Objective 1.2: Schools help all students make successful transitions to college and careers.

Our Role. The Education Department provides national leadership to improve the quality of career and
technical, adult, and workforce education. The programs administered through the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE) help secondary, postsecondary, and adult education students gain the academic and technical knowledge needed to succeed in further education, careers, and citizenship. They promote education reform and improvement, and accountability for results. The joint Education Department/ Department of Labor School-to-Work initiative sunsets in 2001.

Our Performance

Indicator 1.2.a. By fall 2000, 1 million youths will participate annually in School-to-Work (STW) Systems.
Assessment of Progress. There has been positive progress toward the goal. The goal for 1999 was
exceeded. “Participants” are defined as students who take integrated academic and vocational coursework and participate in work-based learning. In 1999, 754,438 students participated in the STW Systems, exceeding the goal of 750,000. The data for 2000 are not available. Figure 1.2.a.1
Annual Student Participation in STW Systems
1,200,000

Num ber of Students

1,000,000 800,000 600,000 400,000 200,000 0 1996 1997 1998 1999
280 ,0 00 471,000 515 ,6 17

1,0 00,000

754 ,4 38 75 0,0 00

G O A L

G O A L

Source: Progress Measures Survey. Frequency: Annual. Next Update: 2001 for 2000-01 school year data. Validation procedure: Data were collected before the Education Department standards for evaluating the quality of program performance data were developed. However, data from other sources – including the National STW evaluation – corroborate these findings. Limitations of data and planned improvements: This survey is voluntary and collects data only from sub-state funded local partnerships. As the Federal investment in state STW initiatives ends - beginning in 1999 with the first eight states that were funded in 1994 - fewer local partnerships will be funded and have the resources required to gather and submit data.

2000

Year

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Goal 1, Objective 1.2

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Goal 1, Objective 1.2

Indicator 1.2.b. By fall 2000, the percentage of vocational concentrators completing core curriculum standards will double from baseline data.
Assessment of Progress. There has been progress toward the goal. The previous goal set for 2002 was
33 percent; this was raised to 55 percent because the previous goal had already been achieved. “Core curriculum standards” include four years of English and three years each of math, science, and social studies. This course sequence is the basis for a postsecondary preparatory curriculum. Data for 2000 are not available. Figure 1.2.b.1
Source: NAEP. Frequency: Approximately every four years. Next Update: 2002 for 2000-2001 school year data. Validation procedure: Data validated by NCES review procedures and NCES Statistical Standards. Limitations of data and planned improvements: In future years, this indicator will be supplemented with another measure of academic attainment – performance on state-established academic proficiencies – as specified in the 1998 Perkins Act.

Percentage of Vocational Concentrators Meeting Core Curriculum Standards 100%
Percentage of Vocational Concentrators
90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

55% 45% 33% 19%

G O A L

1990

1994

1998

2000

Year
* A “Vocational Concentrator” is a student who completed 3 credits in one of the

following specific labor market preparation programs: agriculture, business/office, marketing/distribution, health, occupational home economics, trade and industry, or technical communications.

Indicator 1.2.c. By fall 2000, the percentage of high school graduates, including vocational concentrators, who make a successful transition into employment, further education, or the military, will increase to 92 percent.
Assessment of Progress. Progress toward the goal is likely, as both groups of students (i.e. all students
and vocational concentrators) approached the goal in 1998. Eighteen months after graduating from high schools that participate in School-To-Work systems, 55 percent of 1998 graduates were enrolled in a 2year or 4-year college, six percent were in other postsecondary training programs or the military, and 29 percent were employed full time. Overall, 90 percent of all students were enrolled in postsecondary education or the military or were employed full time. A similar proportion of vocational concentrators

Goal 1, Objective 1.2

Page 10

made successful transitions, although these students were less likely to be enrolled in postsecondary study and more likely to be employed full time. The data for 2000 are not available.

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Goal 1, Objective 1.2

Goal 1, Objective 1.2

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Figure 1.2.c.1
Student Participation in Education and Employment Activities (18 months after high school graduation, 1998)
100% 90% 80%
Pe rce n tage C u rre n tl y Pa rti ci pati n g i n Acti vi ty

All Stude nts Vocational Conce ntrators * Targe t For The Ye ar 2000
29%

90% 90% 92%

70% 61% 63% 55% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

G O A L 6%
Any College (Two or Four Year)

22% 6% 7%
Goal

20%
G O A L

G O A L

Source: Student surveys and transcripts from National Evaluation of School-to-Work Implementation, Mathematical Policy Research. Frequency: Biennial. Next Update: 2002 for 2000 high school graduates. Validation procedure: Surveys subject to rigorous contractor’s quality control procedures. Limitations of data and planned improvements: Results based on high school transcripts for sample of high school students in eight states.

Other Postsecondary Full Time /Military Employment

* A “Vocational Concentrator” is a student who completed 3 credits in one of the following

specific labor market preparation programs: agriculture, business/office, marketing/distribution, health, occupational home economics, trade and industry, or technical communications. **Percentage in each activity is exclusive of other activities; where students were both employed full time and attending college, they were counted as enrolled in college. Sample sizes: all students, n=1776; vocational concentrators, n=353

An Colle e y g, Postsecondary, Military or Full-Time Employment

Indicator 1.2.d. By fall 2000, ten percent of students in local School-To-Work Systems will earn skill certificates.
Assessment of Progress. The goal is unlikely to have been met. The upward trend reversed in 1999,
with a change from 4.2 percent in 1998 to 2.3 percent in 1999. The data for 2000 are not available. Figure 1.2.d.1
Students Earning Skill Certificates

100%

20%

Percentage of Students

15% 10.0%

10%

5% 2.4% 0%
1996

3.6%

4.2% 2.3%

G O A L

Source: Local partnership surveys from National Evaluation of School-to-Work Implementation, Mathematical Policy Research. Frequency: Annual. Next Update: 2001 for 199900 school year. Validation procedure: Survey subject to rigorous data quality procedures. Limitations of data and planned improvements: Based on aggregate estimates of STW partnerships.

1997

1998

1999

2000

*NOTE: A “skill certificate” is a portable industry recognized credential that certifies student competency on a core set of content and performance standards related to an occupational or career cluster area.

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Goal 1, Objective 1.2

Goal 1, Objective 1.2

Page 14

Indicator 1.2.e. By fall 2001, 200 high schools will receive and 2,500 will be working toward Departmental recognition for implementing New American High School (NAHS) strategies that combine career and academic preparation.
Assessment of Progress. Progress occurred, although the goal for 2000 was not met. As of 2000, 59
high schools received NAHS recognition and 1,077 schools were working with three high school reform networks to implement NAHS strategies. High school reform networks include High Schools That Work, Sonoma State University—California State Department of Education, and Jobs for the Future (JFF). Figure 1.2.e.1
Schools Implementing NAHS* High School Reform Strategies Schools Implementing NAHS* High School Reform Strategies
Schools WhoRecognition NAH S H ave Achieved NAHS Recognition
200

Schools Who Have Achieved

200

Schools Working Toward Schools Working Toward NAHS Strategies NAH S Strategies
2 50 0

200

2500
2 00 0

200

2500
2 00 0

Number of Schools

Number of Schools

150

Schools

Schools

150
100 59 50 10 17 30

G O G A OL

2000
1 50 0

100

A L

1500

1500 10 77

1 00 0

G O A L

G O A L

1000 50 0

Source: NAHS application tracking documents. Frequency: Annual. Next Update: 2001 for 2000-01 data. Validation procedure: Data collection processes were developed before the Education Department standards for evaluating the quality of program performance data were developed. Limitations of data and planned improvements: No data limitations are noted.

.

50 0
19 19 19

.

30
20 20

500

0

10

17

96

98

99

00

00

2000

2000

Year
0

0 1996

Year
1998 1999 2001

1999

200 1

*NOTE: NAHS = New American High Schools

Y ear

Year

*NOTE: NAHS = New American High Schools

Indicator 1.2.f. By fall 2000, 350,000 employers participating in School-toWork systems will offer work-based learning opportunities.
Assessment of Progress. Achieving the goal is unlikely, as the upward trend reversed direction in 1999
from 178,000 in 1998 to 154,543. The data for 2000 are not available.

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Goal 1, Objective 1.2

Figure 1.2.f.1
Employers Providing Work-Based Learning* Experiences Employers Providing Work-Based Learning* Experiences
400,000 350,000

400,000 350,000 300,000
200,000 178,000 178,000 270,000

350,000

350,000

Numbe r of Employe rs

300,000

250,000 250,000 200,000 200,000 150,000 150,000

Employers

136,176 136,176 59,239

154,543

G O A L

100,000 100,000
50,000 50,000 0

59,239

Source: Progress Measures Survey. Frequency: Annual. Next Update: 2001 for 1999-2000 school year data. Validation procedure: Case studies in four states are underway to examine the process by which local partnerships gather the information reported in their progress reports. Limitations of data and planned improvements: The nature of work-based learning experiences may differ considerably across employers.

0
1996

1996

1997

1997

1998

1998 Y ear

1999

1999

2000 2000

Ye ar

*NOTE: Work-based learning includes shadowing, mentoring, internships, youth apprenticeships, *NOTE: Work-based learning learning. school-based enterprises and serviceincludes shadowing, mentoring, internships, youth apprenticeships, school-based enterprises and service learning.

Goal 1, Objective 1.2

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Goal 1, Objective 1.2