909) 621-4761
www.claremont-courier.com

optometry
ANNA M. TORRES, O.D.

optometry
Ann M. Johannsen, O.D. Brad A. Baggarly, O.D.

real estate broker Geoff T. Hamill
Broker Associate, ABR. CRS. GRI, E-PRO, SRES, D.R.E. #00997900
Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty

tax preparation D. PROFFITT, E.A.
Claremont, CA 91711

OPTOMETRY
1420 N. Claremont Blvd.,Ste. 209-B Claremont

OPTOMETRY
695 W. Foothill Blvd. Established 1972

Phone: (909) 445-1379
dee@dproffittea.com Visit my website at www.dproffittea.com
Income Tax Specialist since 1981
Payroll Service • Accounting

Phone: (909) 621-0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
#1 in Claremont sales & listings since 1988

(909) 621-0057
www.visioncenterofclaremont.com
United Healthcare • VSP • MES • Medicare

(909) 625-7861
www.claremontoptometry.com
Eyemed - VSP - MES - Medicare

Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!

NEW CAR GUIDE
mazda
ROMERO MAZDA ONTARIO AUTO CENTER (866) 232-4092 NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS
SERVING YOUR NEEDS OVER 35 YEARS 15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE. WWW.ROMEROMAZDA.COM

hyundai
ROMERO HYUNDAI ONTARIO AUTO CENTER (866) 232-4092 NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS
15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE. WWW.ROMEROHYUNDAI.COM

volvo
EXCLUSIVELY VOLVO 1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO CALL: SAM NASRI (909) 605-5700 WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVOLVOCARS.COM GOING ABROAD? CALL ABOUT “EUROPEAN DELIVERY”

fiat
FIAT OF ONTARIO ONTARIO AUTO CENTER 1201 AUTO CENTER DR. 800-BUY-FIAT 800-289-3428 WWW.FIATOFONTARIO.COM

cadillac
CRESTVIEW CADILLAC 2700 EAST GARVEY SOUTH, WEST COVINA (626) 966-7441
NEW AND CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALES

nissan
EMPIRE NISSAN ONTARIO AUTO CENTER (866) 234-2544
15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE.

volkswagen
EXCLUSIVELY VOLKSWAGEN 1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO CALL CHRIS OR DON (909) 605-8843 WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVW.COM WE REFUSE TO BE UNDERSOLD

toyota
CLAREMONT TOYOTA 508 AUTO CENTER DR., CLAREMONT (909) 625-1500 SALES • SERVICE • PARTS

LEASING • PARTS • BODY SHOP

NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS WWW.EMPIRENISSAN.COM

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

15

Connie Q. Belmontes
Beloved mother and grandmother, avid sports fan
Connie Q. Belmontes, a longtime Claremont resident, died peacefully in her sleep at her daughter’s home in Upland on February 15, 2013. She was 69. Ms. Belmontes was born in Sanger, California on January 23, 1944 to Henry and Hyacinth Quintanar, the oldest daughter among 12 children. Her given name, Consuelo, was shortened to Connie, which she would go by for the rest of her life. Her family moved south when Ms. Belmontes was 2, settling in Chino, which had become a thriving agricultural enclave. As a young girl, Ms. Belmontes pitched in to help her family, picking crops and working at local dairy farms as well as helping to care for her younger siblings. By the time she was a teen, she was working as a fruit packer, boxing up oranges, lemons and grapefruit in the citrus industry that flourished throughout the region. She had moved on to work as a sales associate at Kmart when she was set up on a blind date with a co-worker’s brother, Louie Belmontes. They fell in love and were married soon after. In 1969, Ms. Belmontes moved with her new husband to Claremont, where they lived for the next 36 years, raising 3 children and becoming active parishioners of Our Lady of the Assumption Catholic Church. Ms. Belmontes worked for a number of years in a sewing shop. Later, as a homemaker, she took pride in sewing for her family. There are a number of photo the retro crooning of Michael Bublé, and had tickets to see Barbara Streisand at the time of her death. She regularly tuned in to catch reruns of bandleader Lawrence Welk’s long-running TV show and once had the chance to take a photograph with Mr. Welk, a piece of memorabilia she cherished. A huge fan of sports, Ms. Belmontes also delighted in heading to games to root for her beloved Lakers—particularly Kobe Bryant and Pau Gasol—as well as the Dodgers, of whom Mike Piazza was her favorite. Ms. Belmontes sometimes boasted about another celebrity encounter, the time she met Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda. Between their mother’s enthusiasm for athletics and the fact that Mr. Belmontes was a baseball coach, each of their kids participated in youth sports. Ms. Belmontes always made sure to be there at games, cheering them on. “She was a fun-loving, bubbly, people person,” according to family. Ms. Belmontes would be the first to admit she was a bit of a shop-aholic, but her purchases were most often made with others in mind. She regularly purchased socks and blankets to donate to homeless shelters or to the local dialysis center. She also bought countless gifts for her children and her grandchildren. They came to expect sports-themed presents, including Laker- and Dodgerthemed items ranging from hats to visors to purses and wallets. Ms. Belmontes also enjoyed quiet mo-

OBITUARIES
ments, knitting or crotcheting, writing in her daily journal, poring through books of sewing patterns and reading religious magazines. “Every single day, she’d read about being Catholic. It meant so much to her,” Ms. Belmontes’ daughter Irene said. She loved traveling with her husband, including trips to Washington, DC and country music haven Branson, Missouri, and was always involved in a new project. Shortly before her death, she went shopping to pick up some yarn for a blanket she planned to knit in the colors of the Virgin Mary to be raffled off by her church. “She often did things like that. She was so into giving and helping people,” family said. Ms. Belmontes’ final moments were in keeping with her life. She did some needlework, said her prayers and had laid down for a nap when her “golden heart” stopped beating, family shared. Ms. Belmontes is survived by her mother, Hyacinth Quintanar of Chino; by her siblings, Ben, Frank, Lydia, Alice and Annie, all of Chino; by her children, Ralph Chiappone and Grace Silva, both of Chino, and Irene “Rena” Chiappone of Upland; by 8 grandchildren and by 9 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Louie Belmontes, who died in 2005.

tos featuring Ms. Belmontes and her daughters in matching homemade dresses, with her son in a shirt of her making. She also loved cooking, and was known for her savory tamales and delicious biscuits. Not long ago, she visited her great-granddaughter’s classroom, demonstrating for the students how to make homemade chicken soup. Ms. Belmontes’ greatest loves were her family and her faith. She enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren and lending her soprano voice to the choir at OLA. Those were not her only enthusiasms, though. Ms. Belmontes loved music, from country tunes to opera

Start or renew your subscription online at: www.claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

16

Operating this longtime family bakery is a real treat

S

ome Crust Bakery is such a Claremont fixture, it seems like it’s been here forever. For all intents and purposes it has, because this cozy bastion of good coffee and delectable baked goods has a decidedly venerable history.

When Larry and Sandy Feemster purchased the business in 1997, Some Crust had already been a Village staple since 1978. In fact, the Yale Avenue shop has been a bakery since 1916. Before that, it was a dry goods store founded in 1889. Those white-painted wooden shelves behind the counter, which are so familiar to the bakery’s regulars, date back to the store’s turn-of-the-century opening. Upon assuming ownership, Mr. Feemster, who had served for almost 2 decades as the security director for In-N-Out Burger, felt a responsibility to uphold the shop’s longstanding reputation for quality. Ms. Feemster was already a skilled baker, who was making specialty items for Some Crust on a part-time basis when then owner Dorothy Demke approached her to see if she was interested in buying the business. Not to be outdone, Mr. Feemster headed for the International School of Baking in Bend, Oregon for a crash course on artisan baking. There, he acquired more than the ability to turn flour, milk and eggs into a bit of oven-warmed heaven. Mr. Feemster acquired a philosophy: If you focus on using the highest-quality ingredients available, and take the time to perfect your recipes, the end product is bound to be outstanding. While in recent times Some Crust has introduced diet-conscious items like gluten-free cookies in response to customer requests, the bakery is no health food store. Their concoctions feature cream instead of skim milk, and lots and lots of butter. It is, however, an establishment with a fiercely loyal clientele and a decidedly continental flavor. A number of patrons have remarked that Some Crust has the best pastries you can get outside of Europe, and that its croissants, in particular, rival those made in France. “We’re very busy, but we’re busy because we don’t cut corners,” Mr. Feemster said. “It costs me a lot to make things the way we do, but we don’t want to turn off our customers, so we ride out the price increases.” Mr. and Ms. Feemster’s success is based on a winning formula. They kept the elements that originally

Mom & Pop

Claremont

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff General Manager Jack Housen mixes a large bowl of chocolate cake batter on Tuesday at Some Crust Bakery in the Claremont Village. Mr. Housen started working at Some Crust 25 years ago making dough for the croissants and pastries.

made Some Crust popular, like quality bread and favorite offerings like chocolate chip cookies and snickerdoodles, but they also introduced some much-needed changes. Ms. Demke operated the space next door to the bakery as a teashop, which wasn’t actively frequented. The Feemsters turned the teashop into a down-to-earth café where customers could sit down and have a sandwich with some soup or salad as well as opting for a sweet treat. The café has become a sort of headquarters for many Village regulars, including students and staff of the Claremont Colleges. “There are many professors who just about live there,” Mr. Feemster joked. The Feemsters have also, over the years, introduced a greater level of business-mindedness and discipline to their staff. While there are still many musicians and artists working behind the counters of Some Crust, eccentricity and the occasional hint of self-indulgence has been replaced with top-notch customer service, ac-

cording to the Feemsters’ son, Scott. In recent years, Ms. Feemster has moved away from the day-to-day operations of the business, but Some Crust remains very much a family affair. Some 3 years ago, Scott joined the business as its general manager, a title he shares with 25-year Some Crust veteran Jack Housen, who also happens to be one of his best friends. They attended high school together and, after decades of friendship and years of working with the older Mr. Feemster, Mr. Housen has become like a second brother to Scott. Some Crust’s coffee alone has a magnetic pull on java junkies looking for a strong cup of joe with fair trade credentials. They brew coffee by Monkey and Son, a company founded by Thom Fuhrmann, a former Some Crust employee. Another element that helps maintain a devoted army of regular “Crusties” is that, while Some Crust continMOM & POP: SOME CRUST continues on the next page

BEEN

THERE.

REPORTED

THAT.

Covering the Claremont news scene, that is. Itʼs what we do. And itʼs all we do.
With a staff of experienced editors, reporters and photographers, our commitment is to bring you the news in an unbiased, timely fashion. So in a world with too many choices, there is only one place to go to stay in touch with Claremont.

Start or renew your subscription online at: claremont-courier.com

Claremont’s voice since 1908

our C ier
Claremont
claremont-courier.com

(909) 621-4761

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

17

Briyahn Thompson helps a customer on Tuesday at Some Crust Bakery in Claremont. As a “Crustie,” Ms. Thompson helps at the counter and also provides an extra hand in the bakery. MOM & POP: SOME CRUST continued from the previous page

ues to make popular standbys, they introduce new delicacies every year. Mr. Housen helped develop the bakery’s mocha cookie, for instance, which is one of the most in-demand treats on Some Crust’s shelves. Mr. Feemster introduced egg sliders a while back and, as the saying goes, they sell like hotcakes, especially among Claremont Colleges students. One of Scott’s claims to fame is a maple scone. Mr. Scott was in the high desert when, beset by a fit of coffee withdrawal, he made a rare foray into Starbucks. He noticed a maple scone on their shelves and, since he

CHS

loves the taste of maple, he decided to give it a try. After a few bites, he tossed aside the scone, which he says was remarkably dry and tasteless. He was inspired by the idea, though, and, after hours of experimentation, created a sweet and moist facsimile to add to Some Crust’s offerings. Scott, who worked for years in retail, including as a manager and buyer at record stores like Rhino Records and Amoeba, is no stranger to running a business. It is not until he returned to his roots, however, and began working with his father that he realized how rewarding it can be. “I’ve worked jobs where I’m running, running and I’m beat at the end of the day. You get your paycheck and kind of go, ‘Ugh,’” he said. “But working with my dad and my family, even when I’ve had really rough days—and I do tend to work pretty long hours—it’s a different kind of feeling. I feel like I’m contributing to my family.” There are things you might not know about Some Crust. Ironically, the elder Mr. Feemster doesn’t have much of a sweet tooth. And there are many customers

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Diners enjoy a meal while sitting on the sidewalk outside Some Crust Bakery on Yale Avenue in the Claremont Village. Some Crust has been in business since 1978, but the location has been a bakery going back to 1916.

and employees who are convinced that benevolent, though mischievous, spirit haunts the old building. For the most part, however, the Feemsters and their business are like an open book. They love being a part of the Claremont community, and take endless pride in what they do. “Not long ago, I was outside doing maintenance work when a van pulled up and a disabled person in a wheelchair came out—she was missing a couple of limbs,” Mr. Feemster recalled. “I heard her say, ‘This is the best bakery in the world.’ What a wonderful thing to hear from a person.” Some Crust Bakery is located at 119 Yale Ave. in Claremont. Those who are out of town will be delighted to hear that you can order their baked goods online as well as in their brick-and-mortar storefront. For more information, call 621-9772 or visit SomeCrust.com.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 8, 2013

18

Longtime officers are promoted for outstanding service

T

he good news keeps coming for the Claremont Police Department. In recent months Claremont’s budget success and grant funding has allowed the local police department the ability to add to its ranks.
First, with the addition of a four-legged staff member named Dodger, a one-year-old British Labrador trained to identify narcotics. He is now the trusty partner of Officer Sean Evans, following him around to local schools and assisting in drug searches around the city. Last month, officers began the search for a parttime, $32,500-a-year police detective with the approval of the Claremont City Council. On the heels of these successes, Claremont police have another reason to celebrate. Last week as 7 longtime Claremont policemen were honored with promotions totaling a pay increase of $23,364 a year, according to Finance Director Adam Pirrie.

Officers Sean Evans and David Hardin were promoted to corporals, Detective David De Metz to sergeant and Sergeants Jason Walters and Aaron Fate to lieutenants. The promotions will POLICE fill existing department vacancies, according to Claremont Chief of Police Paul Cooper. NEWS In 2010 the police department was forced to cut 6 officer positions with an additional post cut in 2011 as the city struggled with budget cuts. Though the number of police officers in the Claremont force is still below the 2009 total, Chief Cooper is encouraged by the city’s continued commitment to public safety as the budget returns to good health. “I am pleased whenever we can add tools to the police department to enhance our effectiveness and the services we provide the community,” Chief Cooper said. “While these have and continue to be challenging economic times, the impacts of Realignment are being felt throughout the region and my hope is these tools and the partnership we share with the commu-

nity will be an equalizer.” The Police Commission meeting was crammed with friends, family and community members in attendance in support of the local police force (though some may also chalk up the high attendance to Dodger the drug dog’s special appearance in support of his partner). The promoted servicemen have given a total of over 50 years of service to the city of Claremont. Lt. Walters leads the pack of promotees with 15 years at the Claremont Police Department with hardly an area of enforcement he hasn’t had a part in.  He was selected as the department’s Police Officer of the Year in 2004 and the Supervisor of the Year in 2012. He is also the recipient of the Police Department’s Medal of Excellence.   Lt. Fate came to the Claremont Police Department 14 years ago as the highest-ranked recruit in his class from the San Bernardino Sheriff’s Academy. He continues to rank at CPD, the recipient of the Police Commission’s Distinguished Service Medal, the City
OFFICERS PROMOTED continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

19

OFFICERS PROMOTED continued from the previous page

Manager’s Award of Excellence, and the Police Department Medal of Excellence. Lt. Fate was also selected as the department’s Police Officer of the Year

in 2006. Sgt. De Metz, an 8-year veteran of the Claremont police force, currently serves the city in the CPD’s Investigations Bureau, in addition to working patrol and as a field training officer. He

was honored as Police Officer of the Year in 2009. Corporal Hardin, who currently works as a traffic officer, followed suit as Police Officer of the Year in 2010. The 10-year Claremont police veteran notably authored 2 competitive Alcohol Beverage Control grants focused on education and enforcement of alcohol regulations and preventing the illegal purchase and use of alcohol by minors. Now with Dodger by his side, Corporal Evans, an 8-year police department veteran, continues to serve the city as the local DARE officer. Before his time with the Claremont police, he served 2 years with the San Bernardino School Police Department and with the United States Marines for 7 years. He was recognized as Claremont’s Police

Officer of the Year in 2008. In addition to recognizing its promoted officers, the department took time to honor a few more of its own for exemplary service. Corporals Russell Haynes and Brian Thompson were awarded the department’s Lifesaving Award for coming to the aid of a Claremont man found unresponsive last Christmas. The officers performed CPR and shocked the victim 3 times with an external defibrillator prior to the arrival of fire department paramedics, according to Chief Cooper. The man made a full recovery and was in attendance at the meeting to add his cheers to the resounding applause.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Friday, March 15 to Saturday, March 23

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

20

CALENDAR
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

Folk Music Festival
Musicians announced for the 2013 Folk Music Festival.

Party Parade
View an updated listing of Party Parade events.

Page 23

Page 26
SUSTAINABILITY Lance M. Neckar, Pitzer College professor and director of the Robert Redford Conservancy for Southern California Sustainability, will discuss conservancy, including sustainability challenges in the region, and will outline plans to establish conservancy headquarters at the Bernard Field Station in Claremont. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $6. The University Club meets each Tuesday in the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. CENSUS Luz Castillo from the Los Angeles Regional Office of the United State Census Bureau will present the most recent data from the 2010 Census and the American Community Survey for ZIP code 91711. The presentation will highlight current demographics, social, economic and housing characteristics, as well as changes that have taken place over the past decade in Claremont. For guests 18 and over. 6 to 7:30 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. 621-4902.
9-DAY CALENDAR continues on the next page

March Friday

SPANISH GUITAR Enjoy the authentic Spanish sounds of Kimera in the VIP lounge at Walter’s. 7 to 10 p.m. Walter’s Restaurant, 310 N. Yale Ave., Claremont. 624-2779, ext. 2. TANGO CLASS Learn to dance or take your current dancing skills to a higher level. All levels are welcome. 7 to 8:30 p.m. $20 single or $35 for couples. Pilates Studio M, 548 W. First St., Claremont Packing House.

15 March

and open to the public. 1 to 4 p.m. Claremont Public Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont.

March Tuesday

19

Sunday

17

March Saturday

16 March

ST. JOSEPH’S TABLE Celebrate the arrival of spring at the traditional St. Joseph’s Table, laden with Italian pastries and Easter breads. A spaghetti dinner will be served from noon to 6:30 p.m. Purchase dinner tickets at $9 for adults and $5 for children (children 5 years and under eat for free). Our Lady of the Assumption Church, 435 N. Berkeley Ave., Claremont. 626-3596.

CHILDREN’S BOOK FESTIVAL “Hats, Hats, and More Hats!” presented by Friends of the Claremont Library. Children and their families are invited to the library for an afternoon of stories, activities, crafts, magic and more—all with the theme of hats. Every child will receive a book or 2 to take home, while supplies last. Free

Monday

18

COMPUTER PROBLEMS Learn about resolving your iPad and Mac problems with a Q&A session, plus hear the latest news from Apple products. Hosted by Claremont Macintosh Users Group. 7 p.m. Hughes Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont.

PILATES Students will learn correct postural alignment through a series of mat work. The class is designed to work all planes of motion and restore the natural curves of the spine and place the pelvis and spine in a neutral state. Students who take and repeat this course will maintain and regain strength, flexibility, coordination, agility and balance. Bring a mat, towel, 2 to 3 pound hand weights, water, 9-inch inflatable ball or dyna bands to class. This is a 6-week course held on Tuesdays from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Registration is required. Visit www.ci.claremont.ca.us or call 399-5490. Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. IPAD INFO Claremont Macintosh Users Group hosts a series on “Getting to Know Your iPad.” Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday March 19, 21 and 23 from 10 a.m. to noon. $30 tuition. Joslyn Annex, 650 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont. 626-2045.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

21

9-DAY CALENDAR continued from the previous page

DEVICES Jacob Christ discusses Virtual Box and numerically controlled devices. Hosted by the Claremont Senior Computer Club. 7:30 p.m. Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. 399-5488.

housing in Claremont and the Claremont After School Tutoring Program (CLASP). 7 p.m. Hughes Center’s Grove Room, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. 624-4796.

March Saturday

23

March Friday

22

March Wednesday

20

LENTEN CONCERT SERIES Carey Robertson, principal organist of Claremont United Church or Christ (CUCC) and organ professor at Claremont Graduate University, performs Sonata on the 94th Psalm by Julius Reubke. 12:15 to 12:45 p.m. CUCC, 233 W. Harrison Ave., Claremont.

March Thursday

21

ACTIVE CLAREMONT Jim Keith will discuss crime-free, multi-family

ARTOON EXHIBITION The new Claremont Museum of Art arts education project, gives voice to a generation of middle school students through the art of cartooning. 6 to 8 p.m. ARToon cartoons will be on exhibit at El Roble Intermediate School in the Multi-Purpose Room, located at 665 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont. EDUCATION FUNDRAISER Friends and family of the Sycamore School Library are having a fundraising event hosted by Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop. Enjoy an evening of fun, food and entertainment. Proceeds of sales benefit Sycamore’s library. 6 to 8 p.m. Mrs. Nelson’s, 1030 Bonita Ave., La Verne.

COLLEGES TOUR Visit the Claremont Colleges with a Claremont Heritage guide. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m. in front of Seaver House located at 305 N. College Ave., Claremont. A 2-and-a-half hour tour of the history, architecture and people of the academic community. The tour includes Claremont Graduate School, Claremont McKenna College, Harvey Mudd Colley and Pitzer College. The tour is $8 per person. ORIGAMI Learn about origami, watch a demonstration and make simple models. Linda Adams has been doing origami since the age of 12, teaching the paperfolding technique for the last 15 years. Space is limited to 20 guests. The class is for ages 12 to 18. Sign up at the adult information desk. Free program sponsored by Friends of the Claremont Library. 2 to 3 p.m. Claremont Library Meeting Room, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont.

The Friends of the Bernard Biological Field Station (FBBFS) are having their annual silent auction of works by local artists during the month of March. Ceramics, glass, paintings, jewelry, textiles and more are up for bid. Items can be seen in the window of the Folk Music Center at 220 Yale Ave., Claremont. Bids can be left any day except Mondays through March 30. FBBFS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to education and the environment.
Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Phone: 621-4761. Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

Local arts silent auction

OUR TOWN

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

22

NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 445-1200. —Thursday: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Friday through Sunday: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. to closing. —Sunday: Mariachi San Pedro. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ESPIAUS RESTAURANTE Y CANTINA: 109 Yale Ave., Claremont. Cantina remains open until flow of customers slows down. 621-1818. EUREKA! GOURMET BURGERS & CRAFT BEER: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open daily from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, March 21: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka! Thursday Night Music featuring Escency. THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open Mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com.

—Saturday, March 16: I See Hawks in LA perform at 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m. $12. —Through March 30: The Friends of the Bernard Biological Field Station (FBBFS) are having their annual silent auction of works by local artists during the month of March. Ceramics, glass, paintings, jewelry, textiles, and more are up for bid. Items can be seen in the window of the Folk Music Center. Bids can be left any day except Mondays from now through March 30. FBBFS is a non-profit organization dedicated to education and the environment. —Saturday, April 20: The Dustbowl Revival is a Venice, California-based roots collective that merges old school bluegrass, gospel, jug band, swamp blues and hot swing of the 1930s. Performance at 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m. $10. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —March 15 and 16: Tom Clark has performed for corporate environments, colleges and clubs across the country. He has performed at the Capetown Comedy Festival in South Africa and at the Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. Mr. Clark’s credits include Comedy Central’s Premium Blend, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, NBC’s Last Comic Standing and The Bob and Tom Radio Show. Visit www.tomclark.com. —March 22 and 23: Peter Berman has been seen on Comedy Central Presents, CBS’ The Late Late

Show with Craig Ferguson and the Montreal Comedy Festival. Katsy Chappell hosts the event and Picard Maneuver and Shaman Johal will also be featured. FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. www.fox pomona.com. —Wednesday, March 20: The Specials. —Friday, April 19: Bullet for my Valentine. —Thursday, April 25: Crystal Castles. THE GLASS HOUSE: 200 W. Second St., Pomona. 865-3802. —Saturday, March 16: The Suppy Nation Tour featuring The Story So Far, Man Overboard, Tonight Alive, Citizen, The American Scene. $15. 6 p.m. —Wednesday, March 20: Los Autenticos Decadentes featuring La Santa Cecilia and Forever Farewell. $25. 7 p.m. —Friday, March 22: Breakthru presents Artist vs. Poet featuring This Century, More Amor, Madison, Marie and Mackenzie Paige, Highway, Savannah Van Band and Dare to Dream. $12 to $14. 6 p.m. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, March 15: Lil “A” and the Allnighters (blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, March 16: The Dustbowl Revival (Americana/bluegrass/swing/ jug band). —Sunday, March 17: The Atomic Shamrocks (funk). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, March 19: Ladies Night (female DJs). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, March 20: Open Jam Night with Menno & Friends (jazz). 8 p.m. —Thursday, March 21: Sean Amato Trio at 7 p.m. and Beat Cinema (DJ) at 10 p.m. —Friday, March 22: Nutty (swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, March 23: Big Papa and the TCB album release party featuring special guests (swing). HOTEL CASA 425: 425 W. First St., Claremont. Call 624-2272 or visit www.casa425.com. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Friday, March 15: Greater Pacific (alternative/country). 10 p.m. —Saturday, March 16: The Dustbowl Revival (bluegrass/gospel/jug-band/ roots). 10 p.m. —Tuesday, March 19: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, March 20: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. —Thursday, March 21: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band (jazz). 8 p.m. —Friday, March 22: Tremoloco (Mexican-Americana roots). 10 p.m. —Saturday, March 23: The Claremont Voodoo Society (blues). 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. 767-2255. —Friday, March 15: Enjoy the authentic Spanish sounds of Kimera in the VIP lounge. 7 to 10 p.m. WINE MERCHANTS: Claremont Packing House, 540 W. First St., Claremont. 445-9463. Mondays call, Tuesday through Thursday: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 11 a.m. to 12 a.m., Sunday: 12 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

23

Folk Music Festival boasts vibrant lineup, new venue
The annual event, set for Saturday, June 15, 2013, will feature a picturesque new setting and some heavyhitting performers, including Henry Rollins, David Lindley and Leon Mobley. “We’re very excited about this year’s festival because we get to team up with the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, which is such a beautiful venue and is also a great cause,” Folk Music Center manager Ellen Chase-Verdries said. The natural environment of the local botanic garden, which showcases California native plants, is the perfect backdrop for folk music, Ms. ChaseVerdries noted. There is another benefit to the relocation of the all-day event, which has been held at Sycamore Elementary School in recent years: Beer will be offered by Dale Bros. Brewery and Claremont Craft Ales. The festival, which runs from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., will also feature vendors selling wares such as jewelry, candles, bath products, vintage prints and posters, blown glass, mosaic art and handmade instruments. Along with live entertainment, garden tours and a drum circle lead by the Wahlbangers, guests may join a variety of workshops, including African drumming with Leon Mobley, cajon drumming with Homero Chavez, songwriting with Rick Shea, European and American folk songs with VOCO and Gypsy guitar with Gonzalo Bergara. Other workshops include ukulele with Janet Klein and Ian Whitcomb, didgeridoo with Steve Goode, protest songs with Ross Altman, harmonica with Kevin Marin plus tutorials in puppeteering, mosaic-making and creating succulent planters. This year’s performers are a particularly varied and talented group, according to Ms. Ellen Chase-Verdries. Read on for a rundown of who’s on tap.

L

ocal music fans will be delighted to hear that the 2013 Claremont Folk Music Festival is on its way.

Band, Jack Johnson, Peter Wolf, Mick Jagger, Quincy Jones, Santana, Michael Jackson, Macy Gray, Trevor Hall, the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, the Blind Boys of Alabama, Jason Mraz, Madonna, The Fugees and Stevie Wonder.

Round Mountain Round Mountain is a collaboration between brothers Char and Robby Rothschild, a “2-man singing orchestra” whose original songs fuse musical influences from around the world. Along with singing and harmonization, the brothers are skilled in an array of instruments. Chad plays accordion, guitar, dobro, trumpet, Bulgarian gaida and highland bagpipes. Robie provides rhythm via the djembe and the Peruvian cajon and is also adept at playing the Irish bouzoui and a West African harp called the kora.

Images special to the COURIER

Henry Rollins Musician, spoken-word artist, author and activist Henry Rollins rose to prominence while fronting the California hardcore punk band Black Flag from 1981-1986. He later toured in support of albums like Weight, which featured the hit song “Liar,” with his group The Rollins Band. Mr. Rollins won a Best Spoken Word Recording Grammy in 1994 for his “Get in the Van: On the Road with Black Flag,” a double-disc album in which he reads aloud from his Black Flag tour diary.

(www.janetklein.com), “obscure, naughty and lovely songs from the 1910s, ‘20s and ‘30s.” A regular performer at the Steve Allen Theater in Hollywood, Ms. Klein and her group will appeal to anyone with a taste for hot jazz, ragtime, ballads, blues and novelty tunes of yore. Ms. Klein—who is also known for her vintage sartorial style—says when audiences hear her interpret old songs, she often “shocks them with sweetness.” And example is her rendition of Joe Young’s “You’re a Heavenly Thing,” a 1930s tune that insists, “They took the moonlight out of the skies and put the moonlight right in your eyes, like a June night.”

David Lindley A master of a dizzying number of instruments, particularly those with strings, David Lindley performed with the psychedelic folk rock band Kaleidoscope (1966-1970) and served as bandleader for the group El Rayo X. He has contributed to recordings and live performances with a Who’s Who of musicians, including Ben Harper, Leonard Cohen, Warren Zevon, Jackson Browne, Linda Ronstadt, Curtis Mayfield, James Taylor, David Crosby, Graham Nash, Dolly Parton, Bob Dylan and Rod Stewart.

Janet Klein and Her Parlor boys Janet Klein and Her Parlor Boys will also be adding their unique sound to the Claremont Folk Music Festival. Ms. Klein is a vocalist, ukulele player, painter and poet whose musical specialty is, according to her website

Leon Mobley Percussionist Leon Mobley and his group Da Lion specialize in Africanderived drums and rhythms. The artistic director for Djimbe West African Drummers and Dancers, Mr. Mobley is a member of Ben Harper’s The Innocent Criminals and is currently working with Damian Marley and Nas. Over the years, he has recorded and performed with a wide variety of noted musicians, including the Dave Matthews

Moira Smiley & VOCO Whether Moira Smiley & VOCO are delving into the sound of 19th century Americana or a keening eastern European folk song, their music has an arresting sound that spurred the Herald Times to call the ensemble “persuasive, near-perfect musicians.” Ms. Smiley and the women of VOCO—who were named the numberone a cappella group in the United States in 2007—perform traditional and original songs, setting vocal harmonies to the strains of cello, banjo, ukulele, accordion and body percussion. Also set to perform are MexicanAmerican roots rockers Tremoloco; “singer/songfighter” Ross Altman, who specializes in traditional tunes protesting war and advancing the causes of labor and civil rights; “American Swamp Music” performers the Black Tongued Bells and the acoustic gypsy jazz of the Gonzalo Bergara Quartet, along with Peter Harper and Phoebe Bridges. General admission is $26.87 with service fee; kids 12 and younger get in free. VIP admission is available for $104.49 and includes preferred seating and a festival T-shirt. To buy tickets or get more information on the Claremont Folk Music Festival, visit http://folkmusiccenter.com/folk-fes tival or call 624-2928.
-Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

24

GALLERIES
57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona Arts Colony. Friday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., second and last Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. 397-0218. —Through April 27: Two mid-career women artists from the Inland Empire are featured this month at 57 Underground. Mary Hughes has exhibited all over the region, establishing herself as painter of darkened and elusive dreamscapes, in which forms appear and disappear from behind seemingly arbitrary and random patterns of paint, and recognizable objects move from background to foreground depending on the viewer’s focus. Yi-li Chin Ward has had a career notable for her consistent and persistent interpretations of the female form. Ms. Chin’s paintings are economical of line, and seem not at all that particular. Yet, if one spends the time with them, one sees that they are very particular, and very specific about thought and emotion. Closing reception: Saturday, April 27 form 5 to 9 p.m. Art walk: March 30; April 13 and 27 from 5 to 9 p.m. AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. www.amoca.org. 865-3146. —Through May 5: “Friendship Forged in Fire: British Ceramics in America,” featuring British pottery in a thematic and chronological order, from the industrial potteries of the Victorian era, to the Arts and Crafts movement, to the traditionalist approach of Bernard Leach and his followers. Modern ceramic artists will be represented by the works of Lucie Rie, Hans Coper and Ruth Duckworth. The largest segment of the exhibition will display contemporary innovations of “post-modern” ceramic art being created in Great Britain today. —Saturday, April 13: Free Admission Day sponsored by Southern California Edison. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 626-3322. —Through March 31: “Partnering” tells of the relationship of individuals with each other. Also included are collages, prints and a number of constructions made from antiques and found items. Jan Wheatcroft exhibits tapestry weavings, woven from handspun and naturally dyed wools and silks, and depicts a rat who meditates, partners who dance, a circus goat that balances on a high wire and a cat who flies across the sun on the back of a bird. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. www.loft204.com. —Through, March 31: The Claremont COURIER is featured at The Colony for the month of March as they celebrate the kick-off of their weekly edition. Participants in The Colony this month include stained glass/mosaics by Jenifer Hall, watercolors by Arwen Allen, photography by Vicki, limited edition prints by

Melody Grace Cave, photography by Barbara Sammons, plus a boutique by Clare Miranda and oddities by Sarah Toribbio and friends. —Saturday, March 16: “What’s Your Type?” From address poem to persona poem, and from acrostic poem to the villanelle: Explore some of the many creativity-evoking poetic genres. 1 to 2 p.m. $10. Free open forum from 2 to 3 p.m. —Tuesday, March 19: Workout belly dance class with Jacki Torres of the Renaissance Pleasure Faire. Bring a yoga mat. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Wednesday, March 20: Traditional belly dance class with Adina Dane of Casablanca Bar & Grill. Bring a yoga mat. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. dA CENTER FOR THE ARTS: 252 S. Main St., Pomona Arts Colony. Wednesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m., Thursday 12 to 9 p.m. 397-9716. —Through March 30: Guest Curator, Walter Christensen, was inspired to invite artists to use art as an ambassador in various mediums to create works that express and communicate eastern and western cultures: “East Meets West:” East means Artwork or Artists related to China, Japan, Vietnam Iran and Iraq. West means Artwork or Artists related to the United States, Britain and Canada. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: 626-5455. —Through April 12: “Found in Translation,” an investigation into the role of technology as a catalyst for human connectivity featuring Charles Long. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 624-0548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Open Sundays from noon to 3 p.m.: Visitors welcome anytime, appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. —Sunday, March 24: Opening reception from 3 to 6 p.m. Internationally recognized watercolor painter, author and twice president of the National Watercolor Society, Gerald Brommer. Opening reception: Sunday, March 24 from 3 to 6 p.m. GALLERY SOHO: 300-A S. Thomas St., basement level, Pomona Arts Colony. Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. —Through March 29: Student work, grades 7 through 12. IRENE CARISON GALLERY: The University of La Verne, Miller Hall, 1950 Third St., La Verne. 593-3511 ext. 4281. —Through April 5: Mitch Dobrowner’s “Vital Firmament.” LATINO ART MUSEUM: 281 S. Thomas St. Suite 105, Pomona. www.lamoa.net. 620-6009 or 484-2618. —Through March 30: Ninth Women International Exhibition. LENZNER FAMILY ART GALLERY: First floor of Atherton Hall on the Pitzer College campus. Free admission. Tuesday through Friday, 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through March 22: Emerging Artist Series #7: “Tannaz Farsi: Crowd Control.” MAIN STREET GALLERY: 252C

S. Main St., Pomona. 868-2979. —Through March 30: “Mind In Transition: The Art of Yi Kai,” featuring paintings from the artist’s Tibetan travels resulting in a personal comparison of the spiritual and material values between the east and west. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 980-0412, info@maloof foundation.org or www.malooffounda tion.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, advance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features droughttolerant plants native to California and other parts of the world. NICHOLS GALLERY: First floor of the Broad Center on Pitzer College campus. Tuesday through Friday, 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through March 22: “Martha Wilson,” an independent traveling exhibition. PEGGY PHELPS & EAST GALLERY: Claremont Graduate University, 251 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 621-8071. —Through March 15: “Blue Balloons and White Fog,” MFA Thesis Show featuring Stephanie Meredith. Peggy Phelps Gallery. — Through March 15: “Traces of Earthly Things,” MFA Thesis Exhibition featuring Kristin Frost. East Gallery. —March 24 through 29: “There Be Dragons,” MFA Thesis Show by Jacqueline Bell Johnson. Soft opening: Sunday, March 24 from noon to 5 p.m. Opening reception: Tuesday, March 26 from 6 to 9 p.m. Peggy Phelps Gallery. —March 24 through 29: “Reticent Doodle” MFA Thesis Exhibition by Matthew Hillseth. Soft opening: Sunday, March 24 from noon to 5 p.m. Opening reception: Tuesday, March 26 from 6 to 9 p.m. East Gallery. PERMADIRTY PROJECT SPACE: 532 W. First St., Unit 219, Claremont. Thursday through Sunday. Visit www.permadirty.org. —Through May 3: “Intertwine Originals,” an exhibition celebrating 7 emerging artists who got their start in the Inland Empire and Chaffey College community. The artists exhibiting are some of the original resident artists of PermaDirty Project Space and intertwined in many different ways with each other and PermaDirty since it opened one year ago. —Wednesdays: Meditation group with Johnathan Thomas. 7 to 8 p.m. $5. RSVP to www.whole-person-healing.com. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 B.C. to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends,

covering every continent. 399-5544. —Through March 24: “Fabulous Fauna: Mythical Beasts from around the Globe.” Mermaids, dragons, griffins, phoenixes, fu dogs and more. This exhibit will also give the public a rare look at some of the amazing imperial Chinese dragon robes in the museum’s collection. —April 20 through July 28: “Celebrating the Arts of Polynesia and Micronesia.” Opening reception: Saturday, April 20. Enjoy an all-day event featuring music, dance, food and crafts from the region. POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 330 N. College Ave. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Admission info: 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum. —Through April 14: “Nuance of Sky: Edgar Heap of Birds Invites Spirit Objects to Join His Art Practice” unites the work of Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds with historic American art works from the collection of the Pomona College Museum of Art. —Through April 14: “Project Series 45 – Kirsten Everberg: In a Grove” consists of a new suite of 4 paintings and 4 drawings based on Akira Kurosawa’s film Rashomon (1950). —Through April 14: “Art and Activism in the US: Selections from the Permanent Collection” showcases American artists of the 20th and 21st centuries who have made their art work an integral part of their political activism. RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN: 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The gallery is open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Admission to the garden is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors (65+) and students with valid ID, $4 for children 3 to 12, no charge for children under 3 and members. 625-8767 or www.rsabg.org. —Saturday, March 23: Spring open house and free admission for all visitors. —Through June 9: “Where They Grow Wild,” an exclusive display of original artworks from Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s archival collections, complementing the “When they were Wild” collaborative exhibition with the Huntington and the Theodore Payne Foundation. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., on 11th and Columbia, Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. www.scrippscollege.edu/williamson-gallery/ or 607-3397. —Through April 7: “Denatured Nature,” Scripps College Ceramic Annual—the longest-running exhibition of contemporary ceramics in the United States. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every 6 weeks. Call 621-9091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. —Through March 30: “Embracing the Cross” paintings by featured artist Fr. Bill Moore. Closing reception: March 30 from 6 to 9 p.m.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

25

RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

PERFORMING ARTS
ALLEN THEATRE: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. 607-4375. —April 11 through 14: Krunk Fu Battle Battle directed by Joyce Lu. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. BALCH AUDITORIUM: 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. 607-2671. —Friday, April 5: Friday Noon Concert featuring Danielle Ondarza (horn), Stephen Klein (tuba), Maria Perez Goodman (piano) and Jason Goodman (percussion). 12:15 p.m. BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box office hours: Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online at www.pomona.edu/bridges. Military discounts are available through box office for most shows. —April 20 and 21: Inland Pacific Ballet’s Cinderella is an enchanting version of the classic story featuring music of the famous waltz king, Johann Strauss. $29 to $39 with discounts for seniors and children. Two performances on Saturday, April 20 at 1 and 7 p.m. and one performance on Sunday, April 21 at 1 p.m. —Sunday, May 12: Emmy-nominated political comedian Bill Maher, called “one of the establishment’s most entertaining critics” by The New York Times, will perform at Pomona College’s Bridges Auditorium presented by AEG LIVE. Mr. Maher, who has garnered 23 Emmy nominations over 18 years, is the host of HBO’s television series Real Time, which features Maher’s funny,

sociopolitical commentary and a roundtable of guests, including Arianna Huffington, Ben Affleck, Michael Moore and Robin Williams, among numerous others. He has described himself as a libertarian and “as a progressive, as a sane person.” Maher’s 2008 film Religulous (directed by Larry David), a satirical skewer of organized religion, is the seventh highest grossing documentary of all time. He is formerly the host of the Comedy Central and ABC late night talk show Politically Incorrect. Maher has written 4 bestsellers, most recently The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass (2012), Does Anybody Have a Problem with That? Politically Incorrect’s Greatest Hits (2010) and New Rules: Polite Musings from a Timid Observer (2005). His most recent HBO stand-up special was Bill Maher: But I’m Not Wrong (2010). Mr. Maher is a frequent commentator on CNN, MSNBC and HLN cable networks. Tickets cost $50.25 and $70.25, with additional online fees. Performance begins at 8 p.m. Tickets may be purchased by visiting www.pomona.edu/bridges or calling 607-1139. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Sunday, March 17: The Claremont Symphony Orchestra will present a free concert titled “A United State Landscape.” Associate conductor, Ruth Charloff, will lead the symphony in a variety of contemporary pieces that reflect the history and culture of the United States. Featured in the program is “Souvenir de Porto Rico” by Louis Moreau Gottschalk, the suite

from the Hitchcock film Vertigo by Bernard Hermann, Afro-American Symphony by William Grant Still, George Whitefield Chadwick’s “Jubilee” from Symphonic Sketches and selection from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess. 3:30 p.m. —Saturday, March 23: Claremont Young Musicians Orchestra presents “A Concert for Children” featuring music that tells a story with music wizard and maestro Roger Samuel including music by Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Saint-Saens and Copland. Come early to see and hear the instruments up close. Event features audience participation and prizes. 10:30 a.m. Admission is free. For information call 624-3614. —Saturday, April 6: West African Music and Dance presented by the CalArts African Music and Dance Ensemble directed by Yeko Ladzekpo-Cole and Andrew Grueschow. The performance features traditional repertoire from the Ewe and Dagomba people of Ghana, Togo and Benin, West Africa. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through March 24: The Sound of Music. —March 29 through May 5: Sweet Charity. SEAVER THEATRE COMPLEX: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. The box office is available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and one hour prior to

curtain times. Call 607-4375 or e-mail seaverboxoffice@pomona.edu. —May 2 through 5: Pomona College Spring Dance Concert with artistic direction by Laurie Cameron. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. SYCAMORE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AUDITORIUM: 225 W. Eighth St., Claremont. —March 15 and 16: The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee presented by the Claremont High School Theatre Department. 7:30 p.m.

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. General admission $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: Oz the Great and Powerful [PG], Emperor [PG13], Jack the Giant Slayer [PG13], Dead Man Down [R], Silver Linings Playbook [R]. —March 17 at 10 a.m. and 19 at 7:30 p.m.: Cavalleria Rusticana and Pagliacci [NR] from Teatro Alla Scala. Two brief operas in a double billing. Italian with English subtitles. —March 24 at 10 a.m. and 26 at 7:30 p.m.: Tosca [NR] from London’s Royal Opera House. Italian with English subtitles.

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, March 15, 2013

26

Announcing Party Parade 2013
he Claremont Community Foundation (CCF) invites residents to their 17th annual Party Parade, a series of events hosted by community members and local businesses to raise money for the many programs and endeavors supported by the CCF. To purchase tickets to any of the following events, visit www.claremontfoundation.org. Organizers recommend making reservations early—several events have already sold out. To join “the best non-party in town,” opt for Party Parade event #17, Do Your Own Thing, which allows guests to donate to CCF without having to attend an event. # 6 The Pound at Padua Wag your tails on the dance floor to the music of featured band, The Dogs. See who wins the Dog Eat Dog Chef Challenge and the Top DOG trophy in the Homegrown Talent Class. Friday, March 15 from 7 to 11 p.m. Padua Hills Theatre. $50 per 2 legs (maximum 200 guests). Sponsors: Dr. Harry and Maria Brown, Casey Jones, Andy and Liisa Primack, Chris and Ellie Soltis. With special thanks to: Bert and Rocky’s Cream Company, The BREW Crew, Claremont Craft Ales, The Dogs, Susan Guntner, Heirloom, Paul Henry, Over The Top Rentals. Chefs: Applebees, Casa de Salsa, Chef Henry Gonzales of Spaggi’s, Darvish Restaurant, Delhi Palace, Espiau’s and The Press. Hosts: Floy and Lloyd Biggs, Rosie and Leo Bister, Dee Ann and Mark Estupinian, Michelle and Julio Guillen, Megan Hampton, Joan and Jack Harper, Judi and Bill Manis, Liisa

T

and Andy Primack, Wendy and Bob Reeder, Mary Jane and Arthur Shapiro, Rosemary and Jeff Smith, Diane and Kent Stalwick, Dawn and Paul Steffen. # 7 SPAA = Spin, Pilates, Attitude Adjustment 30 mins. SPIN* 30 mins. Pilates* 30 mins. Attitude Adjustment. Sample these muscle-shaping, heart-pumping physical activities, then enjoy some healthy nibbles and libations plus a relaxing chair massage. Saturday, March 16 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (classes start on the half-hour). WundaBar Pilates & Pedal Spin Claremont Studios, Second Street and Indian Hill Boulevard in Village West. $30 per person (30 guests). Hosts: Michelle Bell, Pedal Spin Claremont; Stacey Ziegler, WundaBar Pilates Claremont. # 8 A Taste of Chicago, Then and Now (SOLD OUT. CALL FOR WAIT LIST, 398-1060) Fine dining with treats from Chicago’s famous restaurants and renowned chefs. Saturday, March 16 at 7 p.m. 1080 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. $125 per person (10 guests). Hosts: Mike Conkey, Sheryl Ragland, Rob Ragland, Grillmeister. # 9 A Night In Buenos Aires - Cooking Class/Party Learn cooking techniques at a funfilled class by Chef Linda Heilpern featuring foods of South America. Enjoy the meal at the end of class. Wednesday, March 20 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. $50 per person (12 guests). Hosts: Linda and Michael Heilpern. # 10 Bunco Central Win prizes and enjoy chef-prepared

appetizers at Claremont Place in an evening of this popular, mindless dice game.Friday, March 22 at 7 p.m. Bunco Central at Claremont Place Senior Living, 120 W. San Jose Ave., Claremont. $35 per person (40 guests). Hosts: Claremont Place Senior Living—Judith Jones, Sonja Stump Photography— Sonja Stump and Bob Fagg. #11 Dom’s Speakeasy Our very own 1920s-style illicit nightclub with PROHIBITED libations and decadent morsels. Vocalist Tony Di Gerlando will provide mood music from a bygone era. Friday, March 22 at 7:30 p.m. Dom’s Lounge, Smith Campus Center (lower level, southeast end), Pomona College, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. $65 per person (60 guests). Hosts: Annie and Mike Alpert, Suzanne Hall and Ken Corhan, Vicki Hardy and Richard Chute, Victoria and Jack Greening, Kristen and Steve Hagstrom, Janell and Randall Lewis, Tracey and Spike Meury, Michelle and Jim Mitchell, Don Pattison, Liisa and Andy Primack, Marion and Jess Swick, Kathy and Ray Woodbury. With thanks to Pomona College, Wine Warehouse and Spike Meury. # 12 MAHJ! Bring your current American Mah Jongg card and come play, laugh, snack, win unique prizes and experience the thrill of yelling “MAHJ!” Saturday, March 23 from 1 to 4 p.m. 1207 Berkeley Ave., Claremont $40 per person (9 or 10 guests) Host: Tammy Zipser. # 14 From Dirt To Dinner Tour our Urban Farms then enjoy a

collaborative feast of “Home Grown and Local” bounty. Sunday, March 24 from 1 to 6 p.m. Kidwell home. 335 Alamosa Dr., Claremont. $45 per person (30 guests). Hosts: Kelly and Cristy Kidwell, Sung and Myra Sohn, Pitzer Grove House—Zenia Gutierrez, Danielle and Campbell Wright. Contributors/helpers: Ron Mittino, Nancy Auerbach, Doug and Judy McGoon, Liisa Primack. # 15 Mutts & Margaritas Party with your pooch at a Fiesta in the Zoom Room; a playground for your pet and delicious fare including margaritas by Casa de Salsa for you. Friday, March 29 from 5 to 7 p.m. Zoom Room, Old School House, 405 W. Foothill Blvd. #204, Claremont. $15 per person or canine (15 dogs). Don’t forget to list each guest and each canine when you reserve. Hosts: Francine and Bill Baker, Suzanne Hall and Ken Corhan, Kristen and Steve Hagstrom, Angela Sousa. # 16 Souper Supper X Sample sumptuous soups and delectable Bear Claw Bread Pudding at a beautiful setting. Good cooks and good company! Friday, March 29 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Home of Dr. Gerald and Barbara Friedman. 4003 Via Padova, Claremont. $50 per person (75 guests) Hosts: Rosemary and Butch Henderson, Liisa and Andrew Primack. Guest chefs: Francine Baker, Nickie Cleaves, Suzanne Wojcik, Kay Held, Carol Levey, Rosie Bister, Teddie Warner, Marilyn Bidwell, Cindy Denne Radici, Lola Taylor and Bill McAlister, Velma McKelvey and Janet Vandevender.

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #202

Across
1. Edges 5. False god 9. Laces 13. Fancy 14. Kind of bean 15. Balm ingredient 16. End 18. Exceptional 19. Ancient 20. Certain colonist 21. ____ Place, senior community now recognized for its sustainable buildings 23. Arabian bigwig 24. Feed lines to 25. Hobby 33. Large-eyed lemur 34. English royal house 35. Ghost's cry

36. Newton, for one 37. Latin dance 39. "Oh, right!" 40. Genetic inits. 41. Door fastener 42. Not just fat 43. Office accessory 47. Frequently, in poetry 48. Damon of "Good Will Hunting" 49. Get about driver who dedicates his time helping seniors and the disabled, Noureddine _____ 53. Compact submachine gun 54. Sorority letter 57. After-lunch sandwich 58. Deviation from a straight or normal course 61. Opposin' 62. Readied an apple

63. Oil grp. 64. Like Santa's cheeks 65. Masseur's target 66. Fit together

Down
1. Last name of a US island 2. Hollywood favorite 3. Darn, as socks 4. Bag 5. Casual eatery 6. "Wheel of Fortune" contestant's request 7. At the summit of 8. Woodbine 9. Aim 10. Butterfly like 11. Spelling of "Beverly Hills 90210" 12. Appear to be 14. Some Roman wars 17. Illuminations 22. Fortune 23. Give off 25. Float drinking sound 26. 1,000 kilograms 27. Someone born under a certain sign 28. Bloodstream fluid 29. High ball? 30. "Peer Gynt" dramatist 31. Bing, bang or boom 32. Errand runner 37. Deposit for cattle 38. Clod 39. Look out for, maybe 41. Old audio system 42. Sight-related 44. Nudist or artist 45. It works like a charm 46. Leveled 49. Wild hog 50. For this reason 51. Luau souvenirs 52. Aware of 54. Snowman prop 55. Turns over 56. Mark of a ruler 59. One way to swing 60. Arnold or Jones

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #201

Creation of public art master plan launched with forum
A community forum to discuss the public art master plan is scheduled for Wednesday, March 20 at 6:30 p.m. The city of Claremont is currently working with a consultant to prepare the plan, which aims to identify a unified community vision, clarify key themes and values and provide direction for the selection and placement of public art throughout the community. The master plan will serve as a tool to address funding sources, review criteria and define the staffing levels and decision-making processes necessary to achieve the community’s vision for public art. Staff and the consultant are currently seeking input from the community on all of the above topics related to public art. The community is invited to attend the public meeting in the Padua Room at the Hughes Community Center. Comments and questions may also be submitted via email to Melissa Vollaro, community and human services manager at mvollaro@ci.claremont.ca.us or by phone at 399-5490.

OUR TOWN
dents/seniors. Tickets are available at Rio de Ojas, 250 N. Harvard, at the door or from any member of the Chorale. For more information, please visit the Chorale’s website at www.claremontchorale.org.

27 Inspired rendition of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at Pilgrim Place
Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

Explore new politics of extremism with Norman Ornstein
Norman Ornstein, co-author of the New York Times’ bestseller It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism, will speak this Sunday, March 17, at the Claremont United Church of Christ, 233 W. Harrison Ave. The event begins at 7 p.m. In his best seller, Mr. Ornstein and congressional scholar Thomas Mann argue that 2 overriding problems have led Congress and the United States to the brink of institutional collapse. Mr. Ornstein offers solutions to the problem. Mr. Ornstein’s lecture is the fourth in the “Agenda for a Prophetic Faith” lecture series, a program of Progressive Christians Uniting (PCU) centered on social action. Tickets for the lecture are $10. Low-income and scholarship tickets are available. For more information, contact John Forney via email at JForney170@aol.com or Vern Visick at vmvisick@gmail.com. For more on the series, visit www.agendaforapropheticfaith.com.

On Tuesday, March 19, actor Gerald Rivers will bring to life the voice of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at 5:30 p.m. in the Napier Common Room at Pilgrim Place, 625 Mayflower Rd. Mr. Rivers, a theater graduate from Los Angeles City College and Morehouse College in Atlanta, has been presenting the words and works of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for over 30 years. Mr. Rivers has dedicated his life’s work to keeping alive the spirit and inspiration of Dr. King through his renditions and has been invited to perform across the country and in Bermuda as a guest of the minister of cultural affairs. He also had the privilege of meeting and performing for Dr. King’s Family and the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change. All are invited to hear Mr. Rivers perform. The event was made possible by the United Nations Association of Pomona Valley, Pilgrim Place and the city of Claremont. Admission is free.

Claremont Chorale to present Haydnʼs ʻThe Seasonsʼ
The second concert of the Claremont Chorale’s 2012-2013 season will feature Haydn’s “The Seasons,” depicting the lives of country folk as they celebrate the yearly cycle. The concert, to be held Saturday, March 23 at 3 p.m. at Scripps College’s Garrison Theater, will be accompanied by full orchestra and guest soloists, Anne Harley, soprano, Nicholas Preston, tenor, and Wayne Shepperd, bass. Tickets are $15 for general admission, $12 for stu-

Claremont Symphony Orchestra pays homage to US landscape
In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day, the Claremont Symphony Orchestra will offer a free performance this Sunday, March 17 at 3:30 p.m. at Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. 4th St. Entitled, “A United States Landscape,” the CSO and Conductor Ruth Charloff will perform Chadwick’s “Jubilee,” Gottschalk’s “Souvenir de Porto Rico” and selections from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess.

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

28

Lady Wolfpack softball blanked by La Habra, 5-0

C

laremont continued its 2013 softball season on Monday after a week off, with newly promoted head coach Vince Hernandez and a young team hoping to get back to winning ways in the Charter Oak Tournament at Big League Dreams West Covina. The Wolfpack struggled to put bat to ball, and their frustration reflected itself in a 5-0 loss to La Habra.
Looking at early season results, it is apparent that Coach Hernandez has turned the team around following a mediocre 6-18 overall campaign for Claremont in 2012, “We have been solid in the last few games. I have few complaints about out defense, and once our hitting comes around we will be a solid team,” he said. Indeed, the Lady Wolfpack won their first 3 games of the season, and came into the game against the La Habra Highlanders with a 4-3 record. However, in the last 5 games the Pack have averaged just over 2 runs. The Highlanders, meanwhile, have had few problems manufacturing runs. La Habra possessed a 5-2 record coming into the Charter Oak Tournament. Claremont ran into trouble in the bottom of the first inning. With a runner on base, La Habra’s Racquel Manzo lined a base hit into right field, and came all the way in to score after a Wolfpack fielding error. Claremont right-handed hurler Rosalie Keirns settled into the game after this, retiring 8 out of the next 9 hitters. Keirns induced 4 straight ground balls to shortstop Melanie Lauer, who fielded each short-hop with ease. On the flip side of the coin, Highlander righty Vanessa Ciocatto was almost unhittable. Ciocatto allowed only 3 hits to Wolfpack batters all game, retiring 14 Claremont hitters in a row after allowing a leadoff hit by second baseman Kiana Moreno. Coach Hernandez commented on his team’s lack of offense. “This is the third game where we have let the other pitcher strike us out at least 6 times. I need to work with the girls more in the cages to get more aggressive at the plate.” La Habra did not add to the 2-0 lead until the fourth inning. Highlander first baseman Amanda Akles led off the fourth by cracking an outside pitch deep into center field for a double. With one out, La Habra shortstop Taylor Pierce brought Akles home with a RBI single. Moreno ended the inning when she chased down a shallow fly ball, making a nice running catch to her left. The Highlanders added 2 more runs in the fifth, as Keirns began to show signs of faGIRLS SOFTBALL continues on the next page

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremont High Schoolʼs Andrea Olmstead, right, throws to first base after fielding a bunt by La Habraʼs Racquel Monzo during the Charter Oak Softball Tournament on Monday in West Covina. The Wolfpack lost to the Highlanders, 5-0. The Claremont High School girls softball team celebrates getting a particularly hard out on Monday during their game against La Habra in West Covina. The Pack had little to celebrate during the game, however, failing to capitalize on a few base runners.

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

29

Coaches look forward to promising seasons
Claremont High School
BOYS VOLLEYBALL The Wolfpack have charged forward this season under 15-year head coach Bernie Wendling. “We have a strong sense of urgency this year to win the Sierra League,” he said. “We are a senior-heavy team.” Claremont boys volleyball finished 111 and co-champions last year, falling in the second round of CIF. This year, kill leader Stephen Zetterberg and captain Lane Giammalva hope to repeat as champions, with the help of veterans Stan Reeder and Hunter McIntyre. The Pack finished second in the Mayfair Tournament and third in the Foothill Tournament, and will feature in the Edison Tournament this weekend. GIRLS TRACK AND FIELD Girls track and field will look to make it 3 Sierra League championships in a row when the season continues this weekend, at the Nicholson Relays in Norco. Jose Ancona is in his sixth year as head coach, and hopes to build a team that takes a systematic approach to meets and practices. “We want to make sure the athletes are well-prepared for their events. They must make sure to do a proper warm up and cool down, understand the meet schedule, and prepare mentally for what they need to do.” The Lady Wolfpack won their first 2 meets against La Salle and Arroyo Valley, featuring a dual-threat sprinting and distance racing team. BOYS TRACK AND FIELD On the boys side of track and field, longtime head coach Veronica Amarasekara looks to improve on her team’s third place Sierra League finish last season. Coach Amarasekara stressed the importance of staying healthy. “I want us to have a balanced season, to keep everyone healthy, and to qualify as many athletes to CIF as possible. We had one CIF champion graduate, but we have a number of athletes that hope to emulate him.” Claremont has 15 captains that help organize and prepare the team for individual success. The Wolfpack are fresh off of a preseason tri-meet and the Claremont Novice Trials for first year athletes, and will race in the Nicholson Relays this weekend. BOYS TENNIS Claremont boys tennis has brought in a new coach this year to continue its storied program. Clint Rees hopes to bring yet another Sierra League title home by forgoing the rebuilding year Claremont was expected to have. “I have been experimenting with different doubles combinations, and we have 3 starting freshmen on the team. I am confident we will win another title and do better than the second round CIF loss last year.” The Wolfpack will look to brothers Alan and Andrew Leahy to sweep their singles matches each time round, and hope to develop at least 2 doubles pairings who have chemistry on the court. Claremont has played 3 preseason matches, and host Palm Springs in a tune-up match before heading into league play next week.

COLLEGE SCOREBOARD SOFTBALL sports@claremont-courier.com
C-M-S 3, Christopher Newport 0 C-M-S 7, Depauw 3 C-M-S 8, Cortland St 7 C-M-S 4, East Texas Baptist 3 C-M-S 2, Linfield 0 Trine 5, C-M-S 4 Citrus 17, Santa Monica 0 Citrus 22, Santa Monica 3 Citrus 13, Fullerton 3 Chapman 2, P-P 0 Chapman 4, P-P 1

Webb Schools
BASEBALL The Gauls are in pole position to repeat as Prep League Champions in 2013, with Jeff Stodgel in his fifth year as head coach. Webb’s Nick Gollin, Aaron DiGiamarino, and Jordan Veiga will provide experience as the team’s returning stars. The Gauls have started 1-1 on the season, and beat Sacred Heart 12-0 in their last game. TRACK AND FIELD Webb track and field welcomes back coaches John Lawrence and Geoff Owers for their fourth and fifth years, respectively. Coming off of a second place finish last year, the Gauls feature Marcos Lopez, Ricky Gonzales, and Nick Pankratz for the boys team. The Lady Gauls’ key performers will be Alicia Zheng, Miya Wensley, and Mairin Wilson. Boys track beat Montclair 75-67 in the first meet of the season, while the girls were defeated 80-62.

BASEBALL
Chapman 5, C-M-S 2 Chapman 6, C-M-S 5 Chapman 6, C-M-S 1 Bridgewater (VA) 14, C-M-S 6 LA Valley 5, Citrus 3 P-P 10, Whittier 0 P-P 3, Whittier 1 Whittier 4, P-P 3 P-P 16, Ithaca 11

WOMENS WATER POLO
Cal Baptist 13, C-M-S 7 Indiana 14, C-M-S 8 C-M-S 9, VMI 5 UCSD 17, C-M-S 8 P-P 9, Cal Baptist 8 P-P 9, Long Beach St 6 P-P 13, Connecticut Col 1

SWIMMING AND DIVING Coach Ken Rosenfeld is in his ninth year at the helm for the Gauls boys and girls teams. The boys team will look to Adrian Hui, Alec Hou, and Wilson Parnell. For the girls team, Shannon Fei, Shannon Torrance, and Maddie WOMENS LACROSSE Gaumer will lead the Gauls against C-M-S 9, Colorado Col 8 Prep League opposition. Boys swim P-P 22, Berry 7 and dive beat San Dimas in their first meet of the year 90-84, but the girls fell 81-71. —Chris Oakley

GIRLS SOFTBALL continued from the previous page

tigue. “Rosalie has great stuff, but we need to cut down on the 5 walks if we want to win more games. We also hit a couple of batters today, and that allowed them to score those last runs,” Coach Hernandez noted. La Habra’s Ciocatto finished the game with an impressive 7 strikeouts, 3 of them by called third strike. Moreno had 2 hits for 3 at-bats, and outfielder Ashley Waller had Claremont’s third hit of the game. The Highlanders produced their 5 runs from 6 base hits and 2 Pack fielding errors. Coach Hernandez had a number of takeaways from the day. “We have a really young team, and so my job is to build a new program,” he said. “I have some ladies that have come back to play for me after taking a year away from softball, so I hope that speaks well for my philosophy of coaching. The girls are a positive group and all they want to do is improve their game.” Following this tournament, Claremont will have a long break before the next game as spring break is fast approaching. The Wolfpack travel to South Hills on Tuesday, April 9 at 3:30 p.m. for their first league game of the season. This will be Claremont’s barometer game, as the Huskies have only lost 2 of their 9 games thus far. —Chris Oakley
sports@claremont-courier.com

Claremontʼs Jordan Navarro warms up her arm as teammate Ashley Waller plays center field on Monday during the Charter Oak Softball Tournament in West Covina. The tournament was played at Big League Dreams where the fields resemble MLB stadiums and the Claremont game was decorated to look like Chicagoʼs Wrigley Field.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 15, 2013

30

FLYING HIGH More information came in regarding the plane crash of 1936, although the year of the crash may be under question. Margaret Burgess Cooke shared: “I think, at that time, the Hawkins family lived there. It crashed into the gazebo in the backyard of 132 W. 12th Street. The 2 people in the plane were college students. My parents said they had had too much to drink! The fire department was worried that the plane would catch fire and so they buried the gasoline in our backyard. We lived next door, but, unfortunately, I was at my piano lesson and did not see it happen. The firemen were just finishing getting rid of the gasoline when I arrived home.” Bud Weisbrod followed up this week to express the impact of witnessing the crash. “I was interested in airplanes, even at that age, and eventually became a pilot and flight instructor in single and multiengine planes, seaplanes and gliders. Even ran a flight school in Hawaii for a couple of years. I’m an industrial engineer, Oregon State 1955, and have been married for over 58 years to my won-

derful wife, who is also a pilot. I proposed to her in a tailspin in a Piper Cub, spinning straight down, just like the plane I had seen crash some 16 years earlier. But I didn’t crash…and she said ‘yes.’” THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME The COURIER received a most scornful email this week with the subject line, “Disgusting message spread at local festival.” In it, the writer blasts Claremont for defending sexual assault and promoting a rape culture. “I was appalled to see that the Soundwave Festival held in Claremont over the weekend allowed such disgusting T-shirts to be sold at their otherwise fine festival,” she wrote in reference to the sale of a collection of T-shirts emblazoned with unsavory comments about women. The Soundwave Festival didn’t ring a bell with newsroom staff. After a request for more information, the woman responded, “Sorry, wrong Claremont! My apologies. Claremont, Australia.”

BACK PAGE
MAKING A SPLASH Golden State Water Company launched a project to replace approximately 1300 feet of aging pipeline in Claremont as part of an infrastructure improvement. The new pipeline, according to Golden State, “will reduce the risk of leaks and improve water flow for customers locally.” There’s no mention of what, if any, impact these improvements will have on residents’ water bills. MONEY MATTERS Los Angeles County will receive $3.6 million from the city of Claremont as part of a mandate by the Department of Finance, according to City Manager Tony Ramos’ latest city update. Mr. Ramos explains that the payment is a requirement of “the state’s elimination of redevelopment and the seizure of local redevelopment funds to balance the state budget.” A bulk of the fee,

about $2.9 million, had been given to the city’s former Redevelopment Agency for economic and redevelopment, with $673,479 for the creation of affordable housing. Anticipating the payment, city officials incorporated the amount into the city’s budget. In other city finance news, Mr. Ramos reported that the California Department of Finance rescinded its claim that any profits received from the city’s Base Line Road property and its purcase agreement with City Ventures, LLC was to be shared with the DOF. Mr. Ramos and his team flew to Sacramento last month and successfully defeated the DOF’s grab at the cash. The property will remain a housing asset of the city, as will the proceeds from its sale. “Had the final determination not been in the city’s favor,” Mr. Ramos noted, “it is likely that the property would have been subject to disposition and the proceeds turned over to Los Angeles County for distribution to taxing entities.”
Until next time, Sammy sammy@claremont-courier.com

909.621.4761
Friday 03-15-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

31

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals............31 legals...............32 services...........34 real estate.......37
Rentals
Condo for rent
ONE bedroom, one bathroom condo in gated community. Garage, A/C, refrigerator and pool. $1065 monthly, water and trash included. 2287362. CLUB Terrace, 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom, 2 car garage. Fresh paint, community pool. No pets. $1950 monthly. WSPM, 621-5941. LARAMIE River Ranch. Limited parcels left! 35 acre ranches from $695 per acre. Magnificent water and mountain views. Low down. Guaranteed financing. Call today! www.RanchLandWyoming.com. 1-888-411-7050. (Cal-SCAN) AMERICA'S best buy! Twenty acres only $99 a month! Zero down, no credit checks, money back guarantee. Owner financing. West Texas beautiful mountain views! Free color brochure. www.sunsetranches.com. 1800-755-8953. (Cal-SCAN)

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Rentals
Studio for rent
CLAREMONT studio with eating, sleeping area. Carpet, A/C, window coverings, stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer. 462 Grinnell Drive. $750 monthly. 626-327-8436.

Employment
Help wanted
DRIVERS: Inexperienced? Get on the road to a successful career with CDL training. Regional training locations. Train and work for Central Refrigerated. 877-369-7091. www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Freight up and get more money. CDL Class A required. Call 877-258-8782. www.ad-drivers.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Marketplace
Antiques
A barn and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. La Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com. AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden décor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 212 W. Foothill Blvd. 621-6628.

EMPLOYMENT
Engineering Intern $12.33 - $14.90 per hour
(Part-time) The City of Claremont Engineering Department is looking for one enthusiastic, highly motivated, customer service oriented individual with excellent public relations skills to perform a variety of general engineering support activities and routine technical work in the office and field. Additional information about job duties and qualifications are available on the City website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us or from the Personnel Office at (909) 399-5450. A completed application is required and must be received by Monday, April 8, 2013, by 1:00 p.m. EOE.

Real Estate
Land for sale

Financial
GET free of credit card debt now! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (Cal-SCAN) EVER consider a reverse mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home and increase cash flow! Safe and effective! Call now for your free DVD! Call now 888-6983165. (Cal-SCAN)

Marketplace
Announcements
DID you know that 10 million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million plus Californians. For brochure call Elizabeth, 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) THE business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. Reach Californians with a classified in almost every county! Over 270 newspapers! ComboCalifornia daily and weekly networks. Free brochures. elizabeth@cnpa.com or 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) “MANY a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” —Mark Twain. Advertise your business card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over 3 million plus Californians. Free brochure. elizabeth@cnpa.com. 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
It's a Zoe TeBeau Estate Sale Saturday and Sunday March 16-17 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
504 E. McKinley Ave., Pomona Home is full of wonderful decorative accessories, all vintage from 1880's through 1960's. Open salt collection. Costume jewelry. Vintage clothing. Curtis Mathes 60's stereo console. A few pieces of furniture are Mid-Century Modern. Loaded kitchen and garage. Books. Records. All major appliances. This will be a fun sale! 1989 Saturn (sedan) with only 22,000 miles and in excellent condition.

Garage sales
BIG fitness equipment and yard sale. Saturday, March 16 and Sunday, March 17. 3351 Yankton at Miramar. MARCH 16 and 17, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Garage full of tools, large furniture, household items. 344 Taylor Drive, Claremont. DOWNSIZING household items, furniture, garden supplies, tools, luxury crap. Saturday, March 16, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. No early birds. 1040 Northwestern Drive.

House for rent
CLAREMONT: 3 bedroom, one bathroom. Walk to Village, park. Detached garage, hardwood floors, fireplace. $1850 monthly. Call 6246547. SAN Antonio Heights home for rent. Ten minutes from Village. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, large kitchen, great schools, pets okay. $1895 monthly, yard service and water included. Call Kevin, 714-402-0034. THREE bedrooms, 1.75 bathrooms, 2 car garage. Walking distance to Village. $2275 monthly. First and last payment. 985-6668. CLAREMONT: $2100 monthly. No smoking, pets. Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom house. Desirable neighborhood (Hillsdale). Newly renovated. Available March 20. 477-1373. CHARMING Village house, 2 bedrooms, one bathroom, washer, dryer. $1775 monthly. One block from Colleges. 6213808.

Employment
Help wanted
NEED Class A CDL training? Start a career in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best InClass” training. New academy classes weekly. No money down or credit check. Certified mentors ready and available. Paid while training with mentor. Regional and dedicated opportunities. Great career path. Excellent benefits package. Please call 520-226-4362. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Job stability. Ashley Distribution Services seeks regional/LTL drivers. CDL A, minimum one year OTR and yard drivers, second shift. Great pay and benefits! 1-800-837-2241. jobs@ashleydistributionser vices.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Qualify for any portion of 3 cents per mile quarterly bonus, one cent safety, one cent production, one cent MPG. Two raises in first year. Three months OTR experience. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com. (Cal-SCAN)

For sale
ANTIQUE Grunther piano for sale. $1000 or best offer. Call 818-236-2625. EdenPURE Portable Infrared Heaters. Join the 3 million beating the cold and winter heating bills. Save $229 on our EdenPURE Model 750. Call now while supplies last! 1-888-7529941. (Cal-SCAN) SAWMILLS from only $3997. Make and save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free information/DVD. www.NorwoodSawmills.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Donations
DONATE your car. Fast, free towing. 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN) DONATE your car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 046834 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as California Shaved Ice, California Sno, 1174 Whitman Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Michael Zaid Sweis, 1174 Whitman Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Michael Zaid Sweis This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/08/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 044068 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Inland Energy Service, 809 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: P.O. Box 995, Claremont, CA 91711. Alan Medak, 809 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 02/11/13. /s/ Alan Medak This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/06/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-12532042-JB Order No.: 120346424-CA-GTI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/31/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): TY HASHIOKA, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Recorded: 2/3/2006 as Instrument No. 06 0265658 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/5/2013 at 9:00 A.M. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $126,316.01 The purported property address is: 177 LIMESTONE RD, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8671-017-047 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-12532042-JB . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA-12-532042-JB IDSPub #0047007 3/15/2013 3/22/2013 3/29/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-10414611-RM Order No.: 100791939-CA-BFO YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/27/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): DEREK HEISEY AND JENNIFER LYNN HEISEY, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Recorded: 7/5/2007 as Instrument No. 20071599857 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/5/2013 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $360,416.77 The purported property address is: 698 SYCAMORE AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8315-029-027 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-10414611-RM . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 15, 2013

32

NOTICE OF SPECIAL EVENT PERMIT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Municipal Code of the City of Claremont, Sustainable Claremont partnered with the City of Claremont, have petitioned for approval of the annual Earth Day Celebration and Street Faire (File #13-SEP01). This event will take place on Saturday, April 20, 2013, between the hours of 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The event is proposed to include the following: • 50 to 60 exhibitors and vendors in booths along Second Street, between Yale and Oberlin Avenues (no prepared food vendors); • Live entertainment in the Village Square (public plaza in front of Laemmle’s box office) or on the street; • Village merchant tie-in specials and green product/service showcase; • Speakers located within the street fair area or on an adjacent parking lot area; and • Street closures along Second Street between Yale and Oberlin Avenues – ALL NORTH/SOUTH STREETS WILL REMAIN OPEN. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT the Director of Community Development has determined that this proposal is exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) in accordance with Section 3.17.42 of the City of Claremont’s 2012 Revision of the Local Guidelines for Implements the California Environmental Quality Act. This is due to the Special Event being of short duration (approximately 5 hours) and it will not create long term physical impacts to the City of Claremont. Therefore, no further environmental review is necessary. The public review period will commence on Thursday, March 14, 2013, and will run through Monday, March 25, 2013. Any interested person is directed to contact Associate Planner Luke Seibert, Department of Community Development Planning Division, 207 Harvard Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711, or call (909) 399-5483 for further information.

PUBLISH: Friday, March 15 2013

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CITY OF CLAREMONT

designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line:

(866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA10-414611-RM IDSPub #0047146 3/15/2013 3/22/2013 3/29/2013

Marketplace
For sale
CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime! 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

Bulletins
Business
MY computer works. Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections. Fix it now! Professional, U.S. based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-888-865-0271. (CalSCAN) SAVE on cable TV, Internet, digital phone, satellite. You’ve got a choice! Options from all major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call today, 888-706-4301. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE money on auto insurance from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call Ready For My Quote now! Call 1-888-706-8325. (CalSCAN)

Bulletins
Business
DISH Network. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1-888-806-7317. (Cal-SCAN) HIGHSPEED internet everywhere by satellite! Speeds up to 12mbps! 200 times faster than dial-up. Starting at $449.95 a month. Call now and go fast! 1-888-718-6268. (Cal-SCAN) AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN)

Bulletins
Education
ATTEND college 100 percent online. Medical, business, criminal justice, hospitality, web. Job placement assistance. Computers available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-210-5162. www.Cen turaOnline.com. (Cal-SCAN) AIRLINES are hiring. Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance, 877804-5293. (Cal-SCAN)

Bulletins
Health
ATTENTION Sleep Apnea sufferers with Medicare. Get CPAP replacement supplies at little or no cost, plus free home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888-699-7660. (Cal-SCAN) CANADA Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today, 1-800-2730209, for $10 off your first prescription and free shipping. (Cal-SCAN) CANADA Drug Center es tu mejor opcion para ordenar medicamentos seguros y economicos. Nuestros servicios de farmacia con licencia Canadiense e Internacional te proveeran con ahorros de hasta el 90 en todas las medicinas que necesites. Llama ahora al 1-800-3852192 y obten $10 de descuento con tu primer orden ademas de envio gratutio. (Cal-SCAN)

Bulletins
Personals
CHAT with local men. Local men are waiting for you! Call Livelinks now. 800-291-3969. Women talk free! (Cal-SCAN) MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

Autos
Autos wanted
WANTED any condition pre1973 Mercedes SL, other convertibles, Porsche 356, 912, 911, Jaguar XK150 through Etypes. Gas station signs. Other interesting cars considered. 714-267-3436 or michaelcan field204@gmail.com. (CalSCAN)

Animals
Animal Shelters
Inland Valley Humane Society 623-9777 Upland Animal Shelter 931-4185 H.O.P.E Upland 1800-811-4285 West End Animal Shelter 947-3517

Health
DO you know your testosterone levels? Call 888-9042372 and ask about our test kits and get a free trial of Progene All-Natural Testosterone Supplement. (Cal-SCAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 036554 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as HK Investments, HK Financial Services, 420 Heidelburg Lane, Claremont, CA 91711. Heran Kim, 420 Heidelburg Lane, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Heran Kim This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/22/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013

LEGAL TENDER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
nation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 12-2719-11. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 2/21/2013 The Wolf Firm, A Law Corporation 2955 Main Street, 2nd Floor Irvine, California 92614 Foreclosure Department (949) 720-9200 Sale Information Only: (714) 573-1965 www.priorityposting.com Frank Escalera, Team Lead P1022656 3/1, 3/8, 03/15/2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SAN BERNARDINO ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS OR CITATION Case Number: CIVRS1202404 PLANTIFF (S)/PETITIONER(S): J.A. CARR vs. DEFENDANT(S)/RESPONDENT(S): THOMAS REES, et al. Upon reading and filing evidence consisting of a declaration as provided in Section 415.50 CCP by Douglas Sloan, and it satisfactorily appearing therefrom that the defendant, respondent, or citee, “All persons unknown claiming any legal or equitable right, title, estate, lien or interest in the property described in Plaintiff’s Complaint adverse to Plaintiff’s title, or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title thereto.” cannot be served with reasonable diligence in any other manner specified in Article 3, Chapter 4, Title 5 of the Code of Civil Procedure, and it also appearing from the verified complaint or petition that a good cause of action exists in this action in favor of the plaintiff, petitioner, or citee therein and against the defendant respondent, or citee and that the said defendant, respondent, or cited is a necessary and proper party to the action or that the party to be served has or claims an interest in, real or personal property in this state that is subject to the Court or the relief demanded in the action consists wholly or in part in excluding such part from any interest in such property: NOW, on motion of Mitchel J. Ezer Attorney for the Plaintiff(s), Petitioner(s), or contestant(s), IT IS ORDERED that the service of said summons or citation in this action be made upon said defendant, respondent, or citee by publication thereof in CLAREMONT COURIER a newspaper of general circulation published at Claremont, California, hereby designated as the newspaper most likely to give notice to said defendant; that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FUTHER ORDERED that a copy of said summons or citation and of said complaint or petition in this action be forthwith deposited in the United States Post Office, post-paid, directed to said defendant, respondent, or citee if his address is ascertained before expiration of the time prescribed for the publication of this summons or citation and declaration of this mailing or of the fact that the address was not ascertained be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. /s/ GILBERT G. OCHOA, Judge Dated: September 10, 2012 Filed: Superior Court, County of San Bernardino Rancho Cucamonga District 8303 Haven Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 /s/ Jeanne Zour, Deputy Dated: September 10, 2012 Attorney For: John Carr Mitchel J. Ezer SBN: 30100 LAW OFFICE MITCHEL J. EZER 1153 Lachman Lane Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 Ph.: 310-347-4608 Publish: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 TSG No.: 4231636 TS No.: 20099134003938 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 8307-008-004 Property Address: 546 CLARION PLACE CLAREMONT, CA 91711 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 04/12/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 03/21/2013 at 10:00 A.M., First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 04/20/2006, as Instrument No. 06 0866937, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of California. Executed by: AUDREY MCCLAIN FIELDER and ALLAN JOHNSON FIELDER II, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 8307-008-004 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 546 CLARION PLACE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $630,838.85. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case 20099134003938 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse. First American Title Insurance Company First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC 3 FIRST AMERICAN WAY SANTA ANA, CA 92707 Date: FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)939-0772 First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.NPP0214110 CLAREMONT COURIER 03/01/2013, 03/08/2013, 03/15/2013 T.S. No.: 1003732CA Loan No.: 0000014082 A.P.N.: 8671-041-042 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/20/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the notes(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: AMANDA ROBINSON, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: Seaside Trustee, Inc. Recorded 10/3/2005 as Instrument No. 05 2377192 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 4/2/2013 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, Ca. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $970,629.73 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 870 LAWRENCE CIRCLE CLAREMONT, CA 91711 A.P.N.: 8671-041-042 As required by California Civil Code Section 2923.5, the current beneficiary has declared to Seaside Trustee Inc, the original trustee, the duly appointed substituted trustee, or acting as agent for the trustee, that the requirements of said section have been met by one or more of the following: 1. Borrower was con-

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 15, 2013
tacted to assess their financial situation and to explore the options for the borrower to avoid foreclosure 2. The borrower has surrendered the property to the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary or authorized agent 3. Due diligence to contact the borrower was made as required by said Section 2923.5. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder al the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and dale for the sale of this property, you may call 800-50-SALES Sale line or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com using the file number assigned to this case 1003732CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 2/27/2013 Seaside Trustee, Inc. Trustee Sales Information: 800-50-SALES www.priorityposting.com Seaside Trustee Inc. P.O. Box 2676 Ventura, Ca. 93014 Melissa B. Olmos, Admin Assistant P1024349 3/8, 3/15, 03/22/2013 Trustee Sale No. 250665CA Loan No. 1596871266 Title Order No. 837785 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02-26-2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04-022013 at 9:00 AM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 03-02-2007, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 20070458719, , and as modified by the Modification of Deed of Trust recorded on 10-02-2009, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 20091501930 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: PATRICK SULLIVAN AND DEBBIE SULLIVAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA Legal Description: PARCEL 1: LOT 56 OF TRACT NO. 50568, IN THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 1274 PAGES 20 THROUGH 46, INCLUSIVE, OF MAPS IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 2: NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENTS FOR USE, INGRESS, EGRESS, ACCESS, REPAIR, DRAINAGE, ENCROACHMENT, OR OTHER PURPOSES ALL AS DESCRIBED AND/OR DEPICTED IN THE ''DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS, AND RESERVATION OF EASEMENTS FOR STONE CANYON'', RECORDED ON OCTOBER 21, 2003, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 03-3139167, AND THE ''NOTICE OF ANNEXATION FOR PHASE 2 OF STONE CANYON'' RECORDED ON APRIL 28, 2004, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 041042744, BOTH IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, AS SAME MAY BE AMENDED, MODIFIED, AND/OR RE-RECORDED FROM TIME TO TIME (''DECLARATION''). PARCEL 3: A NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENT APPURTENANT TO SUCH LOT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS, ACCESS, USE AND ENJOYMENT ON, OVER, AND ACROSS THE COMMON AREA WITHIN THE PROJECT, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AND OR DEPICTED IN THE DECLARATION. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,317,280.70 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 1389 FERGUS FALLS CLAREMONT, CA 91711 APN Number: 8673-040-

33

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 034167 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as REAL EXERCISE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 2980 First St., Unit A, La Verne, CA 91750. Mailing address: 424 N. Neil St., West Covina, CA 91791. Roy A. Nystrom, 424 N. Neil St., West Covina, CA 91791. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Roy Nystrom This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 034881 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as ETANA inc. dba Made 4 Museum, 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. ETANA inc. dba Made 4 Museum, 5050 Arrow Hwy., Montclair, CA 91763. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in December, 2012. /s/ Walter Ebrahimzadeh Title: CEO This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/21/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 T.S. No. 12-2719-11 Loan No. 3011757014 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/4/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: MI RAN KIM, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HERSOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: The Wolf Firm, A Law Corporation Recorded 12/12/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2752666 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 3/22/2013 at 09:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $488,569.61, estimated Street Address or other common designation of real property: 1637 SILVER RAIN DR DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 A.P.N.: 8702-018-025 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common desig-

011 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 03-05-2013 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee FRED RESTREPO, ASSISTANT SECRETARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-280-2832 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales & Posting at (714) 7302727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting & Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for “Advanced Search” to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1-800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. P1024005 3/8, 3/15, 03/22/2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF PATRICIA LEE STOUT CASE NO. KP 015005 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of PATRICIA LEE STOUT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DAVID ELLIS STOUT in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DAVID ELLIS STOUT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: 03/28/13 at Time: 8:30 a.m. in Dept. A located at: Superior Court Of California, County of Los Angeles, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766. EAST DISTRICT IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of the estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner In Pro Per: David Ellis Stout 736 West 12th Street, Claremont, CA 91711 Phone # 951-663-5288 Publish: March 8, 15 and 22, 2013

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 03-15-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

34

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

Electrician
MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience. ASA ELECTRIC
Residential and commercial. New installations, repairs and more!

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Handyman
A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Antiques
ANTIQUES wanted. Fair prices for the following old items: Hollywood, comics, toys, watches, medals, coins, badges, jewelry, postcards, books, magazines, military, photos, tools, sports, fishing, Disneyland, medical, historic documents, autographs, holiday decorations and other interesting items. 909-2389076. micklet@earthlink.net.

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

Caregiver
CAREGIVER/Personal Assistant. Experienced, compassionate and caring. CPR and First Aid certified. References. Barbara, 949-228-2128. PRIVATE duty care provider with 6 years experience, specializing in elderly care. Current CPR, TB test. For a free assessment contact: Wendi Griffin, 909-4372298. Bond#71294838.

951-283-9531
Claremont resident. Lic.860606

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795.

Contractor
WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616.

Hauling
Serving Claremont Since 1995.
Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED finish remodeler. Does kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting and more. Call Paul, 909919-3315.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182. HACIENDA Carpet, upholstery and tile cleaning. Special: with any carpet cleaning, 20 percent off tile cleaning. Senior discounts. Since 1970. 909-985-3875.

Residential, Commercial. Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, trouble-shooting, landscaping lighting, pool and spa equipment replacement. Free estimates 24-hours. References. 909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149 Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

909-599-9530

Hayden’s Services Inc.

House Cleaning
CHRISTIAN lady will clean homes, offices, windows. Bonded. Licensed. Excellent references. 21 years. Yolanda, 909-621-2162. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Call Lupe, 525-3273. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929.

KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Drywall

Girl Friday
I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Childcare
AFFORDABLE childcare. Families with multiple children welcome. Large Claremont home. Miss Carmen, 909621-3108 or 909-367-3560.

Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-2512013. Lic.922000

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360. Claremont Handyman Service All your handyman needs. Carpentry, lighting, painting. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 921-6334

Aikido

909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

Programs for adults and children. Established 1983. Call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

SERVICES
Irrigation
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Friday 03-15-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

35

Landscaping

Painting

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Tutoring
AFFORDABLE K-5 Reading Tutor. Retired teacher. 35 years. Multiple strategies, resources. Individual, group. Janice, 909-596-1266.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

Plumbing
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994. COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484. STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-9821604.

Upholstery

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

Tile

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont.

PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Weed Abatement
JOHNNIES Tree Service. Weed abatement and land clearing. Disking and mowing. Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Please call 909-946-1123 or 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Please call 909-989-9786.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175. Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.

Learn Japanese
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-9228042. www.vjpaint.com.

Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
30 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning specialist of your perennials. 909-624-8238 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909-629-6960.

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 CHARLES' Landscape. 30 years experience. Drought tolerant design. 909-217-9722. TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909626-3066.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls. Service and repair. Drain cleaning, leak detection, gas lines, water heaters, installation of plumbing fixtures, bathroom remodels. Fully insured and bonded. All work guaranteed.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

909-260-4376
www.ThePlumbersConnection.net

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691

Lic.839835

Pet Sitting
PET SITTER/DOG WALKER
Reliable, friendly, knowledgeable. Local references available.

Tutoring
PRIVATE tutor available for afterschool and weekend homework help. Secondary teaching credential in English Language Arts. Will work with your student on any subject. Fee negotiated at first meeting. 909-261-3099. HELP your child achieve success in school. Family man, currently completing graduate work in education, available for homework help and tutoring in your home or in my Claremont home. Evenings or weekends. $20 hourly. 626-466-8391, rcmsangab@gmail.com. Free initial consultation. PRIVATE tutor. Reading, writing and vocabulary. Experienced teacher over 40 years. Contact Allen, agross91768@yahoo.com or 909-629-6007.

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

AMANDA, 818-219-3268

Yoga

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron

Pilates

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. YOUR neigborhood classical Pilates studio. 665 E. Foothill Blvd. Unit M., Claremont, Ca 91711. Call for a free demo! 909-730-1033. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

909-615-4858
Lic.778506 D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

RESTORATIVE YOGA
Classes and workshops. Susan Perry 35 year yoga practitioner. Weekly classes held at Musubi Dojo. Please call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

909.621.4761
Friday 03-15-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

36

SERVICES
AUTOMOTIVE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

COMPUTERS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

909-262-4633

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOUSE CLEANING

Cleaning Service
Call for a free estimate: House or Business!

909-621-5626
LANDSCAPING SPECIALTY SERVICE

909.234.5766
SPECIALTY SERVICE

Kandi Ford

Dick Oosterheert
Landscape Services
Donʼt Landscape…Renovate! Lic. #C-27 876953
• Save money by designing with drought tolerant materials! • Conserve water by converting existing irrigation to low flow!

Free E-Waste drop-off facility!

909-579-0248 • 1551 W. 13th Street, Upland CA 91786
10% OFF first-time customers & senior citizens!

Legal ease. Keep it local.
We can publish your LA County legal.

Call Vickie, 621-4761
legalads@claremont-courier.com

our C ier
Claremont
claremont-courier.com

909.621.4761
Friday 03-15-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

37

REAL ESTATE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

(909) 260-5560
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing... Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com
CLAREMONT CLUB TERRACE
Immaculate 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom condo. Approximately 1563 sq. ft. with vaulted ceilings, sky lights, laminate flooring and private balcony off master bedroom. Lots of storage. Community pool and spa. $435,000. (A1831)

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

HISTORIC UPLAND HOME
Fabulous home built in 1918. Old world charm updated with new wiring, copper plumbing, insulation, drywall, central heat/AC, roof and more. Mountain and city views. Sparkling pool and spa. Four car, 1050 sq. ft. garage. Situated on an expansive corner lot. $589,000. (T645)

SOLD!

624 POMELLO DRIVE, CLAREMONT www.624pomellodr.com.
Enjoy the comfort of subtle elegance in this custom built, single story, north Claremont home. Featuring 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms in over 4000 sq. ft. Spectacular park-like grounds, dozens of trees, beautiful salt water pool/spa and magnificent mountain views. Updated kitchen with French style custom cabinets and Italian tile. $1,145,000. (P624)

FOR LEASE: 2 Bedroom Claremont House - $1,525 2 Bedroom "West Arms" condo - Claremont - $1,600 3 Bedroom - 3 Bathroom Condo - $1,750

Carol Curtis, Broker
Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

SELLING, BUYING OR RENTING? Advertise in the
Claremont COURIER! Call Jessica at 621-4761.

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 15, 2013

38

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

REALTORS! Place your ads in the most
widely read real estate section in the area.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds Call JESSICA at 621-4761

Don’t leave us in the dark!
Let us know when you move.
Donʼt miss a moment of superlative community coverage from the Claremont COURIER.

Through my affiliation with Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty, I am able to offer local, national and international marketing programs that are unparalleled in the industry. These programs complement my extensive working knowledge of the local market, allowing me to provide my sellers’ properties maximum exposure to attract the most qualified buyers. If you are considering selling, please contact me and I will help you determine the optimum sales price for your home. I currently have several anxious buyers looking for Claremont properties.

Call 909-621-4761 to update your mailing information.

Madhu Sengupta

909.260.5560

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 15, 2013

39

GEOFF T. HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

909.621.0500

Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
NEW LISTING! SALE PENDING

Tell a Friend...

"Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!"
HISTORIC CLAREMONT VILLAGE ESTATE. One of the finest and grandest homes in Claremont! On 3 prime city lots on over 2/3 acre, this Italian Renaissance style home has numerous original embellishments plus recent upgrades! Main residence features 5 bedrooms plus a parlor and den. Separate guest/chauffer's quarters over garage. Custom built circa 1922 by and for the original owner, David Crookshank, a local commercial contractor and important citrus grower. The home was later owned by the Baum family; L. Frank Baum was the author of The Wizard of Oz, his son and family lived in the home for many years. Formal entry hall, grand scale rooms, high ceilings, crown moldings, mahogany woodwork, hardwood floors, elevator, built-ins, newer tile roof, retrofitted foundation, copper gutters, plus an attic and basement. (C1105) CLARABOYA CONTEMPORARY SHOWCASE VIEW HOME. $1,250,000 Sweeping panoramic valley, city lights, canyon and mountain views! Newly rebuilt and expanded in 2001. This classic one story residence has an open flowing floor plan with extensive architectural built-ins and elements. Brazilian Maple floors, high ceilings, whole house speaker system and dual pane windows. Dual double door entry, formal foyer, library, formal living family room with fireplace and built-in entertainment center, formal dining room, chef's kitchen with cook's island, stone counters, stainless steel appliances and eating area. Luxurious master suite with adjacent office/studio retreat with bathroom, spa jetted tub, separate shower and large walk-in closet. Over 1/3 acre landscaped with large lawn and stone patio areas. (M2556) CLAREMONT VILLAGE NEW ENGLAND STYLE. $695,000 Newly refreshed, inside and out! Historically known as ‘The Beck House’. Custom built circa 1900, this home enjoys beautiful fine woodwork, built-ins, high ceilings and refinished White Oak hardwood floors. Great early American curb appeal with covered front porch. Versatile floor plan with 4 bedrooms and a library/den. Updated kitchen with stone counters and a breakfast nook. Grand living great room with fireplace. Formal dining room with garden views. Central air and heat. Indoor laundry room. Drive-thru 2 car garage plus carport. Spacious lot with tall mature shade trees and a deep lap pool. Prime locale close to the Colleges, Memorial Park, Metrolink and downtown Village shopping! (I1275)

COMING SOON:
• One Story Blaisdell Ranch Executive Home $850,000 • Custom North Claremont Mid-Century Home $825,000 • Garnet Model with Park Views $638,000 • Sprawling Home in Condit District $575,000 • Charming Claremont Home $438,000 • Nice Home in Condit District $425,000 • Griswolds End Unit $2,250 Monthly

SALE PENDING

SALE PENDING

SALE PENDING

FOR LEASE: SELLERS:

CLASSIC RENOVATED OLD CLAREMONT VILLAGE HOME. $588,000 Prime locale on quiet block and coveted street. Charming traditional style home boasting great curb appeal! Three bedrooms (one currently converted to a den), 2 bathrooms and approximately 1,812 sq. ft. Wonderful Pacific Red Oak hardwood floors and smooth ceilings throughout most rooms. Brazilian cherry wood flooring in sunroom. Spacious formal living room with fireplace plus separate dining room. Cheerful remodeled kitchen with tiled counters. Newer copper plumbing. Solatubes for natural lighting. Central air and heat. Attached 2 car garage with direct access. Spacious lot with multiple grass areas and tall shade trees. (T760)

IMMACULATE RANCH STYLE HOME IN OLD CLAREMONT VILLAGE. $580,000 Once owned by the Gerber family. Custom built in 1955, this 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home boasts many upgrades throughout, plus impressive curb appeal! Landscaping with flowerful gardens, shaded patios and fruit trees. Spacious updated kitchen with center island, a large sunlit kitchen table area, bathrooms featuring a jetted tub in one and a Premier walk-in tub in the other. Main bedroom features a large cedar-lined walk-in closet, spacious second bedroom off hallway and the smaller third bedroom has separate outdoor access, making it well suited for a home office. Oak hardwood floors under the carpet in the formal living and dining rooms! Indoor laundry, 2 car over-sized garage plus additional private parking with alley access. Zoned for Sycamore Elementary School. (N785)

CLAREMONT HOME BOASTS AWESOME GREAT ROOM. $450,000 Convenient to Village shopping, Claremont Colleges, transportation and fine schools! Approximately 2000 sq. ft. of well designed living space perfect for entertaining and family living. Oversized lot in a picturesque setting features sustainable garden areas. Formal entry leads to living room with brick fireplace. Cheerful kitchen opens to a magnificent great room featuring a vaulted wood beamed ceiling and large picture windows with garden views. Includes a family dining area, comfortable lounge area and potential home theater. Central air and heat. Indoor laundry room. Spacious lot nearly ¼ acre with flowerful gardens, tall shade trees and mature landscape. (G442)

“I have motivated and qualified buyers looking for a Claremont home”
Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property. Thank you!
D.R.E. #00997900

For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500

Absolutely very professional. Smoothest transaction I have ever experienced when comparing to any other large purchases I have ever made. Mason has really raised the bar for me to evaluate any other customer service in any field. He is very knowledgeable, has great rapport and was absolutely on top of [every step]. I had some very tight deadlines in purchasing my home and I feel very fortunate that I came across Mason as I consider him an integral part of why I was able to meet my purchase goals and deadlines. My parents are now considering moving into the area and of course, this is a no-brainer, they will call Mason when they are ready.

—Andy P.

To read more of what my clients are saying, please visit MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on Yelp.com.

Mason Prophet

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034

Your Local Real Estate Resource

NG TI IS  L W NE

PANORAMIC VIEWS
North Claremont Stone Canyon Estate home tucked away on a quiet cul-de-sac. Enjoy panoramic mountain, valley and city light views from this stately residence. This home is in model perfect condition and boasts extensive upgrades amounting to $300,000. Bask in the elegance of high ceilings, a sweeping wrought iron staircase, French doors and designer glass windows. The kitchen is a gourmands dream with black pearl countertops and cutting edge stainless steel appliances. Two master suite options, one upstairs and one down. Upstairs master showcases a 3 sided fireplace, sumptuous retreat and luxurious bathroom. Call today for your own private viewing of this spectacular estate. 909-398-1810. $1,300,000. (C4471)

ONE-OF-A-KIND MASTERPIECE
This stately and resplendent property in northeast Claremont gives attention to every detail and features custom appointments and amenities. Enter through iron and glass doors to find a sweeping staircase and spacious living room with soaring ceilings and an abundance of natural light. First floor master bedroom is splendid with 2 fireplaces, crystal chandeliers and sconces. Gleaming hardwood floors welcome you into the fabulous great room that includes a gourmet kitchen with 2 islands which overlook the garden of flowering shrubs and roses. Yard boasts fully appointed covered patio, outdoor kitchen with granite counters, outdoor fireplace, salt water pool, spa, fire ring and orchard. Two separate garages house 7 vehicles. The home has solar. 909-398-1810. $2,498,000. (B808)

G IN T IS  L W NE

TIMELESS ROMANTICISM Step into another world as you breathe in the elegant living room with custom designed fireplace and coffered ceilings, the spacious family room with wet bar, the billiard room and so much more! Show stopper kitchen boasts professional grade Thermador appliances, granite counters and butlerʼs pantry. Sumptuous master suite has private courtyard with romantic fireplace. Artfully manicured grounds are complete with pool, spa, patios and an orchard. 909-398-1810. $2,498,000. (B659)

ABSOLUTELY STUNNING
Privately gated courtyard entry. Imported Italian flooring as well as Tec-Sun carbonized bamboo throughout the house. The kitchen is a chef's dream with newly crafted birch cabinets, professional grade appliances, granite counters and Walker Zanger backsplash. Living and dining rooms are open spaces that provide the perfect backdrop for all types of entertaining, featuring a captivating dual sided fireplace. Separate guest suite, pool, spa and 4 car garages. 909-398-1810. $1,150,000. (D830)

CLAREMONT CONTEMPORARY
Clean lines and bright open spaces connect the outdoors with the indoors of this home behind private gates in the Griswold’s community. Solid wood floors and plantation shutters accent the vaulted ceilings, cheery kitchen and master suite. Private yard offers relaxation in a tranquil environment. 909398-1810. $359,000. (V406)

SPLASH THIS SUMMER!
Wonderful family pool home in La Verne. Step into this lovely home with hardwood flooring, living room with elegant fireplace and a kitchen with granite counters. Two car detached garage and over 11,000 sq. ft. yard with covered patio. This is a must see! 909-398-1810. $360,000. (R531)

EXCEPTIONAL LIVING
This home welcomes you with warmth and elegance. Inviting formal dining room is tastefully appointed with crown moldings and impressive ceiling details. Gourmet kitchen is a true chefʼs delight with granite counters and Viking range. Unwind from a busy day under the covered patio surrounded by lush foliage as you hear the bubbling fountains. 909-398-1810. $609,000. (C2294)

LOTS OF ROOM
Great 2 story home on a quiet street close to downtown Upland, near schools and shopping. New carpet, paint, kitchen cabinets and countertops. There is lots of room in this home, so call today. 909-398-1810. $325,000. (S643)

NORTH CLAREMONT LIVING
Entertaining in this home is a delight with a floor plan that offers plenty of space for you and your guests. Hear the soft laughter of family and friends as they mingle around the warmth of a crackling fire. Large backyard boasts swimming pool and large grassy areas. Don't miss out, call today, 909-3981810. $502,100. (N2296)

FRENCH CHATEAU
Immerse yourself in The Manior Residence, reminiscent of a classic Brittany styled French Chateau. Wood and travertine flooring, an elevator, game room, teen loft and 5-star energy rating! A kitchen that Julia Child would have adored. Hand laid stone façade is the first blush of the exotic grounds which include a pool pavilion and a guest casita. 909-3981810. $3,195,000. (S1015)

If you or someone you know are struggling with your mortgage don't wait until it is too late. There are options and solutions for you. Call me today!

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful